Close-up of three young medicine students in white coats look down at something out of frame
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    Faculty

    • Max Rady College of Medicine
    • Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

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    Degree

    • Doctor of Medicine

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    Expected duration

    • 4 years

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    Program options

    • Summer research program

Program details

The Max Rady College of Medicine offers a four-year Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree program. The program is a continuum over the four years organized into Pre-Clerkship (Years 1 and 2) and Clerkship (Years 3 and 4), each divided into four modules.

Module 0: Foundation of medicine

The first module provides basic science foundation relevant to the study and practice of medicine. The course is intended to provide foundational knowledge in cell biology, cell adaptation/response to insult, importance of genetics in disease, exogenous factors that impact health (pathogens, toxins), and a brief introduction to how these cellular mechanisms relate to regulating and/or maintaining whole body function; presented mostly with WGS (Whole Group Sessions) with relevant illustrative clinical scenarios if applicable.

Module 1: Human biology and health

The M1 courses will cover normal processes specific to the individual system including normal development and embryology, gross anatomy & Imaging, histology, physiology, biochemistry & molecular biology and general pharmacology where relevant. Included for each system is an overview of burden of illness and diseases, and impact of life cycle and aging related to the system. Anatomy sessions will integrate normal radiology and cross sectional imaging. Content is predominantly basic sciences with clinical cases (normal or abnormal) to contrast or help illustrate normal. The M1 courses will provide the foundation to begin to build a clinical approach to assessment and management of diseases within that system covered in M2. Format will be combination of WGS (Whole Group Sessions), AS (directed assigned studies) and Small Group Sessions (SGS) tailored to the system.

Module 2: Health and disease

The M2 courses will each build upon the basic processes established in their respective M1 course to develop clinical approaches to the relevant disease states. Abnormal processes and pathophysiology for disease related to the specific system are covered. This will include the scientific basis and anatomy review (i.e. M1) then for each entity epidemiology, prevention and screening, natural history & prognosis, diagnosis , therapeutics and disease management, and impact of cultural, social, ethical issues and health care system where relevant. Format will be predominantly clinical cases with review of basic science presented as combination of WGS (Whole Group Sessions), AS (directed assigned studies)and Small Group Sessions (SGS) tailored to the system.

Module 3: Consolidation

As the final Pre-Clerkship module, Consolidation ensures that all the content from the previous modules, and the CP4s (one hundred thirty (137) Composite Clinical Presentations) are fully integrated and applied to patient care in a complex health care environment at a defined level of competence. Sessions will include approaches to single symptom conditions with broad differential diagnosis (e.g. management of a patient presenting with shortness of breath), multisystem diseases such as complicated diabetes within a complex patient context, and systemic diseases such as HIV or SLE. Consolidation will also include topics that cross system boundaries, such as pain management, and dermatology, and address diseases and conditions across the life cycle specifically pediatrics and geriatrics. Format will be mostly AS (directed assigned studies) and Small Group Sessions (SGS) tailored to the system.

Module 4: Transition to clerkship

The goals of TTC are to help the students expand their focus from learning during the Pre Clerkship years to the actual provision of care in various health care settings. This includes supervised responsibilities that accompany the provision of health and the management of disease. The format includes the use of simulation, patient assessments, small group sessions and shadowing experiences to teach students to translate the knowledge gained in pre-clerkship to the clinical setting and the actual provision of care. This will enable students to further facilitate achievement of UGME global objectives transitioning from the predominantly medical expert, scholar and communicator domains to include collaborator, manager, health advocate and professionalism domains. The students spend the last week of TTC shadowing their first core rotation.

Module 5: Core Clinical Rotations and UGME Academic Half Days

M5 consists of the 8 core clinical rotations and a centrally organized weekly UGME academic half day separated into four, 12 week blocks. Students move through each block in a cascading pattern of eight tracks to complete all 8 core clinical rotations. Block 1: Surgery and Anesthesia provides clinical teaching in; general surgery (3 wks) musculoskeletal medicine (2 wks), urology (1 wk), plastic surgery (1 wk), neurosurgery (1 wk), anesthesia (2 wks), and perioperative care (2 wks). Block 2: Pediatrics and Obstetrics & Gynecology provides clinical teaching in; pediatrics inpatient care (3 wks), pediatric outpatient care (3 wks), obstetrics (2 wks), gynecology (2 wks) and obstetrics & gynecology outpatient clinics (2 wks). Block 3: Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine provides clinical teaching in; internal medicine inpatient care (6 wks), internal medicine selective (2 wks), and emergency medicine (4 wks). During emergency medicine students will also spend one morning a week attending an internal medicine outpatient clinic. Block 4: Psychiatry and Family Medicine/Public Health provides clinical teaching in; psychiatry inpatient, outpatient and consultations (6 wks), family medicine clinics – majority in a rural community with public health teaching interlaced within the community placement (6 wks). The UGME academic time occurs the first half of Thursday afternoons and incorporates the Longitudinal courses of Clinical Skills, Professionalism, Indigenous Health and Population Health. The sessions also incorporates many of the Themes specifically Clinical Health Psychology, Information Sciences, Health care systems and safety, and Social accountability amongst others. Each of the core rotations have scheduled academic time with the majority in the second half of Thursday afternoons but additional time may also be scheduled during the week. Surgery & Anesthesia, as well as, Internal Medicine & Emergency Medicine organize their Thursday afternoon sessions conjointly.

Module 6: Electives and CaRMS

M6: 14 weeks of electives followed by the CaRMS national interview period of 3 weeks. The module is completed with the Comprehensive Clinical Examination (CCE) a formal skills based exam that takes place in the Clinical Learning and Simulation Facility over a 3 day period.

Module 7: Transition to residency

M7 is the last 11 weeks of the UGME program and commences after the completion of the CaRMS interviews. The goal of TTR is to provide opportunities to enhance ambulatory and community care exposures for students, provide a platform to transition skills, experience and knowledge acquired during UGME to the entry point of the PGME program. TTR consists of the following: Selectives – two, 3 week blocks of selectives intended to be non-traditional emphasizing community and outpatient activities. Sandwiched between the two selective blocks is Match week.

Match Week – With the CaRMS match released on a Wednesday, the students have that day free to celebrate and spend with family & friends. The two preceding days consist of a team building & leadership program; with the two days following devoted to presentations from PGME, PARIM and Financial management. Evidence Based Medicine Capstone Course & Project (EBM) – the course has 6 weeks of formal teaching sessions each Friday afternoon throughout the selective blocks. The course concludes with a written paper and presentation in the seventh week. CCR/CP4R – The comprehensive course review and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) course occurs during the last four weeks of year four to provide a review of the items from CP4s and aid the students in preparing for the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE Pt I).

Pre-clerkship courses

Throughout the first two years of the program, you'll take courses in areas such as: Blood and Immunology; Cardiovascular; Respiratory; Neuroscience; Musculoskeletal;  Women’s Reproductive Health; Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition; Urinary Tract; Infectious Diseases and Therapeutics and Introduction to Oncology. Longitudinal courses also cover topics such as: Clinical Reasoning, Clinical Skills, Professionalism, Population Health and Indigenous Health.

Electives

Elective courses provide the opportunity for you to pursue a specific area of interest while gaining experience and knowledge that equips you to become a well-rounded physician in your chosen career field.

Choose from subspecialty courses in areas such as Indigenous health, family medicine, endocrinology, infectious diseases and international travel electives at affiliated clinical sites, including Kenya, the Philippines, Haiti, Japan and China. 

Admission requirements

The following are minimum requirements to be considered for entry into the MD program. Meeting these requirements does not guarantee acceptance into the program. Admission is highly competitive, with 110 seats available each year.

The Doctor of Medicine is an advanced entry program. Before you can be considered for admission, you must complete a bachelor's degree from a recognized university with an adjusted grade point average of 3.30 or higher. You must also complete the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and a situational judgement test (CASPer). For complete admission requirements, please consult the advanced entry applicant information bulletin.

If you do not meet the requirements for advanced entry into the Doctor of Medicine program, you can apply for admission to University 1, the Bachelor of Science program, or another program with direct entry.

How to apply

Domestic student application fee: $100

Applications to the University of Manitoba are completed online. To begin your application, select the Start or continue your application button. The online application includes several parts, and you may be required to submit transcripts, proof of English Language proficiency, and other documents.

CASPer test

All applicants to the Max Rady College of Medicine at the University of Manitoba are required to complete an online assessment, CASPer, to be eligible for admission. CASPer is an online test that assesses for the personal and professional characteristics we believe are important for successful students and graduates of our program. It is a complement to the other tools that we use for applicant screening. In implementing CASPer, we are trying to further enhance fairness and objectivity in our selection process.

In order to take CASPer, you will be responsible for securing access to a laptop or desktop computer with webcam and audio capabilities. You will require the following for both account creation and taking the test:

  • Government-issued photo ID
  • Valid email address
  • Working webcam
  • Working microphone
  • Reliable high-speed internet connection

CASPer can be taken practically anywhere that you can satisfy the aforementioned requirements. No exceptions will be provided for applicants who are unable to take CASPer during one of the available test dates. Please go to www.takeCASPer.com to register your CASPer account and sign up for the CSP-10201 – Canadian Professional Health Sciences version of CASPer.

You will be provided with a limited number of testing dates and times based on the admissions timeline and requirements. Please note that these are the only testing dates available for your CASPer test, and you must select Max Rady College of Medicine for distribution before the posted distribution deadline. Likely, there will be no additional tests scheduled, but the most up-to-date information can be found by browsing the Test Dates and Times on takecasper.com.

To account for identity verification and payment processing timeline, ensure that you register for your test at least three days before your preferred test date and time. Last-minute bookings are not recommended. If you require testing accommodations for CASPer, you will need to submit the Accommodations Request Form signed by you and your qualified professional three weeks in advance of your desired test date.

Please direct any inquiries about the test to support@takecasper.com. Alternatively, you may reach out to the CASPer Support Team through the chat bubble in the bottom right-hand corner of your screen on the takecasper.com website or in your CASPer account.

The CASPer test is comprised of 12 sections: 8 video-based and 4 word-based scenarios. Following each scenario, you will be required to answer a set of 3 probing questions in 5 minutes or less. Halfway through the test, there is an optional 15-minute break. The test typically takes between 75-90 minutes to complete. Each of the 12 responses are anonymized and scored by a unique rater, giving a robust and reliable impression of your personal and professional characteristics important to our program. No studying is required, however you are encouraged to familiarize yourself with the test format via the System Requirements Check and 12 section practice test prior to taking CASPer.  Additional helpful resources are available free of charge at https://takecasper.com/test-prep/ and https://takecasper.com/faq/

CASPer test results are valid for one admissions cycle. Applicants who have already taken CASPer in previous years will therefore be expected to re-take it.

MCAT information

The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a mandatory standardized test that measures the ability to understand basic concepts and to solve problems in natural, behavioral and social sciences. For testing information and registration go to www.aamc.org/mcat

The MCAT 2015 is an updated version of the Medical College Admission Test that will assess test takers' knowledge and problem-solving skills in the natural, behavioral, and social sciences.

Two of the four sections test academic competencies; Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems and Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems. Topics to study include biology, general and organic chemistry, physics and biochemistry.

One of the four sections will test reasoning and analysis skills in Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills.  Topics to study may include population health, cultural studies, ethics and philosophy and other humanities and social sciences disciplines.

The last of the four sections will test the ways that psychological, sociocultural and biological factors influence people's perceptions of the world, behaviour and behaviour change, individuals' opinions of themselves and others, cultural and social differences that influence overall health and the relationships between social stratification, access to resources and well-being.  This section is called Psychological, Social and Biological Foundations of Behaviour.

For more information and to register for an exam go to www.aamc.org/mcat

The MCAT is a required examination and will not be waived.

Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI)

The University of Manitoba uses the Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) format for all applicants.

Invitations to interview will be sent via your application centre in Radius on January 7, 2021. The MMI is scheduled to take place on Saturday, February 13, 2021 starting at 11:00am CST. Unlike previous years, you do not need to register for the MMI. If you receive an invitation to interview on January 7, 2021, you will automatically be registered to take the MMI on February 13, 2021.

MMI format for 2021

The online MMI for 2021 will have six stations only. Each station will have three questions. It is estimated that completing the six stations will take applicants two hours to complete.

In addition to the six stations, there will be a warm-up station at the beginning of the MMI, which will not be scored. This will give you a chance to get used to the new format of the MMI. The warm-up station will be set up exactly the same as all of the scored stations. There will not be a written station this year.

Each station will consist of an introduction video that discusses a topic or scenario, followed by three questions.

  • After listening to the introductory video, you will be presented with the first question for the station.
    • You will be provided with two minutes to prepare your response.
    • After the two minutes of preparation time is up, you will then have two minutes to record your response.
  • Once you complete the first question, you will be presented with the second question for that station.
    • You will be provided with two minutes to prepare your response.
    • After the two minutes of preparation time is up, you will then have three minutes to record your response.
  • Upon completion of the second question, you will be presented with the third, and final question of the station.
    • You will be provided with two minutes to prepare your response.
    • After the two minutes of preparation time is up, you will then have three minutes to record your response.
  • Once all of the questions within a station are completed, you will move on to the next MMI station.

There will be a total of six minutes of preparation time at each station, and a total of eight minutes of response time at each station.

Although there is no-one sitting on the either side of the screen, there will be multiple raters viewing your recording at a later time. There will be a tech check and 24/7 support from Admit Video.

You will need to present a piece of photo ID to the camera on your computer or mobile device at the beginning of your MMI.

The MMI questions for 2021 are not from the McMaster bank of questions. All questions for the 2021 MMI have been developed with a focus on content specific to the populations served in Manitoba.

MMI scoring and pass/fail criteria

Scoring and passing a question

  • The questions within the MMI will be scored using a 5-point Likert scale.
  • A rater's score of 1 out of 5 is a fail, with 2 and above a passing score.
  • Each rater will submit a score out of 5 to each of your responses.
  • As there will be 3 raters scoring each question, the scores from all 3 raters will be added and averaged to create your question score.
  • Receiving a score of "1" from one of the 3 raters will not necessarily result in a failure. The scores of all raters (question score) will determine whether you pass or fail a question.
  • The averaged score for the question must be equal to 2 or greater than 2 (=>2) to be a passing score for the question. An averaged score less than 2 (<2) will be a failing score for the question.
    • Example 1: Rater 1 score: 1 out of 5; Rater 2 score: 3 out of 5; Rater 3 score: 2 out of 5
    • Total score for the question is 6, which provides an average score of 2. This is a passing score for the question.
    • Example 2: Rater 1 score: 1 out of 5; Rater 2 score: 2 out of 5; Rater 3 score: 2 out of 5
    • Total score for the question is 5, which provides an average score less than 2. This is a failing score for the question.

Passing an MMI station

  • There are 3 questions at each station.
  • Each question will be scored by the 3 raters assigned to the station.
  • As described above, each rater submits a score which is used to calculate your question score.
  • A question score must be equal to 2 or great than 2 to be considered a pass. A score less than 2 would be considered a fail.
  • To pass an MMI station, you must pass at least 2 out of 3 questions.
  • If you receive a failing score for 2 or 3 questions at one station, this will be considered a failed MMI station.

Pass criteria for the MMI

  • An applicant will pass the MMI if they meet all of the following criteria (approved by the Admissions Committee on February 4, 2021):
    • Receive a passing score on 15 out of 18 individual questions (a passing score for the question); and
    • Receive a passing score on 5 out of 6 MMI stations; and
    • Receive a total MMI score greater than two standard deviations below the mean.

How to prepare for the MMI

Follow these tips to prepare for the MMI:

  • Practice general interview techniques like speech patterns, facial expressions and body language.
  • Find a comfortable spot where you can set up your computer or mobile device (i.e. tablet or phone) to take the MMI.
  • If possible, find a room where you won't have any distractions and, if available, sit in front of a blank wall.
  • Since the MMI is asynchronous this year, there won't be an interviewer to interact with at any of the stations. Practice responding to questions using platforms such as Zoom while your friends or family members keep their microphone and video off; or video record yourself answering questions and play your responses back.
  • Find a practice partner to have Zoom, FaceTime, or Skype video calls together.  
    • Have your practice partner read a question to you, then turn off their audio and video while you respond to mimic the format of an asynchronous interview.
  • Record yourself responding to scenarios so you can see your body language and expression.
  • Read our Frequently Asked Questions document.
  • Sign up for a 'Mock MMI' with the MMSA.
  • The stations have been developed based on themes and CanMEDS roles (competencies). These themes and competencies are reflective of the Indigenous health values and principles that were interpreted through the CanMEDS framework, and values identified by community members at a Town Hall with the Harm Reduction Network (hosted by the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Social Accountability Committee).
  • Reflect on your life experiences and write down examples that correspond with the values identified above.  
  • Read the following articles and documents:

Technical requirements for the MMI—using a computer

  • Make sure your webcam and microphone are in working order.
  • Use either Firefox or Google Chrome as your internet browser if you are conducting the MMI on a computer. Make sure you have the most up-to-date version of your internet browser.
  • Find a spot within your physical location where you either can plug directly into your network (internet) cable or where you have the best WIFI signal.
  • Test your WIFI strength on the same time and day of the week that the MMI will take place to get a sense of what bandwidth strength or issues you may encounter.

Technical requirements for the MMI—using a mobile device

  • Download the VidResponse mobile application for apple or android devices.
  • Find a spot within your physical location where you have the best WIFI signal or cell coverage.
  • Test your WIFI strength on the same time and day of the week that the MMI will take place to get a sense of what bandwidth strength or issues you may encounter.

Interview day setup

  • Make sure you have your ID ready to present to the camera during the warm-up station.
  • Find a comfortable spot where you can set up your computer or mobile device (i.e. tablet or phone) to take the MMI.
  • The MMI must be completed in one sitting. You will not be able to start, stop, and start again.
  • If possible, find a room where you won't have any distractions.
  • If available, sit in front of a blank wall, screen, or sheet.
  • Relax, and have fun!

Additional tips

  • Read a book on medical ethics. For example:  Doing Right by Philip C. Hebert
  • Get informed about the Canadian health system. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/index-eng.php
  • Ask a family member or friend to surprise you with a topic to discuss on the spot.
  • Ask a family member or friend to debate a difficult issue with you.
  • Work on time management and organization.
  • Join an online speaking group or debate club (if available).
  • Take an online interview skills workshop (if available).

Canadian Indigenous Panel Interview

This year, the Panel Interview will take place online using the Admit Video synchronous platform. The interviews will be live with the panel members interacting virtually with the applicant.

The structure of the interview itself will remain the same as previous years, just adapted to a virtual setting.

Preparation for the Indigenous Panel Interview

  • Find a comfortable spot, away from distractions, for your interview time.
  • Dress appropriately for the interview. Even though the interview is taking place using a virtual platform, you should prepare yourself as you normally would for an in-person interview.
  • Test your wifi strength ahead of your interview and complete the tech checks provided by Admit Video.
  • Reflect upon your life experiences as you prepare for the interview.
  • Find ways to centre yourself prior to the interview, whether you use medicines (smudging), prayer, or other activities that help to centre you.
  • Make arrangements with a trusted individual to schedule an opportunity to debrief after the interview, regardless if you register for an appointment with an Elder. Please ensure that you follow appropriate health directives regarding COVID restrictions.

Additional supports

  • A virtual "coat room" or "meeting room" will be available to all applicants 30 minutes prior to their interview start time.
  • Elders and student support volunteers will be available to chat and welcome you to the 2021 Indigenous Panel Interviews.
  • Elders will be available for 30 minutes following your interview time if you would like an opportunity to debrief with an Elder one-on-one. Please check your email over the next few days for an opportunity to pre-register for a one-on-one appointment with an Elder.

Reference letter requirements

Applicants who are invited to an interview will need to identify three referees and provide their name, phone number and email address.

  • Applicants should select referees who can speak about their ability as a student as well as their work background and community experiences.
  • Choose referees who know you well, and can comment on your strengths and weaknesses and who have had an evaluative role. We recommend that you choose referees who have known you for a minimum of two years.
  • Choosing high profile referees who do not know you well and have a casual passing relationship with you will have little or no benefit.
  • We will not consider references from immediate family members including in-laws, spouses, siblings, nieces, nephews, etc. according to the Nepotism Policy at the University of Manitoba. This policy can be found here.
  • The Admissions Committee may elect to contact these individuals to verify their reference.
  • Referee letters are held in the strictest confidence and are not released to the applicant.
  • Once your application is submitted to the Admissions Office, changes can not be made. This includes changes of referees. Please ensure your referee is aware of this and that they are committed to submitting the required forms and letter of support in January.

You do not need to include the reference letters with your application. The Max Rady College of Medicine will request references only for those applicants who are invited to an interview. Applicants who have received an interview invite, will submit their three recommenders via the online application centre. They will need to provide the first name, last name and email for each of their recommenders. Please ensure that the email addresses entered are correct. If a letter is received from your reference prior to the opening of this process, the letter will not be used unless prior arrangements have been made.

All referees are required to fill out a questionnaire. Once you have submitted your three referees, they will receive a "request for recommendation email" which will include a link to their recommendation questionnaire.

Reference letters for Indigenous applicants are due in early January. Reference letters for all other applicants invited to interview are due in early February.

We do not accept reference letters from the Health Professions Advisory Committee.

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Includes the Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, Geography, Geological Sciences and Physical Geography programs.

Includes Bachelor of Health Sciences and Bachelor of Health Studies programs.

Includes Bachelor of Science degrees in Agribusiness, Agriculture, Agroecology, Food Science and Human Nutritional Sciences.

Annual application deadlines

Term Type of entry Application opens Application deadline
Fall (September) Direct entry Early October August 1
Winter (January) Direct entry Early May December 1
Summer (May) Direct entry Early October April 1

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Bachelor of Fine Art application deadlines

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Fall (September) Direct entry Early October March 1
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To apply to the Inner City Social Work program, attend an information session at the William Norrie Centre. You will receive an application form at the information session. All information sessions are held in Room 126, William Norrie Centre.

Room 126 William Norrie Centre
485 Selkirk Ave.
Winnipeg, MB R2W 2M6 Canada
204-668-8160
Fax: 204-663-8857

All applicants need approval from the Faculty of Social Work – Inner City Selection Coordinator, Debra Diubaldo who can be reached at debra.diubaldo@umanitoba.ca or 204-668-8160.

Annual application deadlines

Term Type of entry Application deadline
Summer (May, part-time) Advanced entry Please contact the Inner City Social Work program to determine the next available session and any applicable deadline dates.
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Annual application deadlines

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Fall (September) Direct entry Early October March 1
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Admission to the winter term is on a space available basis only.

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Fall (September) Direct entry Early October May 1 Deadline for Fall 2021 extended to July 15
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Students who wish to enrol in Summer courses that start in May should apply by April 1.

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Applicants must seek permission from the Faculty representative, Jennifer Mitchell, prior to applying.

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Fall (September) Advanced entry Early November January 15

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Fall (September) Advanced entry Early November April 1

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Fall (September) Advanced entry Early November March 1

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Bachelor of Respiratory Therapy annual application deadline

Term Type of entry Applications open Application deadline
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Fall (September) Advanced entry Early November May 1
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Annual application deadlines

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Fall (September) Direct entry Early October March 1
Advanced entry Early November May 1
Winter (January) Advanced entry Early May October 1

Admission to the Winter term is on a space available basis only.

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Annual application deadlines

Term Type of entry Applications open Application deadline
Fall (September) Direct entry Early October March 1
Advanced entry Early November April 1

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Annual application deadline

Term Type of entry Applications open Application deadline
Fall (September) Advanced entry Early November April 1

Start or continue your application

Annual application deadlines

Term Type of entry Applications open Application deadline
Fall (September) Direct entry Early October March 1
Advanced entry Early November April 1

Start or continue your application

Annual application deadlines

Term Type of entry Applications open Application deadline
Fall (September) Direct entry Early October March 1
Advanced entry Early November May 1
Winter (January) Advanced entry Early May October 1

Admission to the Winter term is available on a space available basis only.

Start or continue your application

Annual direct entry application deadlines

Term Applications open Application deadline
Fall (September) Early October March 1
Winter (January) Early May October 1
Summer (May) Early October March 1

Annual advanced entry application deadlines

Term Applications open Application deadline
Fall (September) Early November June 1
Winter (January) Early May October 1
Summer (May) Early November February 1

Start or continue your application

Annual application deadlines

Type of applicant Type of entry Term Applications open Application deadline
First year applicants Advanced entry Fall (September) Early September December 1
Upper year applicants Advanced entry Fall (September) Early November June 30

Start or continue your application 

Annual application deadlines

Term Type of entry Applications open Application deadline
Fall (September) Advanced entry Early November August 1
Winter (January) Advanced entry Early May December 1
Summer (May) Advanced entry Early November June 15

Applicants are encouraged to apply early and check their course availability prior to applying.

Applicants applying to the Summer term are recommended to apply a minimum of one month prior to the start of their classes. Summer session offers a number of different start dates based on course offerings.

Apply for Summer 2021 or Continue your Summer 2021 application

Start or continue your application for Fall 2021 onward

Annual application deadlines

Term Type of entry Applications open Application deadline
Fall (September) Direct entry Early October March 1
Advanced entry Early November June 1
Winter (January) Direct or advanced entry Early May October 1
Summer (May) Direct entry Early October March 1
Advanced entry Early November February 1

Start or continue your application

Annual application deadlines

Term Applications open Application deadline
Fall (September) Early November June 1
Winter (January) Early May October 1
Summer (May) Early November February 1

Start or continue your application

The BPRN program has been placed on a temporary suspension starting for the Fall 2019 intake.

Access students

Annual application deadline
Term Type of entry Application deadline
Fall (September) Advanced entry March 1

Application form for Access students (PDF)

External students

Annual application deadline
Term Type of entry Application opens Application deadline
Fall (September) Advanced entry Early November March 1

Start or continue your external student application

Learn more

Contact us

Admission and application inquiries

Mailing address
Attn: Undergraduate Admissions
University of Manitoba
66 Chancellors Circle
Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 Canada

Office location
Room 424 UMSU University Centre
65 Chancellors Circle
University of Manitoba (Fort Garry campus)

admissions@umanitoba.ca
Phone: 204-474-8808
Toll-free: 1-800-224-7713 ext. 8808
Fax: 204-474-7554

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Program inquiries

Max Rady College of Medicine Admissions
260 Brodie Centre
727 McDermot Avenue
University of Manitoba (Bannatyne campus)
Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P5

medicine.admissions@umanitoba.ca
Phone: 204-789-3499