Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

Attire and dress code guidelines

1. Purpose

Because of innumerable appropriate dress choices, attire guidelines /dress code can be difficult to concisely define. This guideline is intended to provide general principles to be considered for attire (including personal grooming decisions) for staff, faculty members, and learners within the RFHS and its Colleges, to ensure safe learning and work environments, and is intended to respect equity, diversity and promotion of inclusion.

2. Guidelines

2.1 Staff, faculty members and learners have the right to express themselves, including in decisions about attire, along with a shared responsibility to maintain respectful, safe and positive learning and working environments.

2.2 Attire should be respectful of a community that is anti-oppressive, equitable, accepting and inclusive of a diverse range of social and cultural identities. Dress shall not promote offensive, harassing, hostile or intimidating environments.

2.3 Discretion and good judgment should be exercised in attire, taking into consideration:

  • The safe performance of work or learning duties, so that dress does not interfere with health or safety requirements for the intended activity;
  • The specific work or learning environment, ensuring that attire is appropriate to the environment;
  • Interactions with clients, business contacts, learners, faculty members and staff;
  • The importance of reducing the risk of spreading pathogens from person-to-person.

2.4 Scented products should be avoided, recognizing that some individuals have allergies and/or are sensitive to certain chemicals in scented products. Fragrances and other scented hygiene products shall not be used/worn in designated scent free zones. In areas that are not designated scent free zones, fragrances and scented hygiene products shall be used/worn in moderation and shall abide by any directions received in regard to the limitation or use of products with scents and/or fragrances to accommodate those with scent and/or fragrance allergies.

2.5 This guideline is not intended to replace more detailed College or Program-specific policies, such as learner attire in clinical settings. Please reference applicable college- or program-specific policies or guidelines.

2.6 Should there be an issue identified respecting an individual’s attire, please contact the appropriate manager, Human Resources, or learner authority (program director, associate dean, etc.) for consultation and direction. Enforcement of individual attire or dress code requirements should not reinforce or increase marginalization or oppression of any individual or group based on any of the personal characteristics as set out in the Human Rights Code (Manitoba). The Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management may also be consulted.

3 References

 

3.1 The Human Rights code (Manitoba) C.C.S.M. c. H175

 

3.2 The Respectful Workplace and Learning Environment Policy, University of Manitoba

4. Guideline Contact

Please contact the Director, Planning & Priorities, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, with questions regarding this document.

5. Approval

These guidelines were approved by the RFHS Dean’s Council on April 28, 2020.

Child safeguarding and protection policy

Policy Name:

Child safeguarding and protection policy

Application/

Scope:

All Faculty members, staff and learners of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and its

Colleges, University of Manitoba

Approved (Date):

August 25, 2020

Review Date:

Five years from approval date

Revised (Date):

Approved By:

Dean’s Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: July 7, 2020

Faculty Executive Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: August 25, 2020

1. Application and scope

1.1 The Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and its Colleges (“RFHS”) is committed to treating all Children with respect and dignity. It is dedicated to safeguarding and protecting the rights of all Children.

1.2 This policy incorporates the legal requirements for Child safeguarding and protection in Manitoba within the operations of the RFHS. It applies to all faculty, staff and learners of the RFHS and other individuals involved in RFHS activities, regardless of location. It applies most specifically to individuals working on projects, grants or initiatives that directly or indirectly involve Children. This policy is meant to complement, and not detract from, other applicable University policies, contractual agreements, including collective agreements, and other applicable laws.

1.3 In the event an inconsistency or conflict arises between this policy and any other applicable University policy, contractual agreement, collective agreement or law (including the law of another jurisdiction), such inconsistency or conflict shall be resolved in favour of the University policy of higher authority, or in favour of the contractual agreement or collective agreement, in accordance with the laws applicable in the Province of Manitoba, in a manner that affords the highest standards for the safeguarding and protection of Children as possible.

2. Purpose

2.1 To guide learners, staff and faculty members in the safeguarding and protection of Children.

3. Definitions

In addition to certain capitalized words and phrases that may be defined elsewhere in this policy, the following capitalized words and phrases shall have the following meanings:

3.1 Child/Children: is any individual under 18 years of age.

3.2 Abuse: as defined under section one of The CFS Act (including as such definition may be updated from time to time), an act or omission by a person where the act or omission results in:

(a) physical injury to the Child;

(b) emotional disability of a permanent nature in the Child or is likely to result in such a disability;

(c) sexual exploitation of the Child with or without the Child’s consent.

3.3 Child Neglect: is the failure of a Child’s primary caregiver to provide adequate food, clothing, shelter, supervision, and/or medical care. Child neglect involves an act of omission by a parent or guardian, resulting in (or likely to result in) harm or imminent risk of harm to a child.

3.4 CFS Act: The Child and Family Services Act (Manitoba).

3.5 In Need of Protection: Under The CFS Act, a Child is in need of protection where the life, health or emotional well-being of the Child is endangered by the act or omission of a person. Without restricting the generality of the above, a Child is in need of protection where the Child:

(a) is without adequate care, supervision or control;

(b) is in the care, custody, control or charge of a person

(i) who is unable or unwilling to provide adequate care, supervision or control of the child, or

(ii) whose conduct endangers or might endanger the life, health or emotional well-being of the Child, or

(iii) who neglects or refuses to provide or obtain proper medical or other remedial care or treatment necessary for the health or well-being of the Child or who refuses to permit such care or treatment to be provided to the Child when the care or treatment is recommended by a duly qualified medical practitioner;

(c) is abused or is in danger of being abused, including where the Child is likely to suffer harm or injury due to child pornography;

(d) is beyond the control of a person who has the care, custody, control or charge of the child;

(e) is likely to suffer harm or injury due to the behaviour, condition, domestic environment or associations of the child or of a person having care, custody, control or charge of the child;

(f) is subjected to aggression or sexual harassment that endangers the life, health or emotional well-being of the child;

(g) being under the age of 12 years, is left unattended and without reasonable provision being made for the supervision and safety of the child; or

(h) is the subject, or is about to become the subject, of an unlawful adoption under

The Adoption Act or of a sale under section 84 of the CFS Act.

4. Policy and procedure statements

Prevention

4.1 All new RFHS learners, staff and faculty members shall be familiarized with this Child Safeguarding and Protection Policy through their new faculty/staff/learner orientations.

4.2 For learners, staff or faculty members whose University of Manitoba work or University of Manitoba learning activities directly involve Children:

  • A Criminal Records Check, Child Abuse Registry Check, and Adult Abuse Registry Check shall be required. For most learners, these Checks are a requirement on admission to, or registration in, the program. Therefore, please consult with the specific applicable program policy or regulation for additional detail;
  • The Code of Conduct – Child Safeguarding and Protection (at Appendix A to this policy) is required to be read and the responsibilities of the individual acknowledged. Examples of activities that may directly involve Children include clinical learning/fieldwork activities, service-learning activities or training Children as standardized patients.

4.3 For research involving Children, please refer to the specific ethics requirements and processes applicable to the research project.

4.4 The requirements set out in section 4.2 are not applicable to group tours or other visits to RFHS facilities or affiliated sites where Children are present (such as “Take Our Kids to Work Day”) or other interactions where Children are present in a group setting (such as learner examination/invigilation where Children standardized patients are present but participating in a group setting; Children brought into a classroom or lab in a group setting).

Reporting

4.5 It is the legal responsibility and duty of anyone who reasonably believes that a Child is, or might be, In Need of Protection or suffering from Child Abuse, to report the information directly to a CFS agency. Reporting to other law enforcement authorities may also be required, if the suspected activity is criminal in nature. While a report of Child Abuse can result in an initial negative experience for the parties involved, reporting is both compulsory and necessary, as a Child’s life or safety may be at risk.

4.6 In addition to the mandatory reporting obligations as above noted, it may be necessary for the Child’s immediate safety to report the concerns to the parent(s) or guardian(s).

4.7 The duty to report supersedes any restrictions respecting the disclosure of information in legislation, including The Personal Health Information Act (Manitoba) or otherwise.

4.8 In addition to the mandatory reporting obligations under The CFS Act, suspicions or concerns about Child Abuse, a Child in Need of Protection, or other behaviour that might be considered inappropriate (refer to the Code of Conduct at Appendix A), require a report within the RFHS. The person making the mandatory CFS Act report shall inform their immediate supervisor (for learners this could be their preceptor, course/rotation/program director, Department Head, Associate Dean), as well as make a written report to the Dean and Vice-Provost of the RFHS, using the report form attached hereto at Appendix B (“Report Form”). If desired, the person’s immediate supervisor may assist in completing the Report Form.

4.9 Should an individual have any questions or require any guidance respecting the requirements to report, they should, in consultation with their immediate supervisor, access resources available to assist in decision making (such as Child and Family Services or RFHS resources) that have trained staff available to assist with decision making and with any parental communication and disclosure required.

4.10 Special Provision for Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (“CIFF”) Grants/Projects

In addition to the above reporting requirements, for CIFF grants or projects, the grantee must advise the local CIFF Designated Safeguarding Officer (“DSO”) or Programme Manager, within three (3) days of knowledge of the concern or disclosure. Grantees are expected to provide regular updates to CIFF as to the status of any investigation and the outcome of the process, to the extent the Grantee is made aware of the status and outcome.

Investigation of a Faculty Member, Staff or Learner of the RFHS

4.11 If the respondent/offender is a faculty member, staff or learner of the RFHS, the Dean and Vice-Provost, RFHS will, upon receipt of a completed Report Form, ensure that an investigator (the “Investigator”) is assigned to review the report (“Report”) and ensure that all other mandatory reporting obligations as above noted are completed.

The Dean and Vice-Provost, RFHS may appoint either an employee of the University or an external consultant to act as the Investigator, provided that the Investigator:

(a) Has relevant skills and/or experience;

(b) Would be able to conduct an investigation in an unbiased manner; and

(c) Would not be placed in a conflict of interest.

4.12 Within 10 working days of being appointed, the Investigator ensures that the investigatory steps described below are completed. This may involve consultation with other units of the University about appropriate investigatory steps in accordance with applicable policies (e.g., Human Resources, Faculty of Graduate Studies). If the matter reported is being investigated by a law enforcement authority (e.g., under the CFS Act or Criminal Code of Canada), the Investigator may defer the University investigation to such other authority while also implementing measures to ensure the safety of work and learning environment in accordance with appropriate policies.

4.13 The Investigator will meet with the appropriate individuals to conduct an investigation and will inform senior leadership as required (e.g. Dean of the College, Associate Dean, Department Head, etc.) of the Report. The Investigator will conduct an investigation by interviewing the reporting individual, informing the respondent about the matter of the Report, interviewing the respondent, and interviewing any other persons who might have insight into the situation, such as witnesses and individuals in relevant positions. The Investigator may also conduct a joint investigation, including without limitation, with an affiliated clinical learning site, the Faculty of Graduate Studies, another Faculty, or the Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management. All such individuals will be bound to strict confidentiality regarding all aspects of the case.

4.14 The Investigator will review all of the information gathered in the course of the investigation and will submit their investigative report to the Dean and Vice-Provost, RFHS and the lead of any other applicable program or College (the “Dean/Director”) that includes the summary of the evidence and facts of the case and recommendations for action. If the matter has been deferred in lieu of investigation by a governmental authority, this should be reflected along with other interim measures that have been put into place. Once the other investigation is completed, this should also be reported, along with all findings. The Dean and Vice-Provost, RFHS will review the report and make a decision on the action to take, in consultation with the Dean/Director.

4.15 Actions resulting from a Report will depend on the circumstances, on the seriousness of the behaviour, whether the Report is determined to be founded or unfounded, on any mitigating factors and on applicable University policy, bylaw, collective agreement or academic regulation. The following list provides examples of measures and is not meant to be exhaustive nor necessarily represents a progression of measures:

a) A letter of apology;

b) Attendance at educational session(s);

c) Attendance at coaching session(s);

d) Prohibited or restricted access to Children;

e) Academic consequences such as remediation, probation, notation on the

performance record, dismissal/expulsion from the Program/College/RFHS, termination of academic appointment.

4.16 In cases where the respondent is dissatisfied with the decision, that person must submit his or her appeal in writing to the Dean and Vice-Provost, RFHS within 10 working days of the decision and refer to the applicable University Policy, Procedure or Bylaw or collective agreement.

Retaliation / Reprisal

4.17 A reporting individual, respondent, witness, and/or any other person who has

sought advice regarding this Policy, who has brought forward allegations, who has made a report or who has cooperated with an investigation, is entitled to be supported and protected from retaliation and reprisal. Retaliation or reprisal of any sort during or following the investigation is prohibited and will not be tolerated. All concerns and complaints raised respecting retaliation or reprisal will be thoroughly reviewed and investigated, and any breaches appropriately addressed. Accusations that retaliation or reprisal has occurred will be subject to investigation and may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination or expulsion.

4.18 There are many supports to assist in addressing one’s concerns about retaliation or reprisal. The University’s Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management is a resource available to all University members. Faculty members and staff may contact Human Resources and their union representatives. Learners may contact Student Affairs and Student Services at Bannatyne Campus representatives, including Student Advocacy. If the individual is an employee in a certified bargaining unit, he or she may challenge a retaliation or reprisal, through the grievance process or applicable collective agreement. A non-unionized employee may contact Human Resources. A learner can challenge a retaliation or reprisal through an appeal process set out in the Student Discipline Bylaw, the academic appeal policy relating to their program, or other applicable discipline or academic appeal routes within the University.

4.19 False Accusations

Any RFHS faculty member, staff or learner found to have been dishonest in making allegations with a conscious design to mislead or deceive, or with a malicious or fraudulent intent may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination or expulsion.

Confidentiality and Record Keeping

4.20 Any communication of information gathered in any case is confidential. The RFHS will not disclose the name of the reporting individual, of the respondent, or the circumstances related to a report except to the extent that disclosure is necessary

to effectively implement this policy or to undertake any disciplinary or action arising from a decision made under this policy. Records will be kept pursuant to any applicable relevant University policy and/or procedure.

5. References

5.1 Academic Regulations for graduate programs within the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and its Colleges

5.2 Academic Regulations for undergraduate programs within the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and its Colleges

5.3 Children’s Investment Fund Foundation Child Safeguarding and Protect ion Policy

5.4 Code of Conduct to Protect Children: Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba (in development)

5.5 Reporting of Child Protection and Child Abuse: Handbook and Protocols for Manitoba

Service Providers

5.6 The Child and Family Services Act (Manitoba)

5.7 The Student Discipline Bylaw, University of Manitoba

6. Policy contact

Please contact the Dean’s Office, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, with questions regarding this policy.

Confidentiality and conflicts of interest: Guidelines for search committee members

1. Purpose

1.1 To provide guidance respecting confidentiality provisions for Search committee members.

1.2 To provide direction respecting Conflicts of Interest for Search committee members and to ensure the Search process is fair, equitable and consistent for all applicants. “Search” means the search process, from beginning to end, to hire for a position within the RFHS or one of its Colleges or Programs, which search process requires a Search committee advisory to a Dean or Director.

1.3 To have a consistent approach across the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (“RFHS”) respecting confidentiality and Conflicts of Interest in Search processes.

1.4 To provide a complementary process to existing University of Manitoba policies and procedures.


2. Guidelines

Confidentiality

2.1 All matters within a Search and all Search committee meetings are confidential. Members should be reminded at the start of each meeting that discussions and materials shall only be retained within the confines of the meetings.

2.2 The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (Manitoba) (“FIPPA”) provides that all application materials, including letters of reference will be held in strict confidence. As the end of Search deliberations, members will be required to return all Search materials and they shall be shredded. The Chair is required to keep the original documents for one year after the Board of Governors’ approval and shredded thereafter.

2.3 Following selection of a top-ranked candidate, Search committee members shall maintain strict confidentiality of the decision until the appointment is ratified by the Board of Governors or the announcement is formally made.

2.4 A confidentiality declaration should be completed and signed by each Search committee member, at the start of the Search process. A confidentiality declaration template can be obtained from RFHS Human Resources.

Nepotism

2.5 University of Manitoba Nepotism Policy

All University employees are subject to the University of Manitoba Nepotism Policy. It must be applied in circumstances whereby a University employee may be involved in the hiring and supervision of that employee's immediate family member.

Conflicts of Interest

2.6 University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy

All Faculty, Staff and Students are subject to the University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy. “Conflict of Interest”, as defined by the policy, means a situation in which the private interests (financial interests or personal interests) of a person or related party compromise or have the appearance of compromising the person’s independence and objectivity of judgement in the performance of his or her obligations to the University, including teaching, research and service activities. Conflicts of Interest can be potential, actual or perceived. In section 2.3, the policy provides examples of Conflicts of Interest.

2.7 Conflicts of Interest for Search Committee Members

In addition to the conflicts of interest as described in section 2.6, below are examples of other possible conflicts of interest respecting Search committee members (without limitation):

(a) Having a personal relationship with an applicant (e.g. spouse/partner; parent; child; sibling; grandparent; aunt; uncle or other person living in the same household); (b) Having recently (within the last five years) been a co-author or co-editor with the applicant on major projects;

(c) Recently (within the last five years) serving as a Co-Principal Investigator on an applicant’s grant;

(d) Owning, having shares in, or otherwise participating in, a business or financial venture with the applicant;

(e) Having served as an applicant’s thesis advisor;

(f) Providing a reference for an applicant for this Search.

Because some fields of expertise are relatively small, there may be associations through published works, involvement in conferences and professional organizations, as well as knowledge of junior applicants through associations with advisors and graduate programs.

As well, there may be associations through team teaching, co-leading workshops, presenting on panels, or appearing in the same issues of journals or same edited volumes. These types of relationship do not necessarily constitute a Conflict of Interest; however, disclosure should be made for assessment.

2.8 Process for Disclosure

In accordance with the University of Manitoba policy and procedure and as outlined in section 2.7, upon recognition of a Conflict of Interest, whether real, perceived or potential, Search members shall disclose the Conflict of Interest respecting their participation in the Search process. This disclosure shall be to the Search committee Chair (the “Initial Reviewer”). If the flict of Interest involves the Chair, the Chair shall disclose to the Dean of the College or where not related to a specific College, to the Dean and Vice-Provost (Health Sciences), RFHS.

2.9 The disclosure shall be documented in some manner. The disclosure may be in the form of the University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Disclosure Form, although use of the form is not mandatory.

2.10 The Initial Reviewer will assess the disclosure, in consultation with the Search committee member. The Initial Reviewer will recommend either:

(a) No action is required to address the Conflict of Interest; or

(b) Recommend some action be taken, including without limitation:

a. Withdrawal from the Search committee for all stages of its work;

b. Framing of their review comments in terms of the Conflict of Interest. This may include implementation of bias interrupter strategies (for example, reminding the Search Committee of their relationship with the applicant before providing their comments; providing their review comments last; etc.).

2.11 The Initial Reviewer shall submit its recommendations to the Dean of the College, or where no specific College is involved, to the Dean and Vice-Provost (Health Sciences), RFHS (the “Second Reviewer”). The Second Reviewer shall consider the Initial Reviewer’s recommendation and determine how the Conflict of Interest shall be managed. The Second Reviewer will provide his/her determination to the Initial Reviewer, who shall advise the Search committee member, in writing.


3. References

3.1 Confidentiality Declaration for Search Committee Members (please contact RFHS Human Resources for the most recent template)

3.2 University of Manitoba: A Guide to Recruiting the Best: Academic Search Handbook 2016

3.3 University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy

3.4 University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Procedure

3.5 University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Disclosure Form

3.6 University of Manitoba Nepotism Policy


4. Contact

Please contact the Human Resources Officer, RFHS, with questions regarding this document.


5. Approval

These guidelines were approved by the RFHS Dean’s Council on January 7, 2020.

Disruption of all Forms of Racism

Policy Name:

Disruption of all Forms of Racism

Application/

Scope:

Staff, Faculty Members and Learners of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and its

Colleges and Programs

Approved (Date):

August 25, 2020

Review Date:

2 years from approval date

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

Dean’s Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: July 7, 2020

Faculty Executive Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: August 25, 2020

1.1 Senator Murray Sinclair has defined systemic racism as “when the system itself is based upon and founded upon racist beliefs and philosophies and thinking that has put in place policies and practices.”1 The 2011 University of Manitoba Statement of Apology and Reconciliation to Indian Residential School Survivors recognizes the participation of the University in systemic racism both through its own structures and in its education and training of a workforce that participates in systems that also have deeply embedded racism. This is not less true today when we think of the pervasive impacts of racism in many systems including health care.

1.2 Existing University of Manitoba policies including the Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (PLM, Max Rady College of Medicine), the Responsibilities of Academic Staff with Regard to Students Policy, the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Policy (Rady Faculty of Health Sciences), the Respectful Workplace and Learning Environment Policy, the Violent or Threatening Behaviour Policy, the Student Non-Academic Misconduct and Concerning Behaviour Procedure, the Student Discipline Bylaw and the Sexual Assault Policy, do not communicate an adequate understanding of the politics of race and the significance of racism as it pertains to BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) learners, staff and faculty. If a policy does not take race into account in a meaningful way, then racism can remain “invisible” or can be deemed to be nonexistent and therefore allowed to persist and potentially increase. This Policy constitutes a formal recognition of racial harassment, discrimination, vilification, and racism. It is an affirmation of

a) the histories of dispossession, enslavement, genocide and their legacies;

b) ongoing settler colonial projects; and

c) the humanity, rights, dignity and safety of BIPOC students, staff, and faculty.

1.3 The purpose of this Policy is to:

(a) Define the multiple forms of racism that are present in the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (“RFHS”) and to set out procedures for the reporting of and disruption of racism.

(b) Affirm the responsibility of the RFHS to implement policies, procedures, education, and training to eliminate expression of racism in its myriad forms.

(c) Describe the commitments and proactive steps of the RFHS to foster learning and work environments that fully respect peoples’ right to freedom from racism, racial discrimination, harassment, or vilification.

(d) Set out the requirements for all RFHS Community members, especially those in an instructional, supervisory or managerial position, who have a duty to educate those for whom they are responsible regarding expectations for respectful conduct, including this Policy. It is further the duty of such individuals to intervene when observing any form of racism impacting learners, staff or faculty, and to deal appropriately with allegations regarding violations of this Policy.

(e) Complement and build upon related policies including the EDI Policy and PLM Policy by defining the multiple forms of racism present within the RFHS and clarifying expectations for anti-racism.

1.4 More information on the context and background of this Policy is available on the RFHS Anti- Racism website.


2. Definitions

The terms in this Definition section are defined for the purposes of this Policy:

2.1 “Academic Staff” refers to all individuals whose primary assignment is instruction, research, and/ or service/ academic administration. This includes employees who hold an academic rank such as professor, associate professor, assistant professor, instructor, lecturer, librarian, or the equivalent of any of those academic ranks. This category also includes a dean, director, associate dean, assistant dean, chair or head of department, visiting scholars, senior scholars, and those holding unpaid academic appointments, insofar as they perform instructional, research, and/ or service/ academic administrative duties.

2.2 “Faculty Member” means all unionized and non-unionized academic staff of the RFHS, visiting professors, clinicians with academic appointments and including academic staff whose salary or stipend may be paid, in whole or in part, by another organization.

2.3 “Intersectionality” refers to the ways that racism, racial discrimination, harassment, and vilification are frequently linked/shaped/informed by other elements such as sex, gender and sexuality.

2.4 “Learner” means an individual registered at the University, within a program of the RFHS or one of its Colleges, on a full time or part time basis or as a special student. A Learner can be at the undergraduate, graduate or postdoctoral level, and includes medical students, non- professional graduate students, residents, and fellows and individuals registered at another institution but attending the RFHS on a temporary basis as part of an elective or similar program.

2.5 “Race” is one of the fundamental components of descriptive systems of difference in society (e.g., along with sex-gender, class, ability, and sexuality). At its inception “race” was defined as a natural or biological difference, indicated by physical features such as skin colour, hair texture and other bodily features. The creation of race as a key system of classification was created during European imperial and colonial domination as a means to justify hierarchies of humanity. Despite efforts to locate differences between different groups as evidence of biological and/or genetic differences as unsound, science demonstrates that the differences within different groups are greater than the differences between the so called “races.” However, there remains a significant investment in identifying racial differences as natural and inevitable, as evidence of intelligence, ability, worth, and so on. Rather, scholars and researchers recognize that race is a socio-historical and social construct.

2.6 “Racism” is the differential treatment of various human racial groups by a dominant racial group rooted in the belief of the superiority of one group over the other. Racism takes many forms, some of which include symbolic, embodied, psychological, institutional/systemic, everyday, and interpersonal. Experiences of racial discrimination, harassment and vilification can be affected by its intersection with other elements of identity such as sex-gender, sexuality, disability, and age. The following definitions of different forms of racism are illustrative and not exhaustive. Additional definitions can be found on the Anti-Racism Website.

  • “Everyday Racism” refers to the “mundane” elements of everyday life that are typically not recognized because these manifestations of racism have become so normalized that they are typically not identified as racism. Everyday racism refers to tone, language, a gaze, forms of surveillance (in stores), differential service (being ignored in a store) and actions such as moving when an Indigenous, Black or racialized student is seated beside a person on the bus or in the classroom. Everyday racism is multidimensional and its impact is cumulative.
  • “Gendered Racism” refers to the allocation of resources along racially and ethnically ascribed understandings of masculinity and femininity as well as along gendered forms of race and ethnic discrimination.
  • “Interpersonal Racism” refers to attitudes, ideas, and behaviours that support, and therefore reinforce, racial inequality. It is important to note that interpersonal and institutional racism function both independently and in concert.
  • “Systemic/Institutional Racism” refers to the arrangements and practices that maintain racial hierarchies and racial inequality. It comprises policies, behaviours and practices that are part of the social, cultural or administrative elements of an organization and which produce or maintain positions of disadvantage for racialized individuals.
  • “Racial Discrimination” refers to behavior that impedes and disadvantages people, by withholding benefits, opportunities due to their perceived race, colour, nationality, ethnicity, ethno-religious or national origin.
  • “Racial Harassment” refers to an incident or a series of incidents having the effect of intimidating, offending or harming an individual or group because of their perceived ethnic origin, race or nationality. This includes verbal and/or physical abuse, insults and name- calling, bullying, threatening behaviour, damage to property, displaying and/or sharing racially offensive material and encouraging others to commit racist acts.
  • “Racial Microaggressions” are everyday slights, indignities, put downs and insults that BIPOC individuals experience in their day-to-day interactions with people.
  • “Racial Vilification” refers to a public act that inspires or provokes others to hate, have disrespect, or ruthlessly deride a person or group of people due to their perceived race, colour, nationality, ethnicity or ethno-religious or national origin.

2.7 "RFHS Community" means all RFHS members including Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the RFHS, Learners, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

2.8 "RFHS Matter" means any activity, event, or undertaking in which a member of the RFHS Community participates, which has a substantial connection to the RFHS, such as:

(a) RFHS-related activities or events, including but not limited to:

  • Any activity or event on property owned or controlled by the RFHS;
  • Learner placements, practica, or clinical training;
  • RFHS research activities, whether on or off campus;
  • Learner and/or employee exchanges arranged in connection with the RFHS;
  • Social events or networking, where matters regarding the RFHS or members of the RFHS Community are a significant focus of the activity;
  • RFHS field trips, travel-study tours, service-learning activities, and similar activities;

(b) Activities or events involving members of the RFHS Community, where the actions of those members of the RFHS Community may reasonably reflect upon or affect the RFHS, including but not limited to:

  • Any aspect of the employment or engagement of employees and contractors for roles and projects substantially connected to the RFHS;
  • Writings, photographs, artwork, audio or video recordings, and/or electronic communications, including communications through social media, where matters regarding the RFHS Community are a significant focus of the communication;
  • Matters related to The University of Manitoba Students’ Union, the Graduate Students’ Association, and their affiliated Learner groups to the extent that it affects the proper functioning of the RFHS or the rights of a member of the RFHS Community to use and enjoy the RFHS’s learning and working environments; or
  • Matters of off-campus conduct that have, or might reasonably be seen to have an adverse effect on the proper functioning of the RFHS or the rights of a member of the RFHS Community to use and enjoy the RFHS’s learning and working environments.

2.9 “Third Party Reporting” refers to a form of anonymous reporting where someone who has experienced racism can report it through someone else (described further below) who then accesses one of the established reporting mechanisms to report the experience.

2.10 “Racial Equity Impact Assessments” (REIAs) is a systematic examination of how different racial and ethnic groups will likely be affected by a proposed action or decision. REIAs are used to minimize unanticipated adverse consequences in a variety of contexts, including the analysis of proposed policies, institutional practices, programs, plans and budgetary decisions.


3. Policy and procedure statements

3.1 The RFHS is committed to taking the necessary steps to ensure that no RFHS Community member is subjected to Racism, Racial Discrimination, Racial Vilification, and Racial Harassment while participating at the RFHS and to interrupt and address Racism when it is identified.

3.2 This Policy and Procedure applies to members of the RFHS Community in relation to any RFHS Matter.

3.3 Examples of Racism include, but are not limited to the following actions which the person experiencing them believes are based on perceived race, colour, nationality, ethnicity, ethno- religious (e.g. anti-Semitism or Islamophobia) or national origin of an individual or group.

Interpersonal:

(1) Racial stereotyping, racial profiling of individuals on campus.

(2) Subjecting an individual to racially or ethnically offensive remarks, names, slurs, racial epithets or jokes

(3) Singling out an individual for teasing or jokes related to race, ancestry, place of origin, or ethnic origin.

(4) Circulating racially offensive jokes, pictures or cartoons by e-mail/social media.

(5) Comments ridiculing individuals because of race-related characteristics, religious dress.

(6) Failing to deal with racial incidents or downplaying the seriousness of such conduct e.g., “that was not their intent”.

(7) Characterizing normal communication from Indigenous, Black and racialized learners, staff, and faculty as rude or aggressive.

(8 Treating normal differences of opinion as confrontational or insubordinate when involved with Indigenous, Black and racialized persons.

(9) Treating an Indigenous, Black, and racialized individuals’ responses to racial incidents or bullying as a disciplinary problem without dealing with the underlying incident or considering the underlying incident as a mitigating factor.

(10) Differential disciplinary action for BIPOC individuals. (11) Racist graffiti.

(l2) Penalizing a person for failing to get along with someone else (e.g. colleague, manager, fellow learner), when one of the reasons for the tension is racially discriminatory attitudes or behaviour.

(13) Using a racial epithet.

(14) Disparaging an individual based on their race.

(15) Attributing the same characteristics to all members of a group, regardless of individual differences.

(16) Failing to hire, train, mentor or promote a racialized person. Racialized persons may find themselves subjected to excessive performance monitoring and documentation or deviation from written policies or standard practices or may be more seriously blamed for a common mistake.

(17) Normal differences of opinion or failing to get along with a co-worker/colleague/learner may be treated as more serious when a racialized person is involved.

(18) Contrasting how a racialized person was treated with how others were treated in a comparable situation

(19) A non-existent contradictory or changing explanation for why a racialized person was targeted.

(20) Denial of mentoring or developmental opportunities and training which were made available to others.

(21) Subjecting a BIPOC individual to threatening gestures. Verbally abusing, belittling, insulting, ridiculing or yelling or speaking in a sarcastic manner in public or private.

(22) Assigning BIPOC individuals less desirable positions or duties or assigning duties as punishment rather than education.

(23) Disproportionate blame for an incident or singling out a BIPOC individual for arbitrary treatment that is punitive.

(24) Belief in the inherent superiority of one racial group, over another, through actions or criticism conducted in public that can be interpreted as embarrassing, humiliating and/or demeaning.

(25) Incident or a series of incidents having the effect of intimidating, offending or harming a BIPOC individual or group.

(26) Exclusion from formal or informal networks or opportunities. Neglecting or leaving a BIPOC individual out of comunications.

(27) Not providing racialized individuals with clear work/learning expectations yet holding them responsible for the expectations.

(28) Committing an act of physical abuse or violence of any kind (e.g. throwing objects, aggressive violation of personal space) against a BIPOC individual.

(29) Making unwelcome sexual comments, jokes, innuendos, or taunting remarks.

(30) Using grades/poor reviews as punishment rather than as an objective evaluation of performance.

(31) Threatening to fail, give lower grades, poor performance review or give a poor evaluation for anything other than documented performance issues.

(32) Looks of contempt/hate.

(33) Subjecting an individual to inappropriate references to racist organizations.

Systemic/ Institutional:

(34) Not allowing for time off for religious or spiritual practices other than Christian holidays. (35) Differential career trajectories, opportunities (e.g. time to promotion and/ or tenure) for different BIPOC populations.

(36) Patterned exclusion from formal or informal networks, thereby providing advantages to the racial majority while disadvantaging others.

(37) Differential practices such as excessive monitoring and documentation or deviation from written policies or standard practices for BIPOC populations.

(38) Differential disciplinary action for BIPOC populations .

(39) Disproportionate blame for an incident on BIPOC populations.

(40) Unequal opportunity for employment related to hiring practices, union rules around seniority.

(41) Failing to deal with racial incidents or downplaying the seriousness of such conduct e.g., “that was not their intent”.

(42) Admissions criteria that reflect racial bias through exclusion, universalism or selective/simplistic representative inclusion.

(43) Curriculum content that does not address issues of race and racism and/or promotes or reinforces racial bias or stereotypes.

3.4 All new policies, procedures and programs, and, at the time of their review, all existing policies, procedures and programs, of the RFHS and its member Colleges will undergo a Racial Equity Impact Assessment to identify any potential elements of systemic/institutional racism and propose mitigating measures. These REIAs will be done by the person/ committee responsible for the policy, procedure or program in partnership with the Anti-Racism Working Group and submitted with the draft policy/ procedure or program to the appropriate College or Faculty decision-making body.

3.5 The RFHS adopts a “no wrong door” reporting approach regarding Racism concerns that centers the needs of the person(s) who has experienced Racism, and is trauma- and violence- informed in its processes. The procedures for investigations and remediation/resolution of experiences of racism will rely on existing mechanisms at this time, which will be enhanced with the participation of individuals with specific anti-racism expertise. Existing potential mechanisms to report and address experiences of Racism that have procedures detailed in other related or relevant policies and include:

(a) The Speak Up button (anonymous or non-anonymous reporting) and the Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (currently Medicine only but under review for expansion to the RFHS);

(b) Report to a manager, supervisor, course leader, Department Head, Dean, or other trusted Academic Staff or Faculty Member who is expected to provide the person(s) with options for formal or informal reporting;

(c) Report to the Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management;

(d) Report to the Office or Associate Dean of Professionalism (currently Medicine only).

3.6 Nothing in this Policy is intended to discourage or prevent a member of the RFHS Community from filing a complaint with the Manitoba Human Rights Commission, or from exercising any other legal rights pursuant to any other law or policy.

3.7 In addition to the existing potential reporting mechanisms, breaches of this Policy can be reported through a third party(ies). Third Party Reporting offers the option of reporting the details of an experience or experiences of racism anonymously when individuals are not ready or willing to participate in an investigation because of the risk of reprisal or further racial violence. Third Party Reporting can be an important procedure to address under- reporting of racism.

3.8 Disciplinary options may be limited for breaches of this Policy reported anonymously or using Third Party reporting where that results in the unavailability of sufficient information. This does not preclude remedial action based on the information available or disciplinary action where the information available is sufficient or where a previous pattern of behaviour has been established through previous reporting (anonymous or non-anonymous).

3.9 When any form of Racism occurs and is reported, remedial measures will depend on multiple factors including the input of the person(s) who experienced the Racism (e.g. whether the complaint is formal or informal, and through what process the complaint is made), the circumstances, the seriousness of the behaviour, the frequency or duration of the behaviour, any mitigating factors and applicable University policy, bylaw, collective agreement or academic regulation. The following list provides examples of remedial measures and is not meant to be exhaustive or necessarily represent a progression of measures:

  • Attendance at educational sessions on antiracism with evidence of reflective learning;
  • A restorative justice based approach to mediation when all parties are willing;
  • Prohibited or restricted access to the work or learning environment;
  • Academic consequences such as remediation, probation, notation on the performance record, dismissal/ expulsion from the program of the RFHS/its College, termination of the academic appointment;
  • Disciplinary consequences according to applicable policies and procedures for Faculty

Members and staff;

  • Reporting to legal authorities if the actions represent a potential violation of the Canadian Criminal Code.

4. Review and effect on previous statements

4.1 The Review Date for this Policy and Procedure is two (2) years from the date it is approved by the approving body. In the interim, this document may be revised or repealed if:

(a) The Dean, RFHS & Vice-Provost (Health Sciences), with appropriate approvals, deems it necessary or desirable to do so;

(b) It is no longer legislatively or statutorily compliant; and/or

(c) It comes into conflict with another governing document of the RFHS or the University of Manitoba.

4.2 If this document is revised or repealed, any related RFHS documents shall be reviewed as soon as possible to ensure that they comply with the revised document, or are in term revised or repealed.

4.3 This Policy supersedes all previous governing documents dealing with the subject matter addressed in this document.


5. References

This policy should be cross-reference to the following relevant governing documents, legislations and forms:

5.1 The Human Rights Code, C.C.S.M. c. H175;

5.2 The International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination.

5.3 The Max Rady College of Medicine Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy

5.4 The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples;

5.5 The University of Manitoba Respectful Work and Learning Environment (RWLE) Policy;

5.6 The University of Manitoba RWLE and Sexual Assault Procedure;

5.7 The University of Manitoba Responsibilities of Academic Staff with Regard to the Student

5.8 The University of Manitoba Sexual Assault Policy;

5.9 The University of Manitoba Violent or Threatening Behaviour policy and procedure;

5.10 The University of Manitoba Student Discipline Bylaw and procedures;


6. Sources

6.1 Alexander, C., & Knowles, C. (2005). Introduction. In C. Alexander, & C. Knowles (Eds.), Making race matter: Bodies, space and identity (pp. 1-16). New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

6.2 Crenshaw, K. W. (1994). Mapping the margins: Intersectionality, identity politics, and violence against women of color. In M. A. Fineman (Ed.), The public nature of private violence: women and the discovery of abuse (pp. 93-120). New York, NY: Routledge.

6.3 Essed, P. (2002). Everyday racism: A new approach to the study of racism. In P. Essed, & D. T. Goldberg (Eds.), Race critical theories: Text and context (pp. 176-194). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

6.4 Hall, S. (1996). Race the floating signifier. The Media Education Foundation.

6.5 Matsuda, M. J., Lawrence III, C. R., Delgado, R., Words, & Crenshaw, K. W. (1993). Words that wound: Critical race theory, assaultive speech, and the First Amendment. New York, NY: Routledge.

6.6 Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (2019).

6.7 Steinmetz, K. (February 20, 2020). “She coined the term ‘intersectionality’ over 30 years ago. Here’s what it means to her today.” Time magazine. Available at https://time.com/5786710/kimberle-crenshaw-intersectionality/.

6.8 Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action (2015). Available at http://trc.ca/assets/pdf/Calls_to_Action_English2.pdf.

6.9 United Nations: International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (1969). Available at https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/cerd.aspx.

6.10 United Nations: Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007). Available at https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/cerd.aspx.

6.11 United United Nations. Report of the Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent on its Mission to Canada (2017).

6.12 Kendi, I. (2016). Stamped From the Beginning: the definitive history of racist ideas in America. New York, NY: Nation Books.


7. Policy contact

Please contact The Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, RFHS, with questions regarding this document.

 

Equity Diversity and Inclusion

Policy Name:

Equity Diversity and Inclusion

Application/

Scope:

Staff, Faculty Members and Learners of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

Approved (Date):

February 4, 2020

Review Date:

5 years from approval date

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

Dean’s Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: January 21, 2020

Faculty Executive Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: February 4, 2020

1. PREAMBLE AND COMMITMENT

1.1 On January 26, 2018 (revised January 21, 2020), the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (“RFHS”) and its Colleges of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Rehabilitation Sciences (collectively, the “Colleges”) agreed upon a joint commitment of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (also referred to herein as “EDI”) which included the commitment of ensuring that its learners, faculty, and staff are reflective of the population served.

1.2 The RFHS wishes to set out its commitment to EDI into policy form, in an effort to promote and support a community that embraces EDI, provides for equality of opportunity, and recognizes the dignity of all people.

1.3 The RFHS acknowledges its location on Treaty 1 Territory, acknowledges its obligation to provide service to diverse Indigenous communities and is committed to implementing the Calls to Action and Principles of Reconciliation issued by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (“TRC”). In furtherance of this commitment, the RFHS pledges to work with Ongomiizwin, the Indigenous Institute of Health and Healing, in accordance with the RFHS Reconciliation Action Plan, led by Ongomiizwin.

1.4 Equity, Diversity and Inclusion are linked to all five University of Manitoba’s Strategic priorities:

1. Inspiring Minds through innovating and quality teaching;

2. Driving Discovery and Insight through excellence in research, scholarly work and other creative activities;

3. Creating Pathways to Indigenous Achievement;

4. Building Community that creates an outstanding learning and working environment; and

5. Forging Connections to foster high impact community engagement that build on the advantages of a diverse and inclusive workplace.

1.5 Equity, Diversity and Inclusion align with the RFHS’ shared set of values in community and collaboration, scholarship and innovation, equity and inclusion, professionalism and social accountability.

1.6 Learners, faculty and staff are to be free from harassment and discrimination, as defined in The Human Rights Code (Manitoba) and in accordance with the University of Manitoba’s Respectful Work and Learning Environment (RWLE) Policy. That is, all Learners, faculty and staff, regardless of race, ethnicity, colour, religious beliefs, national origin, rurality, gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, political beliefs, language, or socio-economic status, are to be valued for their individuality, advanced academic pursuits, and contributions to the diversity and functions of the RFHS and the University of Manitoba. Unacceptable discrimination, including racism, micro aggressions, sexism, ableism, ageism, homophobia and transphobia will not be tolerated. An RFHS Anti-Racism policy is currently in development.

1.7 Learners, faculty, or staff found to have engaged in such conduct will be counselled, warned or disciplined. Severe or repeated breaches will lead to formal discipline up to and including leave without pay or dismissal.


2. PURPOSE

2.1 To set out the minimum principle-based requirements to be implemented by the RFHS and its member Colleges in accordance with their joint commitment to Equity, Diversity and Inclusion. We, individually and collectively, are committed to ensuring the following:

1. The RFHS community is a safe and welcoming place for all people.

2. All Learners, faculty, staff and other individuals in the RFHS community are respected.

3. The RFHS community is stronger because it recognizes, embraces and values its differences.

4. The faculty, staff and Learner populations are representative of the populations we serve in Manitoba.

5. We seek to understand the effects of colonization on Indigenous communities.

6. We treat each other with unconditional respect.

7. We are accountable to each other for our behaviour.

8. We are open, honest and authentic in our dealings with each other.

9. We will take action and speak up when we believe others are disrespected in our presence.

10. We will continually grow and learn together to be a strong community of valued people.


3. DEFINITIONS

3.1 “Diversity” includes all the ways in which people differ, and it encompasses all the different characteristics that make one individual or group different from another. It is all-inclusive and recognizes everyone and every group as part of the diversity that should be valued. A broad definition includes not only race, ethnicity, and gender - the groups that most often come to mind when the term “diversity” is used — but also age, national origin, religion, disability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, education, marital status, language, and physical appearance. It also involves different ideas, perspectives, and values.

3.2 “Equity” is the guarantee of fair treatment, access, opportunity, and advancement for all Learners, faculty, and staff, while at the same time striving to identify and eliminate barriers that have prevented the full participation of some groups. The principle of equity acknowledges that there are historically underserved and underrepresented populations and that fairness regarding these unbalanced conditions is needed to assist equality in the provision of effective opportunities to all groups.

3.3 “Historically Under-Represented Groups” means the four designated groups pursuant to the Employment Equity Act: women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities, and members of racialized communities, as well as other historically under-represented groups such as 2STLGBQ+1, refugee and immigrant groups as well as others.

3.4 “Inclusion” is the act of creating environments in which any individual or group can be and feel welcomed, respected, supported, and valued to fully participate. An inclusive and welcoming climate embraces differences and offers respect in words and actions for all people.

3.5 “Indigenous peoples” means First Nations, Metis and Inuit people.

3.6 “Learner” means an individual registered, enrolled, or classified as a student within or with the University of Manitoba, participating in any of the College programs or Rady Faculty of Health Sciences programs including the IHP Program.

3.7 “Principles of Reconciliation” are as documented by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada to guide its renewed relationships with First Nations, Metis, and Inuit people. As set out in the RFHS Reconciliation Action Plan, these principles include:

1. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is the framework for reconciliation.

2. First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples have Treaty, constitutional and human rights that must be respected.

3. Reconciliation is a process of healing of relationships that requires truth sharing, apology, and commemoration that acknowledge and redress past harms.

4. Reconciliation requires constructive action on addressing the ongoing legacies of colonialism that have destructive impacts on Indigenous peoples’ health.

5. Reconciliation must create a more equitable society and close the gaps in health.

6. All Canadians share the responsibility.

7. The perspectives and understandings of Traditional Knowledge Keepers are vital.

8. Reconciliation requires political will, joint leadership, trust building, accountability, transparency and a substantial investment of resources.

1 “2STLGBQ+” is an acronym describing sexual and gender minority communities namely the two-spirit, transgender, lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and questioning community. The “+” recognizes the diversity of identities and represents many more sexual orientations and gender identities not captured within the acronym.


4. POLICY STATEMENTS

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Commitment

4.1 The RFHS and its Colleges commit to embedding Equity, Diversity and Inclusion throughout every area and level of the RFHS and the Colleges. In that respect, the RFHS Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

Committee is established to act as the main discussion and advisory committee to the RFHS Dean and Vice-Provost (Health Sciences) in relation to issues of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.

Faculty and Staff – Recruitment (Selection and Hiring)

4.2 The RFHS and its Colleges shall promote and implement inclusive recruitment and hiring practices, including implementing measures for the identification and removal of artificial barriers to the selection and hiring of Historically Under-Represented Groups, and to take steps to improve the employment status of these groups by increasing their participation in all levels of employment.

At a minimum:

a) Best practices will be developed for promoting Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at each stage of planning for, recruiting, hiring and retaining diverse faculty and staff, and will actively implement employment equity;

b) Targeted outreach and selection methodologies will be used that avoid biases and barriers to address areas of under-representation of Historically Under-Represented Groups;

c) Training for all search and selection committees will be provided to ensure the recruitment and retention of diverse faculty and staff, avoiding unintended bias and building strategies to build diverse candidate pools.

Faculty and Staff Retention (Training, Development and Mentorship)

4.3 The RFHS and its Colleges commit to implementing Equity, Diversity and Inclusion efforts in its retention (including training, development and mentorship) of its faculty and staff. In particular, the RFHS and its Colleges shall, at a minimum:

a) Review the RFHS/College’s current orientation process for new staff and faculty to ensure it is effectively welcoming and connecting with new members;

b) Implement systemic ways to ensure women and other Historically Under-Represented Groups achieve leadership positions within the RFHS/College;

c) Review and enhance the career-planning and mentoring system(s) for faculty and staff.

Learners – Recruitment, Admissions and Retention

4.4 The RFHS and its Colleges commit to:

a) Recruitment and retention of Learners from Historically Under-Represented Groups, to ensure Learners are a reflection of the population the RFHS/Colleges serve. The RFHS/Colleges shall review and revise, as necessary, their admissions policies, procedures and requirements to reflect this commitment.

b) Ensure all Learners receive orientation to Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.

Learners - Curriculum

4.5 The RFHS and its Colleges commit to provide a diverse educational experience for all Learners through an inclusive curriculum that:

a) Is inclusive, respectful, safe and free from mistreatment;

b) Reflects the perspectives and experiences of a pluralistic society;

c) Reflects the perspective, world views and contributions of Indigenous communities;

d) Promotes understanding of health disparities and inequities;

e) Builds insight about Historically Under-Represented Groups and populations and the capacity to serve them competently;

f) Provides curricular learning experiences that include patient cases that represent diversity within the curriculum, as well as a variety of practice settings (such as First Nations communities; small, remote, northern and rural communities; complex health care facilities; community health agencies);

g) Fosters learner interaction in small group sessions;

h) Develops service-learning experiences with volunteer and community groups.

The RFHS/Colleges shall review and revise, as necessary, their curriculum to reflect this commitment.

Accessibility

4.6 The RFHS and its Colleges commit to cultivate positive dialogue about stereotypes regarding accessibility and accommodation, with a focus on improving the understanding of the needs, the process for accommodation, and how accommodations are beneficial. The RFHS/Colleges shall review their practices and processes to ensure compliance with applicable legislation and complementary policies.

Committees

4.7 The RFHS and its Colleges will strive to achieve diverse membership among their standing and ad hoc committees, working groups, consultants, advisory and community partners, to ensure differing perspectives and experiences with the goal of maintaining objectivity and a balanced skill-set for matters under review and consideration.

Skill-Building Workshops

4.8 The RFHS and its Colleges will initiate skill-building workshops for Learners, faculty and staff aimed at addressing Equity, Diversity and Inclusion goals and challenges.

Research

4.9 The RFHS and its Colleges encourage research that responds to the needs of the population the RFHS and its Colleges serve, and encourages compliance with the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan of the Canada Research Chairs as well as other EDI plans that may be applicable.

Outreach

4.10 The RFHS and its Colleges will actively seek out and build partnerships, including supporting outreach programs and initiatives with communities, schools, diverse community organizations and individuals, including Indigenous peoples, in order to create, maintain and enhance career pathing programs and social accountability initiatives, coordinated through the RFHS Office of Community Engagement and other units of the RFHS and member colleges (e.g., Ongomiizwin).

Communications

4.11 RFHS External Relations shall ensure the commitment to Equity, Diversity and Inclusion be considered and featured in print ads, website materials and other materials used for Learners, faculty, staff and public promotion.

All Faculty, Staff and Learners

4.12 All Learners, faculty, and staff of the RFHS and its Colleges are responsible to:

  • Educate themselves on matters relating to Equity, Diversity and Inclusion;
  • Create and maintain a respectful working and learning environment that respects and values the rights and dignities of all individuals;
  • Report any activity that is contrary to the Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy or the University of Manitoba Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy, including use of the “Speak Up” button.

5. PROCEDURE STATEMENTS

Implementation Plan

5.1 The above policy statements are minimum principle-based requirements. Working through the RFHS Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, implementation/action plans will be developed for each policy statement, which may include the establishment of working groups to develop specific action items.

RFHS and College Leads

5.2 At the request of the RFHS Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, each College and RFHS Program (not otherwise associated with a College) shall identify one or more lead(s) respecting the Colleges’/Programs’ efforts in implementing particular policy statements relating to the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.

Targets

5.3 As part of the implementation/action plans, the RFHS/Colleges, with the RFHS Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion shall set specific targets and outcome measures to meet the commitments made in this policy, keeping in mind the RFHS goal to have Learners, faculty, and staff be reflective of the population served by the RFHS and its Colleges, and to achieve greater representation of Historically Under-Represented Groups.

Tracking

5.4 In order to determine whether the RFHS and its Colleges are meeting the set targets and outcome measures, the RFHS/Colleges shall, at minimum, track its Learners, faculty, and staff from Historically Under-Represented Groups through surveys and/or other mechanisms, and adopt mechanisms to address gaps.

Reporting

5.5 The RFHS Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion shall coordinate the reporting on the implementation and outcomes in Equity, Diversity and Inclusion. A formal written report shall be provided to the RFHS Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Committee at least once per year. Each College/RFHS Program shall provide the necessary information respecting the College’s implementation of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, including efforts, outcomes and tracking data, to the RFHS Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.


6. REFERENCES

6.1 Diversity, Inclusion and Equity Guidelines, November 2016, Dalhousie University, Faculty of Medicine

6.2 Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan, Canada Research Chairs

6.3 Equity, Diversity and Inclusion: Best Practices for Recruitment, Hiring and Retention, Canada Research Chairs

6.4 The Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Reconciliation Action Plan

6.5 The Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Strategic Framework

6.6 Red River College Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Policy

6.7 The Accessibility for Manitobans Act (Manitoba)

6.8 the Employment Equity Act (Canada)

6.9 The Human Rights Code (Manitoba)

6.10 Framework for Research Engagement with First Nation, Metis, and Inuit Peoples

6.11 The Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (Max Rady College of Medicine) (under review)

6.12 University of Manitoba Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy

6.13 University of Manitoba Accessibility Policy and Procedures

6.14 The University of Manitoba Strategic Plan

6.15 Western University Diversity and Inclusion Plan for Faculty and Staff


7. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the RFHS Director, Equity, Inclusion and Diversity with questions regarding this policy.

Mobile/Wireless Device Policy

Policy Name:

Mobile/Wireless Device Policy

Effective Date:

May 15, 2018

Date Approved:

May 15, 2018

Approved by:

Council of Deans, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

Review Date:

March 31, 2023

PURPOSE

To provide a consistent process for the eligibility, approval and tracking of mobile/ wireless devices or portable electronic devices and their respective charges on operating funds. Any exceptions to this policy require written approval of the Director of Finance, RFHS.

DEFINITIONS

Mobile/ Wireless Devices - include cellular/ smartphones, laptops, tablets, and other similar devices. Examples of devices:

Cellular/ Smartphones – iPhone, blackberries, Samsung, Sony, Nokia, etc.

Laptops – MacBook, Samsung, IBM, Asus, etc. Tablets – iPad, Samsung, Asus, etc.


STATEMENT OF POLICY

1. Device Approvals

Purchase of cellular devices/smartphones may be approved by the individuals one-over-one and Director of Finance using U of M operating funds, prior to submission to IST, for those staff or faculty who meet all the following criteria:

a. They hold a position at the level of Dean, Vice Dean, Associate Dean, Department Head, Director or Manager;

b. The majority of their annual income is derived from the position in (a) above;

c. There is an essential business need/ justification specific to the individual’s role in the

College or Faculty including:

i. Significant amount of time is spent out of the office for various work related reasons.

ii. Due to the nature of their position they are required by the respective Dean to respond to urgent email or phone messages.

2. UMFA Approvals

Cellular/ smartphone contracts for UMFA members must follow Article 27 of the Collective Agreement and there must be sufficient budget in the respective Travel and Expense fund to cover the expenses. Purchase approval for both the phone/upgrades & monthly plan will follow the same process of one-over-one approver & the Director of Finance, prior to submission of the request to IST.

3. Research Funds

Cellular/ smartphone contracts are typically not an approved expense on research funds unless it is necessary for conduct of the research project, required for personnel safety reasons and appropriate justification is documented and kept on file.

4. Upgrades & Replacement

a. Upgrades to mobile/ wireless devices may be approved by the Director of Finance when the respective contract is expiring and the device is not in good working condition. Any requests for upgrades/replacements prior to contract expiry will require the original device be submitted to the RFHS Finance Office.

b. All smartphone contracts are to be held with the U of M approved supplier (ie Rogers) via a U of M approved contract. Personally held contracts will not be reimbursed, and Purchasing cards (Pcards) should not be used for monthly device charges.

c. For further information on the process, please see below:

i. Mobile device purchase and activation (standard data plans range between 5 and 6 GBs per month depending on the device)

ii. Laptop or tablet purchase

iii. Upgrade a mobile device

iv. Cancelling mobile device contract

v. Transfer of ownership (personal device to University)

vi. Transfer of ownership (University to personal device)

vii. Lost or stolen devices

viii. Repairs to devices

5. Travel Packages

For individuals holding a position of Dean, Vice Dean, Associate Dean, Department Head or Director, the appropriate travel package may be purchased prior to travelling to prevent the incursion of roaming charges. Roaming charges occur when you enter another country other than Canada, and use cellular services (telephone, texting and data). A notification is usually received on your device alerting you that you need to add a roaming travel plan.

a. For positions not mentioned above the request to purchase travel packages must be sent to the Director of Finance for review and approval prior to each trip. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis and where a justifiable business need exists.

b. Travel plans

c. Tips for reducing mobile/ wireless costs while travelling:

i. Turn data roaming off when you don’t need to check email/ internet.

ii. WiFi services should be used as often as possible to reduce these costs and manage the data plan for the mobile device. Most hotels offer WiFi free of charge or for a nominal fee, which allows the individual to check emails and download files or information.

iii. Turn off applications that leverage GPS, such as Maps, Weather, etc.

6. Overages

Wireless devices with a monthly invoice based on usage will be monitored by RFHS Finance Office. Individuals whose monthly charges exceed the normal monthly charge by $10 or more will be responsible for reimbursing the University for the entire overage. Individuals who exceed their travel packages may be personally responsible for the overages.

7. Inventory

An inventory of mobile/ wireless devices with monthly charges must be kept by the respective College Senior Financial Officer and reviewed annually.


POLICY CONTACT: Director of Finance, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

CROSS REFERENCES – This policy should be cross-referenced to the following relevant Governing Documents:

Mobile/ Wireless Devices

Use of Computer Facilities Policy and Procedures – November 2013

Travel and Business Expense Claims Policy and Procedures – December 2017

Custody and Control of Electronic Devices and Media Policy and Procedures – June 2015

Social Media Guidelines

1. BACKGROUND

Social media plays an important role in communication with, and among, learners, faculty, staff, patients, community stakeholders and others. Inappropriate or offensive behaviors, use or interactions on social media can impact employment, training, or learner status.


2. PURPOSE

2.1 To provide guidance to learners, faculty members and staff of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (“RFHS”), University of Manitoba, respecting existing resources and requirements relating to social media; and

2.2 To provide guidance in understanding their roles and responsibilities as a member of the RFHS when using social media.


3. DEFINITIONS

3.1 RFHS-Hosted Social Media: a social media account that is created, branded and utilized by a program, Department or unit of the RFHS or a College(s) of the RFHS, and represents the RFHS.

3.2 Personal Social Media: social media used for personal purposes, such as communicating with family, friends, other learners, faculty, staff. This includes learner or student groups.

3.3 Social Media: a term used to describe websites and/or applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking including without limitation popular platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, SnapChat, TikTok, LinkedIn and YouTube.


4. GUIDELINES

RFHS-Hosted Social Media

4.1 RFHS-Hosted Social Media shall follow the Guidelines and best practices at the University of Manitoba including:

Social Media Guidelines and Best Practices – Marketing Communications Office;

Social Media at the University of Manitoba – Access and Privacy Office.

Personal Social Media

4.2 Academic freedom and freedom of expression are fundamental values supported by the University of Manitoba and the RFHS.

4.3 While use of Personal Social Media for educational, personal or professional development is permitted and the principles of academic freedom and freedom of expression are supported, individuals assume personal responsibility for information they post online or send electronically. Personal Social Media must comply with professional standards, University policy, and legislation.

4.4 It is important to be aware that, even with Personal Social Media use, the person’s RFHS affiliation may still be identified, known or presumed. A “University Matter” is broadly defined, as provided in the RWLE and Sexual Assault Policy and Procedure.

4.5 For Personal Social Media, if a person identifies their affiliation with RFHS or the University of Manitoba, then they should visibly include a disclaimer such as: “The views expressed here are my own and do not reflect the views of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba” or “these views are my own”. Even with this disclaimer, the matter may be considered a University Matter and, in either case, must comply with professional standards, University policy, and legislation.

4.6 Although any item posted on Social Media will continue to exist in some form, here are select articles that may be helpful to “clean up” one’s Personal Social Media:

Legislation

4.7 The Personal Health Information Act (Manitoba) (“PHIA”) outlines responsibilities that anyone who collects personal health information must abide by. All health care providers, including learners, take a PHIA pledge and are considered trustees under PHIA. The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (Manitoba) (“FIPPA”) contains privacy responsibilities that are applicable. There are many forms of online or electronic communications that may undermine these obligations, for example, blogging about specific patient encounters, or posting patient information on a social networking site.

4.8 In Manitoba, the Human Rights Code prohibits discrimination and harassment of any individual or group based on any of the personal characteristics as set out in the Human Rights Code (Manitoba). The Criminal Code of Canada contains provisions respecting hate speech. Any Social Media shall be free of harassment, discrimination, as well as public incitement, and wilful promotion, of hatred.

Professional Standards

4.9 Professional Standards: Each profession has its own governing body that may have statements or guidelines relevant to Social Media that provide responsibilities for its members. The following list is provided for reference and may not be exhaustive:

Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses

Code of Ethics and Standards of Psychiatric Nursing Practice

College of Occupational Therapists of Manitoba: Code of Ethics

College of Pharmacists of Manitoba: Code of Ethics

College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba – adoption of Canadian Medical

Association Code of Ethics and Professionalism

College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba: Standards of Practice of Medicine

College of Physiotherapists of Manitoba: Use of Social Media

College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba and College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of Manitoba: Social Media and Social Networking

Manitoba Association of Registered Respiratory Therapists: Code of Ethics

Manitoba Association of Registered Respiratory Therapists: Standards of Practice

Manitoba Dental Association: Code of Ethics

Practice Expectations for RNs

University of Manitoba Policies and Values

4.10 A number of University of Manitoba policies and values are relevant and applicable to online communication, electronic activities and work/learning environments. They include:

  • Access and Privacy Policy and Procedures: University members are required to comply with PHIA, FIPPA, and this policy to ensure the University meets its obligations under access and privacy legislation.
  • Use of Computer Facilities Policy and Procedures: University members, including learners, agree to abide by this policy when they claim a user ID. The policy outlines clear user responsibilities.
  • Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy and Procedure (currently under review): This policy, in part provides: “Members of the University Community, including every student and employee, are entitled to a respectful work and learning environment that is: (a) Free from Discrimination and provides for Reasonable Accommodation; (b) Free from Harassment; and (c) Collegial and conducive to early resolution of conflict between members of the University Community.” It provides a process for complaint and resolution should there be a concern respecting a respectful work or learning environment.
  • Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy, Max Rady College of Medicine: This policy provides a commitment “to assuring safe, respectful and supportive working and learning environments in which all of its members are enabled and encouraged to excel. This is an environment free of discrimination, harassment and mistreatment and one in which feedback regarding performance can be shared openly without concern for ridicule or reprisal.” It provides a process for complaint and resolution should there be a concern respecting learner mistreatment. It is currently under review to be applicable across all of the RFHS.
  • Discipline avenues for unprofessional conduct. For learners, unprofessional conduct can result in discipline pursuant to the Student Discipline Bylaw; a program’s
  • Professional Unsuitability Bylaw or a program’s essential/requisite skills and abilities document. For faculty members or staff, unprofessional conduct can result in discipline pursuant to an applicable collective agreement, human resources policy or employment standards law.
  • The University’s commitment to six fundamental values: honesty, trust, fairness, respect, responsibility and courage, defining Academic Integrity, should be kept in mind at all times, as well as the University’s values set out in its Strategic Plan: academic freedom, accountability, collegiality, equity and inclusion, excellence, innovation, integrity, respect, and sustainability.

Social Media Orientation/Training

4.11 It is recommended that each College/Program consider the following to be provided for review or orientation (or other similar orientations/modules) for learners, faculty members and staff:

4.12 It is recommended that learners receive social media orientation/training at admissions/orientation, as well as refresher training prior to commencement of clinical field work/clinical practice/clerkship/clinical learning, as determined to be appropriate by the program.

4.13 It is recommended that staff and faculty members receive social media orientation such as review of the above Social Media Module and this Guideline as part of their new staff on- boarding or College/RFHS-level new faculty orientation process.

4.14 This Guideline is not intended to replace University-level policies or procedures, or more detailed College or Program-specific policies or guidelines. Please reference any applicable College or Program-specific policies or guidelines.

4.15 Should a concern arise respecting Social Media use as it relates to the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences community, learners can report concerns to any of their teachers, preceptors, course/rotation directors, administrative staff members, Department Heads, Associate Deans within their program, Student Affairs or Student Services at Bannatyne Campus representatives, including Student Advocacy, according to personal comfort and preference. The “Speak Up” button can be utilized by Medical learners (currently under review for expansion to all Rady Faculty learners). Faculty members and staff may contact Human Resources or their union representatives. The University’s Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management is a resource available to all University members. If the matter involves a potential privacy breach, the Access and Privacy Office shall be notified in accordance with the Access and Privacy Policy.

4.16 The consequences of posting concerning Social Media is dependent upon the applicable University policy, bylaw, collective agreement, professional standard or legislation that may have been breached, as well as on the circumstances, on the seriousness of the breach, and any mitigating factors. The applicable policy or other governing document

should be referenced, however the following list provides examples of measures and is not meant to be exhaustive nor necessarily represents a progression of measures:

a) A letter of apology;

b) Attendance at educational session(s);

c) Attendance at coaching session(s);

d) Academic consequences such as remediation, probation, notation on the performance record, dismissal/expulsion from the Program/College/RFHS;

e) Termination of employment or academic appointment.


5. GUIDELINE CONTACT

Please contact the Director, Planning and Priorities or the Director, External Relations, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, with questions regarding this document.


6. APPROVAL

These guidelines were approved by the RFHS Dean’s Council on September 1, 2020.

Travel and Business Expense Guideline

Avenues to address professionalism

Learners - professionalism issues

Professional Unsuitability Bylaw (Program/College)

Jurisdiction: A program’s Professional Unsuitability Committee reviews and makes recommendations regarding the suitability of a learner for the program, and may require the learner to withdraw from the program. Please note: Not all programs have professional unsuitability bylaws, and therefore this avenue is not open to all programs.

Application: The following programs within the RFHS have a Professional Unsuitability Bylaw/Committee:

  • Bachelor of Nursing Program
  • Undergraduate Programs of the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry and School of Dental Hygiene
  • Doctor of Pharmacy Program
  • Bachelor of Midwifery Program
  • Masters of Occupational Therapy Program

Responsibility: The Program/College, through the Program’s Professional Unsuitability Committee.

Appeal: To the University of Manitoba’s Senate Appeals Committee.


Essential/Requisite Skills Policy / Bona Fide Academic Requirements (Program/College)

Jurisdiction: The document sets out the requisite skills and abilities for learners in the program, and may require a learner to withdraw from the program, if not meeting the requirements. Often, the requisite skills and abilities document has a requirement to conduct oneself in a professional manner and/or other professionalism requirements.

Application: The following programs have an Essentials/Requisite Skills policy/document or BFARs:

  • Applied Health Sciences
  • Bachelor of Midwifery Program
  • Bachelor of Nursing Program
  • Bachelor of Respiratory Therapy Program
  • Biochemistry and Medical Genetics
  • Community Health Sciences
  • Dental Hygiene Diploma Program
  • Doctor of Dental Medicine Program
  • Doctor of Pharmacy Program
  • Human Anatomy and Cell Science
  • Immunology
  • Masters in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
  • Masters of Nursing, Nurse Practitioner Program, PhD in Nursing
  • Masters of Occupational Therapy Program
  • Masters of Physical Therapy Program
  • Masters of Physician Assistants Program
  • Masters of Science Genetic Counselling
  • Masters of Science Pharmacy
  • Masters of Science Prosthodontic Program
  • Masters of Science Rehabilitation Sciences Program
  • Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
  • Oral Biology Program
  • Pathology Program
  • Pharmacology and Therapeutics
  • PhD Pharmacy
  • Physiology and Pathophysiology
  • Postgraduate Medical Education Program
  • Preventative Dental Sciences
  • Prosthodontics
  • Surgery
  • Undergraduate Medical Education Program

Responsibility: The Program is responsible to address any issues with requisite skills and abilities; this usually proceeds through the program to the Associate Dean, Director or Department Head responsible for the Program.

Appeal: Although not usually stated within the document, an appeal related to BFARs or Essential Skills would usually be considered an academic matter, and would go the Student Appeals Committee of the College or the Faculty of Graduate Studies. In some cases, the BFARs or Essential Skills of the program are referenced in matters that proceed through the “non-academic misconduct” route (see the Student Discipline Bylaw process below).


Student Discipline Bylaw (UM)

Jurisdiction: To address academic misconduct and non-academic misconduct of learners. Inappropriate or disruptive behaviour includes unprofessional conduct.

Application: To all learners at the University of Manitoba.

Responsibility: The responsibility for discipline depends on the misconduct, and ranges from academic staff responsibility to the President. Tables 1 and 2 of the Bylaw set out the jurisdiction of the disciplinary authority.

Appeal: Appeals proceed in accordance with the Bylaw Appeal Procedure. Final decisions of a College/Program would proceed to the RFHS Local Disciplinary Committee and then to the University Discipline Committee, which is the final level of appeal within the University.


Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (Professionalism Office, Max Rady College of Medicine, possible expansion to RFHS)

Jurisdiction: To consider any intentional or unintentional, disrespectful treatment of a learner, trainee, or colleague that has or may have the effect of creating an intimidating, humiliating, hostile or offensive work or learning environment for learners in that circumstance. In addition to addressing the processes under the Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (complaints via the Speak Up button/process and compliments via the Keep It Up Button), the Associate Dean, Professionalism/Professionalism Office also reviews and addresses learner mistreatment student surveys and end of rotation evaluations, all which feed into the same system (Entrada) for tracking. This allows a centralized system to track all information relating to learner mistreatment, and provides for a denominator in tracking all incidents of learner mistreatment and capturing the data where no mistreatment is reported (i.e. answering “no” to the question). Referrals are made to the OHRCM if the matters falls under the RWLE Policy. Consultations occur with affiliated clinical placement sites, on an as-needed basis.

Application: It currently applies across the Max Rady College of Medicine, however, the Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion is leading a Faculty-wide Learner Mistreatment working group to review Faculty-wide application.

Responsibility: The Associate Dean, Professionalism, Max Rady College of Medicine. Should Faculty-wide application of the policy occur, the query is whether this position/office should be made Faculty-wide to address matters under the policy, and, as well, whether the office would also be responsible for collecting/reviewing end-of-rotation evaluations and mistreatment surveys for all professional programs across the Faculty, captured through Entrada or another online system.

Appeal: The avenue of appeal is dependent on the action taken under the policy.


Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy (Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, UM)

Jurisdiction: To address complaints respecting discrimination, human-rights based harassment, personal harassment and sexual harassment.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: The Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, University of Manitoba.

Appeal: If the respondent is a learner, the appeal proceeds in accordance with the Student Discipline Bylaw and the Student Discipline Appeal Procedure.


Sexual Assault Policy (Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, UofM)

Jurisdiction: To address complaints respecting sexual assault/sexual violence.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: The Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, University of Manitoba.

Appeal: If the respondent is a learner, the appeal proceeds in accordance with the Student Discipline Bylaw and the Student Discipline Appeal Procedure.


Violent or Threatening Behaviour Policy (UM)

Jurisdiction: To establish a protocol for reporting and responding to issues of violence that occur with respect to University matters.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: University Security Services and Student/Staff Threat Assessment Triage Intervention Support team (STATIS), with review from the Vice-President (Administration).

Appeal: Where the individual is a student, the discipline will be implemented in accordance with the Student Discipline Bylaw and the Student Non-Academic Misconduct and Concerning Behaviour Procedure. Appeals proceed in accordance with the Bylaw Appeal Procedure. Final decisions of a College/Program would proceed to the RFHS Local Disciplinary Committee and then to the University Discipline Committee, which is the final level of appeal within the University.


Referral to Regulatory Body (if Learner is a Member)

Although not within University of Manitoba jurisdiction, a referral to the professional regulatory authority may be advisable or required, depending on the status of learners as members of the regulatory authority, and the particular reporting obligations of the regulatory authority.

Faculty or staff - professionalism issues

Collective Agreement Process (Labour Relations/Human Resources)

Jurisdiction: Faculty or staff that are part of a bargaining unit if there is a breach of their collective agreement. A breach is dependent on the specific wording in the collective agreement.

Application: To faculty or staff part of the collective agreement. Responsibility: Labour Relations/Human Resources, University of Manitoba.
Appeal: An appeal proceeds in accordance with the appropriate grievance process defined by the applicable collective agreement.

Human Resources Policy/Employment Standards (Human Resources)

Jurisdiction: Faculty or staff excluded from a bargaining unit, if there is a breach an employment agreement, human resources policy or employment standards law. A breach is dependent on the specific wording in the policy/employment law. Application: To faculty or staff of the University of Manitoba, excluded from a bargaining unit. Responsibility: Human Resources, University of Manitoba.

Appeal: An appeal mechanism is set out in The Appeals by Academic or Support Staff excluded from Bargaining Units Policy.

Responsibilities of Academic Staff with regard to Students Policy (UM)

Jurisdiction: To set out the responsibilities, and discharge of responsibilities, of Academic Staff with respect to students, including in their interactions with students.

Application: It applies to Academic Staff and Academic Administrators.

Responsibility: The Vice-Provost (Academic Affairs) is responsible for implementation of the policy. Appeal: It does not state what process applies should non-compliance occur.

Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (Professionalism Office, Max Rady College of Medicine, possible expansion to RFHS)
Jurisdiction: To consider any intentional or unintentional, disrespectful treatment of a learner, trainee, or colleague that has or may have the effect of creating an intimidating, humiliating, hostile or offensive work or learning environment for learners in that circumstance.

Application: It currently applies across the Max Rady College of Medicine, however, the Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion is leading a Faculty-wide Learner Mistreatment working group to review Faculty-wide application.

Responsibility: The Associate Dean, Professionalism, Max Rady College of Medicine. Should Faculty-wide application of the policy occur, the query is whether this position/office should be made Faculty-wide to address matters under the policy.

Appeal: The avenue of appeal is dependent on the action taken under the policy.


Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy (Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, UM)

Jurisdiction: To address complaints respecting discrimination, human-rights based harassment, personal harassment and sexual harassment.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, University of Manitoba.

Appeal: If the respondent is a member of a bargaining unit, an appeal proceeds in accordance with the appropriate grievance process defined by any applicable collective agreement. If the respondent is not a member of a bargaining unit, an appeal would proceed in accordance with The Appeals by Academic or Support Staff excluded from Bargaining Units Policy.


Sexual Assault Policy (Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, UM)

Jurisdiction: To address complaints respecting sexual assault/violence.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, University of Manitoba. There is a recently-opened Sexual Violence Resource Centre, but this is a resource/support centre.

Appeal: If the respondent is a member of a bargaining unit, an appeal proceeds in accordance with the appropriate grievance process defined by any applicable collective agreement. If the respondent is not a member of a bargaining unit, an appeal would proceed in accordance with The Appeals by Academic or Support Staff excluded from Bargaining Units Policy.


Violent or Threatening Behaviour Policy (UM)

Jurisdiction: To establish a protocol for reporting and responding to issues of violence that occur with respect to University matters.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: University Security Services and Student/Staff Threat Assessment Triage Intervention Support team (STATIS), with review from the Vice-President (Administration).

Appeal: Where the individual is an employee, the discipline would be implemented pursuant to and in accordance with applicable legislation, common law, collective agreements, and University policies, procedures and bylaws. An appeal would be pursuant to that mechanism.

Referral to Regulatory Body (if Faculty/Staff is a Member)
Although not within University of Manitoba jurisdiction, a referral to the applicable professional regulatory authority may be advisable or required, depending on the status of faculty/staff as members of a regulatory authority, and the particular reporting obligations of the regulatory authority.

Individuals outside university jurisdiction

Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (Professionalism Office, Max Rady College of Medicine, possible expansion to RFHS)

The Professionalism Office may receive a complaint through the policy that involves an individual outside of University jurisdiction (such as at a clinical learning site). The Associate Dean, Professionalism, will work with the CEO or delegate of that site to address the matter. In some cases, joint investigations occur.


Agreements with Individuals/Sites (e.g. Learner Placement Agreement; Independent Contractor Agreement; GFT Agreement)

Certain agreements may place professionalism responsibilities on individuals or entities. For example, the template learner placement agreement states that learners will be placed in a professional and safe work and learning environment. It also allows learners to be removed from a site. A professionalism issue could be addressed through this avenue.


Shared Health Joint Council / College Subcommittees

The Joint Council and its College Subcommittees are intended to be an avenue to address any professionalism issues against learners. This might involve members of a clinical learning site.

College of Nursing

Professional unsuitability by-law

Bylaw: Professional Unsuitability
Application: Students of the Bachelor of Nursing Program, College of Nursing
Review Date: 5 years from approval/revised date
Revised (Date): May 13, 2020
Approved By: College Council, College of Nursing: [April 29, 2020]
Senate: [June 24, 2020]

The purpose of this Bachelor of Nursing Program (“Program”) Professional Unsuitability Bylaw (“Bylaw”) is to set out the jurisdiction of the Program’s Professional Unsuitability Committee and procedures for professional unsuitability hearings. The purpose of the Professional Unsuitability Committee is to review and make recommendations regarding the suitability of a student for the Program.

For the purpose of this Bylaw, the “University” refers to the University of Manitoba.
For the purpose of this Bylaw, the “College” refers to the College of Nursing.

1.00 Jurisdiction

1.01 General
The College of Nursing may require a student to withdraw from the Program pursuant to the procedures set out in this By-Law when the student has been found unsuited, on consideration of competence or professional fitness, for the practice of nursing. A student may be required to withdraw at any time throughout the academic year or following the results of examinations at the end of any academic term. This right to require withdrawal prevails notwithstanding any other provision in the College's Rules or Regulations. The Canadian Nurses' Association Code of Ethics, as the ethical basis for nursing in Canada, will be considered in every situation in which an inquiry is being held into the conduct of a student in the practice of nursing. Furthermore, in accordance with provisions of the Manitoba Human Rights Code, the College’s duty to reasonably accommodate the special needs of its students will be considered. 

1.02 Grounds for Required Withdrawal
A student may be required to withdraw from the Program if the student has been found to be unsuitable for the practice of nursing, including without limitation, if the student has:

  • i. been found guilty of such conduct which, if participated in by a practicing registered nurse would result in suspension or expulsion of the practitioner from the practice of nursing or such other disciplinary actions available against a practitioner by the governing body of the profession;
  • ii. practiced incompetently in any clinical setting;
  • iii. jeopardized professional judgment through self-interest or a conflict of interest;
  • iv. demonstrated behaviour with respect to other students, colleagues, faculty or the public which is exploitive, irresponsible or destructive;
  • v. acquired a criminal conviction which according to the established College processes was determined to be of such a nature as to bring disrepute to the profession, or by which in the opinion of the College, the student demonstrated poor judgment, lack of integrity or (other) unsuitability for the profession;
  • vi. any health condition, the occurrence of which impairs essential performance required for the health profession;
  • vii. been under the influence of alcohol, cannabis products, legal or illegal drugs which impair client care, any other professional activity, or any activity related to the practice of the nursing profession;
  • vii. demonstrated unethical behaviour as specified by the Canadian Nurses’ Association Code of Ethics.

2.00 Professional Unsuitability Committee (PUC)

2.01 There shall be established within the College a standing committee known as the Professional Unsuitability Committee (PUC) to hear and determine matters of competence and/or professional fitness for the practice of nursing. 

Membership in the PUC shall be as follows:

Chair (non-voting, except in the case of tie): a tenured faculty member or instructor in a continuing appointment to be appointed by the Dean, College of Nursing for a five (5) year term, which may be renewable.

Committee Members:

  • i. three full time academic members of the College, elected by the Council of the College of Nursing, for a five (5) year term, which may be renewable;
  • ii. two students from the Bachelor of Nursing Program, College of Nursing; from either third year or fourth-year undergraduate and one graduate student, appointed by the respective student organizations, for a one (1) year term, which may be renewable; and
  • iii. one full time academic member of the University College of the North, appointed by the Dean, College of Nursing; and
  • iv. one representative of the Nursing Profession to be appointed by the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba (CRNM), preferably with experience in dealing with CRNM disciplinary matters, for a five (5) year term, which may be renewable.

3.00 Procedure

3.01 The Dean (or designate) shall:

i) refer matters, which in her/his opinion, involve conduct or circumstances described in Article 1.01 and 1.02 herein, to the PUC in a written report, setting out the name of the student involved, the alleged facts and the alleged ground(s) warranting withdrawal pursuant to section 1.01 and 1.02. In no circumstances will a referral be based solely on anonymous allegations or materials. Anonymous materials are defined as “authorship that has not been disclosed”.

ii) provide the PUC and student with the information which supports the request to assess, through a hearing, the student’s suitability for the profession of nursing. 

3.02 Upon receipt of a request for a hearing into a student’s suitability for the profession of nursing, the PUC shall:

i) send a Notice of Hearing to the named student pursuant to section 4.01 by registered mail to the last known address of the student as found on the College’s records. At the student’s request, additional information may be sent by regular mail, email or facsimile;

ii) consider whether just cause exists to suspend the student while the matter is being determined and if so, to issue an interim suspension to the student;

iii) at all times act expeditiously to complete the hearing;

iv) determine whether any of the grounds requiring withdrawal under section 1.01 and 1.02 exist at hearing of the matter pursuant to this By-Law; and

v) make a disposition in accordance with section 6.00 herein.

3.03 Once a request for a hearing has been made to the PUC, the proceedings may continue notwithstanding that the student has subsequently voluntarily withdrawn from the Program, or has refused to participate in the proceedings.


4.00 Notice to Students

4.01 The Chair of the PUC shall inform the student in writing, within five (5) working days of receipt of the request for a hearing, of the grounds for referral to the PUC, as well as the membership of the PUC and the date, time, and place for the hearing by the PUC of the matters set out in the referral.

4.02 The Notice from the Chair shall include a statement that if the allegations contained in the reference are established to the satisfaction of the PUC the student may be required to withdraw from the Program.

4.03 A faculty member shall not be disqualified from sitting as a member of the PUC hearing the matter by reason only that such faculty member has had previous contact with the student or has prior personal knowledge of the matter.

4.04 The student whose case is to be dealt with shall be permitted to challenge and thereby cause to be disqualified any member of the PUC. In such a case, the Chair would consider the grounds for the challenge and may replace the disqualified members pursuant to section 2.01.  An academic member of the Program shall not be disqualified from sitting as a member of the PUC hearing the matter by reason only that such academic member has had previous contact with the student or has prior personal knowledge of the matter.


5.00 Hearing Procedures

5.01 The student may provide a written response to the grounds.  Such written response should be provided to the PUC and the Dean (or designate) within five (5) working days of the hearing date, or at the discretion of the Chair.

5.02 In addition to the written information, the Dean (or designate) may provide the PUC and student with additional relevant information and or evidence that supports the grounds for a hearing within five (5) working days of the hearing date, or at the discretion of the Chair.

5.03 The student may appear in person and may choose to be represented by a Student Advocate provided through the University, legal or other counsel. A student may request an additional support person who may accompany him/her to the hearing.  This person will be considered an observer and will not be able to participate in the hearing process.

5.04 The Program and student may call relevant witnesses as needed. Written notice to each party of witnesses to be called by the other party shall be provided at least five (5) working days prior to the hearing date, or at the discretion of the Chair.

5.05 The hearing shall be closed to all persons except the members of the PUC, Program Representative, the student, the designated representative of the student, if any, and support person of the student, if any.

5.06 The student or her/his representative shall have the right to hear and to cross examine witnesses, to have access to copies of all documents submitted to the PUC for consideration at least five (5) working days prior to the hearing, to call witnesses and to submit other evidence.

5.07 The student shall not be required to give evidence but if the student elects to do so, then the student may be questioned by members of the PUC.

5.08 A quorum for the PUC shall be 4 members and the Chair as referred to in section 2.02 above.

5.09 A simple majority of the members hearing the matter is required for any finding or for the determination of the appropriate disposition of the matter.

5.10 The Chair of the PUC shall vote only to break a tie.

5.11 Members of the PUC shall be bound by confidentiality in respect of information received in Committee. Information will only be disclosed as is reasonably necessary to implement the investigation, the resolution or the terms of any disposition imposed, or as required by law.

5.12 The results of the hearing and the reasons therefore shall be conveyed in writing to the student, the Student Advocate, and/or the designated representative of the student where applicable, with copies to the Dean of the College of Nursing and the Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programs.

5.13 At the discretion of the Chair, hearings may be conducted in whole or in part via teleconference or other video/electronic means.

5.14 If the student is participating in a hearing via teleconference, the Chair may require the student to confirm that there are not recording devices present and only persons set out in section 5.03 are in attendance.

5.15 At the discretion of the Chair, hearings may be conducted at one of the three delivery sites of the Program (Winnipeg, The Pas, or Thompson) to allow the student to participate in person.


6.00 Disposition of the Matter

6.01 The PUC shall, after hearing all the evidence, meet in closed session with its members only, to:

i) consider the evidence;

ii) make its findings using a balance of probabilities standard;

iii) if the allegations are proven, determine the appropriate disposition of the matter;

iv) if the allegations are not proven, dismiss the matter and/or make any other recommendation the PUC deems appropriate.

6.02 The PUC may make any disposition it deems appropriate in the circumstances. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing the following options, alone or in combination, are available:

i) determine that no further action be taken;

ii) allow the student to remain in the program and attach conditions prescribing future conduct by the student. Such conditions to remain in effect for any period of time the PUC deems appropriate;

iii) reprimand the student in writing;

iv) suspend the student from the Program for a specified period of time;

v) require the student to withdraw from the Program, which withdrawal may attach conditions which must be fulfilled before any application for re-admission to the College can be considered;

vi) )expel the student from the Program with no right to apply for re-admission to the College.

6.03 In cases in which the disposition of the hearing is one of iv, v, or vi as set out in section 6.02, the results shall be conveyed in writing to the Registration Consultant, College of Nursing who shall make the appropriate notation in the student’s transcript.

6.04 The student may request the PUC to consider removal of the notation from the transcript.


7.00 Appeals

7.01 If the student wishes to appeal a disposition of the PUC, such appeal may be made to the Senate Appeals Committee in accordance with the procedures of that body.

7.02 In the event of an appeal, the implementation of any decision of the PUC may be suspended until the matter has been disposed of by the Senate Appeals Committee.

7.03 Notwithstanding the above, if the President of the University is satisfied that it is in the best interests of the University, the President may at any time make an order, subject to final disposition of the appropriate review authority, suspending the student from participating in any program of the University.


8.00 Records

8.01 A record of any finding of professional unsuitability and/or disposition related thereto shall be kept on the student’s academic file within the Program and as required by the University. All information relating to the hearing before the PUC shall be kept in the office of the Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programs.


9.00 Amendments

9.01 This By-Law may be amended by the University’s Senate, or by Senate after approval of such amendment(s) by College Council.
 
Approved by Senate: April 6, 2011
Revisions Approved by Senate: June 24, 2020

Student assessment

Undergraduate student assessment policy

Academic progression
Effective September 2013 for Bachelor of Nursing program students:

Students are required to obtain a minimum of “C” grade in every letter grade course, a “Pass” in every Pass/Fail course, and a Program GPA of 2.5 to graduate. A final grade of “D” or “F” in a letter grade course or “Fail” in a Pass/Fail course taken to complete the degree requirement is considered a failure.

Academic assessments will be based on student performance in letter grade courses. The Term Grade Point Average (TGPA) will be calculated at the conclusion of each academic term in which the student has completed a minimum of 6 credit hours. Students who do not complete the minimum credit hours in one term will be assessed as “too few credit hours to assess”. These students will be assessed over two terms or more at the end of the term in which they reach the threshold of 6 credit hours.

The final term of the Bachelor of Nursing Program (NURS 4290/NURS 4580) will be excluded from assessment providing the student meets graduation requirements. Students are required to have a minimum Program GPA of 2.5 to be eligible for graduation.

Good academic standing: a student with a TGPA of 2.5 or higher will be assessed "College Minimum Met".

Academic warning: the first time a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will receive an Academic Warning. Procedures:

  • Students who receive an academic warning will be given the option of remediation, and will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor at least once during the following term of study.

Academic probation: the second time that a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will be placed on Academic Probation. A formal remediation plan will be mandatory for students on academic probation. Procedures:

  • The remediation plan will be developed by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs) or designate with the active participation of the student.
  • The remediation plan will be based on an assessment of the student’s current academic status and identified learning needs.
  • The student may be required to repeat selected Nursing courses.
  • The student may be required to repeat or register for the first time in selected non-Nursing courses (not elective courses). For example, students may be required or permitted to take or repeat select Statistics, Nutrition, or Native Studies course(s) from years 2 or 3.
  • If any courses are repeated, the student will be subject to all academic regulations related to final grades in repeated courses and the number of failures allowed in any given course or sequence of courses in the Bachelor of Nursing Program.
  • Students will be allowed to register in courses that they are required to repeat after students who are taking the course for the first time have had the opportunity to register and availability of space in the course can be confirmed.
  • The student will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor at least twice during the following term of study.
  • Students on probation will not be permitted to register in any new nursing courses until they are removed from probation.
  • If there are non-academic issues interfering with the student’s academic progress, the student will be required to make every effort to deal with and resolve those issues during the period of academic probation.
  • Where indicated, a student will be referred to the student services unit for information and guidance. Any student subsequently registered with Student Accessibility Services and requiring accommodation by the College of Nursing will be referred to the College of Nursing Accommodation Team.

Academic suspension: The third time that a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will be placed on Suspension. Students who are suspended shall be ineligible to take any courses at the University of Manitoba or on a letter of permission for a minimum of eight and a maximum of 15 calendar months. Procedures:

  • The time period for the suspension actually served by the student is contingent on the program timetable and course availability.
  • Students who wish to continue their studies in the Bachelor of Nursing Program must submit a written application for reinstatement to the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs) by May 1 of each calendar year.
    • The written application must specifically address the academic and non-academic issues that had affected their academic standing prior to their academic suspension and describe how these issues have been addressed and/or resolved. This information should include, at a minimum:
      • An outline of what they have been doing during their time away from Nursing (e.g., developing good study habits, attending counseling, etc.);
      • An explanation of what has changed to make it more likely that they will be successful, and their plan for success if reinstated; and
      • An academic plan for the rest of their program.
  • The College of Nursing will consider each request on a case by case basis and reserves the right to deny a student’s request for reinstatement.
  • Students who are reinstated or who are actively under consideration for reinstatement will be subject to the following procedures with respect to their course registrations:
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Fall Term (January) will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1 of the same year in which they were suspended;
      • Be given a final decision by May 15;
      • Register for courses during the College’s registration period; and
      • Proceed to course work in Fall term subject to space availability.
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Winter Term (May) will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1 of the following year;
      • Be given a provisional decision by May 15;
      • Register for Fall term courses during the College’s registration period; and
      • Proceed to course work in Fall term subject to space availability.
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Summer Term will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1;
      • Be given a provisional decision by May 15
      • Register for summer term, or the subsequent Fall term, courses during the College’s registration periods; and
      • Proceed to course work in summer term subject to course/space availability.
    • Students who do not apply for reinstatement by this deadline will be considered as having withdrawn from the College of Nursing and will not be permitted to return.
    • Students who are permitted to return from suspension will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor to plan their program.

Required to withdraw: students who have been permitted to return from Suspension and whose TGPA drops below 2.5 a fourth time will be Required to Withdraw. Students who are Required to Withdraw are ineligible for re-admission to the College of Nursing.

Student assessment

Undergraduate student assessment policy

Academic progression
Effective September 2013 for Bachelor of Nursing program students:

Students are required to obtain a minimum of “C” grade in every letter grade course, a “Pass” in every Pass/Fail course, and a Program GPA of 2.5 to graduate. A final grade of “D” or “F” in a letter grade course or “Fail” in a Pass/Fail course taken to complete the degree requirement is considered a failure.

Academic assessments will be based on student performance in letter grade courses. The Term Grade Point Average (TGPA) will be calculated at the conclusion of each academic term in which the student has completed a minimum of 6 credit hours. Students who do not complete the minimum credit hours in one term will be assessed as “too few credit hours to assess”. These students will be assessed over two terms or more at the end of the term in which they reach the threshold of 6 credit hours.

The final term of the Bachelor of Nursing Program (NURS 4290/NURS 4580) will be excluded from assessment providing the student meets graduation requirements. Students are required to have a minimum Program GPA of 2.5 to be eligible for graduation.

Good academic standing: a student with a TGPA of 2.5 or higher will be assessed "College Minimum Met".

Academic warning: the first time a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will receive an Academic Warning. Procedures:

  • Students who receive an academic warning will be given the option of remediation, and will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor at least once during the following term of study.

Academic probation: the second time that a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will be placed on Academic Probation. A formal remediation plan will be mandatory for students on academic probation. Procedures:

  • The remediation plan will be developed by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs) or designate with the active participation of the student.
  • The remediation plan will be based on an assessment of the student’s current academic status and identified learning needs.
  • The student may be required to repeat selected Nursing courses.
  • The student may be required to repeat or register for the first time in selected non-Nursing courses (not elective courses). For example, students may be required or permitted to take or repeat select Statistics, Nutrition, or Native Studies course(s) from years 2 or 3.
  • If any courses are repeated, the student will be subject to all academic regulations related to final grades in repeated courses and the number of failures allowed in any given course or sequence of courses in the Bachelor of Nursing Program.
  • Students will be allowed to register in courses that they are required to repeat after students who are taking the course for the first time have had the opportunity to register and availability of space in the course can be confirmed.
  • The student will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor at least twice during the following term of study.
  • Students on probation will not be permitted to register in any new nursing courses until they are removed from probation.
  • If there are non-academic issues interfering with the student’s academic progress, the student will be required to make every effort to deal with and resolve those issues during the period of academic probation.
  • Where indicated, a student will be referred to the student services unit for information and guidance. Any student subsequently registered with Student Accessibility Services and requiring accommodation by the College of Nursing will be referred to the College of Nursing Accommodation Team.

Academic suspension: The third time that a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will be placed on Suspension. Students who are suspended shall be ineligible to take any courses at the University of Manitoba or on a letter of permission for a minimum of eight and a maximum of 15 calendar months. Procedures:

  • The time period for the suspension actually served by the student is contingent on the program timetable and course availability.
  • Students who wish to continue their studies in the Bachelor of Nursing Program must submit a written application for reinstatement to the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs) by May 1 of each calendar year.
    • The written application must specifically address the academic and non-academic issues that had affected their academic standing prior to their academic suspension and describe how these issues have been addressed and/or resolved. This information should include, at a minimum:
      • An outline of what they have been doing during their time away from Nursing (e.g., developing good study habits, attending counseling, etc.);
      • An explanation of what has changed to make it more likely that they will be successful, and their plan for success if reinstated; and
      • An academic plan for the rest of their program.
  • The College of Nursing will consider each request on a case by case basis and reserves the right to deny a student’s request for reinstatement.
  • Students who are reinstated or who are actively under consideration for reinstatement will be subject to the following procedures with respect to their course registrations:
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Fall Term (January) will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1 of the same year in which they were suspended;
      • Be given a final decision by May 15;
      • Register for courses during the College’s registration period; and
      • Proceed to course work in Fall term subject to space availability.
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Winter Term (May) will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1 of the following year;
      • Be given a provisional decision by May 15;
      • Register for Fall term courses during the College’s registration period; and
      • Proceed to course work in Fall term subject to space availability.
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Summer Term will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1;
      • Be given a provisional decision by May 15
      • Register for summer term, or the subsequent Fall term, courses during the College’s registration periods; and
      • Proceed to course work in summer term subject to course/space availability.
    • Students who do not apply for reinstatement by this deadline will be considered as having withdrawn from the College of Nursing and will not be permitted to return.
    • Students who are permitted to return from suspension will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor to plan their program.

Required to withdraw: students who have been permitted to return from Suspension and whose TGPA drops below 2.5 a fourth time will be Required to Withdraw. Students who are Required to Withdraw are ineligible for re-admission to the College of Nursing.

Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry

Policy on Student Attendance in the DMD program

This Policy is intended to govern and guide decisions regarding Student Attendance in the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, University of Manitoba.

1.0 Background

The University of Manitoba Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry has a social mandate to ensure that graduating dentists are caring, skilled healthcare providers who are worthy of the public trust endowed upon them.

To fulfill this mandate, the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry has developed comprehensive programs of education and experience.

Collectively, we refer to these programs as Dental School.

Unlike non-professional education programs, where students can pick and choose their education and experiences based on personal preferences, Dental School requires students to attend and participate actively in all components of the program.

While students are required to complete assignments and pass examinations, these are not considered to be equivalent to attending Dental School.

When the University confers the DMD degree, it attests to society not only that the student has shown successful examination performance, but that the student has participated in the entire educational experience defined by the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry and has thereby demonstrated an appropriate level of professional learning and responsibility.

2.0 Statement of Policy

Students at the University of Manitoba, Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, are required to attend, and be on time for, all scheduled classes, seminars, examinations, small group sessions, laboratories, pre-clinical labs, and clinics.

Students arriving more than 10-minutes late will be recorded as absent.

Students who do not comply with the Student Attendance Policy will face academic consequences, including, but not limited to:

  • Reduced course grades
  • Debarment from class, pre-clinical lab, clinic, and/or from final examination(s)
  • Debarment from receiving academic credit for the course
  • Requirement to repeat a course or year in the program.

3.0 Statement of Procedures

3.1       Attendance

While student attendance in all scheduled educational experiences is mandatory, monitoring of student attendance in classes and pre-clinical labs is optional and left to the discretion of each Course Coordinator.

Academic consequences for non-attendance may apply in those courses that track student attendance, as detailed in the respective Course Outline.

Tracking of student attendance in scheduled clinics will be performed by the Dean’s Office through use of Axium ‘swipes.’ Information about student attendance in clinic will be communicated regularly with Course Coordinators, who are responsible for following-up with individual students.

Tracking of student attendance in classes and preclinical labs will be performed by the Course Coordinator in each course.

Tracking mechanisms may include I-clicker questions, D2L attendance questions, and/or paper sign-in sheets.

The University of Manitoba welcomes all faiths and beliefs.

As such, the decision regarding absence from class/labs/clinics on religious holidays is left to the individual.

Absences due to religious observance will not contribute to any academic consequence for the student.

Each student is responsible for notifying the College of religious observance dates.

Failure to provide notice will result in the student being classified as absent.

Similarly, special consideration will be given for situations of longer-term student absence due to illness, medical care, or other unavoidable circumstances (see 3.3 below).

3.2       Consequences of Non-attendance

3.2.1    Ideal Attendance:

The target for all students is 100% attendance; the College will consider all students who have achieved this target to have demonstrated an ideal level of professional commitment and responsibility within the dentistry program, and within each course of the program.

3.2.2    Expected Attendance:

Students are allowed a few days absence, up to 5% of the scheduled course sessions, for illness or other non-avoidable reasons, without incurring academic penalty.

The College considers this level of non-attendance to fully meet professional commitments and responsibility within the dentistry program.

For comparison, Manitoba Employment Standards allow 6 unpaid days (3% of available work days) each year for illness, bereavement, and attending to family responsibilities.

3.2.3    Below Expected Attendance:

Student absenteeism beyond 5% of the scheduled course sessions represents what the College will consider to be below expected levels of professional commitment and responsibility with regard to attendance.

Progressive academic consequences, in the form of reduced course grades, will be applied to reflect the degree of non-attendance.

Clinic Attendance:

Students will lose 1% of the course mark for every 1% decrease in clinic attendance; to a maximum of 10% of the course grade (see Table 1 below).

Class/Lab Attendance:

Monitoring of student attendance in class/lab is optional, and left to the discretion of the Course Coordinator.

For courses opting to monitor student attendance, the course-specific academic consequences for non-attendance will be detailed in the Course Outline.

The maximum academic penalty for non-attendance is 10%.

3.2.4    Unacceptable Attendance:

The minimum acceptable level of attendance is 85% for each course in the dentistry program.

Course Coordinators or the Associate Dean (Academic) can initiate procedures to debar a student from attending class, pre-clinical labs, clinics, or from final examinations, when the absences for that student exceed 15% of the available academic time in a course.

When notified of a course attendance problem, the Associate Dean (Academic) will call, and give notice to the student, of a Disciplinary Hearing to investigate the issue under the U of M Student Discipline Bylaw.

If it is determined that the student is in breach of this Student Attendance Policy, then debarment from class, pre-clinical lab, clinic, and/or from final examination(s) is possible.

In addition to the above ‘course-level’ academic consequences, students found to be in breach of this Student Attendance Policy, with absenteeism exceeding 15% of the available academic time in a course, may be debarred from receiving academic credit for the course and be required to repeat the course or year in the program.

Table 1: Academic consequences for clinical non-attendance

Attendance (of scheduled clinics)

Academic Consequences

95-100%

No penalty

94%

1% penalty

93%

2% penalty

92%

3% penalty

91%

4% penalty

90%

5% penalty

89%

6% penalty

88%

7% penalty

87%

8% penalty

86%

9% penalty

85%

10% penalty

<85%

Debarment

3.3       Special consideration for extended illness/medical care

Students are allowed a reasonable number of absences due to illness or for compassionate reasons before incurring academic consequences (see 3.2 above).

In cases of longer-term (greater than 3 days) illness, or other extended or recurring absence, students can submit a formal written request to the Associate Dean (Academic) detailing the reasons why special consideration should be given for the student’s attendance.

The Associate Dean (Academic) will decide whether or not normal academic consequences should apply.

These requests will normally require a signed physician's certificate or other external documentation of the reason for non-attendance.

Academic consequences will normally be waived for extended absence for unavoidable, documented illness, healthcare, and compassionate reasons.

3.4       Absence from Clinics with Booked Patients

The Dentistry Program includes some clinics where students book their own patients, and some clinics where College staff book patients for the students.

The latter includes the Pediatric Dentistry, Orthodontic, 4th year General Practice, Urgent Care, Oral Surgery, Oral Sleep Medicine, TMD, and Community Externship rotation clinics.

The convenience of having patients booked by College staff brings an additional professional responsibility regarding absence on these clinic days.

Absence without notification on these dates would result in harm to the patient (abandonment, lost time from work), inconvenience to staff and fellow students, and harm to the reputation of the College and University.

On days when a student will be absent from a clinic with booked patients, including days of unexpected illness in the morning, the student is required to report the absence to the Faculty prior to the scheduled patient appointment time.

For student convenience, all contact regarding absence should be directed to the Student Services Office at (204) 480-1355 or by email to absent@umanitoba.ca.

When notified that a student is absent without notice from a clinic with booked patients, the Associate Dean (Academic) will call, and give notice to the student, of a Disciplinary Hearing to investigate the issue under the Student Discipline Bylaw, or the Professional Unsuitability Bylaw for repeated offenses.

If it is determined that the student is in breach of this Student Attendance Policy, then more serious academic consequences, including suspension or expulsion is possible.

For details of possible consequences see http://umanitoba.ca/admin/governance/media/Student_Discipline_Bylaw_-_Table_2.pdf and http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/dentistry/media/Dentistry_Professional_Unsuitability_Bylaw.pdf .

3.5       Examinations

Students are required to attend all scheduled examinations.

A student who is prevented from attending any regular examination, by reason of illness or other cause beyond his or her control, must at once notify the College prior to the start of the examination, and give satisfactory evidence of the cause of absence.

Students failing to provide prior notice and satisfactory evidence will receive a mark of zero (“0”) on the missed examination.

If the absence was necessary by reason of illness, then the student MUST provide a physician’s certificate to avoid a mark of zero (“0”).

The College reserves the right to require the physician’s note to be from a University of Manitoba Health Service Clinic, and to confirm the validity of any submitted physician’s certificate.

3.5       Communication of the Policy

The Policy will be reviewed with students each year during the orientation period.

4.0 University and College Expectations

The above stated Policy and Procedures are designed to govern and guide decisions regarding student attendance in the DMD program at the Dr.

Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry , and are complementary and supportive to the following University of Manitoba Policy on Attendance and Withdrawal excerpted from the 2013-2014 Undergraduate Calendar, available at http://crscalprod1.cc.umanitoba.ca/Catalog/ViewCatalog.aspx?pageid=viewcatalog&catalogid=240&chapterid=2310&topicgroupid=14502

Attendance and Withdrawal

1. Attendance at Class and Debarment

Regular attendance is expected of all students in all courses.

An instructor may initiate procedures to debar a student from attending classes and from final examinations and/or from receiving credit where unexcused absences exceed those permitted by the faculty or school regulations.

A student may be debarred from class, laboratories, and examinations by action of the dean/director for persistent non-attendance, failure to produce assignments to the satisfaction of the instructor, and/or unsafe clinical practice or practicum.

Students so debarred will have failed that course.

Max Rady College of Medicine

School of Dental Hygiene

Accommodation for Undergraduate Dental Hygiene Students with Disabilities

Preamble

The term "disability" is used to summarize a great number of different functional limitations and activity restrictions.

It is identified that people may be disabled by physical, intellectual or sensory impairment, medical conditions or mental illness, and that these may be permanent or transitory in nature.

The Manitoba Human Rights Code identifies that all individuals be accorded equality of opportunity, and that reasonable accommodation be made for those with special needs.

The University of Manitoba is committed to facilitating the integration of students with disabilities into the University community through to reasonable accommodation of the needs of persons with documented disabilities by making efforts to create a barrier-free campus and provide other supports and services within the limits of available resources.

The University will endeavor to meet the identified needs of each student by adapting services, courses, and programs as feasible, and as resources allow, while maintaining appropriate academic standards.

The University expects that the responsibility for making reasonable accommodations will be shared by the students, instructors and support staff.

Within the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene, each student with a disability is entitled to reasonable accommodation that will assist her or him to meet academic as well as technical standards; the technical standards are identified in a policy entitled Essential Skills and Abilities for Admission, Promotion and Graduation in the Dip. (Dent. Hyg.) Program.

Accommodation for Students with Disabilities

Dissemination of this Policy: This policy and the document entitled Essential Skills and Abilities for Admission, Promotion and Graduation in the Dental Hygiene Program are posted on the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene website: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/dentistry/dentalhygiene/future/index.html.

Both documents are consistent with the University of Manitoba policy entitled Accessibility for Students with Disabilities.

Students are informed of the procedures to request accommodation for disabilities via orientation sessions organized just prior to classes for in-coming students and through an e-mail sent to all students at the beginning of each academic year.

Pre-application Information: The admissions information posted on the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene website: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/dentistry/dentalhygiene/future/index.html will contain the statement:

“Students concerned about the extent to which they meet the technical standards as outlined in the policy entitled Essential Skills and Abilities for Admission, Promotion and Graduation in the Dip.

(Dent. Hyg.) Program, with or without accommodation, are advised to contact the Director for the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene.”

Pre-application advice that is given to students will be confidential and independent of the admissions process, any records generated in this regard shall be retained independently from a student’s application file, and if applicable, the student’s academic record of the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene.

Accommodation Committee: An Accommodation Committee of the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry will be established to oversee the process of integrating students with disabilities who meet the technical standards as identified in the document entitled Essential Skills and Abilities (Technical Standards) for Admission, Promotion and Graduation in the Dental Hygiene Program.

The Accommodation Committee will be chaired by the Director, School of Dental Hygiene or designate, and membership will include the Coordinator of the University of Manitoba Student Accessibility ServicesStudent Accessibility Services or designate, and two full-time Faculty members drawn from the School of Dental Hygiene or from a clinical Department in Dentistry.

The Accommodation Committee may elect to consult with other individuals who may include: other members of Faculty who may be directly involved with specific components of the program and/or student; legal counsel; the Registrar of the College of Dental Hygienists of Manitoba, or designate; and others as deemed appropriate by the Committee.

The Accommodation Committee shall correspond with the Chair, Committee for Selection in Dental Hygiene, and/or the Associate Dean (Academic) as dictated by the circumstances of individual students.

The Accommodation Committee shall submit an annual report of the Committee’s work to Dental Faculty Council Executive.

Student Responsibilities: It is the student’s responsibility to self-identify to the Chair of the Accommodation Committee in a timely proactive fashion.

Where possible, students are requested to declare their needs to Student Accessibility Services at the time of application, or upon admission, or as soon as possible before registration.

Accommodations cannot be made retroactive to an examination or clinical evaluation.

Use of an Intermediary: There are a few circumstances in which an intermediary may be appropriate.

However, no disability can be accommodated if the intermediary has to provide cognitive support, substitute for cognitive skills, perform a physical examination and/or in any way supplement clinical and ethical judgment.

The appropriateness of an intermediary will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Confidentiality

Confidential records of all information regarding accommodation will be placed in the student's file and kept secured in Student Accessibility Services Office.

The nature of the disability, the nature of the accommodation, the dates of implementation, as well as any subsequent modification to the original accommodation will be kept on file.

This information will not be placed in, nor form any part of the student's academic file.

Students will be informed that in order for a requested accommodation to be implemented it may be necessary to share relevant information on a need to know, confidential basis with individuals involved in providing the accommodation (e.g., faculty, clinical supervisors, physical plant, etc.) The specific logistical requests for accommodation will be forwarded to those responsible for facilitating them; disclosure of the nature of the disability may be required.

Students must consent in writing to this degree of communication in order to permit the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene to meet their needs.

Procedures

Preadmission: No inquiries regarding an applicant student’s disability shall be made by individuals involved in the admissions process.

Students who meet the technical standards but may require accommodation for the admissions process or degree program can direct requests for information about reasonable accommodation to the Director for the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene, or Student Accessibility Services.

Such requests are kept independent from a student’s admission file.

Application process: An applicant with a disability may request accommodation for the application process.

The request shall be directed to the Chair of the Accommodation Committee, or Student Accessibility Services.

Newly registered students: A student who gains acceptance to the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene may direct a request for reasonable accommodation for disability to the Chair of the Accommodation Committee, or Student Accessibility Services.

The student requesting the accommodation is responsible for providing Student Accessibility Services with medical documentation to establish that the student has a disability, such that recommendations for accommodation may be determined to be appropriate for the student’s condition.

If the disability is not documented or if the medical or other relevant documentation is not current or complete, the student may be directed to Student Accessibility Services of the University of Manitoba for a preliminary assessment.

The student will then be directed by the Student Accessibility Services office to the appropriate professional for an assessment and for accommodation recommendations.

If there is a delay in acquiring a comprehensive assessment, the Accommodation Committee will meet to develop an interim plan.

The Accommodation Committee will meet with the student to discuss the accommodation plan.

The Accommodation Committee will contact the appropriate persons to facilitate the recommendations.

The Committee will ensure that appropriate individualized accommodation is implemented proactively as the student moves through the Dip. (Dent. Hyg.) Program.

The individual plan will be reviewed as frequently as required as the student progresses through the curriculum, and upon request by the student.

Plans will be reviewed by the Committee to determine whether further accommodation is reasonable in the case of a student who does not progress as expected.

Students in their course of study: Should a student become aware of a disability, or acquire an impairment, condition, or illness during their undergraduate dental education program, the student may direct a request for accommodation for disability to the Chair of the Accommodation Committee, or Student Accessibility Services.

Processes will be invoked as identified above.

Accommodation for disability if required and approved shall be prospective, not retroactive.

Should reasonable accommodation for disability be unsuccessful in assisting the student in attaining the requisite skills and abilities, the student may be requested to withdraw from the dental hygiene program.

Students seeking readmission: Policies and processes regarding students seeking readmission shall be the same as identified above.

Appeals

A student who disagrees with the recommendations of the Accommodation Committee should in the first instance address his/her concerns with the Accommodation Committee.

A student has the right to appeal through the standard appeal process within the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene.

The student may appeal a judgment to the relevant appeal committee of the University of Manitoba.

Students are encouraged to consult with the Student Advocacy office for information and assistance about the appeal processes.

For information about Respectful Work and Learning Environment policy, students are encouraged to contact Equity Services.

Document Review

The Accommodation Committee will review this policy biannually.

This policy document is adapted from the Max Rady College of Medicine policy document entitled Accommodation for Undergraduate Medical Students with Disabilities.

That document was adapted with permission from the policy document entitled Implementation Policy: Students with Disabilities in the MD Program, approved in 2007 by the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, and is influenced by the AAMC document entitled Medical Students with Disabilities: A Generation of Practice, published June, 2005.

Reference may be made to the University of Manitoba Policy entitled Accessibility for Students with Disabilities.