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Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

Attire and dress code guidelines

1. PURPOSE

Because of innumerable appropriate dress choices, attire guidelines /dress code can be difficult to concisely define. This guideline is intended to provide general principles to be considered for attire (including personal grooming decisions) for staff, faculty members, and learners within the RFHS and its Colleges, to ensure safe learning and work environments, and is intended to respect equity, diversity and promotion of inclusion.


2. GUIDELINES

2.1 Staff, faculty members and learners have the right to express themselves, including in decisions about attire, along with a shared responsibility to maintain respectful, safe and positive learning and working environments.

2.2 Attire should be respectful of a community that is anti-oppressive, equitable, accepting and inclusive of a diverse range of social and cultural identities. Dress shall not promote offensive, harassing, hostile or intimidating environments.

2.3 Discretion and good judgment should be exercised in attire, taking into consideration:

  • The safe performance of work or learning duties, so that dress does not interfere with health or safety requirements for the intended activity;
  • The specific work or learning environment, ensuring that attire is appropriate to the environment;
  • Interactions with clients, business contacts, learners, faculty members and staff;
  • The importance of reducing the risk of spreading pathogens from person-to-person.

2.4 Scented products should be avoided, recognizing that some individuals have allergies and/or are sensitive to certain chemicals in scented products. Fragrances and other scented hygiene products shall not be used/worn in designated scent free zones. In areas that are not designated scent free zones, fragrances and scented hygiene products shall be used/worn in moderation and shall abide by any directions received in regard to the limitation or use of products with scents and/or fragrances to accommodate those with scent and/or fragrance allergies.

2.5 This guideline is not intended to replace more detailed College or Program-specific policies, such as learner attire in clinical settings. Please reference applicable college- or program-specific policies or guidelines.

2.6 Should there be an issue identified respecting an individual’s attire, please contact the appropriate manager, Human Resources, or learner authority (program director, associate dean, etc.) for consultation and direction. Enforcement of individual attire or dress code requirements should not reinforce or increase marginalization or oppression of any individual or group based on any of the personal characteristics as set out in the Human Rights Code (Manitoba). The Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management may also be consulted.


3 REFERENCES

3.1 The Human Rights code (Manitoba) C.C.S.M. c. H175

3.2 The Respectful Workplace and Learning Environment Policy, University of Manitoba


4. GUIDELINE CONTACT

Please contact the Director, Planning & Priorities, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, with questions regarding this document.


5. APPROVAL

These guidelines were approved by the RFHS Dean’s Council on April 28, 2020.

Booking Clinical Learning and Simulation Program (CLSP) resources

Policy Name:

Booking CLSP Resources

Policy Number:

SIM - 5001

Application/Scope:

All Rooms / Resources booked through the Clinical Learning and Simulation Program

Approved (Date):

April 28, 2020

Review Date:

Five (5) years from the approval date

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

Dean’s Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

BACKGROUND

The Clinical Learning and Simulation Program (CLSP) is a shared Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (RFHS) and Winnipeg Regional Health Authority resource that provides simulation-based education space, equipment, supplies and expertise to a vast array of learner groups. The CLSP currently manages bookings for simulation space, related staff, equipment and supplies. In addition, the CLSP also manages bookings to support mobile (in-situ) simulations and also provides equipment and supply loans for offsite use. The volume of use in the CLSP often strains the capacity to provide these services. Due to the volume of requests submitted to the CLSP, it is not always possible to provide all users with their first choice of resource bookings.


1. PURPOSE

To ensure fair and equitable booking of CLSP Resources available to User Groups, and to effectively manage the availability of resources including equipment and teaching space in the CLSP.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Booking Coordinator - means a staff member from the CLSP responsible for receiving, acknowledging and confirming bookings. 

2.2 CLSP Resources - include the simulation staff, faculty, space, supplies and equipment.

2.3  Formative Learning – means learning activities/experiences designed to assist participants in obtaining the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for developing intraprofessional and interprofessional healthcare competencies.

2.4 Formative Assessment – means assessments conducted during the learning process and prior to summative assessments. These assessments are used to determine whether objectives have been achieved, ascertain if gaps in learning still exist, and assess readiness to provide patient care in the clinical setting. After formative assessments, debrief with feedback should be provided and, if gaps were identified, an action plan developed jointly between the educator and learner.

2.5 Longitudinal Curriculum – means curricula made up of multiple elements that must occur in a predetermined sequence within a tightly circumscribed time frame.

2.6 Summative Assessment – means assessments conducted that are integrated into curricula at specific times to objectively validate achievement of a preset level of competence.

2.7 User Groups – means users identified through CLSP as authorized to access CLSP Resources.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Guiding Principles: The following principles shall guide the allocation of CLSP Resources:

a. Transparency: Every attempt will be made by the CLSP to be as transparent as possible with User Groups regarding how decisions are made with respect to accepting one booking over another and/or declining booking requests;

b. Efficiency: Given the finite resources available and at times high demand, the CLSP will attempt to maximize the use of space and resources including sharing space and/or other resources between User Groups where it makes sense or is feasible;

c. Prioritization: Space and resource allocation will be prioritized based on the type of activity being booked, not the User Group making the booking request. Please see the exception for the space in 204 Brodie as outlined in 3.3.

d. Confirmation: Once a booking is confirmed by the CLSP, User Groups should have a reasonable expectation that their booking(s) will not be cancelled or altered due to another User Group having a higher priority activity;

e. Collaboration: The CLSP will work collaboratively with User Groups to resolve conflicts in booking requests. Session organizers may be asked to provide alternate dates in order to accommodate a request from another session organizer whose priority level may not rank higher, but whose options to provide alternate dates are limited. 

3.2 Annual Booking Cycle: Due to the extensive array of User Groups, and the need to have concrete dates for many curricula well in advance, the CLSP employs an Annual Booking Cycle. The Annual Booking Cycle runs from August 1st through to July 31st.

Upcoming Booking Cycle:

  • The deadline for requests for sessions for the upcoming booking cycle (between August 1st through to July 31st of the upcoming year), is March 1st of the current booking cycle.
  • All booking requests received prior to the March 1st deadline will be considered based on the prioritization process outlined below. Bookings are prioritized, conflicts identified, resolved, and/or adjudicated and confirmations sent via email on or shortly after April 1st of the current booking cycle.
  • Requests for sessions in the upcoming booking cycle that missed the March 1st deadline will be accommodated to the best of the CLSP’s ability, but subject to resource availability.

Current Booking Cycle:

Requests for sessions to occur between August 1 to July 31 of the current booking cycle will be processed and responded to within 10 business days.

Confirmation of Bookings before the Regular Notification Process:

In exceptional circumstances, a User Group may request confirmation of a booking in the upcoming booking cycle ahead of the notification process noted above (i.e. a request for confirmation of a booking in the upcoming booking cycle prior to April 1st of the current booking cycle). Such confirmation will only be considered in exceptional circumstances and requires approval of the CLSP Director. 

3.3 Priority Levels:

For conflicts among booking requests, attempts will be made to reach a mutually satisfactory solution. However, in the event of the inability to reach a solution, the following criteria will be used as a guide to determine priority. The list below is arranged in descending order of priority. User Groups higher in the list will be given priority, on the condition that the function has been booked prior to the March 1st deadline during the Annual Booking Cycle. Final decisions regarding booking prioritization will be at the discretion of the CLSP Director.

Note: The College of Pharmacy will be given priority for booking the CLSP space in 204

Brodie as that space was developed to implement and support the PharmD program. The priority of use for other CLSP spaces will be based on the function of the space or type of activity for which the space is being booked, using the following as a guide (in order of priority):

  • Activities such as conferences, courses or national licensing/qualifying exams whose dates are set externally, often well in advance, and whereby the University Manitoba has entered into a formal agreement to support the activity. 
  • University of Manitoba RFHS Exams or Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) whereby successful completion is required for advancement (i.e. summative assessments), whose dates are limited due to the sequential nature of learning. Justification will be required from the unit head for all such events where alternate dates cannot be provided.
  • Sessions that are part of a RFHS Longitudinal Curriculum whose objectives require use of simulation resources not available outside of the CLSP, whose dates are limited due to the sequential nature of learning. Justification will be required from the unit head for all such events where alternate dates cannot be provided.
  • OSCE used for advancement (i.e.) summative assessments).
  • OSCE not used for advancement (i.e.) Formative Assessments).
  • Sessions that are not part of a Longitudinal Curriculum whose objectives require use of simulation resources not available outside of the CLSP.
  • Setup time for any of the above events.
  • Sessions that potentially could be accommodated in other settings but would be better served in the CLSP.
  • Other uses (tours, etc.).

3.4 Dispute Adjudication: In the event that a conflict arises that is not resolvable within the above process, the matter will be referred to the CLSP Manager and/or CLSP Director. Final decisions regarding booking prioritization will be at the discretion of the CLSP Director.

3.5 Declined Bookings: The CLSP does not commit to running all events requested, and the decision as to whether or not to host an event will be at the discretion of the CLSP Manager and/or CLSP Director. In such circumstances the reasons for declining the booking will be clearly communicated in writing to the requesting User Group.

3.6 After Hours and Weekend Bookings: As the regular operating hours for the CLSP are from 8:00AM to 4:00PM Monday to Friday, bookings within these hours are preferred. The CLSP will be closed according to the schedule of Holiday Closures posted on the Human Resources website, University of Manitoba. After hours and weekend bookings will be considered within the context of budget for overtime, overall staff work hours, and resource availability (both human and physical resources) and ultimately are at the discretion of the CLSP Manager and CLSP Director.


4. PROCEDURE STATEMENTS

4.1 All requests for booking CLSP Resources (including but not limited to simulation-based activities, exams and tours) must be done by completing the online booking request form. 
 
4.2 All reservations must be reserved for the actual time and space needed for experiences.  Misuse of reservations may result in loss of future prioritization of booking requests from that offending User Group.  No-shows or late arrivals (greater than 15 minutes) may lose the requested space for the reservation.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 CLSP Online Booking Request Form  

5.2 University of Manitoba Holiday Closure Dates


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Director, CLSP with questions respecting this policy.

Child safeguarding and protection policy

Policy Name:

Child safeguarding and protection policy

Application/

Scope:

All Faculty members, staff and learners of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and its

Colleges, University of Manitoba

Approved (Date):

August 25, 2020

Review Date:

Five years from approval date

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

Dean’s Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: July 7, 2020

Faculty Executive Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: August 25, 2020

1. APPLICATION AND SCOPE

1.1 The Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and its Colleges (“RFHS”) is committed to treating all Children with respect and dignity. It is dedicated to safeguarding and protecting the rights of all Children.

1.2 This policy incorporates the legal requirements for Child safeguarding and protection in Manitoba within the operations of the RFHS. It applies to all faculty, staff and learners of the RFHS and other individuals involved in RFHS activities, regardless of location. It applies most specifically to individuals working on projects, grants or initiatives that directly or indirectly involve Children. This policy is meant to complement, and not detract from, other applicable University policies, contractual agreements, including collective agreements, and other applicable laws.

1.3 In the event an inconsistency or conflict arises between this policy and any other applicable University policy, contractual agreement, collective agreement or law (including the law of another jurisdiction), such inconsistency or conflict shall be resolved in favour of the University policy of higher authority, or in favour of the contractual agreement or collective agreement, in accordance with the laws applicable in the Province of Manitoba, in a manner that affords the highest standards for the safeguarding and protection of Children as possible.


2. PURPOSE

2.1 To guide learners, staff and faculty members in the safeguarding and protection of Children.


3. DEFINITIONS

In addition to certain capitalized words and phrases that may be defined elsewhere in this policy, the following capitalized words and phrases shall have the following meanings:

3.1 Child/Children: is any individual under 18 years of age.

3.2 Abuse: as defined under section one of The CFS Act (including as such definition may be updated from time to time), an act or omission by a person where the act or omission results in:

(a) physical injury to the Child;

(b) emotional disability of a permanent nature in the Child or is likely to result in such a disability;

(c) sexual exploitation of the Child with or without the Child’s consent.

3.3 Child Neglect: is the failure of a Child’s primary caregiver to provide adequate food, clothing, shelter, supervision, and/or medical care. Child neglect involves an act of omission by a parent or guardian, resulting in (or likely to result in) harm or imminent risk of harm to a child.

3.4 CFS Act: The Child and Family Services Act (Manitoba).

3.5 In Need of Protection: Under The CFS Act, a Child is in need of protection where the life, health or emotional well-being of the Child is endangered by the act or omission of a person. Without restricting the generality of the above, a Child is in need of protection where the Child:

(a) is without adequate care, supervision or control;

(b) is in the care, custody, control or charge of a person

(i) who is unable or unwilling to provide adequate care, supervision or control of the child, or

(ii) whose conduct endangers or might endanger the life, health or emotional well-being of the Child, or

(iii) who neglects or refuses to provide or obtain proper medical or other remedial care or treatment necessary for the health or well-being of the Child or who refuses to permit such care or treatment to be provided to the Child when the care or treatment is recommended by a duly qualified medical practitioner;

(c) is abused or is in danger of being abused, including where the Child is likely to suffer harm or injury due to child pornography;

(d) is beyond the control of a person who has the care, custody, control or charge of the child;

(e) is likely to suffer harm or injury due to the behaviour, condition, domestic environment or associations of the child or of a person having care, custody, control or charge of the child;

(f) is subjected to aggression or sexual harassment that endangers the life, health or emotional well-being of the child;

(g) being under the age of 12 years, is left unattended and without reasonable provision being made for the supervision and safety of the child; or

(h) is the subject, or is about to become the subject, of an unlawful adoption under

The Adoption Act or of a sale under section 84 of the CFS Act.


4. POLICY AND PROCEDURE STATEMENTS

Prevention

4.1 All new RFHS learners, staff and faculty members shall be familiarized with this Child Safeguarding and Protection Policy through their new faculty/staff/learner orientations.

4.2 For learners, staff or faculty members whose University of Manitoba work or University of Manitoba learning activities directly involve Children:

  • A Criminal Records Check, Child Abuse Registry Check, and Adult Abuse Registry Check shall be required. For most learners, these Checks are a requirement on admission to, or registration in, the program. Therefore, please consult with the specific applicable program policy or regulation for additional detail;
  • The Code of Conduct – Child Safeguarding and Protection (at Appendix A to this policy) is required to be read and the responsibilities of the individual acknowledged. Examples of activities that may directly involve Children include clinical learning/fieldwork activities, service-learning activities or training Children as standardized patients.

4.3 For research involving Children, please refer to the specific ethics requirements and processes applicable to the research project.

4.4 The requirements set out in section 4.2 are not applicable to group tours or other visits to RFHS facilities or affiliated sites where Children are present (such as “Take Our Kids to Work Day”) or other interactions where Children are present in a group setting (such as learner examination/invigilation where Children standardized patients are present but participating in a group setting; Children brought into a classroom or lab in a group setting).

Reporting

4.5 It is the legal responsibility and duty of anyone who reasonably believes that a Child is, or might be, In Need of Protection or suffering from Child Abuse, to report the information directly to a CFS agency. Reporting to other law enforcement authorities may also be required, if the suspected activity is criminal in nature. While a report of Child Abuse can result in an initial negative experience for the parties involved, reporting is both compulsory and necessary, as a Child’s life or safety may be at risk.

4.6 In addition to the mandatory reporting obligations as above noted, it may be necessary for the Child’s immediate safety to report the concerns to the parent(s) or guardian(s).

4.7 The duty to report supersedes any restrictions respecting the disclosure of information in legislation, including The Personal Health Information Act (Manitoba) or otherwise.

4.8 In addition to the mandatory reporting obligations under The CFS Act, suspicions or concerns about Child Abuse, a Child in Need of Protection, or other behaviour that might be considered inappropriate (refer to the Code of Conduct at Appendix A), require a report within the RFHS. The person making the mandatory CFS Act report shall inform their immediate supervisor (for learners this could be their preceptor, course/rotation/program director, Department Head, Associate Dean), as well as make a written report to the Dean and Vice-Provost of the RFHS, using the report form attached hereto at Appendix B (“Report Form”). If desired, the person’s immediate supervisor may assist in completing the Report Form.

4.9 Should an individual have any questions or require any guidance respecting the requirements to report, they should, in consultation with their immediate supervisor, access resources available to assist in decision making (such as Child and Family Services or RFHS resources) that have trained staff available to assist with decision making and with any parental communication and disclosure required.

4.10 Special Provision for Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (“CIFF”) Grants/Projects

In addition to the above reporting requirements, for CIFF grants or projects, the grantee must advise the local CIFF Designated Safeguarding Officer (“DSO”) or Programme Manager, within three (3) days of knowledge of the concern or disclosure. Grantees are expected to provide regular updates to CIFF as to the status of any investigation and the outcome of the process, to the extent the Grantee is made aware of the status and outcome.

Investigation of a Faculty Member, Staff or Learner of the RFHS

4.11 If the respondent/offender is a faculty member, staff or learner of the RFHS, the Dean and Vice-Provost, RFHS will, upon receipt of a completed Report Form, ensure that an investigator (the “Investigator”) is assigned to review the report (“Report”) and ensure that all other mandatory reporting obligations as above noted are completed.

The Dean and Vice-Provost, RFHS may appoint either an employee of the University or an external consultant to act as the Investigator, provided that the Investigator:

(a) Has relevant skills and/or experience;

(b) Would be able to conduct an investigation in an unbiased manner; and

(c) Would not be placed in a conflict of interest.

4.12 Within 10 working days of being appointed, the Investigator ensures that the investigatory steps described below are completed. This may involve consultation with other units of the University about appropriate investigatory steps in accordance with applicable policies (e.g., Human Resources, Faculty of Graduate Studies). If the matter reported is being investigated by a law enforcement authority (e.g., under the CFS Act or Criminal Code of Canada), the Investigator may defer the University investigation to such other authority while also implementing measures to ensure the safety of work and learning environment in accordance with appropriate policies.

4.13 The Investigator will meet with the appropriate individuals to conduct an investigation and will inform senior leadership as required (e.g. Dean of the College, Associate Dean, Department Head, etc.) of the Report. The Investigator will conduct an investigation by interviewing the reporting individual, informing the respondent about the matter of the Report, interviewing the respondent, and interviewing any other persons who might have insight into the situation, such as witnesses and individuals in relevant positions. The Investigator may also conduct a joint investigation, including without limitation, with an affiliated clinical learning site, the Faculty of Graduate Studies, another Faculty, or the Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management. All such individuals will be bound to strict confidentiality regarding all aspects of the case.

4.14 The Investigator will review all of the information gathered in the course of the investigation and will submit their investigative report to the Dean and Vice-Provost, RFHS and the lead of any other applicable program or College (the “Dean/Director”) that includes the summary of the evidence and facts of the case and recommendations for action. If the matter has been deferred in lieu of investigation by a governmental authority, this should be reflected along with other interim measures that have been put into place. Once the other investigation is completed, this should also be reported, along with all findings. The Dean and Vice-Provost, RFHS will review the report and make a decision on the action to take, in consultation with the Dean/Director.

4.15 Actions resulting from a Report will depend on the circumstances, on the seriousness of the behaviour, whether the Report is determined to be founded or unfounded, on any mitigating factors and on applicable University policy, bylaw, collective agreement or academic regulation. The following list provides examples of measures and is not meant to be exhaustive nor necessarily represents a progression of measures:

a) A letter of apology;

b) Attendance at educational session(s);

c) Attendance at coaching session(s);

d) Prohibited or restricted access to Children;

e) Academic consequences such as remediation, probation, notation on the

performance record, dismissal/expulsion from the Program/College/RFHS, termination of academic appointment.

4.16 In cases where the respondent is dissatisfied with the decision, that person must submit his or her appeal in writing to the Dean and Vice-Provost, RFHS within 10 working days of the decision and refer to the applicable University Policy, Procedure or Bylaw or collective agreement.

Retaliation / Reprisal

4.17 A reporting individual, respondent, witness, and/or any other person who has

sought advice regarding this Policy, who has brought forward allegations, who has made a report or who has cooperated with an investigation, is entitled to be supported and protected from retaliation and reprisal. Retaliation or reprisal of any sort during or following the investigation is prohibited and will not be tolerated. All concerns and complaints raised respecting retaliation or reprisal will be thoroughly reviewed and investigated, and any breaches appropriately addressed. Accusations that retaliation or reprisal has occurred will be subject to investigation and may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination or expulsion.

4.18 There are many supports to assist in addressing one’s concerns about retaliation or reprisal. The University’s Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management is a resource available to all University members. Faculty members and staff may contact Human Resources and their union representatives. Learners may contact Student Affairs and Student Services at Bannatyne Campus representatives, including Student Advocacy. If the individual is an employee in a certified bargaining unit, he or she may challenge a retaliation or reprisal, through the grievance process or applicable collective agreement. A non-unionized employee may contact Human Resources. A learner can challenge a retaliation or reprisal through an appeal process set out in the Student Discipline Bylaw, the academic appeal policy relating to their program, or other applicable discipline or academic appeal routes within the University.

4.19 False Accusations

Any RFHS faculty member, staff or learner found to have been dishonest in making allegations with a conscious design to mislead or deceive, or with a malicious or fraudulent intent may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination or expulsion.

Confidentiality and Record Keeping

4.20 Any communication of information gathered in any case is confidential. The RFHS will not disclose the name of the reporting individual, of the respondent, or the circumstances related to a report except to the extent that disclosure is necessary

to effectively implement this policy or to undertake any disciplinary or action arising from a decision made under this policy. Records will be kept pursuant to any applicable relevant University policy and/or procedure.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 Academic Regulations for graduate programs within the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and its Colleges

5.2 Academic Regulations for undergraduate programs within the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and its Colleges

5.3 Children’s Investment Fund Foundation Child Safeguarding and Protect ion Policy

5.4 Code of Conduct to Protect Children: Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba (in development)

5.5 Reporting of Child Protection and Child Abuse: Handbook and Protocols for Manitoba

Service Providers

5.6 The Child and Family Services Act (Manitoba)

5.7 The Student Discipline Bylaw, University of Manitoba


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Dean’s Office, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, with questions regarding this policy.

Confidentiality and conflicts of interest: Guidelines for search committee members

1. PURPOSE

1.1 To provide guidance respecting confidentiality provisions for Search committee members.

1.2 To provide direction respecting Conflicts of Interest for Search committee members and to ensure the Search process is fair, equitable and consistent for all applicants. “Search” means the search process, from beginning to end, to hire for a position within the RFHS or one of its Colleges or Programs, which search process requires a Search committee advisory to a Dean or Director.

1.3 To have a consistent approach across the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (“RFHS”) respecting confidentiality and Conflicts of Interest in Search processes.

1.4 To provide a complementary process to existing University of Manitoba policies and procedures.


2. GUIDELINES

Confidentiality

2.1 All matters within a Search and all Search committee meetings are confidential. Members should be reminded at the start of each meeting that discussions and materials shall only be retained within the confines of the meetings.

2.2 The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (Manitoba) (“FIPPA”) provides that all application materials, including letters of reference will be held in strict confidence. As the end of Search deliberations, members will be required to return all Search materials and they shall be shredded. The Chair is required to keep the original documents for one year after the Board of Governors’ approval and shredded thereafter.

2.3 Following selection of a top-ranked candidate, Search committee members shall maintain strict confidentiality of the decision until the appointment is ratified by the Board of Governors or the announcement is formally made.

2.4 A confidentiality declaration should be completed and signed by each Search committee member, at the start of the Search process. A confidentiality declaration template can be obtained from RFHS Human Resources.

Nepotism

2.5    University of Manitoba Nepotism Policy

All University employees are subject to the University of Manitoba Nepotism Policy. It must be applied in circumstances whereby a University employee may be involved in the hiring and supervision of that employee's immediate family member.

Conflicts of Interest

2.6    University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy

All Faculty, Staff and Students are subject to the University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy. “Conflict of Interest”, as defined by the policy, means a situation in which the private interests (financial interests or personal interests) of a person or related party compromise or have the appearance of compromising the person’s independence and objectivity of judgement in the performance of his or her obligations to the University, including teaching, research and service activities. Conflicts of Interest can be potential, actual or perceived. In section 2.3, the policy provides examples of Conflicts of Interest.

2.7 Conflicts of Interest for Search Committee Members

In addition to the conflicts of interest as described in section 2.6, below are examples of other possible conflicts of interest respecting Search committee members (without limitation):

(a) Having a personal relationship with an applicant (e.g. spouse/partner; parent; child; sibling; grandparent; aunt; uncle or other person living in the same household);

(b) Having recently (within the last five years) been a co-author or co-editor with the applicant on major projects;

(c) Recently (within the last five years) serving as a Co-Principal Investigator on an applicant’s grant;

(d) Owning, having shares in, or otherwise participating in, a business or financial venture with the applicant; 

(e) Having served as an applicant’s thesis advisor;

(f) Providing a reference for an applicant for this Search.

Because some fields of expertise are relatively small, there may be associations through published works, involvement in conferences and professional organizations, as well as knowledge of junior applicants through associations with advisors and graduate programs.

As well, there may be associations through team teaching, co-leading workshops, presenting on panels, or appearing in the same issues of journals or same edited volumes. These types of relationship do not necessarily constitute a Conflict of Interest; however, disclosure
should be made for assessment.

2.8 Process for Disclosure

In accordance with the University of Manitoba policy and procedure and as outlined in section 2.7, upon recognition of a Conflict of Interest, whether real, perceived or potential, Search members shall disclose the Conflict of Interest respecting their participation in the Search process. This disclosure shall be to the Search committee Chair (the “Initial Reviewer”). If the Conflict of Interest involves the Chair, the Chair shall disclose to the Dean of the College or where not related to a specific College, to the Dean & Vice-Provost (Health Sciences), RFHS.

2.9  The disclosure shall be documented in some manner. The disclosure may be in the form of the University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Disclosure Form, although use of the form is not mandatory.

2.10 The Initial Reviewer will assess the disclosure, in consultation with the Search committee member. The Initial Reviewer will recommend either:

(a) No action is required to address the Conflict of Interest; or

(b) Recommend some action be taken, including without limitation:

a. Withdrawal from the Search committee for all stages of its work;
b. Framing of their review comments in terms of the Conflict of Interest. This may include implementation of bias interrupter strategies (for example, reminding the Search Committee of their relationship with the applicant before providing their comments; providing their review comments last; etc.).

2.11 The Initial Reviewer shall submit its recommendations to the Dean of the College, or where no specific College is involved, to the Dean & Vice-Provost (Health Sciences), RFHS (the “Second Reviewer”). The Second Reviewer shall consider the Initial Reviewer’s recommendation and determine how the Conflict of Interest shall be managed. The Second Reviewer will provide his/her determination to the Initial Reviewer, who shall advise the Search committee member, in writing.


3. REFERENCES

3.1 Confidentiality Declaration for Search Committee Members (please contact RFHS Human Resources for the most recent template)

3.2 University of Manitoba: A Guide to Recruiting the Best: Academic Search Handbook 2016

3.3 University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy

3.4 University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Procedure

3.5 University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Disclosure Form

3.6 University of Manitoba Nepotism Policy


4. CONTACT
Please contact the Human Resources Officer, RFHS, with questions regarding this document.


5. APPROVAL
These guidelines were approved by the RFHS Dean’s Council on January 7, 2020.

Disruption of all forms of racism

Policy Name:

Disruption of all Forms of Racism

Application/

Scope:

Staff, Faculty Members and Learners of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and its

Colleges and Programs

Approved (Date):

August 25, 2020

Review Date:

2 years from approval date

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

Dean’s Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: July 7, 2020

Faculty Executive Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: August 25, 2020

1.1 Senator Murray Sinclair has defined systemic racism as “when the system itself is based upon and founded upon racist beliefs and philosophies and thinking that has put in place policies and practices.”1 The 2011 University of Manitoba Statement of Apology and Reconciliation to Indian Residential School Survivors recognizes the participation of the University in systemic racism both through its own structures and in its education and training of a workforce that participates in systems that also have deeply embedded racism. This is not less true today when we think of the pervasive impacts of racism in many systems including health care.

1.2 Existing University of Manitoba policies including the Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (PLM, Max Rady College of Medicine), the Responsibilities of Academic Staff with Regard to Students Policy, the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Policy (Rady Faculty of Health Sciences), the Respectful Workplace and Learning Environment Policy, the Violent or Threatening Behaviour Policy, the Student Non-Academic Misconduct and Concerning Behaviour Procedure, the Student Discipline Bylaw and the Sexual Assault Policy, do not communicate an adequate understanding of the politics of race and the significance of racism as it pertains to BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) learners, staff and faculty. If a policy does not take race into account in a meaningful way, then racism can remain “invisible” or can be deemed to be nonexistent and therefore allowed to persist and potentially increase. This Policy constitutes a formal recognition of racial harassment, discrimination, vilification, and racism. It is an affirmation of

a) the histories of dispossession, enslavement, genocide and their legacies;

b) ongoing settler colonial projects; and

c) the humanity, rights, dignity and safety of BIPOC students, staff, and faculty.

1.3 The purpose of this Policy is to:

(a) Define the multiple forms of racism that are present in the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (“RFHS”) and to set out procedures for the reporting of and disruption of racism.

(b) Affirm the responsibility of the RFHS to implement policies, procedures, education, and training to eliminate expression of racism in its myriad forms.

(c) Describe the commitments and proactive steps of the RFHS to foster learning and work environments that fully respect peoples’ right to freedom from racism, racial discrimination, harassment, or vilification.

(d) Set out the requirements for all RFHS Community members, especially those in an instructional, supervisory or managerial position, who have a duty to educate those for whom they are responsible regarding expectations for respectful conduct, including this Policy. It is further the duty of such individuals to intervene when observing any form of racism impacting learners, staff or faculty, and to deal appropriately with allegations regarding violations of this Policy.

(e) Complement and build upon related policies including the EDI Policy and PLM Policy by defining the multiple forms of racism present within the RFHS and clarifying expectations for anti-racism.

1.4 More information on the context and background of this Policy is available on the RFHS Anti- Racism website.


2. Definitions

The terms in this Definition section are defined for the purposes of this Policy:

2.1 “Academic Staff” refers to all individuals whose primary assignment is instruction, research, and/ or service/ academic administration. This includes employees who hold an academic rank such as professor, associate professor, assistant professor, instructor, lecturer, librarian, or the equivalent of any of those academic ranks. This category also includes a dean, director, associate dean, assistant dean, chair or head of department, visiting scholars, senior scholars, and those holding unpaid academic appointments, insofar as they perform instructional, research, and/ or service/ academic administrative duties.

2.2 “Faculty Member” means all unionized and non-unionized academic staff of the RFHS, visiting professors, clinicians with academic appointments and including academic staff whose salary or stipend may be paid, in whole or in part, by another organization.

2.3 “Intersectionality” refers to the ways that racism, racial discrimination, harassment, and vilification are frequently linked/shaped/informed by other elements such as sex, gender and sexuality.

2.4 “Learner” means an individual registered at the University, within a program of the RFHS or one of its Colleges, on a full time or part time basis or as a special student. A Learner can be at the undergraduate, graduate or postdoctoral level, and includes medical students, non- professional graduate students, residents, and fellows and individuals registered at another institution but attending the RFHS on a temporary basis as part of an elective or similar program.

2.5 “Race” is one of the fundamental components of descriptive systems of difference in society (e.g., along with sex-gender, class, ability, and sexuality). At its inception “race” was defined as a natural or biological difference, indicated by physical features such as skin colour, hair texture and other bodily features. The creation of race as a key system of classification was created during European imperial and colonial domination as a means to justify hierarchies of humanity. Despite efforts to locate differences between different groups as evidence of biological and/or genetic differences as unsound, science demonstrates that the differences within different groups are greater than the differences between the so called “races.” However, there remains a significant investment in identifying racial differences as natural and inevitable, as evidence of intelligence, ability, worth, and so on. Rather, scholars and researchers recognize that race is a socio-historical and social construct.

2.6 “Racism” is the differential treatment of various human racial groups by a dominant racial group rooted in the belief of the superiority of one group over the other. Racism takes many forms, some of which include symbolic, embodied, psychological, institutional/systemic, everyday, and interpersonal. Experiences of racial discrimination, harassment and vilification can be affected by its intersection with other elements of identity such as sex-gender, sexuality, disability, and age. The following definitions of different forms of racism are illustrative and not exhaustive. Additional definitions can be found on the Anti-Racism Website.

  • “Everyday Racism” refers to the “mundane” elements of everyday life that are typically not recognized because these manifestations of racism have become so normalized that they are typically not identified as racism. Everyday racism refers to tone, language, a gaze, forms of surveillance (in stores), differential service (being ignored in a store) and actions such as moving when an Indigenous, Black or racialized student is seated beside a person on the bus or in the classroom. Everyday racism is multidimensional and its impact is cumulative.
  • “Gendered Racism” refers to the allocation of resources along racially and ethnically ascribed understandings of masculinity and femininity as well as along gendered forms of race and ethnic discrimination.
  • “Interpersonal Racism” refers to attitudes, ideas, and behaviours that support, and therefore reinforce, racial inequality. It is important to note that interpersonal and institutional racism function both independently and in concert.
  • “Systemic/Institutional Racism” refers to the arrangements and practices that maintain racial hierarchies and racial inequality. It comprises policies, behaviours and practices that are part of the social, cultural or administrative elements of an organization and which produce or maintain positions of disadvantage for racialized individuals.
  • “Racial Discrimination” refers to behavior that impedes and disadvantages people, by withholding benefits, opportunities due to their perceived race, colour, nationality, ethnicity, ethno-religious or national origin.
  • “Racial Harassment” refers to an incident or a series of incidents having the effect of intimidating, offending or harming an individual or group because of their perceived ethnic origin, race or nationality. This includes verbal and/or physical abuse, insults and name- calling, bullying, threatening behaviour, damage to property, displaying and/or sharing racially offensive material and encouraging others to commit racist acts.
  • “Racial Microaggressions” are everyday slights, indignities, put downs and insults that BIPOC individuals experience in their day-to-day interactions with people.
  • “Racial Vilification” refers to a public act that inspires or provokes others to hate, have disrespect, or ruthlessly deride a person or group of people due to their perceived race, colour, nationality, ethnicity or ethno-religious or national origin.

2.7 "RFHS Community" means all RFHS members including Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the RFHS, Learners, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

2.8 "RFHS Matter" means any activity, event, or undertaking in which a member of the RFHS Community participates, which has a substantial connection to the RFHS, such as:

(a) RFHS-related activities or events, including but not limited to:

  • Any activity or event on property owned or controlled by the RFHS;
  • Learner placements, practica, or clinical training;
  • RFHS research activities, whether on or off campus;
  • Learner and/or employee exchanges arranged in connection with the RFHS;
  • Social events or networking, where matters regarding the RFHS or members of the RFHS Community are a significant focus of the activity;
  • RFHS field trips, travel-study tours, service-learning activities, and similar activities;

(b) Activities or events involving members of the RFHS Community, where the actions of those members of the RFHS Community may reasonably reflect upon or affect the RFHS, including but not limited to:

  • Any aspect of the employment or engagement of employees and contractors for roles and projects substantially connected to the RFHS;
  • Writings, photographs, artwork, audio or video recordings, and/or electronic communications, including communications through social media, where matters regarding the RFHS Community are a significant focus of the communication;
  • Matters related to The University of Manitoba Students’ Union, the Graduate Students’ Association, and their affiliated Learner groups to the extent that it affects the proper functioning of the RFHS or the rights of a member of the RFHS Community to use and enjoy the RFHS’s learning and working environments; or
  • Matters of off-campus conduct that have, or might reasonably be seen to have an adverse effect on the proper functioning of the RFHS or the rights of a member of the RFHS Community to use and enjoy the RFHS’s learning and working environments.

2.9 “Third Party Reporting” refers to a form of anonymous reporting where someone who has experienced racism can report it through someone else (described further below) who then accesses one of the established reporting mechanisms to report the experience.

2.10 “Racial Equity Impact Assessments” (REIAs) is a systematic examination of how different racial and ethnic groups will likely be affected by a proposed action or decision. REIAs are used to minimize unanticipated adverse consequences in a variety of contexts, including the analysis of proposed policies, institutional practices, programs, plans and budgetary decisions.


3. Policy and procedure statements

3.1 The RFHS is committed to taking the necessary steps to ensure that no RFHS Community member is subjected to Racism, Racial Discrimination, Racial Vilification, and Racial Harassment while participating at the RFHS and to interrupt and address Racism when it is identified.

3.2 This Policy and Procedure applies to members of the RFHS Community in relation to any RFHS Matter.

3.3 Examples of Racism include, but are not limited to the following actions which the person experiencing them believes are based on perceived race, colour, nationality, ethnicity, ethno- religious (e.g. anti-Semitism or Islamophobia) or national origin of an individual or group.

Interpersonal:

(1) Racial stereotyping, racial profiling of individuals on campus.

(2) Subjecting an individual to racially or ethnically offensive remarks, names, slurs, racial epithets or jokes

(3) Singling out an individual for teasing or jokes related to race, ancestry, place of origin, or ethnic origin.

(4) Circulating racially offensive jokes, pictures or cartoons by e-mail/social media.

(5) Comments ridiculing individuals because of race-related characteristics, religious dress.

(6) Failing to deal with racial incidents or downplaying the seriousness of such conduct e.g., “that was not their intent”.

(7) Characterizing normal communication from Indigenous, Black and racialized learners, staff, and faculty as rude or aggressive.

(8 Treating normal differences of opinion as confrontational or insubordinate when involved with Indigenous, Black and racialized persons.

(9) Treating an Indigenous, Black, and racialized individuals’ responses to racial incidents or bullying as a disciplinary problem without dealing with the underlying incident or considering the underlying incident as a mitigating factor.

(10) Differential disciplinary action for BIPOC individuals. (11) Racist graffiti.

(l2) Penalizing a person for failing to get along with someone else (e.g. colleague, manager, fellow learner), when one of the reasons for the tension is racially discriminatory attitudes or behaviour.

(13) Using a racial epithet.

(14) Disparaging an individual based on their race.

(15) Attributing the same characteristics to all members of a group, regardless of individual differences.

(16) Failing to hire, train, mentor or promote a racialized person. Racialized persons may find themselves subjected to excessive performance monitoring and documentation or deviation from written policies or standard practices or may be more seriously blamed for a common mistake.

(17) Normal differences of opinion or failing to get along with a co-worker/colleague/learner may be treated as more serious when a racialized person is involved.

(18) Contrasting how a racialized person was treated with how others were treated in a comparable situation

(19) A non-existent contradictory or changing explanation for why a racialized person was targeted.

(20) Denial of mentoring or developmental opportunities and training which were made available to others.

(21) Subjecting a BIPOC individual to threatening gestures. Verbally abusing, belittling, insulting, ridiculing or yelling or speaking in a sarcastic manner in public or private.

(22) Assigning BIPOC individuals less desirable positions or duties or assigning duties as punishment rather than education.

(23) Disproportionate blame for an incident or singling out a BIPOC individual for arbitrary treatment that is punitive.

(24) Belief in the inherent superiority of one racial group, over another, through actions or criticism conducted in public that can be interpreted as embarrassing, humiliating and/or demeaning.

(25) Incident or a series of incidents having the effect of intimidating, offending or harming a BIPOC individual or group.

(26) Exclusion from formal or informal networks or opportunities. Neglecting or leaving a BIPOC individual out of comunications.

(27) Not providing racialized individuals with clear work/learning expectations yet holding them responsible for the expectations.

(28) Committing an act of physical abuse or violence of any kind (e.g. throwing objects, aggressive violation of personal space) against a BIPOC individual.

(29) Making unwelcome sexual comments, jokes, innuendos, or taunting remarks.

(30) Using grades/poor reviews as punishment rather than as an objective evaluation of performance.

(31) Threatening to fail, give lower grades, poor performance review or give a poor evaluation for anything other than documented performance issues.

(32) Looks of contempt/hate.

(33) Subjecting an individual to inappropriate references to racist organizations.

Systemic/ Institutional:

(34) Not allowing for time off for religious or spiritual practices other than Christian holidays. (35) Differential career trajectories, opportunities (e.g. time to promotion and/ or tenure) for different BIPOC populations.

(36) Patterned exclusion from formal or informal networks, thereby providing advantages to the racial majority while disadvantaging others.

(37) Differential practices such as excessive monitoring and documentation or deviation from written policies or standard practices for BIPOC populations.

(38) Differential disciplinary action for BIPOC populations .

(39) Disproportionate blame for an incident on BIPOC populations.

(40) Unequal opportunity for employment related to hiring practices, union rules around seniority.

(41) Failing to deal with racial incidents or downplaying the seriousness of such conduct e.g., “that was not their intent”.

(42) Admissions criteria that reflect racial bias through exclusion, universalism or selective/simplistic representative inclusion.

(43) Curriculum content that does not address issues of race and racism and/or promotes or reinforces racial bias or stereotypes.

3.4 All new policies, procedures and programs, and, at the time of their review, all existing policies, procedures and programs, of the RFHS and its member Colleges will undergo a Racial Equity Impact Assessment to identify any potential elements of systemic/institutional racism and propose mitigating measures. These REIAs will be done by the person/ committee responsible for the policy, procedure or program in partnership with the Anti-Racism Working Group and submitted with the draft policy/ procedure or program to the appropriate College or Faculty decision-making body.

3.5 The RFHS adopts a “no wrong door” reporting approach regarding Racism concerns that centers the needs of the person(s) who has experienced Racism, and is trauma- and violence- informed in its processes. The procedures for investigations and remediation/resolution of experiences of racism will rely on existing mechanisms at this time, which will be enhanced with the participation of individuals with specific anti-racism expertise. Existing potential mechanisms to report and address experiences of Racism that have procedures detailed in other related or relevant policies and include:

(a) The Speak Up button (anonymous or non-anonymous reporting) and the Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (currently Medicine only but under review for expansion to the RFHS);

(b) Report to a manager, supervisor, course leader, Department Head, Dean, or other trusted Academic Staff or Faculty Member who is expected to provide the person(s) with options for formal or informal reporting;

(c) Report to the Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management;

(d) Report to the Office or Associate Dean of Professionalism (currently Medicine only).

3.6 Nothing in this Policy is intended to discourage or prevent a member of the RFHS Community from filing a complaint with the Manitoba Human Rights Commission, or from exercising any other legal rights pursuant to any other law or policy.

3.7 In addition to the existing potential reporting mechanisms, breaches of this Policy can be reported through a third party(ies). Third Party Reporting offers the option of reporting the details of an experience or experiences of racism anonymously when individuals are not ready or willing to participate in an investigation because of the risk of reprisal or further racial violence. Third Party Reporting can be an important procedure to address under- reporting of racism.

3.8 Disciplinary options may be limited for breaches of this Policy reported anonymously or using Third Party reporting where that results in the unavailability of sufficient information. This does not preclude remedial action based on the information available or disciplinary action where the information available is sufficient or where a previous pattern of behaviour has been established through previous reporting (anonymous or non-anonymous).

3.9 When any form of Racism occurs and is reported, remedial measures will depend on multiple factors including the input of the person(s) who experienced the Racism (e.g. whether the complaint is formal or informal, and through what process the complaint is made), the circumstances, the seriousness of the behaviour, the frequency or duration of the behaviour, any mitigating factors and applicable University policy, bylaw, collective agreement or academic regulation. The following list provides examples of remedial measures and is not meant to be exhaustive or necessarily represent a progression of measures:

  • Attendance at educational sessions on antiracism with evidence of reflective learning;
  • A restorative justice based approach to mediation when all parties are willing;
  • Prohibited or restricted access to the work or learning environment;
  • Academic consequences such as remediation, probation, notation on the performance record, dismissal/ expulsion from the program of the RFHS/its College, termination of the academic appointment;
  • Disciplinary consequences according to applicable policies and procedures for Faculty

Members and staff;

  • Reporting to legal authorities if the actions represent a potential violation of the Canadian Criminal Code.

4. Review and effect on previous statements

4.1 The Review Date for this Policy and Procedure is two (2) years from the date it is approved by the approving body. In the interim, this document may be revised or repealed if:

(a) The Dean, RFHS & Vice-Provost (Health Sciences), with appropriate approvals, deems it necessary or desirable to do so;

(b) It is no longer legislatively or statutorily compliant; and/or

(c) It comes into conflict with another governing document of the RFHS or the University of Manitoba.

4.2 If this document is revised or repealed, any related RFHS documents shall be reviewed as soon as possible to ensure that they comply with the revised document, or are in term revised or repealed.

4.3 This Policy supersedes all previous governing documents dealing with the subject matter addressed in this document.


5. References

This policy should be cross-reference to the following relevant governing documents, legislations and forms:

5.1 The Human Rights Code, C.C.S.M. c. H175;

5.2 The International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination.

5.3 The Max Rady College of Medicine Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy

5.4 The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples;

5.5 The University of Manitoba Respectful Work and Learning Environment (RWLE) Policy;

5.6 The University of Manitoba RWLE and Sexual Assault Procedure;

5.7 The University of Manitoba Responsibilities of Academic Staff with Regard to the Student

5.8 The University of Manitoba Sexual Assault Policy;

5.9 The University of Manitoba Violent or Threatening Behaviour policy and procedure;

5.10 The University of Manitoba Student Discipline Bylaw and procedures;


6. Sources

6.1 Alexander, C., & Knowles, C. (2005). Introduction. In C. Alexander, & C. Knowles (Eds.), Making race matter: Bodies, space and identity (pp. 1-16). New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

6.2 Crenshaw, K. W. (1994). Mapping the margins: Intersectionality, identity politics, and violence against women of color. In M. A. Fineman (Ed.), The public nature of private violence: women and the discovery of abuse (pp. 93-120). New York, NY: Routledge.

6.3 Essed, P. (2002). Everyday racism: A new approach to the study of racism. In P. Essed, & D. T. Goldberg (Eds.), Race critical theories: Text and context (pp. 176-194). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

6.4 Hall, S. (1996). Race the floating signifier. The Media Education Foundation.

6.5 Matsuda, M. J., Lawrence III, C. R., Delgado, R., Words, & Crenshaw, K. W. (1993). Words that wound: Critical race theory, assaultive speech, and the First Amendment. New York, NY: Routledge.

6.6 Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (2019).

6.7 Steinmetz, K. (February 20, 2020). “She coined the term ‘intersectionality’ over 30 years ago. Here’s what it means to her today.” Time magazine. Available at https://time.com/5786710/kimberle-crenshaw-intersectionality/.

6.8 Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action (2015). Available at http://trc.ca/assets/pdf/Calls_to_Action_English2.pdf.

6.9 United Nations: International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (1969). Available at https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/cerd.aspx.

6.10 United Nations: Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007). Available at https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/cerd.aspx.

6.11 United United Nations. Report of the Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent on its Mission to Canada (2017).

6.12 Kendi, I. (2016). Stamped From the Beginning: the definitive history of racist ideas in America. New York, NY: Nation Books.


7. Policy contact

Please contact The Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, RFHS, with questions regarding this document.

 

Equity, diversity and inclusion

Policy Name:

Equity Diversity and Inclusion

Application / Scope:

Staff, Faculty Members and Learners of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

Approved (Date):

February 4, 2020

Review Date:

5 years from approval date

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

Dean’s Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: January 21, 2020

Faculty Executive Council, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences: February 4, 2020


1. PREAMBLE AND COMMITMENT

1.1 On January 26, 2018 (revised January 21, 2020), the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (“RFHS”) and its Colleges of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Rehabilitation Sciences (collectively, the “Colleges”) agreed upon a joint commitment of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (also referred to herein as “EDI”) which included the commitment of ensuring that its learners, faculty, and staff are reflective of the population served.

1.2 The RFHS wishes to set out its commitment to EDI into policy form, in an effort to promote and support a community that embraces EDI, provides for equality of opportunity and recognizes the dignity of all people.

1.3 The RFHS acknowledges its location on Treaty 1 Territory, acknowledges its obligation to provide service to diverse Indigenous communities and is committed to implementing the Calls to Action and Principles of Reconciliation issued by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (“TRC”). In furtherance of this commitment, the RFHS pledges to work with Ongomiizwin, the Indigenous Institute of Health and Healing, in accordance with the RFHS Reconciliation Action Plan, led by Ongomiizwin.

1.4 Equity, Diversity and Inclusion are linked to all five University of Manitoba’s Strategic priorities:

  1. Inspiring Minds through innovating and quality teaching;
  2. Driving Discovery and Insight through excellence in research, scholarly work and other creative activities;
  3. Creating Pathways to Indigenous Achievement;
  4. Building Community that creates an outstanding learning and working environment; and
  5. Forging Connections to foster high impact community engagement that build on the advantages of a diverse and inclusive workplace.

1.5 Equity, Diversity and Inclusion align with the RFHS’ shared set of values in community and collaboration, scholarship and innovation, equity and inclusion, professionalism and social accountability.

1.6 Learners, faculty and staff are to be free from harassment and discrimination, as defined in The Human Rights Code (Manitoba) and in accordance with the University of Manitoba’s Respectful Work and Learning Environment (RWLE) Policy. That is, all Learners, faculty and staff, regardless of race, ethnicity, colour, religious beliefs, national origin, rurality, gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, political beliefs, language, or socio-economic status, are to be valued for their individuality, advanced academic pursuits, and contributions to the diversity and functions of the RFHS and the University of Manitoba. Unacceptable discrimination, including racism, micro aggressions, sexism, ableism, ageism, homophobia and transphobia will not be tolerated. An RFHS Anti-Racism policy is currently in development.

1.7 Learners, faculty and staff are to be free from harassment and discrimination, as defined in The Human Rights Code (Manitoba) and in accordance with the University of Manitoba’s Respectful Work and Learning Environment (RWLE) Policy. That is, all Learners, faculty and staff, regardless of race, ethnicity, colour, religious beliefs, national origin, rurality, gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, political beliefs, language or socio-economic status, are to be valued for their individuality, advanced academic pursuits, and contributions to the diversity and functions of the RFHS and the University of Manitoba. Unacceptable discrimination, including racism, micro aggressions, sexism, ableism, ageism, homophobia and transphobia will not be tolerated. An RFHS Anti-Racism policy is currently in development.

Learners, faculty or staff found to have engaged in such conduct will be counselled, warned or disciplined. Severe or repeated breaches will lead to formal discipline up to and including leave without pay or dismissal.


2. PURPOSE

2.1 To set out the minimum principle-based requirements to be implemented by the RFHS and its member Colleges in accordance with their joint commitment to Equity, Diversity and Inclusion. We, individually and collectively, are committed to ensuring the following:

  1. The RFHS community is a safe and welcoming place for all people.
  2. All Learners, faculty, staff and other individuals in the RFHS community are respected.
  3. The RFHS community is stronger because it recognizes, embraces and values its differences.
  4. The faculty, staff and Learner populations are representative of the populations we serve in Manitoba.
  5. We seek to understand the effects of colonization on Indigenous communities.
  6. We treat each other with unconditional respect.
  7. We are accountable to each other for our behaviour.
  8. We are open, honest and authentic in our dealings with each other.
  9. We will take action and speak up when we believe others are disrespected in our presence.
  10. We will continually grow and learn together to be a strong community of valued people.

3. DEFINITIONS

3.1 “Diversity” includes all the ways in which people differ, and it encompasses all the different characteristics that make one individual or group different from another. It is all-inclusive and recognizes everyone and every group as part of the diversity that should be valued. A broad definition includes not only race, ethnicity, and gender - the groups that most often come to mind when the term “diversity” is used — but also age, national origin, religion, disability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, education, marital status, language, and physical appearance. It also involves different ideas, perspectives, and values. 

3.2 “Equity” is the guarantee of fair treatment, access, opportunity, and advancement for all Learners, faculty, and staff, while at the same time striving to identify and eliminate barriers that have prevented the full participation of some groups. The principle of equity acknowledges that there are historically underserved and underrepresented populations and that fairness regarding these unbalanced conditions is needed to assist equality in the provision of effective opportunities to all groups.

3.3 “Historically Under-Represented Groups” means the four designated groups pursuant to the Employment Equity Act: women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities, and members of racialized communities, as well as other historically under-represented groups such as 2STLGBQ+1, refugee and immigrant groups as well as others.

Note: “2STLGBQ+” is an acronym describing sexual and gender minority communities namely the two-spirit, transgender, lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and questioning community. The “+” recognizes the diversity of identities and represents many more sexual orientations and gender identities not captured within the acronym.

3.4 “Inclusion” is the act of creating environments in which any individual or group can be and feel welcomed, respected, supported, and valued to fully participate. An inclusive and welcoming climate embraces differences and offers respect in words and actions for all people.

3.5 “Indigenous peoples” means First Nations, Metis and Inuit people.
“Learner” means an individual registered, enrolled, or classified as a student within or with the University of Manitoba, participating in any of the College programs or Rady Faculty of Health Sciences programs including the IHP Program.

3.6 “Learner” means an individual registered, enrolled, or classified as a student within or with the University of Manitoba, participating in any of the College programs or Rady Faculty of Health Sciences programs including the IHP Program.

3.7  “Principles of Reconciliation” are as documented by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada to guide its renewed relationships with First Nations, Metis, and Inuit people. As set out in the RFHS Reconciliation Action Plan, these principles include:

  1. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is the framework for reconciliation.
  2. First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples have Treaty, constitutional and human rights that must be respected.
  3. Reconciliation is a process of healing of relationships that requires truth sharing, apology, and commemoration that acknowledge and redress past harms.
  4. Reconciliation requires constructive action on addressing the ongoing legacies of colonialism that have destructive impacts on Indigenous peoples’ health.
  5. Reconciliation must create a more equitable society and close the gaps in health.
  6. All Canadians share the responsibility.
  7. The perspectives and understandings of Traditional Knowledge Keepers are vital.
  8. Reconciliation requires political will, joint leadership, trust building, accountability, transparency and a substantial investment of resources.

1 “2STLGBQ+” is an acronym describing sexual and gender minority communities namely the two-spirit, transgender, lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and questioning community. The “+” recognizes the diversity of identities and represents many more sexual orientations and gender identities not captured within the acronym.


4. POLICY STATEMENTS

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Commitment

 4.1 The RFHS and its Colleges commit to embedding Equity, Diversity and Inclusion throughout every area and level of the RFHS and the Colleges. In that respect, the RFHS Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Committee is established to act as the main discussion and advisory committee to the RFHS Dean & Vice-Provost (Health Sciences) in relation to issues of Equity, Diversity & Inclusion.

Faculty and Staff – Recruitment (Selection and Hiring)

 4.2 The RFHS and its Colleges shall promote and implement inclusive recruitment and hiring practices, including implementing measures for the identification and removal of artificial barriers to the selection and hiring of Historically Under-Represented Groups, and to take steps to improve the employment status of these groups by increasing their participation in all levels of employment. At a minimum:

a) Best practices will be developed for promoting Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at each stage of planning for, recruiting, hiring and retaining diverse faculty and staff, and will actively implement employment equity;

b) Targeted outreach and selection methodologies will be used that avoid biases and barriers to address areas of under-representation of Historically Under-Represented Groups;

c) Training for all search and selection committees will be provided to ensure the recruitment and retention of diverse faculty and staff, avoiding unintended bias and building strategies to build diverse candidate pools.

Faculty and Staff Retention (Training, Development and Mentorship)

 4.3 The RFHS and its Colleges commit to implementing Equity, Diversity and Inclusion efforts in its retention (including training, development and mentorship) of its faculty and staff. In particular, the RFHS and its Colleges shall, at a minimum:

a) Review the RFHS/College’s current orientation process for new staff and faculty to ensure it is effectively welcoming and connecting with new members;

b) Implement systemic ways to ensure women and other Historically Under-Represented Groups achieve leadership positions within the RFHS/College;

c) Review and enhance the career-planning and mentoring system(s) for faculty and staff.

Learners – Recruitment, Admissions and Retention

 4.4 The RFHS and its Colleges commit to:

a) Recruitment and retention of Learners from Historically Under-Represented Groups, to ensure Learners are a reflection of the population the RFHS/Colleges serve. The RFHS/Colleges shall review and revise, as necessary, their admissions policies, procedures and requirements to reflect this commitment.

b) Ensure all Learners receive orientation to Equity, Diversity and Inclusion. 

Learners - Curriculum

4.5 The RFHS and its Colleges commit to provide a diverse educational experience for all Learners through an inclusive curriculum that:

a) Is inclusive, respectful, safe and free from mistreatment;

b) Reflects the perspectives and experiences of a pluralistic society;

c) Reflects the perspective, world views and contributions of Indigenous communities;

d) Promotes understanding of health disparities and inequities;

e) Builds insight about Historically Under-Represented Groups and populations and the capacity to serve them competently;

f) Provides curricular learning experiences that include patient cases that represent diversity within the curriculum, as well as a variety of practice settings (such as First Nations communities; small, remote, northern and rural communities; complex health care facilities; community health agencies);

g) Fosters learner interaction in small group sessions;

h) Develops service-learning experiences with volunteer and community groups.

The RFHS/Colleges shall review and revise, as necessary, their curriculum to reflect this commitment.

Accessibility

4.6 The RFHS and its Colleges commit to cultivate positive dialogue about stereotypes regarding accessibility and accommodation, with a focus on improving the understanding of the needs, the process for accommodation, and how accommodations are beneficial. The RFHS/Colleges shall review their practices and processes to ensure compliance with applicable legislation and complementary policies.

Committees

4.7 The RFHS and its Colleges will strive to achieve diverse membership among their standing and ad hoc committees, working groups, consultants, advisory and community partners, to ensure differing perspectives and experiences with the goal of maintaining objectivity and a balanced skill-set for matters under review and consideration.

Skill-Building Workshops

4.8 The RFHS and its Colleges will initiate skill-building workshops for Learners, faculty and staff aimed at addressing Equity, Diversity and Inclusion goals and challenges.

Research

4.9 The RFHS and its Colleges encourage research that responds to the needs of the population the RFHS and its Colleges serve, and encourages compliance with the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan of the Canada Research Chairs as well as other EDI plans that may be applicable.

Outreach

4.10 The RFHS and its Colleges will actively seek out and build partnerships, including supporting outreach programs and initiatives with communities, schools, diverse community organizations and individuals, including Indigenous peoples, in order to create, maintain and enhance career pathing programs and social accountability initiatives, coordinated through the RFHS Office of Community Engagement and other units of the RFHS and member colleges (e.g., Ongomiizwin). 

Communications

 4.11 RFHS External Relations shall ensure the commitment to Equity, Diversity and Inclusion be considered and featured in print ads, website materials and other materials used for Learners, faculty, staff and public promotion.

All Faculty, Staff and Learners

 4.12 All Learners, faculty, and staff of the RFHS and its Colleges are responsible to:

  • Educate themselves on matters relating to Equity, Diversity and Inclusion;
  • Create and maintain a respectful working and learning environment that respects and values the rights and dignities of all individuals;
  • Report any activity that is contrary to the Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy or the University of Manitoba Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy, including use of the “Speak Up” button.

5. PROCEDURE STATEMENTS

Implementation Plan

5.1 The above policy statements are minimum principle-based requirements. Working through the RFHS Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, implementation/action plans will be developed for each policy statement, which may include the establishment of working groups to develop specific action items.

RFHS and College Leads

5.2 At the request of the RFHS Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, each College and RFHS Program (not otherwise associated with a College) shall identify one or more lead(s) respecting the Colleges’/Programs’ efforts in implementing particular policy statements relating to the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.

Targets

5.3 As part of the implementation/action plans, the RFHS/Colleges, with the RFHS Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion shall set specific targets and outcome measures to meet the commitments made in this policy, keeping in mind the RFHS goal to have Learners, faculty, and staff be reflective of the population served by the RFHS and its Colleges, and to achieve greater representation of Historically Under-Represented Groups.

Tracking

5.4 In order to determine whether the RFHS and its Colleges are meeting the set targets and outcome measures, the RFHS/Colleges shall, at minimum, track its Learners, faculty, and staff from Historically Under-Represented Groups through surveys and/or other mechanisms, and adopt mechanisms to address gaps.

Reporting

5.5 The RFHS Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion shall coordinate the reporting on the implementation and outcomes in Equity, Diversity and Inclusion. A formal written report shall be provided to the RFHS Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Committee at least once per year. Each College/RFHS Program shall provide the necessary information respecting the College’s implementation of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, including efforts, outcomes and tracking data, to the RFHS Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.


6. REFERENCES

6.1 Diversity, Inclusion and Equity Guidelines, November 2016, Dalhousie University, Faculty of Medicine 

6.2 Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan, Canada Research Chairs

6.3 Equity, Diversity and Inclusion: Best Practices for Recruitment, Hiring and Retention, Canada Research Chairs

6.4 The Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Reconciliation Action Plan  

6.5 The Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Strategic Framework 

6.6 Red River College Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Policy

6.7 The Accessibility for Manitobans Act (Manitoba)

6.8 The Employment Equity Act (Canada)

6.9 The Human Rights Code (Manitoba)

6.10 Framework for Research Engagement with First Nation, Metis, and Inuit Peoples

6.11 The Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (Max Rady College of Medicine) (under review)

6.12 University of Manitoba Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy

6.13 University of Manitoba Accessibility Policy and Procedures  

6.14 The University of Manitoba Strategic Plan 

6.15 Disruption of all Forms of Racism Policy


7. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the RFHS Director, Equity, Inclusion and Diversity with questions regarding this policy.

Mobile/wireless device policy

Policy Name:

Mobile/Wireless Device Policy

Effective Date:

May 15, 2018

Date Approved:

May 15, 2018

Approved by:

Council of Deans, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

Review Date:

March 31, 2023

PURPOSE

To provide a consistent process for the eligibility, approval and tracking of mobile/ wireless devices or portable electronic devices and their respective charges on operating funds. Any exceptions to this policy require written approval of the Director of Finance, RFHS.


DEFINITIONS

Mobile/ Wireless Devices - include cellular/ smartphones, laptops, tablets, and other similar devices. Examples of devices:

Cellular/ Smartphones – iPhone, blackberries, Samsung, Sony, Nokia, etc.

Laptops – MacBook, Samsung, IBM, Asus, etc. Tablets – iPad, Samsung, Asus, etc.


STATEMENT OF POLICY

1. Device Approvals

Purchase of cellular devices/smartphones may be approved by the individuals one-over-one and Director of Finance using U of M operating funds, prior to submission to IST, for those staff or faculty who meet all the following criteria:

a. They hold a position at the level of Dean, Vice Dean, Associate Dean, Department Head, Director or Manager;

b. The majority of their annual income is derived from the position in (a) above;

c. There is an essential business need/ justification specific to the individual’s role in the

College or Faculty including:

i. Significant amount of time is spent out of the office for various work related reasons.

ii. Due to the nature of their position they are required by the respective Dean to respond to urgent email or phone messages.

2. UMFA Approvals

Cellular/ smartphone contracts for UMFA members must follow Article 27 of the Collective Agreement and there must be sufficient budget in the respective Travel and Expense fund to cover the expenses. Purchase approval for both the phone/upgrades & monthly plan will follow the same process of one-over-one approver & the Director of Finance, prior to submission of the request to IST.

3. Research Funds

Cellular/ smartphone contracts are typically not an approved expense on research funds unless it is necessary for conduct of the research project, required for personnel safety reasons and appropriate justification is documented and kept on file.

4. Upgrades & Replacement

a. Upgrades to mobile/ wireless devices may be approved by the Director of Finance when the respective contract is expiring and the device is not in good working condition. Any requests for upgrades/replacements prior to contract expiry will require the original device be submitted to the RFHS Finance Office.

b. All smartphone contracts are to be held with the U of M approved supplier (ie Rogers) via a U of M approved contract. Personally held contracts will not be reimbursed, and Purchasing cards (Pcards) should not be used for monthly device charges.

c. For further information on the process, please see below:

i. Mobile device purchase and activation (standard data plans range between 5 and 6 GBs per month depending on the device)

ii. Laptop or tablet purchase

iii. Upgrade a mobile device

iv. Cancelling mobile device contract

v. Transfer of ownership (personal device to University)

vi. Transfer of ownership (University to personal device)

vii. Lost or stolen devices

viii. Repairs to devices

5. Travel Packages

For individuals holding a position of Dean, Vice Dean, Associate Dean, Department Head or Director, the appropriate travel package may be purchased prior to travelling to prevent the incursion of roaming charges. Roaming charges occur when you enter another country other than Canada, and use cellular services (telephone, texting and data). A notification is usually received on your device alerting you that you need to add a roaming travel plan.

a. For positions not mentioned above the request to purchase travel packages must be sent to the Director of Finance for review and approval prior to each trip. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis and where a justifiable business need exists.

b. Travel plans

c. Tips for reducing mobile/ wireless costs while travelling:

i. Turn data roaming off when you don’t need to check email/ internet.

ii. WiFi services should be used as often as possible to reduce these costs and manage the data plan for the mobile device. Most hotels offer WiFi free of charge or for a nominal fee, which allows the individual to check emails and download files or information.

iii. Turn off applications that leverage GPS, such as Maps, Weather, etc.

6. Overages

Wireless devices with a monthly invoice based on usage will be monitored by RFHS Finance Office. Individuals whose monthly charges exceed the normal monthly charge by $10 or more will be responsible for reimbursing the University for the entire overage. Individuals who exceed their travel packages may be personally responsible for the overages.

7. Inventory

An inventory of mobile/ wireless devices with monthly charges must be kept by the respective College Senior Financial Officer and reviewed annually.


POLICY CONTACT

Director of Finance, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences


CROSS REFERENCES

This policy should be cross-referenced to the following relevant Governing Documents:

Mobile/ Wireless Devices

Use of Computer Facilities Policy and Procedures – November 2013

Travel and Business Expense Claims Policy and Procedures – December 2017

Custody and Control of Electronic Devices and Media Policy and Procedures – June 2015

Social media guidelines

1. BACKGROUND

Social media plays an important role in communication with, and among, learners, faculty, staff, patients, community stakeholders and others. Inappropriate or offensive behaviors, use or interactions on social media can impact employment, training, or learner status.


2. PURPOSE

2.1 To provide guidance to learners, faculty members and staff of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (“RFHS”), University of Manitoba, respecting existing resources and requirements relating to social media; and

2.2 To provide guidance in understanding their roles and responsibilities as a member of the RFHS when using social media.


3. DEFINITIONS

3.1 RFHS-Hosted Social Media: a social media account that is created, branded and utilized by a program, Department or unit of the RFHS or a College(s) of the RFHS, and represents the RFHS.

3.2 Personal Social Media: social media used for personal purposes, such as communicating with family, friends, other learners, faculty, staff. This includes learner or student groups.

3.3 Social Media: a term used to describe websites and/or applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking including without limitation popular platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, SnapChat, TikTok, LinkedIn and YouTube.


4. GUIDELINES

RFHS-Hosted Social Media

4.1 RFHS-Hosted Social Media shall follow the Guidelines and best practices at the University of Manitoba including:

Social Media Guidelines and Best Practices – Marketing Communications Office;

Social Media at the University of Manitoba – Access and Privacy Office.

Personal Social Media

4.2 Academic freedom and freedom of expression are fundamental values supported by the University of Manitoba and the RFHS.

4.3 While use of Personal Social Media for educational, personal or professional development is permitted and the principles of academic freedom and freedom of expression are supported, individuals assume personal responsibility for information they post online or send electronically. Personal Social Media must comply with professional standards, University policy, and legislation.

4.4 It is important to be aware that, even with Personal Social Media use, the person’s RFHS affiliation may still be identified, known or presumed. A “University Matter” is broadly defined, as provided in the RWLE and Sexual Assault Policy and Procedure.

4.5 For Personal Social Media, if a person identifies their affiliation with RFHS or the University of Manitoba, then they should visibly include a disclaimer such as: “The views expressed here are my own and do not reflect the views of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba” or “these views are my own”. Even with this disclaimer, the matter may be considered a University Matter and, in either case, must comply with professional standards, University policy, and legislation.

4.6 Although any item posted on Social Media will continue to exist in some form, here are select articles that may be helpful to “clean up” one’s Personal Social Media:

Legislation

4.7 The Personal Health Information Act (Manitoba) (“PHIA”) outlines responsibilities that anyone who collects personal health information must abide by. All health care providers, including learners, take a PHIA pledge and are considered trustees under PHIA. The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (Manitoba) (“FIPPA”) contains privacy responsibilities that are applicable. There are many forms of online or electronic communications that may undermine these obligations, for example, blogging about specific patient encounters, or posting patient information on a social networking site.

4.8 In Manitoba, the Human Rights Code prohibits discrimination and harassment of any individual or group based on any of the personal characteristics as set out in the Human Rights Code (Manitoba). The Criminal Code of Canada contains provisions respecting hate speech. Any Social Media shall be free of harassment, discrimination, as well as public incitement, and wilful promotion, of hatred.

Professional Standards

4.9 Professional Standards: Each profession has its own governing body that may have statements or guidelines relevant to Social Media that provide responsibilities for its members. The following list is provided for reference and may not be exhaustive:

Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses

Code of Ethics and Standards of Psychiatric Nursing Practice

College of Occupational Therapists of Manitoba: Code of Ethics

College of Pharmacists of Manitoba: Code of Ethics

College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba – adoption of Canadian Medical

Association Code of Ethics and Professionalism

College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba: Standards of Practice of Medicine

College of Physiotherapists of Manitoba: Use of Social Media

College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba and College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of Manitoba: Social Media and Social Networking

Manitoba Association of Registered Respiratory Therapists: Code of Ethics

Manitoba Association of Registered Respiratory Therapists: Standards of Practice

Manitoba Dental Association: Code of Ethics

Practice Expectations for RNs

University of Manitoba Policies and Values

4.10 A number of University of Manitoba policies and values are relevant and applicable to online communication, electronic activities and work/learning environments. They include:

  • Access and Privacy Policy and Procedures: University members are required to comply with PHIA, FIPPA, and this policy to ensure the University meets its obligations under access and privacy legislation.
  • Use of Computer Facilities Policy and Procedures: University members, including learners, agree to abide by this policy when they claim a user ID. The policy outlines clear user responsibilities.
  • Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy and Procedure (currently under review): This policy, in part provides: “Members of the University Community, including every student and employee, are entitled to a respectful work and learning environment that is: (a) Free from Discrimination and provides for Reasonable Accommodation; (b) Free from Harassment; and (c) Collegial and conducive to early resolution of conflict between members of the University Community.” It provides a process for complaint and resolution should there be a concern respecting a respectful work or learning environment.
  • Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy, Max Rady College of Medicine: This policy provides a commitment “to assuring safe, respectful and supportive working and learning environments in which all of its members are enabled and encouraged to excel. This is an environment free of discrimination, harassment and mistreatment and one in which feedback regarding performance can be shared openly without concern for ridicule or reprisal.” It provides a process for complaint and resolution should there be a concern respecting learner mistreatment. It is currently under review to be applicable across all of the RFHS.
  • Discipline avenues for unprofessional conduct. For learners, unprofessional conduct can result in discipline pursuant to the Student Discipline Bylaw; a program’s
  • Professional Unsuitability Bylaw or a program’s essential/requisite skills and abilities document. For faculty members or staff, unprofessional conduct can result in discipline pursuant to an applicable collective agreement, human resources policy or employment standards law.
  • The University’s commitment to six fundamental values: honesty, trust, fairness, respect, responsibility and courage, defining Academic Integrity, should be kept in mind at all times, as well as the University’s values set out in its Strategic Plan: academic freedom, accountability, collegiality, equity and inclusion, excellence, innovation, integrity, respect, and sustainability.

Social Media Orientation/Training

4.11 It is recommended that each College/Program consider the following to be provided for review or orientation (or other similar orientations/modules) for learners, faculty members and staff:

4.12 It is recommended that learners receive social media orientation/training at admissions/orientation, as well as refresher training prior to commencement of clinical field work/clinical practice/clerkship/clinical learning, as determined to be appropriate by the program.

4.13 It is recommended that staff and faculty members receive social media orientation such as review of the above Social Media Module and this Guideline as part of their new staff on- boarding or College/RFHS-level new faculty orientation process.

4.14 This Guideline is not intended to replace University-level policies or procedures, or more detailed College or Program-specific policies or guidelines. Please reference any applicable College or Program-specific policies or guidelines.

4.15 Should a concern arise respecting Social Media use as it relates to the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences community, learners can report concerns to any of their teachers, preceptors, course/rotation directors, administrative staff members, Department Heads, Associate Deans within their program, Student Affairs or Student Services at Bannatyne Campus representatives, including Student Advocacy, according to personal comfort and preference. The “Speak Up” button can be utilized by Medical learners (currently under review for expansion to all Rady Faculty learners). Faculty members and staff may contact Human Resources or their union representatives. The University’s Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management is a resource available to all University members. If the matter involves a potential privacy breach, the Access and Privacy Office shall be notified in accordance with the Access and Privacy Policy.

4.16 The consequences of posting concerning Social Media is dependent upon the applicable University policy, bylaw, collective agreement, professional standard or legislation that may have been breached, as well as on the circumstances, on the seriousness of the breach, and any mitigating factors. The applicable policy or other governing document

should be referenced, however the following list provides examples of measures and is not meant to be exhaustive nor necessarily represents a progression of measures:

a) A letter of apology;

b) Attendance at educational session(s);

c) Attendance at coaching session(s);

d) Academic consequences such as remediation, probation, notation on the performance record, dismissal/expulsion from the Program/College/RFHS;

e) Termination of employment or academic appointment.


5. GUIDELINE CONTACT

Please contact the Director, Planning and Priorities or the Director, External Relations, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, with questions regarding this document.


6. APPROVAL

These guidelines were approved by the RFHS Dean’s Council on September 1, 2020.

Travel and business expense guideline

Guideline Name:

Travel and Business Expense Guideline

Effective Date:

May 1, 2018

Date Approved:

May 1, 2018

Approved by:

Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Council of Deans

Review Date:

March 31, 2023


PURPOSE

To provide guidance or more restrictive constraints over specific business and/or travel expenditures Travel and Business Expense Claims Procedure below for the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences. In each instance the section in the Procedure in which guidance is being provided or to which the constraint applies will be indicated. The following guideline applies regardless of ultimate source of funding.


DEFINITIONS
Hospitality – Food and/or beverages for events where there is more than one person. An individual travelling on University business and claiming their individual meal is not considered hospitality.

The University has an exclusive agreement with Aramark with respect to providing catering services within U of M space. Therefore, Aramark must be used for all Hospitality or Special Events held within U of M space unless a Catering Waiver has been approved by Dining Services.

Special Events – Hospitality that involves meeting with potential donors or alumni as well as milestone events such as College Anniversaries where there may be dignitaries present. Additional events maybe approved by the Senior Financial Officer of each representative College.


GUIDELINE

1. Meals while traveling (Section 2.20)

a. Actual costs (meals with receipts) will have the following caps:

Region of travel

Breakfast

Lunch

Supper

Per Diem

Canada

$15

$15

$30

$60

USA/Africa

$20

$20

$40

$80

Asia/Latin

America/Oceania

$20

$20

$50

$90

Europe/Caribbean

$25

$25

$60

$110

b. To avoid the requirement to submit receipts the daily per diem allowance can be claimed, and would be considered the daily maximum. If you plan a mix of actual receipts and per diem within a given day, the daily per diem will remain the maximum total claim for that day.

2. Travel Exceptions to the Travel and Business Expense Policy (Section 2.3)

a. For exceptions to the U of M Travel and Business Expense Claims Procedure; airfare using personal cards & expenses 12+ months old, all supporting documentation must accompany the exception request form provided by U of M Travel Services. These should be submitted to the Director of Finance for review and RHFS Dean signature. It will be the submitters responsibility to obtain VP approval following College signoff.

b. Exceptions to this guideline can be requested via email from the Director of Finance, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences. A special exception form is not required.

3. Hospitality/staff events (Section 2.21)

a. All hospitality is to be pre-approved at the following levels via the RFHS Hospitality approval form (note the meal max per person of $75) attached:

i. Senior Financial Officer (SFO) – up to $40 per person (including tax and gratuity)

ii. College Dean – over $40 and up to $75 per person (including tax and gratuity) following initial review and approval by the SFO

b. CPD events where the individual registrant fees cover the entire cost of the event including the meal do not require pre-approval via the Hospitality form, and can be approved by the one-over-one within the College/Department.

c. Research related hospitality/staff events must be approved by the respective FOP Grant Accountant (email will suffice), and included in the submission to the SFO.

d. Approval will not be granted for internal Faculty/Staff/Student meetings, Journal Clubs or Grand Rounds. An exception may be granted by the SFO in specific cases where funding is provided by external partners specifically for this purpose.

e. Recruitment & Visiting Professors dinners are limited to a maximum of 4 people in attendance (3 U of M Faculty plus the guest). A reasonable amount of alcohol may be considered for these events, as discussed with your SFO. Exceptions for number of attendees may be considered for a Dean recruitment.

f. Meals with students during Recruitment & Visiting Professors visits are not considered an acceptable hospitality, and any exceptions will need to be approved by the SFO.

g. Faculty/Staff/Resident planning retreats & events are limited to one event per year for each College or Department. Holiday parties are not considered an acceptable event, as these are provided on a Faculty and/or College level for all Faculty/Staff.

h. Formal graduation dinners must be student funded. Colleges or departments are permitted to make a monetary contribution to these events if their budget allows. Refreshments and snacks may be permitted following College convocation ceremonies when they are not included in the University convocation ceremony.

i. Retirements – a small cake and coffee party is permitted, any larger event requires ticket sales or personal/private funding.

j. CaRMS Interviews – the maximum University approved funding per person will be communicated annually from the Deans office, Max Rady College of Medicine.
 
k. Alcohol may be permitted at Special Events, as pre-approved by the SFO & College Dean. Total expenses are to remain within $100 per person (inclusive of food, beverages, taxes, tip, etc.).

l. Alcoholic beverages are not an allowable expense except as noted in (e) and (k) above and under no circumstance is alcohol to be charged to research funds. Use of a cash bar is acceptable and recommended for events not otherwise approved.

4. Conferences (Section 2.3)
Limited to one (1) per person, per fiscal year, for management and other senior administrative staffing. In situations were other staff are the most appropriate attendees, this would be considered appropriate when requested by a one-over-one with management agreement. Conferences are not to be used to address personal professional development. All attempts are to be made to send the minimum number of individuals to any conference, with the expectation of information gained being disseminated to additional staff at a later date.

5. Parking (Section 2.45)
Airport parking charges while traveling on University business will be permitted up to a maximum of $100/trip. Any amounts exceeding the maximum should be approved by the SFO with justification provided regarding the most economical travel vs taxi transportation to and from the airport.

6. Caregivers (Section 2.49)
Claimants requiring an accompanying caregiver while traveling may be considered following approval of the one-over-one in conjunction with the Director of Finance.


GUIDELINE CONTACT:

Director of Finance, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences


CROSS REFERENCES

This guideline should be cross referenced to the following relevant Governing Documents:

Travel and Business Expense Claims Policy and Procedures – December 2017

Please provide a completed Hospitality Event Pre‐Approval Form to Rady FHS Finance, who will submit for final approval and return via email.

Avenues to address professionalism

Learners - professionalism issues

Professional Unsuitability Bylaw (Program/College)

Jurisdiction: A program’s Professional Unsuitability Committee reviews and makes recommendations regarding the suitability of a learner for the program, and may require the learner to withdraw from the program. Please note: Not all programs have professional unsuitability bylaws, and therefore this avenue is not open to all programs.

Application: The following programs within the RFHS have a Professional Unsuitability Bylaw/Committee:

  • Bachelor of Nursing Program
  • Undergraduate Programs of the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry and School of Dental Hygiene
  • Doctor of Pharmacy Program
  • Bachelor of Midwifery Program
  • Masters of Occupational Therapy Program

Responsibility: The Program/College, through the Program’s Professional Unsuitability Committee.

Appeal: To the University of Manitoba’s Senate Appeals Committee.


Essential/Requisite Skills Policy / Bona Fide Academic Requirements (Program/College)

Jurisdiction: The document sets out the requisite skills and abilities for learners in the program, and may require a learner to withdraw from the program, if not meeting the requirements. Often, the requisite skills and abilities document has a requirement to conduct oneself in a professional manner and/or other professionalism requirements.

Application: The following programs have an Essentials/Requisite Skills policy/document or BFARs:

  • Applied Health Sciences
  • Bachelor of Midwifery Program
  • Bachelor of Nursing Program
  • Bachelor of Respiratory Therapy Program
  • Biochemistry and Medical Genetics
  • Community Health Sciences
  • Dental Hygiene Diploma Program
  • Doctor of Dental Medicine Program
  • Doctor of Pharmacy Program
  • Human Anatomy and Cell Science
  • Immunology
  • Masters in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
  • Masters of Nursing, Nurse Practitioner Program, PhD in Nursing
  • Masters of Occupational Therapy Program
  • Masters of Physical Therapy Program
  • Masters of Physician Assistants Program
  • Masters of Science Genetic Counselling
  • Masters of Science Pharmacy
  • Masters of Science Prosthodontic Program
  • Masters of Science Rehabilitation Sciences Program
  • Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
  • Oral Biology Program
  • Pathology Program
  • Pharmacology and Therapeutics
  • PhD Pharmacy
  • Physiology and Pathophysiology
  • Postgraduate Medical Education Program
  • Preventative Dental Sciences
  • Prosthodontics
  • Surgery
  • Undergraduate Medical Education Program

Responsibility: The Program is responsible to address any issues with requisite skills and abilities; this usually proceeds through the program to the Associate Dean, Director or Department Head responsible for the Program.

Appeal: Although not usually stated within the document, an appeal related to BFARs or Essential Skills would usually be considered an academic matter, and would go the Student Appeals Committee of the College or the Faculty of Graduate Studies. In some cases, the BFARs or Essential Skills of the program are referenced in matters that proceed through the “non-academic misconduct” route (see the Student Discipline Bylaw process below).


Student Discipline Bylaw (UM)

Jurisdiction: To address academic misconduct and non-academic misconduct of learners. Inappropriate or disruptive behaviour includes unprofessional conduct.

Application: To all learners at the University of Manitoba.

Responsibility: The responsibility for discipline depends on the misconduct, and ranges from academic staff responsibility to the President. Tables 1 and 2 of the Bylaw set out the jurisdiction of the disciplinary authority.

Appeal: Appeals proceed in accordance with the Bylaw Appeal Procedure. Final decisions of a College/Program would proceed to the RFHS Local Disciplinary Committee and then to the University Discipline Committee, which is the final level of appeal within the University.


Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (Professionalism Office, Max Rady College of Medicine, possible expansion to RFHS)

Jurisdiction: To consider any intentional or unintentional, disrespectful treatment of a learner, trainee, or colleague that has or may have the effect of creating an intimidating, humiliating, hostile or offensive work or learning environment for learners in that circumstance. In addition to addressing the processes under the Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (complaints via the Speak Up button/process and compliments via the Keep It Up Button), the Associate Dean, Professionalism/Professionalism Office also reviews and addresses learner mistreatment student surveys and end of rotation evaluations, all which feed into the same system (Entrada) for tracking. This allows a centralized system to track all information relating to learner mistreatment, and provides for a denominator in tracking all incidents of learner mistreatment and capturing the data where no mistreatment is reported (i.e. answering “no” to the question). Referrals are made to the OHRCM if the matters falls under the RWLE Policy. Consultations occur with affiliated clinical placement sites, on an as-needed basis.

Application: It currently applies across the Max Rady College of Medicine, however, the Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion is leading a Faculty-wide Learner Mistreatment working group to review Faculty-wide application.

Responsibility: The Associate Dean, Professionalism, Max Rady College of Medicine. Should Faculty-wide application of the policy occur, the query is whether this position/office should be made Faculty-wide to address matters under the policy, and, as well, whether the office would also be responsible for collecting/reviewing end-of-rotation evaluations and mistreatment surveys for all professional programs across the Faculty, captured through Entrada or another online system.

Appeal: The avenue of appeal is dependent on the action taken under the policy.


Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy (Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, UM)

Jurisdiction: To address complaints respecting discrimination, human-rights based harassment, personal harassment and sexual harassment.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: The Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, University of Manitoba.

Appeal: If the respondent is a learner, the appeal proceeds in accordance with the Student Discipline Bylaw and the Student Discipline Appeal Procedure.


Sexual Assault Policy (Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, UofM)

Jurisdiction: To address complaints respecting sexual assault/sexual violence.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: The Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, University of Manitoba.

Appeal: If the respondent is a learner, the appeal proceeds in accordance with the Student Discipline Bylaw and the Student Discipline Appeal Procedure.


Violent or Threatening Behaviour Policy (UM)

Jurisdiction: To establish a protocol for reporting and responding to issues of violence that occur with respect to University matters.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: University Security Services and Student/Staff Threat Assessment Triage Intervention Support team (STATIS), with review from the Vice-President (Administration).

Appeal: Where the individual is a student, the discipline will be implemented in accordance with the Student Discipline Bylaw and the Student Non-Academic Misconduct and Concerning Behaviour Procedure. Appeals proceed in accordance with the Bylaw Appeal Procedure. Final decisions of a College/Program would proceed to the RFHS Local Disciplinary Committee and then to the University Discipline Committee, which is the final level of appeal within the University.


Referral to Regulatory Body (if Learner is a Member)

Although not within University of Manitoba jurisdiction, a referral to the professional regulatory authority may be advisable or required, depending on the status of learners as members of the regulatory authority, and the particular reporting obligations of the regulatory authority.

Faculty or staff - professionalism issues

Collective Agreement Process (Labour Relations/Human Resources)

Jurisdiction: Faculty or staff that are part of a bargaining unit if there is a breach of their collective agreement. A breach is dependent on the specific wording in the collective agreement.

Application: To faculty or staff part of the collective agreement. Responsibility: Labour Relations/Human Resources, University of Manitoba.
Appeal: An appeal proceeds in accordance with the appropriate grievance process defined by the applicable collective agreement.

Human Resources Policy/Employment Standards (Human Resources)

Jurisdiction: Faculty or staff excluded from a bargaining unit, if there is a breach an employment agreement, human resources policy or employment standards law. A breach is dependent on the specific wording in the policy/employment law. Application: To faculty or staff of the University of Manitoba, excluded from a bargaining unit. Responsibility: Human Resources, University of Manitoba.

Appeal: An appeal mechanism is set out in The Appeals by Academic or Support Staff excluded from Bargaining Units Policy.

Responsibilities of Academic Staff with regard to Students Policy (UM)

Jurisdiction: To set out the responsibilities, and discharge of responsibilities, of Academic Staff with respect to students, including in their interactions with students.

Application: It applies to Academic Staff and Academic Administrators.

Responsibility: The Vice-Provost (Academic Affairs) is responsible for implementation of the policy. Appeal: It does not state what process applies should non-compliance occur.

Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (Professionalism Office, Max Rady College of Medicine, possible expansion to RFHS)
Jurisdiction: To consider any intentional or unintentional, disrespectful treatment of a learner, trainee, or colleague that has or may have the effect of creating an intimidating, humiliating, hostile or offensive work or learning environment for learners in that circumstance.

Application: It currently applies across the Max Rady College of Medicine, however, the Director, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion is leading a Faculty-wide Learner Mistreatment working group to review Faculty-wide application.

Responsibility: The Associate Dean, Professionalism, Max Rady College of Medicine. Should Faculty-wide application of the policy occur, the query is whether this position/office should be made Faculty-wide to address matters under the policy.

Appeal: The avenue of appeal is dependent on the action taken under the policy.


Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy (Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, UM)

Jurisdiction: To address complaints respecting discrimination, human-rights based harassment, personal harassment and sexual harassment.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, University of Manitoba.

Appeal: If the respondent is a member of a bargaining unit, an appeal proceeds in accordance with the appropriate grievance process defined by any applicable collective agreement. If the respondent is not a member of a bargaining unit, an appeal would proceed in accordance with The Appeals by Academic or Support Staff excluded from Bargaining Units Policy.


Sexual Assault Policy (Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, UM)

Jurisdiction: To address complaints respecting sexual assault/violence.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management, University of Manitoba. There is a recently-opened Sexual Violence Resource Centre, but this is a resource/support centre.

Appeal: If the respondent is a member of a bargaining unit, an appeal proceeds in accordance with the appropriate grievance process defined by any applicable collective agreement. If the respondent is not a member of a bargaining unit, an appeal would proceed in accordance with The Appeals by Academic or Support Staff excluded from Bargaining Units Policy.


Violent or Threatening Behaviour Policy (UM)

Jurisdiction: To establish a protocol for reporting and responding to issues of violence that occur with respect to University matters.

Application: It applies to the University community, meaning all Board of Governors members, Senate members, Faculty/College/School Councils, employees, anyone holding an appointment with the University, students, volunteers, external parties, contractors and suppliers.

Responsibility: University Security Services and Student/Staff Threat Assessment Triage Intervention Support team (STATIS), with review from the Vice-President (Administration).

Appeal: Where the individual is an employee, the discipline would be implemented pursuant to and in accordance with applicable legislation, common law, collective agreements, and University policies, procedures and bylaws. An appeal would be pursuant to that mechanism.

Referral to Regulatory Body (if Faculty/Staff is a Member)
Although not within University of Manitoba jurisdiction, a referral to the applicable professional regulatory authority may be advisable or required, depending on the status of faculty/staff as members of a regulatory authority, and the particular reporting obligations of the regulatory authority.

Individuals outside university jurisdiction

Prevention of Learner Mistreatment Policy (Professionalism Office, Max Rady College of Medicine, possible expansion to RFHS)

The Professionalism Office may receive a complaint through the policy that involves an individual outside of University jurisdiction (such as at a clinical learning site). The Associate Dean, Professionalism, will work with the CEO or delegate of that site to address the matter. In some cases, joint investigations occur.


Agreements with Individuals/Sites (e.g. Learner Placement Agreement; Independent Contractor Agreement; GFT Agreement)

Certain agreements may place professionalism responsibilities on individuals or entities. For example, the template learner placement agreement states that learners will be placed in a professional and safe work and learning environment. It also allows learners to be removed from a site. A professionalism issue could be addressed through this avenue.


Shared Health Joint Council / College Subcommittees

The Joint Council and its College Subcommittees are intended to be an avenue to address any professionalism issues against learners. This might involve members of a clinical learning site.

College of Nursing

Professional unsuitability by-law

Bylaw: Professional Unsuitability
Application: Students of the Bachelor of Nursing Program, College of Nursing
Review Date: 5 years from approval/revised date
Revised (Date): May 13, 2020
Approved By: College Council, College of Nursing: [April 29, 2020]
Senate: [June 24, 2020]

The purpose of this Bachelor of Nursing Program (“Program”) Professional Unsuitability Bylaw (“Bylaw”) is to set out the jurisdiction of the Program’s Professional Unsuitability Committee and procedures for professional unsuitability hearings. The purpose of the Professional Unsuitability Committee is to review and make recommendations regarding the suitability of a student for the Program.

For the purpose of this Bylaw, the “University” refers to the University of Manitoba.
For the purpose of this Bylaw, the “College” refers to the College of Nursing.


1.00 Jurisdiction

1.01 General
The College of Nursing may require a student to withdraw from the Program pursuant to the procedures set out in this By-Law when the student has been found unsuited, on consideration of competence or professional fitness, for the practice of nursing. A student may be required to withdraw at any time throughout the academic year or following the results of examinations at the end of any academic term. This right to require withdrawal prevails notwithstanding any other provision in the College's Rules or Regulations. The Canadian Nurses' Association Code of Ethics, as the ethical basis for nursing in Canada, will be considered in every situation in which an inquiry is being held into the conduct of a student in the practice of nursing. Furthermore, in accordance with provisions of the Manitoba Human Rights Code, the College’s duty to reasonably accommodate the special needs of its students will be considered. 

1.02 Grounds for Required Withdrawal
A student may be required to withdraw from the Program if the student has been found to be unsuitable for the practice of nursing, including without limitation, if the student has:

  • i. been found guilty of such conduct which, if participated in by a practicing registered nurse would result in suspension or expulsion of the practitioner from the practice of nursing or such other disciplinary actions available against a practitioner by the governing body of the profession;
  • ii. practiced incompetently in any clinical setting;
  • iii. jeopardized professional judgment through self-interest or a conflict of interest;
  • iv. demonstrated behaviour with respect to other students, colleagues, faculty or the public which is exploitive, irresponsible or destructive;
  • v. acquired a criminal conviction which according to the established College processes was determined to be of such a nature as to bring disrepute to the profession, or by which in the opinion of the College, the student demonstrated poor judgment, lack of integrity or (other) unsuitability for the profession;
  • vi. any health condition, the occurrence of which impairs essential performance required for the health profession;
  • vii. been under the influence of alcohol, cannabis products, legal or illegal drugs which impair client care, any other professional activity, or any activity related to the practice of the nursing profession;
  • vii. demonstrated unethical behaviour as specified by the Canadian Nurses’ Association Code of Ethics.

2.00 Professional Unsuitability Committee (PUC)

2.01 There shall be established within the College a standing committee known as the Professional Unsuitability Committee (PUC) to hear and determine matters of competence and/or professional fitness for the practice of nursing. 

Membership in the PUC shall be as follows:

Chair (non-voting, except in the case of tie): a tenured faculty member or instructor in a continuing appointment to be appointed by the Dean, College of Nursing for a five (5) year term, which may be renewable.

Committee Members:

  • i. three full time academic members of the College, elected by the Council of the College of Nursing, for a five (5) year term, which may be renewable;
  • ii. two students from the Bachelor of Nursing Program, College of Nursing; from either third year or fourth-year undergraduate and one graduate student, appointed by the respective student organizations, for a one (1) year term, which may be renewable; and
  • iii. one full time academic member of the University College of the North, appointed by the Dean, College of Nursing; and
  • iv. one representative of the Nursing Profession to be appointed by the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba (CRNM), preferably with experience in dealing with CRNM disciplinary matters, for a five (5) year term, which may be renewable.

3.00 Procedure

3.01 The Dean (or designate) shall:

i) refer matters, which in her/his opinion, involve conduct or circumstances described in Article 1.01 and 1.02 herein, to the PUC in a written report, setting out the name of the student involved, the alleged facts and the alleged ground(s) warranting withdrawal pursuant to section 1.01 and 1.02. In no circumstances will a referral be based solely on anonymous allegations or materials. Anonymous materials are defined as “authorship that has not been disclosed”.

ii) provide the PUC and student with the information which supports the request to assess, through a hearing, the student’s suitability for the profession of nursing. 

3.02 Upon receipt of a request for a hearing into a student’s suitability for the profession of nursing, the PUC shall:

i) send a Notice of Hearing to the named student pursuant to section 4.01 by registered mail to the last known address of the student as found on the College’s records. At the student’s request, additional information may be sent by regular mail, email or facsimile;

ii) consider whether just cause exists to suspend the student while the matter is being determined and if so, to issue an interim suspension to the student;

iii) at all times act expeditiously to complete the hearing;

iv) determine whether any of the grounds requiring withdrawal under section 1.01 and 1.02 exist at hearing of the matter pursuant to this By-Law; and

v) make a disposition in accordance with section 6.00 herein.

3.03 Once a request for a hearing has been made to the PUC, the proceedings may continue notwithstanding that the student has subsequently voluntarily withdrawn from the Program, or has refused to participate in the proceedings.


4.00 Notice to Students

4.01 The Chair of the PUC shall inform the student in writing, within five (5) working days of receipt of the request for a hearing, of the grounds for referral to the PUC, as well as the membership of the PUC and the date, time, and place for the hearing by the PUC of the matters set out in the referral.

4.02 The Notice from the Chair shall include a statement that if the allegations contained in the reference are established to the satisfaction of the PUC the student may be required to withdraw from the Program.

4.03 A faculty member shall not be disqualified from sitting as a member of the PUC hearing the matter by reason only that such faculty member has had previous contact with the student or has prior personal knowledge of the matter.

4.04 The student whose case is to be dealt with shall be permitted to challenge and thereby cause to be disqualified any member of the PUC. In such a case, the Chair would consider the grounds for the challenge and may replace the disqualified members pursuant to section 2.01.  An academic member of the Program shall not be disqualified from sitting as a member of the PUC hearing the matter by reason only that such academic member has had previous contact with the student or has prior personal knowledge of the matter.


5.00 Hearing Procedures

5.01 The student may provide a written response to the grounds.  Such written response should be provided to the PUC and the Dean (or designate) within five (5) working days of the hearing date, or at the discretion of the Chair.

5.02 In addition to the written information, the Dean (or designate) may provide the PUC and student with additional relevant information and or evidence that supports the grounds for a hearing within five (5) working days of the hearing date, or at the discretion of the Chair.

5.03 The student may appear in person and may choose to be represented by a Student Advocate provided through the University, legal or other counsel. A student may request an additional support person who may accompany him/her to the hearing.  This person will be considered an observer and will not be able to participate in the hearing process.

5.04 The Program and student may call relevant witnesses as needed. Written notice to each party of witnesses to be called by the other party shall be provided at least five (5) working days prior to the hearing date, or at the discretion of the Chair.

5.05 The hearing shall be closed to all persons except the members of the PUC, Program Representative, the student, the designated representative of the student, if any, and support person of the student, if any.

5.06 The student or her/his representative shall have the right to hear and to cross examine witnesses, to have access to copies of all documents submitted to the PUC for consideration at least five (5) working days prior to the hearing, to call witnesses and to submit other evidence.

5.07 The student shall not be required to give evidence but if the student elects to do so, then the student may be questioned by members of the PUC.

5.08 A quorum for the PUC shall be 4 members and the Chair as referred to in section 2.02 above.

5.09 A simple majority of the members hearing the matter is required for any finding or for the determination of the appropriate disposition of the matter.

5.10 The Chair of the PUC shall vote only to break a tie.

5.11 Members of the PUC shall be bound by confidentiality in respect of information received in Committee. Information will only be disclosed as is reasonably necessary to implement the investigation, the resolution or the terms of any disposition imposed, or as required by law.

5.12 The results of the hearing and the reasons therefore shall be conveyed in writing to the student, the Student Advocate, and/or the designated representative of the student where applicable, with copies to the Dean of the College of Nursing and the Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programs.

5.13 At the discretion of the Chair, hearings may be conducted in whole or in part via teleconference or other video/electronic means.

5.14 If the student is participating in a hearing via teleconference, the Chair may require the student to confirm that there are not recording devices present and only persons set out in section 5.03 are in attendance.

5.15 At the discretion of the Chair, hearings may be conducted at one of the three delivery sites of the Program (Winnipeg, The Pas, or Thompson) to allow the student to participate in person.


6.00 Disposition of the Matter

6.01 The PUC shall, after hearing all the evidence, meet in closed session with its members only, to:

i) consider the evidence;

ii) make its findings using a balance of probabilities standard;

iii) if the allegations are proven, determine the appropriate disposition of the matter;

iv) if the allegations are not proven, dismiss the matter and/or make any other recommendation the PUC deems appropriate.

6.02 The PUC may make any disposition it deems appropriate in the circumstances. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing the following options, alone or in combination, are available:

i) determine that no further action be taken;

ii) allow the student to remain in the program and attach conditions prescribing future conduct by the student. Such conditions to remain in effect for any period of time the PUC deems appropriate;

iii) reprimand the student in writing;

iv) suspend the student from the Program for a specified period of time;

v) require the student to withdraw from the Program, which withdrawal may attach conditions which must be fulfilled before any application for re-admission to the College can be considered;

vi) )expel the student from the Program with no right to apply for re-admission to the College.

6.03 In cases in which the disposition of the hearing is one of iv, v, or vi as set out in section 6.02, the results shall be conveyed in writing to the Registration Consultant, College of Nursing who shall make the appropriate notation in the student’s transcript.

6.04 The student may request the PUC to consider removal of the notation from the transcript.


7.00 Appeals

7.01 If the student wishes to appeal a disposition of the PUC, such appeal may be made to the Senate Appeals Committee in accordance with the procedures of that body.

7.02 In the event of an appeal, the implementation of any decision of the PUC may be suspended until the matter has been disposed of by the Senate Appeals Committee.

7.03 Notwithstanding the above, if the President of the University is satisfied that it is in the best interests of the University, the President may at any time make an order, subject to final disposition of the appropriate review authority, suspending the student from participating in any program of the University.


8.00 Records

8.01 A record of any finding of professional unsuitability and/or disposition related thereto shall be kept on the student’s academic file within the Program and as required by the University. All information relating to the hearing before the PUC shall be kept in the office of the Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programs.


9.00 Amendments

9.01 This By-Law may be amended by the University’s Senate, or by Senate after approval of such amendment(s) by College Council.
 
Approved by Senate: April 6, 2011
Revisions Approved by Senate: June 24, 2020

Student assessment

Undergraduate student assessment policy

Academic progression


Effective September 2013 for Bachelor of Nursing program students:

Students are required to obtain a minimum of “C” grade in every letter grade course, a “Pass” in every Pass/Fail course, and a Program GPA of 2.5 to graduate. A final grade of “D” or “F” in a letter grade course or “Fail” in a Pass/Fail course taken to complete the degree requirement is considered a failure.

Academic assessments will be based on student performance in letter grade courses. The Term Grade Point Average (TGPA) will be calculated at the conclusion of each academic term in which the student has completed a minimum of 6 credit hours. Students who do not complete the minimum credit hours in one term will be assessed as “too few credit hours to assess”. These students will be assessed over two terms or more at the end of the term in which they reach the threshold of 6 credit hours.

The final term of the Bachelor of Nursing Program (NURS 4290/NURS 4580) will be excluded from assessment providing the student meets graduation requirements. Students are required to have a minimum Program GPA of 2.5 to be eligible for graduation.

Good academic standing: a student with a TGPA of 2.5 or higher will be assessed "College Minimum Met".

Academic warning: the first time a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will receive an Academic Warning. Procedures:

  • Students who receive an academic warning will be given the option of remediation, and will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor at least once during the following term of study.

Academic probation: the second time that a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will be placed on Academic Probation. A formal remediation plan will be mandatory for students on academic probation. Procedures:

  • The remediation plan will be developed by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs) or designate with the active participation of the student.
  • The remediation plan will be based on an assessment of the student’s current academic status and identified learning needs.
  • The student may be required to repeat selected Nursing courses.
  • The student may be required to repeat or register for the first time in selected non-Nursing courses (not elective courses). For example, students may be required or permitted to take or repeat select Statistics, Nutrition, or Native Studies course(s) from years 2 or 3.
  • If any courses are repeated, the student will be subject to all academic regulations related to final grades in repeated courses and the number of failures allowed in any given course or sequence of courses in the Bachelor of Nursing Program.
  • Students will be allowed to register in courses that they are required to repeat after students who are taking the course for the first time have had the opportunity to register and availability of space in the course can be confirmed.
  • The student will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor at least twice during the following term of study.
  • Students on probation will not be permitted to register in any new nursing courses until they are removed from probation.
  • If there are non-academic issues interfering with the student’s academic progress, the student will be required to make every effort to deal with and resolve those issues during the period of academic probation.
  • Where indicated, a student will be referred to the student services unit for information and guidance. Any student subsequently registered with Student Accessibility Services and requiring accommodation by the College of Nursing will be referred to the College of Nursing Accommodation Team.

Academic suspension: The third time that a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will be placed on Suspension. Students who are suspended shall be ineligible to take any courses at the University of Manitoba or on a letter of permission for a minimum of eight and a maximum of 15 calendar months. Procedures:

  • The time period for the suspension actually served by the student is contingent on the program timetable and course availability.
  • Students who wish to continue their studies in the Bachelor of Nursing Program must submit a written application for reinstatement to the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs) by May 1 of each calendar year.
    • The written application must specifically address the academic and non-academic issues that had affected their academic standing prior to their academic suspension and describe how these issues have been addressed and/or resolved. This information should include, at a minimum:
      • An outline of what they have been doing during their time away from Nursing (e.g., developing good study habits, attending counseling, etc.);
      • An explanation of what has changed to make it more likely that they will be successful, and their plan for success if reinstated; and
      • An academic plan for the rest of their program.
  • The College of Nursing will consider each request on a case by case basis and reserves the right to deny a student’s request for reinstatement.
  • Students who are reinstated or who are actively under consideration for reinstatement will be subject to the following procedures with respect to their course registrations:
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Fall Term (January) will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1 of the same year in which they were suspended;
      • Be given a final decision by May 15;
      • Register for courses during the College’s registration period; and
      • Proceed to course work in Fall term subject to space availability.
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Winter Term (May) will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1 of the following year;
      • Be given a provisional decision by May 15;
      • Register for Fall term courses during the College’s registration period; and
      • Proceed to course work in Fall term subject to space availability.
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Summer Term will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1;
      • Be given a provisional decision by May 15
      • Register for summer term, or the subsequent Fall term, courses during the College’s registration periods; and
      • Proceed to course work in summer term subject to course/space availability.
    • Students who do not apply for reinstatement by this deadline will be considered as having withdrawn from the College of Nursing and will not be permitted to return.
    • Students who are permitted to return from suspension will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor to plan their program.

Required to withdraw: students who have been permitted to return from Suspension and whose TGPA drops below 2.5 a fourth time will be Required to Withdraw. Students who are Required to Withdraw are ineligible for re-admission to the College of Nursing.

Student assessment

Undergraduate student assessment policy

Academic progression
Effective September 2013 for Bachelor of Nursing program students:

Students are required to obtain a minimum of “C” grade in every letter grade course, a “Pass” in every Pass/Fail course, and a Program GPA of 2.5 to graduate. A final grade of “D” or “F” in a letter grade course or “Fail” in a Pass/Fail course taken to complete the degree requirement is considered a failure.

Academic assessments will be based on student performance in letter grade courses. The Term Grade Point Average (TGPA) will be calculated at the conclusion of each academic term in which the student has completed a minimum of 6 credit hours. Students who do not complete the minimum credit hours in one term will be assessed as “too few credit hours to assess”. These students will be assessed over two terms or more at the end of the term in which they reach the threshold of 6 credit hours.

The final term of the Bachelor of Nursing Program (NURS 4290/NURS 4580) will be excluded from assessment providing the student meets graduation requirements. Students are required to have a minimum Program GPA of 2.5 to be eligible for graduation.

Good academic standing: a student with a TGPA of 2.5 or higher will be assessed "College Minimum Met".

Academic warning: the first time a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will receive an Academic Warning. Procedures:

  • Students who receive an academic warning will be given the option of remediation, and will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor at least once during the following term of study.

Academic probation: the second time that a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will be placed on Academic Probation. A formal remediation plan will be mandatory for students on academic probation. Procedures:

  • The remediation plan will be developed by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs) or designate with the active participation of the student.
  • The remediation plan will be based on an assessment of the student’s current academic status and identified learning needs.
  • The student may be required to repeat selected Nursing courses.
  • The student may be required to repeat or register for the first time in selected non-Nursing courses (not elective courses). For example, students may be required or permitted to take or repeat select Statistics, Nutrition, or Native Studies course(s) from years 2 or 3.
  • If any courses are repeated, the student will be subject to all academic regulations related to final grades in repeated courses and the number of failures allowed in any given course or sequence of courses in the Bachelor of Nursing Program.
  • Students will be allowed to register in courses that they are required to repeat after students who are taking the course for the first time have had the opportunity to register and availability of space in the course can be confirmed.
  • The student will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor at least twice during the following term of study.
  • Students on probation will not be permitted to register in any new nursing courses until they are removed from probation.
  • If there are non-academic issues interfering with the student’s academic progress, the student will be required to make every effort to deal with and resolve those issues during the period of academic probation.
  • Where indicated, a student will be referred to the student services unit for information and guidance. Any student subsequently registered with Student Accessibility Services and requiring accommodation by the College of Nursing will be referred to the College of Nursing Accommodation Team.

Academic suspension: The third time that a student’s TGPA drops below 2.5, the student will be placed on Suspension. Students who are suspended shall be ineligible to take any courses at the University of Manitoba or on a letter of permission for a minimum of eight and a maximum of 15 calendar months. Procedures:

  • The time period for the suspension actually served by the student is contingent on the program timetable and course availability.
  • Students who wish to continue their studies in the Bachelor of Nursing Program must submit a written application for reinstatement to the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Programs) by May 1 of each calendar year.
    • The written application must specifically address the academic and non-academic issues that had affected their academic standing prior to their academic suspension and describe how these issues have been addressed and/or resolved. This information should include, at a minimum:
      • An outline of what they have been doing during their time away from Nursing (e.g., developing good study habits, attending counseling, etc.);
      • An explanation of what has changed to make it more likely that they will be successful, and their plan for success if reinstated; and
      • An academic plan for the rest of their program.
  • The College of Nursing will consider each request on a case by case basis and reserves the right to deny a student’s request for reinstatement.
  • Students who are reinstated or who are actively under consideration for reinstatement will be subject to the following procedures with respect to their course registrations:
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Fall Term (January) will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1 of the same year in which they were suspended;
      • Be given a final decision by May 15;
      • Register for courses during the College’s registration period; and
      • Proceed to course work in Fall term subject to space availability.
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Winter Term (May) will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1 of the following year;
      • Be given a provisional decision by May 15;
      • Register for Fall term courses during the College’s registration period; and
      • Proceed to course work in Fall term subject to space availability.
    • Students who are suspended at the end of Summer Term will:
      • Request reinstatement by May 1;
      • Be given a provisional decision by May 15
      • Register for summer term, or the subsequent Fall term, courses during the College’s registration periods; and
      • Proceed to course work in summer term subject to course/space availability.
    • Students who do not apply for reinstatement by this deadline will be considered as having withdrawn from the College of Nursing and will not be permitted to return.
    • Students who are permitted to return from suspension will be required to meet with a Nursing Student Advisor to plan their program.

Required to withdraw: students who have been permitted to return from Suspension and whose TGPA drops below 2.5 a fourth time will be Required to Withdraw. Students who are Required to Withdraw are ineligible for re-admission to the College of Nursing.

Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry

Attendance

This Policy is intended to govern and guide decisions regarding Student Attendance in the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, University of Manitoba.


1.0 Background

The University of Manitoba Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry has a social mandate to ensure that graduating dentists are caring, skilled healthcare providers who are worthy of the public trust endowed upon them.

To fulfill this mandate, the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry has developed comprehensive programs of education and experience.

Collectively, we refer to these programs as Dental School.

Unlike non-professional education programs, where students can pick and choose their education and experiences based on personal preferences, Dental School requires students to attend and participate actively in all components of the program.

While students are required to complete assignments and pass examinations, these are not considered to be equivalent to attending Dental School.

When the University confers the DMD degree, it attests to society not only that the student has shown successful examination performance, but that the student has participated in the entire educational experience defined by the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry and has thereby demonstrated an appropriate level of professional learning and responsibility.


2.0 Statement of Policy

Students at the University of Manitoba, Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, are required to attend, and be on time for, all scheduled classes, seminars, examinations, small group sessions, laboratories, pre-clinical labs, and clinics.

Students arriving more than 10-minutes late will be recorded as absent.

Students who do not comply with the Student Attendance Policy will face academic consequences, including, but not limited to:

  • Reduced course grades
  • Debarment from class, pre-clinical lab, clinic, and/or from final examination(s)
  • Debarment from receiving academic credit for the course
  • Requirement to repeat a course or year in the program.

3.0 Statement of Procedures

3.1       Attendance

While student attendance in all scheduled educational experiences is mandatory, monitoring of student attendance in classes and pre-clinical labs is optional and left to the discretion of each Course Coordinator.

Academic consequences for non-attendance may apply in those courses that track student attendance, as detailed in the respective Course Outline.

Tracking of student attendance in scheduled clinics will be performed by the Dean’s Office through use of Axium ‘swipes.’ Information about student attendance in clinic will be communicated regularly with Course Coordinators, who are responsible for following-up with individual students.

Tracking of student attendance in classes and preclinical labs will be performed by the Course Coordinator in each course.

Tracking mechanisms may include I-clicker questions, D2L attendance questions, and/or paper sign-in sheets.

The University of Manitoba welcomes all faiths and beliefs.

As such, the decision regarding absence from class/labs/clinics on religious holidays is left to the individual.

Absences due to religious observance will not contribute to any academic consequence for the student.

Each student is responsible for notifying the College of religious observance dates.

Failure to provide notice will result in the student being classified as absent.

Similarly, special consideration will be given for situations of longer-term student absence due to illness, medical care, or other unavoidable circumstances (see 3.3 below).

3.2       Consequences of Non-attendance

3.2.1    Ideal Attendance:

The target for all students is 100% attendance; the College will consider all students who have achieved this target to have demonstrated an ideal level of professional commitment and responsibility within the dentistry program, and within each course of the program.

3.2.2    Expected Attendance:

Students are allowed a few days absence, up to 5% of the scheduled course sessions, for illness or other non-avoidable reasons, without incurring academic penalty.

The College considers this level of non-attendance to fully meet professional commitments and responsibility within the dentistry program.

For comparison, Manitoba Employment Standards allow 6 unpaid days (3% of available work days) each year for illness, bereavement, and attending to family responsibilities.

3.2.3    Below Expected Attendance:

Student absenteeism beyond 5% of the scheduled course sessions represents what the College will consider to be below expected levels of professional commitment and responsibility with regard to attendance.

Progressive academic consequences, in the form of reduced course grades, will be applied to reflect the degree of non-attendance.

Clinic Attendance:

Students will lose 1% of the course mark for every 1% decrease in clinic attendance; to a maximum of 10% of the course grade (see Table 1 below).

Class/Lab Attendance:

Monitoring of student attendance in class/lab is optional, and left to the discretion of the Course Coordinator.

For courses opting to monitor student attendance, the course-specific academic consequences for non-attendance will be detailed in the Course Outline.

The maximum academic penalty for non-attendance is 10%.

3.2.4    Unacceptable Attendance:

The minimum acceptable level of attendance is 85% for each course in the dentistry program.

Course Coordinators or the Associate Dean (Academic) can initiate procedures to debar a student from attending class, pre-clinical labs, clinics, or from final examinations, when the absences for that student exceed 15% of the available academic time in a course.

When notified of a course attendance problem, the Associate Dean (Academic) will call, and give notice to the student, of a Disciplinary Hearing to investigate the issue under the U of M Student Discipline Bylaw.

If it is determined that the student is in breach of this Student Attendance Policy, then debarment from class, pre-clinical lab, clinic, and/or from final examination(s) is possible.

In addition to the above ‘course-level’ academic consequences, students found to be in breach of this Student Attendance Policy, with absenteeism exceeding 15% of the available academic time in a course, may be debarred from receiving academic credit for the course and be required to repeat the course or year in the program.

Table 1: Academic consequences for clinical non-attendance

Attendance (of scheduled clinics)

Academic Consequences

95-100%

No penalty

94%

1% penalty

93%

2% penalty

92%

3% penalty

91%

4% penalty

90%

5% penalty

89%

6% penalty

88%

7% penalty

87%

8% penalty

86%

9% penalty

85%

10% penalty

<85%

Debarment

3.3       Special consideration for extended illness/medical care

Students are allowed a reasonable number of absences due to illness or for compassionate reasons before incurring academic consequences (see 3.2 above).

In cases of longer-term (greater than 3 days) illness, or other extended or recurring absence, students can submit a formal written request to the Associate Dean (Academic) detailing the reasons why special consideration should be given for the student’s attendance.

The Associate Dean (Academic) will decide whether or not normal academic consequences should apply.

These requests will normally require a signed physician's certificate or other external documentation of the reason for non-attendance.

Academic consequences will normally be waived for extended absence for unavoidable, documented illness, healthcare, and compassionate reasons.

3.4       Absence from Clinics with Booked Patients

The Dentistry Program includes some clinics where students book their own patients, and some clinics where College staff book patients for the students.

The latter includes the Pediatric Dentistry, Orthodontic, 4th year General Practice, Urgent Care, Oral Surgery, Oral Sleep Medicine, TMD, and Community Externship rotation clinics.

The convenience of having patients booked by College staff brings an additional professional responsibility regarding absence on these clinic days.

Absence without notification on these dates would result in harm to the patient (abandonment, lost time from work), inconvenience to staff and fellow students, and harm to the reputation of the College and University.

On days when a student will be absent from a clinic with booked patients, including days of unexpected illness in the morning, the student is required to report the absence to the Faculty prior to the scheduled patient appointment time.

For student convenience, all contact regarding absence should be directed to the Student Services Office at 204-480-1355 or by email to absent@umanitoba.ca.

When notified that a student is absent without notice from a clinic with booked patients, the Associate Dean (Academic) will call, and give notice to the student, of a Disciplinary Hearing to investigate the issue under the Student Discipline Bylaw, or the Professional Unsuitability Bylaw for repeated offenses.

If it is determined that the student is in breach of this Student Attendance Policy, then more serious academic consequences, including suspension or expulsion is possible.

For details of possible consequences see http://umanitoba.ca/admin/governance/media/Student_Discipline_Bylaw_-_Table_2.pdf and http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/dentistry/media/Dentistry_Professional_Unsuitability_Bylaw.pdf .

3.5       Examinations

Students are required to attend all scheduled examinations.

A student who is prevented from attending any regular examination, by reason of illness or other cause beyond his or her control, must at once notify the College prior to the start of the examination, and give satisfactory evidence of the cause of absence.

Students failing to provide prior notice and satisfactory evidence will receive a mark of zero (“0”) on the missed examination.

If the absence was necessary by reason of illness, then the student MUST provide a physician’s certificate to avoid a mark of zero (“0”).

The College reserves the right to require the physician’s note to be from a University of Manitoba Health Service Clinic, and to confirm the validity of any submitted physician’s certificate.

3.5       Communication of the Policy

The Policy will be reviewed with students each year during the orientation period.


4.0 University and College Expectations

The above stated Policy and Procedures are designed to govern and guide decisions regarding student attendance in the DMD program at the Dr.

Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry , and are complementary and supportive to the following University of Manitoba Policy on Attendance and Withdrawal excerpted from the 2013-2014 Undergraduate Calendar, available at http://crscalprod1.cc.umanitoba.ca/Catalog/ViewCatalog.aspx?pageid=viewcatalog&catalogid=240&chapterid=2310&topicgroupid=14502

Attendance and Withdrawal

1. Attendance at Class and Debarment

Regular attendance is expected of all students in all courses.

An instructor may initiate procedures to debar a student from attending classes and from final examinations and/or from receiving credit where unexcused absences exceed those permitted by the faculty or school regulations.

A student may be debarred from class, laboratories, and examinations by action of the dean/director for persistent non-attendance, failure to produce assignments to the satisfaction of the instructor, and/or unsafe clinical practice or practicum.

Students so debarred will have failed that course.

Max Rady College of Medicine

Academic records

Adult criminal records and child abuse registry

Policy Name:

Adult Criminal Records , Child Abuse Registry, Adult Abuse Registry and Basic Life Support (BLS) For Health Care Providers (HCP) Information Specific to the Time of Admission and Annual Re-Registration

Application / Scope:

Applicants to the MD Degree Program, Undergraduate Medical Education Students and to the MPAS Program

Approved (Date):

April, 2017

Review Date:

January, 2021

Revised (Date):

January, 2017

Approved By:

College Executive Council

1. POLICY STATEMENTS

The Max Rady College of Medicine requires that all applicants accepted to the College’s medical education programs:

1.1 Must submit and be cleared on a formal Criminal Records Check (including vulnerable sector screening) by the time of their initial registration and prior to each subsequent annual re-registration.

  • The original documents must be verified by UGME Enrolment
  • Services after which they will be returned to the learner.

1.2 Must submit and be cleared on a formal Child Abuse Registry Check by the time of their initial registration and prior to each subsequent annual re-registration.

  • Child Abuse Registry Checks can be completed at the Educational Programs Office, 260 Brodie Centre during regular business hours. Students must bring two pieces of government-issued identification to complete the application.
  • UGME Enrolment Services will receive the original documents directly from the respective government offices.

1.3 Must submit and be cleared on a formal Adult Abuse Registry Check by the time of their initial registration and prior to each subsequent annual re-registration.

  • Adult Abuse Registry Checks can be completed at the Educational Programs Office, 260 Brodie Centre during regular business hours. Students must bring two pieces of government-issued identification to complete the application.
  • UGME Enrolment Services will receive the original documents directly from the respective government offices.

1.4 Must complete a recent Basic Life Support (BLS) for Health Care Providers (HCP) course and submit proof of course completion by the time of their initial registration and prior to each subsequent annual re-registration.

  • Session information for University of Manitoba course offerings can be found online. Sessions conducted outside of the University of Manitoba will be accepted as long as it is a Basic Life Support (BLS) for Health Care Providers (HCP) Course acceptable to the Heart & Stroke Foundation.

1.5 Must immediately advise the Associate Dean, UGME and Director MPAS if charged with or convicted of any offence under the Criminal Code, Controlled Drugs and Substances Act or Food and Drugs Act at any time during the learner’s registration in the Max Rady College of Medicine’s educational programs. If the learner is charged with or convicted of such an offence while not actively registered, the Associate Dean, UGME or Director of MPAS must be advised at the time of annual re-registration. W here a charge or conviction is disclosed, the Associate Dean may refer the matter to Faculty’s Professionalism Subcommittee on Admissions and Progression, which will determine the appropriate course of action. Failure to disclose a criminal charge or conviction in a timely manner, or at all, may lead to citation for breach of professionalism and ramifications may include expulsion from the educational program.

Please be advised of the following pertinent information.

1.6 Adult criminal convictions or pending charges will not necessarily preclude admission or re-registration. If a conviction is disclosed, the decision on how that will affect the candidate will be made by the Faculty’s Professionalism Subcommittee on Admissions and Progression. This Committee will consist of the following: the Associate Dean, Professionalism and Diversity as Chairperson; the Associate Dean, Postgraduate Medical Education; the Executive Director of the Joint Operating Division or designate; the Registrar of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba or designate; and a student representative. The Committee may determine that a candidate is eligible for admission, eligible for admission under specified conditions, or ineligible for admission; the Committee may similarly determine the parameters for continued registration or dismissal. However, applicants to a medical education program, or those currently enrolled who have adult criminal convictions which indicate they may pose a threat to the safety and well- being of children and others will be denied admission or continued registration.

1.7 Candidates are not required to disclose records under The Youth Criminal Justice Act.

1.8 Candidates for admission who appear on the Child Abuse Registry or Adult Abuse Registry as an offender will be denied admission, and registered learners who subsequently are added will be withdrawn from the medical education program

1.9 The formal checks are the property of the learner and will be returned to the learner.

2.0 The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba has requirements for registration that include a criminal record check suitable to the College; such requirements are independent from the Max Rady College of Medicine. College requirements can be accessed on their website: http://www.cpsm.mb.ca. The Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba cannot be held responsible for future changes in legislation which may affect requirements for registration and licensure to practice medicine in Manitoba.

2.1 Notwithstanding requirements identified in A. 3, any changes in a learner’s criminal record status, Child Abuse Registry status or Adult Abuse Registry status as an offender while in the College’s medical education programs must be reported to the Associate Dean, UGME, who will then consult with the Faculty committee described above.


2. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Administrator, Enrolment with questions respecting this policy.

Criteria for Doctor of Medicine graduand list

Policy Name:

Criteria for Doctor of Medicine Graduand List

Application/ Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students

Approved (Date):

April 2017

Review Date:

June 2021

Revised (Date):

May 2020

Approved By:

College Executive Council

1. PURPOSE

To establish the process for preparing and approving the respective Max Rady College of Medicine MD Graduand lists for Spring and Fall  Convocation.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Prospective Spring Graduand List – The list of students in the final year of the MD degree program who are expected to meet the graduation requirements by the official dates for Spring Convocation as reflected in the current University Academic Calendar.

2.2 Prospective Fall Graduand List – The list of students in the final year of the MD degree program who are expected to meet the graduation requirements by the official dates for Fall Convocation as reflected in the current University Academic Calendar.

2.3 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program.

For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.

2.4 Deferred Examination – An approved delay in writing a summative examination

2.5 Supplemental Examination – An opportunity to rewrite an examination that was failed.

2.6 Remediation – The provision to students on Probationary Status by the Undergraduate Medical Education Faculty of reasonable academic supports, educational resources and protected time for studying and review, and additional clinical exposures as may be deemed appropriate following a Remediation Assessment.

2.7 ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) – A course covering clinical interventions for the urgent treatment of cardiac arrest, stroke and other life threatening medical emergencies, as well as knowledge and skills to deploy these interventions.

2.8 Final Spring Graduand List – The list of students who have met all requirements for Spring Convocation.

2.9 Final Fall Graduand List – The list of students who have met all requirements for fall Convocation.

2.10 Elective – An opportunity for self-education in an area of the student’s own interest.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

SPRING CONVOCATION

3.1 A Year IV student’s name is sent forward for Convocation if the student meets the following requirements no later than the College Executive Council session scheduled in early to mid- April of each academic year:

  • Completion of all Remediation;
  • Completion of all NBME Examinations – Deferred and Supplemental;
  • Completion of all Elective requirements and,
  • Registration in the ACLS course with ability to participate in the course and receive certification no later than the end of April of the academic year.

3.2 A Prospective Spring Graduand List is organized early in the academic year and maintained throughout the academic year to identify the names of students who will be put forward for Convocation. The procedures section of this document outlines the process related to the Prospective Spring Graduand List.

3.3 The Progress Committee and College Executive Council are the responsible governing bodies within the Max Rady College of Medicine which approve the Final Spring Graduand List.

3.4 The Dean, Max Rady College of Medicine is responsible for submitting the Final Spring Graduand List to Senate.  

REQUIREMENTS FOR JULY 1 RESIDENCY

3.5 A Year IV student is permitted to begin Residency on July 1 if the student meets the following requirements by the end of the third week of June of each academic year:

  • Completion of all Remediation;
  • Completion of all NBME Examinations – Deferred and Supplemental;
  • Completion of all Electives requirements, and
  • Registration in the ACLS course with ability to participate in the course and receive certification prior to the third week of June of each academic year.

FALL CONVOCATION

3.6 A Year IV student’s name is sent forward for Convocation if the student meets the following requirements by September 15 of the academic year:

  • Completion of all Remediation;
  • Completion of all NBME Examinations – Deferred and Supplemental;
  • Completion of all Electives requirements, and
  • Registration in the ACLS course with ability to participate in the course and receive certification by end of April of the academic year.

3.7 A Prospective Fall Graduand List is organized from student names moved from the Prospective Spring Graduand List.

3.8 The Progress Committee and College Executive Council are the governing bodies within the Max Rady College of Medicine that approve the Final Fall Graduand List.

3.9 The Dean, Max Rady College of Medicine is responsible for submitting the Final Fall Graduand List to Senate.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT

4.1 Know and understand the graduation requirements.

4.2 Ensure that all graduation requirements are met by the dates outlined within this policy.

4.3 Declare your intention to graduate using the “Declarations” function within Aurora Student.

The deadline date for declaring an intention to graduate is mid-January of the year you intend on graduating. Students will receive an automated notice via their University of Manitoba email address.

SPRING CONVOCATION

UGME/STUDENT AFFAIRS, FACULTY AND STAFF

4.4 In September of the academic year, the Administrator, Enrolment prepares a list of Year IV students, ensuring all names are organized by legal name. This list becomes the basis for the Prospective Spring Graduand List.

4.5 In October of the academic year, the Administrator, Enrolment organizes a meeting involving Administrator, Evaluation Clerkship, Administrator, Clerkship, Administrator, Electives, and Business Manager, UGME to review the Prospective Spring Graduand List a.

4.6 From October to March, the Administrator, Enrolment maintains and adjusts the Prospective Spring Graduand List and Prospective Fall Graduand List based on information submitted by the Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation, Administrator, Clerkship, Administrator, Electives, and Business Manager, UGME.

4.7 From April 1 to the date of the scheduled College Executive Council session in early to mid- April, identified UGME support staff work with students, departments, and outside agencies to confirm all graduation requirements are met for each student listed on the Prospective Spring Graduand List.

4.8 By the date of the College Executive Council session in early to mid-April of the academic year, the Administrator, Enrolment will organize a meeting involving the Administrator, Evaluations Clerkship, Administrator, Clerkship, Administrator, Electives, Business Manager, UGME, to create the Final Spring Graduand List from the Prospective Spring Graduand List. Student names from the Prospective Spring Graduand List that are not moved to the Final Spring Graduand List will be transferred to the Prospective Fall Graduand List.

4.9 Based on the information gathered from the April meeting, the Administrator, Enrolment will prepare two (2) letters as follows:

  • Letter One - A letter promulgating the Final Spring Graduand List identifying Students by Legal Name(s) and Student Number and,
  • Letter Two - A letter promulgating the Final Spring Graduand List with Student Numbers only.

4.10 The Administrator, Enrolment and Business Manager, UGME will have both letters approved by the Director, Evaluations and then signed by both the Director Evaluations and Associate Dean, UGME.

4.11 The Director, Evaluations will subsequently present Letter Two, the Final Spring Graduand List with Student Numbers only to Progress Committee in its regular April session and then to College Executive Council during their scheduled early to mid-April session for approval.

4.12 Once approved by College Executive Council, the Dean, Max Rady College of Medicine will sign Letter One containing the Final Spring Graduand List to the Registrar’s Office by the deadline established within the current Academic Calendar.

4.13 The Administrator, Enrolment will send a copy of the Final Spring Graduand List to the Director, External Relations Faculty of Health Sciences for publication and a copy to the Convocation Coordinator, Registrar’s Office.

FALL CONVOCATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR JULY 1 RESIDENCY UGME/STUDENT AFFAIRS, FACULTY AND STAFF

4.14 From June 15 to June 20, UGME support staff will work with students, departments, and outside agencies to confirm all graduation requirements for each student listed on the Prospective Fall Graduand List who is accepted for a July 1 Residency program are met.

4.15 By June 21 of the academic year, the Administrator, Enrolment will organize a meeting involving the Administrator, Evaluations Clerkship, Administrator, Clerkship, Administrator, Electives, and the Business Manager, UGME to review the Prospective Fall Graduand List.

4.16 The Administrator, Enrolment will send a letter to respective Residency program confirming that the student has met the graduation requirements for Fall Convocation.

FALL CONVOCATION

4.17 From September 15 to September 21, UGME support staff will work with students, departments, and outside agencies to confirm all graduation requirements are met for each student listed on the Prospective Fall Graduand List.

4.18 By September 22 of the academic year, the Administrator, Enrolment will organize a meeting involving the Administrator, Evaluations Clerkship, Administrator, Clerkship, Administrator, Electives, and Business Manager, UGME to review the Prospective Fall Graduand List

4.19 Based on the information gathered from the September meeting, the Administrator Enrolment prepares two letters:

  • Letter One - A letter establishing the Final Fall Graduand List identifying Students Legal Name(s) and Student Number and,
  • Letter Two - A letter establishing the Final Fall Graduand List with Student Numbers only.

4.20 The Administrator, Enrolment and Business Manager, UGME will have the both letters approved by the Director, Evaluations and then signed by both the Director Evaluations and Associate Dean, UGME.

4.21 The Director, Evaluations presents Letter Two, the Final Fall Graduand List with Student Numbers only to Progress Committee during the September sitting and then the College Executive Council during the scheduled September session for approval.

4.22 Once approved by College Executive Council, the Dean, Max Rady College of Medicine will sign Letter One containing the Final Fall Graduand List to the Registrar’s Office by the deadline established within the current Academic Calendar.

4.23 The Administrator, Enrolment will send a copy of the Final Fall Graduand List to the Director, External Relations Faculty of Health Sciences for publication and a copy to the Convocation Coordinator, Registrar’s Office.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 UGME Policy and Procedures – Supplemental Assessments

5.2 UGME Policy and Procedures – Promotion and Failure

5.3 UGME Policy and Procedures – Deferred Examinations

5.4 UGME Policy and Procedures – Remediation

5.5 UGME Policy and Procedures – Midpoint In-Training Evaluation and Final In Training Evaluation preparation, Distribution and Completion and Essential Clinical Presentation Preparation, Distribution, Audit, and Remediation

5.6 UGME Policy and Procedures – Examination Conduct

5.7 UGME Policy and Procedures – Invigilation of Examinations

5.8 UGME Policy and Procedures – Examination Results


6. POLICY CONTACT

Director, Evaluations

Medical Student Performance Report (MSPR)

Policy Name:

Medical Student Performance Report (MSPR)

Application/ Scope:

Year I through Year IV Undergraduate Medical Education Students

Approved (Date):

December 2012

Review Date:

December 2021

Revised (Date):

May 2020

Approved By:

College Executive Council

1. PURPOSE

The MSPR is a record of a medical student’s assessment which provides a description of the history of the student‘s progress throughout their first three years in the UGME program. It documents the student‘s academic progress and notes any gaps, extensions, and failures. Providing an accurate representation of the summative evaluative information for each student, the MSPR is the comprehensive record of each student’s performance. Adhering and fulfilling the specific requirements of the Canadian Residency Matching Service (CaRMS) application process, MSPRs are forwarded to CaRMS with a copy being placed in the student’s active file. For future reference and verification, a finalized copy of the MSPR is updated for each student upon graduation and placed within each student’s permanent academic record.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 CaRMS – Canadian Residency Matching Service

2.2 MSPR – Medical Student Performance Report

2.3 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) - A comprehensive summary of student performance as a necessary component of their Clerkship training which demonstrates the full range of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) required of a physician. Electronically distributed at the start of each rotation, FITERs must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This must include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.4 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program.

For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.

2.5 Course/Module - A Course/Module is a course of study or educational unit, which covers a series of interrelated topics and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the M.D degree. The UGME curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal courses occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.6 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE-type) – an examination used to assess the clinical skills of students.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by a comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by their congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of eight of twelve OSCE stations to pass the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills Courses.
  • The Remedial Examinations for the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills courses will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial exam. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial OSCE.

Comprehensive Clinical Exam (CCE) – An objective structured clinical-type examination used to assess the clinical skills of students in Clerkship.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by the comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by the congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations in order to pass the CCE.
  • The Remedial Examinations for Med IV CCE will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial CCE. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial CCE.

2.7 UGME – Undergraduate Medical Education


3.  POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 The MSPR for each graduating student will include information on each of the following areas:

  • Student Identification
  • Events Worthy of Particular Note
  • Academic History
  • Academic Progress
  • Summary
  • Signature of Associate Dean, UGME

3.2 The MSPR will be electronically created, reviewed and submitted to CaRMS by the stated deadline in each academic year.

3.3 The MSPR will be updated following CaRMS submission to include new information related to academic progress in the final months of the UGME program.

3.4 The MSPR will identify the following information in Academic History section as outlined in the Max Rady College of Medicines Promotion and Failure Policy.

3.5 The Associate Dean, UGME maintains the right to change narrative FITER information on individual MSPRs as necessary.

3.6 Support staff has no authority to change the intent of narrative FITER information.

3.7 The MSPR, prepared for submissions to CaRMS, will contain narrative FITER information for Electives completed during summer vacation periods.

3.8 The MSPR, prepared for submissions to CaRMS, will not contain narrative FITER information for Electives confirmed from early October to deadline for CaRMS submission

3.9 The MSPR, as an institutional assessment, is considered a component of a student’s academic record and, thus, will be made available for student review. Students will be permitted to correct factual errors in the MSPR, but not to revise evaluative statements contained within the MSPR. Students are encouraged, when required, to engage Student Affairs in supporting advocacy efforts in addressing perceived MSPR discrepancies.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENTS

4.1 Track examination results (Pass/Fail) and remediation information to ensure that information matches what is included in the MSPR if applicable.

4.2 Complete required FITER, ECP and Rotation Evaluations electronically at the end of each rotation to ensure FITER comments are released for inclusion in the MSPR.

4.3 Review Section One, Section Two and Section Three MSPR information provided by Evaluation personnel to ensure it accurately reflects requisite information.

4.4 Correspond with Evaluation personnel with respect to Section One, Section Two and Section Three of MSPR as necessary and within the stated deadlines.

4.5 Arrange and attend meeting(s) with the Max Rady College of Medicine, Student Affairs staff to review MSPR as required in the event that advocacy on specific issues of concern is required.

4.6 Request/Order University transcripts to be submitted to the CaRMS Document Centre following promotion to Year IV and upon notification from Evaluation personnel.

4.7 Advise Evaluation personnel of decision to decline participation in CaRMS match for graduation year prior to the CaRMS submission deadline.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF UGME SUPPORT STAFF NOVEMBER

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation

4.8 Communicate with Research Office to receive all required information on students who completed the BSc (Med) program in the format outlined for MSPR merging.

4.9 Ensure the generic MSPR communications is working effectively such that MSPR information may be dispatched to students.

MSPR SECTION 1

DECEMBER TO MID-JANUARY

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation

4.10 Organize the MSPR Section One template to accommodate:

a) CaRMS submission date

b) Merged fields for:

  • Student Legal Name
  • Identifying Information
  • Events Worthy of Particular Note under the Headings: Leadership, Awards, Research
  • Academic History
  • Date of expected graduation
  • Date of initial registration in UGME
  • Joint Degree(s)

4.11 Prepare instructions for student completion of MSPR Section One.

4.12 Identify students who have been carried over from the previous year such that they may be included in the listing for the present class for all components of the MSPR.

4.13 Create and electronically file individual student MSPR Section One from the merged document.

LATE JANUARY

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation

4.14 Email MSPR Section One to each Year III student with instructions on how to complete document as well as the expected deadline for return.

FEBRUARY THRU MARCH

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Administrator, Pre-Clerkship Evaluation & OSCE- Type Examinations

4.15 Review each MSPR Section One for errors and/or omissions. Confer with Academic Lead, Evaluation and Associate Dean, UGME on concerns related to “Events Worthy of Particular Note”.

4.16 Communicate with individual students if clarification or further information for MSPR Section One is required.

4.17 Confirm that MSPR Section One is up-to-date for all Year III students.

MSPR SECTION 2

APRIL TO MID MAY

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.18 Ensure all Period One to Period Four FITERs are completed.

4.19 Prepare a listing of students who have not completed the FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements for Period One to Period Four.

4.20    Communicate with each student who has not completed the FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements for Period One to Period Four to have these requirements met by the end of April.

4.21 Run the MSPR Report in OPAL (Curriculum System) for Period One to Period Four and export as an Excel file.

4.22 Modify exported Excel files to align with required fields for the MSPR.

4.23 Complete a spell check of the modified Excel file.

4.24 Communicate with Administrator, Electives to receive Early Exposure data in the format required for the MSPR Section Two.

4.25 Incorporate Early Exposure data into the modified Excel file.

4.26 Electronically transfer (“merge”) Excel file data into MSPR Section Two Word template.

4.27 Create individual electronic student MSPR Section Two files for each student in Microsoft Word.

4.28 Save each Word document as a PDF file to maintain integrity of information.

4.29 Prepare instructions for student completion of MSPR Section Two.

LATE MAY

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.30 E-mail MSPR Section Two PDF document to each Year III student, who has completed the FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements, with instructions on how to complete the document and the deadline for return.

4.31 Contact each student with outstanding FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements informing the student that Section Two will be released for review when the requirements are met.

LATE JUNE – EARLY JULY

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.32 Make changes to individual MSPR Section Two files based on student feedback.

4.33 Confirm that Section Two is up-to-date for all students.

MSPR SECTION 1 AND SECTION 2 INTEGRATION

LATE JULY – MID AUGUST

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.34 Confirm that each student has met the FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements for Section Two and has reviewed Section Two of the MSPR.

4.35 Combine MSPR Section Two and MSPR Section One for each student, saving each file in Word and PDF format.

4.36 Prepare instructions for student review of MSPR Section One and Section Two.

LATE AUGUST

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.37 E-mail MSPR Section One and Section Two PDF document to each Year III student with instructions on how to review the document and the deadline for return.

EARLY SEPTEMBER

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.38 Make changes to MSPR Section One and Section Two based on student feedback

4.39 Confirm that Section One and Section Two are complete for all students. MID SEPTEMBER Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation

4.40 E-mail Med IV students with details related to submission of University of Manitoba transcript to CaRMS.

MID TO LATE SEPTEMBER

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.41 Ensure all Period Five to Period Seven FITERs are completed electronically.

4.42 Prepare a listing of students who have not completed the FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements for Period Five to Period Seven.

4.43 Communicate with each student who has not completed the FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements for Period Five to Period Seven to have these requirements met by a specific deadline.

4.44 Ensure the UGME Excel file containing student NBME examination results is up-to-date.

4.45 Communicate with the Administrator, Electives to receive Electives data in the format required for MSPR Section Three.

4.46 Organize PDF files on the S-Drive for viewing by Max Rady College of Medicine, Student Affairs personnel in preparation for student meetings.

4.47 Inform Max Rady College of Medicine, Student Affairs personnel of location of student files.

MID OCTOBER

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.48 Communicate with all Year IV students to complete the FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements for Period Five to Period Eight in order to receive MSPR Section Three for review in a timely manner.

4.49 Ensure all Period Eight FITERs are completed electronically.

4.50 Remind students to complete their FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements for Periods Five through Eight in order to receive the Section the MSPR

4.51 Run the MSPR Report in OPAL (Curriculum System) for Period Five to Period Eight and export as an Excel file.

4.52 Complete a spell check of the cleansed Excel file.

4.53 Incorporate the NBME Examination data and Electives data into the cleansed Excel file.

4.54 Electronically transfer (“merge”) Excel file data into MSPR Section Three Word template.

4.55 Create individual electronic student MSPR Section Three files for each student in Microsoft Word.

4.56 Save each Word document as a PDF file to maintain integrity of information.

4.57 Prepare instructions for student completion of MSPR Section Three.

END OCTOBER

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.58 E-mail MSPR Section Three PDF document to each Year IV student, who has completed the FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements, with instructions on how to review the document and the deadline for return.

4.59 Contact each student with outstanding FITER, ECP, and Rotation Evaluation requirements informing the student that Section Three will be released for review when the requirements are met.

4.60 Update PDF files on network drive for viewing by Max Rady College of Medicine and Student Affairs staff in preparation for student meetings.

4.61 Inform Max Rady College of Medicine, Student Affairs personnel of location of student files.

EARLY NOVEMBER

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.62 Make changes to MSPR Section Three based on student feedback.

4.63 Combine Section One, Section Two and Section Three files into one MSPR Word document for each student.

4.64 Insert the following components of Academic History into the final Word document for each student:

  • Leaves of absence/gaps in educational program;
  • Student required to remediate and failures during Year II, Year III or Year IV and,
  • Professionalism & Disciplinary Actions.

4.65 Save each completed Word document as a PDF file.

4.66 E-mail the complete MSPR PDF document to each Year IV student with instructions on how to review the document and advise of the deadline for minor changes.

MID NOVEMBER

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation and Office Assistant, UGME

4.67 Make minor changes to MSPR as identified by students.

4.68 Provide MSPR files to Associate Dean, UGME for review and approval.

4.69 Once approved, insert Associate Dean electronic signature into each completed MSPR.

4.70 Save each Word document as a PDF file to maintain integrity of information.

4.71 Send the completed MSPR (PDF file) to each student for the student’s personal file.

4.72 Send each completed MSPR electronically to CaRMS on or before the CaRMS deadline.

Associate Dean, UGME

4.73 Resolve issues related to content in individual student MSPRs throughout the completion process.

4.74 Review all finalized MSPRs prior to Electronic Signature is applied to each file.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 Association of American Medical Colleges document “A Guide to the Preparation of the Medical Student Performance Evaluation

5.2 UGME – Promotion and Failure Policy and Procedures

5.3 UGME - Midpoint In-Training Evaluation & Final In-Training Evaluation Preparation, Distribution and Completion and Essential Clinical Presentation Preparation, Distribution, Audit, and Remediation


6. POLICY CONTACT

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation

Student records

Policy Name:

Student Records

Application / Scope:

Faculty, Staff and Year I to Year IV Undergraduate Medical Education Students

Approved (Date):

April, 2017

Review Date:

January, 2021

Revised (Date):

January, 2017

Approved By:

College Executive Council

1. PURPOSE

This policy and related procedures pertain to the creation, management and storage of all records for those who apply and/or admitted to the Undergraduate Medical Education program. This policy does not deal with information stored by offices such as the Office of Student Affairs, Medicine and Office of Disability Services, University of Manitoba. Faculty and staff notes and emails to and from applicants and students are not part of Student Records.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Application File – that of a person currently applying or admitted to the Undergraduate Medical Education program. Appendix 1 contains Information on the types of documents included in such a record.

2.2 Active File – that of a student who is currently enrolled in the Undergraduate Medical Education program or on an approved leave of absence. Appendix 2 contains Information on the types of documents included in such a record.

2.3 Permanent File – that of a student who is no longer enrolled in the Undergraduate Medical Education program due to graduation, dismissal, withdrawal, or death. Appendix 1 contains Information on the types of documents included in such a record.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 The Administrator, Enrolment is the custodian of all Student Records.

3.2 Student Records are created as follows:

  • Application File – when an applicant submits the first of the required application documents.
  • Active File - when a student is admitted to the Undergraduate Medical Education program.
  • Permanent File – when a student graduates, is dismissed, withdraws, or dies.

3.3 All Student Records are securely stored either within the Educational Programs Office or off-site. See Appendix 1.

3.4 The student can view information in his/her Active File upon request.

3.5 The student cannot view information in the Application File.

3.6 Faculty and staff can view information in the Application and Active Files on a need to know basis.

3.7 The student may request copies of evaluation documents within the Active File for academic purposes.

3.8 Faculty and staff can view information in the Permanent Files stored within the Office of the Dean, on a need to know basis.

3.9 Faculty and staff access to Permanent Files stored off-site requires the approval of the Administrator, Enrolment.

3.10 No documentation from Student Records can be removed from the Educational Programs Office, Max Rady College of Medicine.

3.11 All documentation from the Application and Active Files that is not required for the Permanent File is securely destroyed when the Permanent File is created.

3.12 A student can challenge the contents of the Active File by following the process outlined in the Undergraduate Medical Education Student Appeals Committee Policy and Procedures.

3.13 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every three years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

4.1 Admissions personnel create the Application File for each person applying to the Undergraduate Medical Education program upon receipt of the first Application document. See Appendix 2 for Components of the Application File.

4.2 Enrolment Services personnel create the Active Record for each person who accepts an Offer of Admission to the Undergraduate Medical Education program. See Appendix 1 for Components of the Application File.

4.3 A student requesting to view the Active File contacts the Administrator, Enrolment to set an appointment. This request will ordinarily be accommodated within 2 working days.

4.4 Evaluation personnel place the following pieces of information in Active Files in accordance with the timelines stated:

  • All Pre-Clerkship evaluation information i.e. student results, letter of probationary/monitored status and Clerkship NBME information within 10 working days following the distribution of this information to students.
  • Letters related to examination deferral, supplementary examinations, etc. within 3 days of receipt of such information.

4.5 Any UGME support staff member who receives document(s) intended for the Active File must ensure such information is placed in the record within 3 working days of receipt of the document(s).

4.6 Enrolment Services personnel create the Permanent File upon a student's graduation, dismissal, withdrawal, or death. See Appendix 2 for Components of the Permanent File.

4.7 Enrolment Services personnel ensure the Permanent Files are maintained and moved in accordance with this policy. See Appendix 1.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 Guidelines for Maintaining Active and Permanent Individual Student Records, AAMC Group on Student Affairs Committee on Student Records (March 2005)

5.2 Undergraduate Medical Education Appeals Committee Policy and Procedures


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Administrator, Enrolment with questions respecting this policy.

 

Information Related to Secure Storage of Student Records - Appendix 1

Type of Student Record

Length of Time Record is Stored

Secure Location

Educational

Programs

Office

Off- Site

Application Files (Unsuccessful Applicants)

  • If no activity within the 2-year period following initial application, it is destroyed.
  • If activity within the 2-year period following initial application it is maintained until, 2-year period without activity then destroyed.

 

Application Files (Unsuccessful Applicants Presenting with Professionalism Concerns)

Minimum of 20 years

 

Application Files (Successful Applicants)

Until student graduates, withdraws, is dismissed, or dies. The required components are then moved to the Permanent File and remainder of the file is destroyed.

 

Active Files

For the duration of a student’s time as an undergraduate medical student. The required components are then moved to the Permanent File

and remainder of the file is destroyed.

 

Permanent Files for graduates

2 years

 

Permanent Files for graduates

40 years

 

Components of Student Records - Appendix 2

Documentation Related to Student Records

Components of Student Records

Application File

Active File

Permanent File

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

1.

Max Rady College of Medicine Application including documentation for scoring rurality

   

 

 

2.

Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) Scores

   

 

 

3.

Letters of Reference

       

4.

Transcript from Undergraduate/Pre-Medical coursework which identifies GPA

   

   

5.

Documentation for applicants selected for interviewing including:

 
 

• MMI Statement of Confidentiality

     

 
 

• MMI Scoring

     

 
 

• Adult Child Abuse Registry Self-Declaration Form for Applicants to Admission

   

 

 

6.

Self-Declaration of Academic Discipline

   

 

 

7.

Self-Declaration re. Criminal Record

   

     

8.

Letters of response to Application

   

   

9.

Letter of Admission to Undergraduate Medical Education Program

   

 

 

10.

Confirmation that Child Abuse and Criminal Record are up to date

   

   

11.

Acknowledgement Form related to Technical Standards Document and Accommodation Policy

   

   

12.

Consent and Waiver Form

   

   

13.

Annual confirmation of CPR

   

   

14.

Student Record Update

   

   

15.

Pre-Clerkship Student Evaluation Summary for each Block (Including letters of Probationary/Monitored

Status as required)

   

   

16.

Summary of OSCE-type results (Including letters of Probationary/Monitored Status as required)

   

   

17.

Summary of National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) results for each required core Clerkship rotation(Including letters of Probationary/Monitored Status as required)

   

   

18.

Notices of awards, research abstracts, publications

   

 

 

19.

Appeal/legal documentation

   

 

 

20.

Documentation related to:

   

 

 

 

 
 

• Academic failure

   

   

 

• Undergraduate Medical Education Policies i.e. Attendance, Immunization, etc.

   

   

 

• Professionalism and conduct

   

 

 
 

• Accommodations in place for student

   

   

 

• Leaves of absence

   

 

 
 

• Appreciation from patients, commendations from faculty

   

   

 

• Examination deferrals, supplementary examinations

   

   

21.

Letters prepared in relation to verification of good standing or enrolment in the program

   

     

22.

Copy of official transcripts

   

 

 

23.

Completed Medical Student Performance Report

   

 

 

24.

Documentation of dismissal or withdrawal

   

 

 

25.

Obituary

     

 

26.

Verification of training to licensing authorities

     

 

Assessment and evaluation

Appeals

Policy Name:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Student Appeals

Application / Scope:

All UGME Students

Approved (Date):

August 2018

Review Date:

August 2023

Revised (Date):

August 2018

Approved By:

Curriculum Executive Committee [August 2018] College Executive Council [August 2018]

1. PURPOSE

This policy and related procedures pertain to the Undergraduate Medical Education Student Appeals Committee (UGME S.A.C), which is the first level of appeal for undergraduate medical students, for academic and professional matters. This committee does not deal with matters of student discipline as identified by the University of Manitoba Student Discipline Bylaw.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 UGME Student Appeals Committee (UGME S.A.C.) Membership – Committee membership is representative of the faculty of the Max Rady College of Medicine and students enrolled in the UGME program.

2.2 Working Day – Any day, other than a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday on which academic business may be conducted. Max Rady College of Medicine usual workday hours are Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

2.3 Respondent – The party responding to a grievance.

2.4 Notification – A written response to a student appeal request. The student is considered notified once the document has been sent from the Committee Chair.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 The Undergraduate Medical Education Student Appeals Committee (UGME S.A.C.) will hear appeals from students enrolled in the UGME program, which cannot be resolved at previous level at which they were presented.

3.2 UGME S.A.C. is comprised of a slate of nine members.

  • The committee consists of three members chosen from the slate (two faculty members and one student) of the UGME S.A.C., without a conflict of interest, who have been selected by UGME S.A.C. to hear a student appeal. The selected members of UGME S.A.C. are voting members. The selected student will not be in the same class as the student submitting the appeal.
  • The Committee Chair is an individual from the UGME S.A.C. appointed by the Dean, Max Rady College of Medicine.
  • Each faculty committee member serves a four-year term, renewable once. Student members are appointed on an annual basis.

3.3 A student must appeal within 10 working days to the UGME S.A.C. after receipt of a decision at a previous level.

3.4 The UGME S.A.C. will review the student appeal documents and decide whether the appeal should be heard based on the definition of the UGME S.A.C. and information provided in the Grounds for Appeal section of this policy. This process will ordinarily be completed within 10 working days.

3.5 A UGME S.A.C. decision to hear an appeal will result in a hearing taking place within 10 working days of the notification of such to the student.

3.6 A student may appeal to the Max Rady College of Medicine Student Appeals Committee if the UGME S.A.C. decides the student appeal will not be heard.

3.7 If the student chooses not to appear before the Committee, the hearing may be heard in absentia. This decision will be made by committee vote.

3.8 When the decision has been made following an appeal, this decision will be communicated to the student and respondent in writing, ordinarily within 5 working days of the appeal decision.

3.9 All presentations, discussion and deliberations of the appeal process will be kept confidential.

3.10 All submitted documentation for both parties will be returned to the office of the Associate Dean, UGME after the hearing. The documents will be stored in the College Archives until the student is no longer enrolled in the UGME program.

3.11 The UGME S.A.C. Chair will report annually to the College Executive Council through the UGME Management Committee concerning the number, types of appeals and outcomes heard by the committee without compromising the confidentiality of the process.

3.12 Grounds for Appeal to the UGME S.A.C

  • A student enrolled in the UGME program may appeal to the UGME S.A.C. if the
  • matter relates directly to the student’s course of study within the program; AND
  • The student believes that course regulations in the calendar of the University of Manitoba have not been applied fairly or that procedural errors in the application of regulations has occurred;

AND/OR

  • The student believes that the course regulation on its face is either unfair or obsolete;

AND/OR

  • The student believes he/she is being discriminated against by a member of the faculty, staff or other students within the UGME Program because of race, gender, ethnic origin, religion, disability or other grounds as stipulated by the Human Rights Code. It is recommended that the student get advice in this matter from the Equity Office of the University of Manitoba before appealing a discrimination issue to UGME S.A.C.

3.13 This policy and its procedures will be on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.1 The student must appeal within 10 working days to the UGME S.A.C. after receipt of a UGME committee decision.

4.2 The student must submit a completed UGME S.A.C. Student Appeal Form (Appendix 1) available from the Office of Associate Dean, UGME, 260 Brodie Centre or from the Max Rady College of Medicine, UGME website.

4.3 The student must submit all documentation presented at the previous level.

4.4 The student can choose to include new documentation. If this is so, this information must be included with the Student Appeal Form (Appendix 1).

4.5 The student is invited to be present throughout the appeal meeting except the in camera committee deliberations after the conclusion of the hearing.

4.6 The student may have one support person and/or one legal counsel present during the appeal. Neither of these parties may present the appeal.

4.7 It is recommended that the student contact the Student Advocacy Office and have a Student Advocate present at the appeal.

4.8 If a student identifies witnesses for the appeal, the student must include the names on the UGME S.A.C Student Appeal Form (Appendix 1).

4.9 The student is responsible for having the witnesses present at the appropriate time.

4.10 The student is responsible for informing the witnesses that they will be present in the hearing only for the time required to present information to the committee.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF UGME S.A.C. CHAIR

4.11 After receipt of the student’s appeal documents, the Chair forwards all appeal materials to the respondent and requests a response document within 5 working days.

4.12 If the student presents new documentation, the Chair may refer the appeal back to the previous level.

4.13 The UGME S.A.C. will review the documents with the Chair and make a decision to hear the appeal based on Grounds for Appeal in the policy document, ordinarily within 10 working days of receipt of the appeal documents.

4.14 If the decision is to hear the appeal, the Chair sends a letter to the student and notifies the respondent.

4.15 If the decision is to have a hearing, the Chair organizes the committee members who will action this hearing.

4.16 The Chair ensures the appeal takes place within 10 working days of the date of the notification to the student.

4.17 The Chair reserves the right to review and refuse any new documentation submitted by the student not relevant or not used at the previous level of hearing.

4.18 The Chair must notify both the student and the respondent of the names of all individuals participating in the appeal hearing including the names of the committee members. This is to ensure that no conflict of interest between the student, respondent or committee member will occur. In the case of a potential conflict of interest, either party can voice an objection to the Chair. The Chair will review the objection and decide if there is a need to reformat the Committee. The decision of the Chair will be binding on both parties.

4.19 The Chair will inform all participants in writing of the time and place of the appeal. The notification information will include all documents received by the Chair.

4.20 The Chair will identify a UGME support staff member to be the recording secretary for the appeal. The recording secretary will not vote.

4.21 When the decision has been made, the Chair will communicate the decision to the student and respondent in writing within 2 working days of the appeal decision.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF RESPONDENT

4.22 The respondent must respond to the Chair, UGME S.A.C. within 5 working days of the date of notification from the Chair.

4.23 The respondent can request a stop of the procedure should the student introduce new information that has not been presented at a lower level.

4.24 A request for a stop of procedure must be made within 5 working days of the date of notification from the Chair.

4.25 The names of all respondents who will speak on behalf of the respondent will be communicated to the UGME S.A.C. Chair at least 2 working days prior to the appeal.

4.26 The respondent members must be present for the full hearing except for the in camera Committee deliberations.

4.27 It is recommended that the respondent seek advice from the University of Manitoba legal counsel.

4.28 Respondent may have legal counsel present at the appeal, but the appeal must be answered by the respondent members present.

THE CONDUCT OF APPEAL

4.29 The quorum for the appeal will be two faculty members and one student plus the UGME S.A.C. Chair.

4.30 The Chair will explain the appeal procedures to the student, respondent and committee members.

4.31 The Chair will introduce the committee members.

4.32 The student will introduce himself/herself and the supporting individuals to the committee.

4.33 The student will present first followed by the respondent.

4.34 Following presentations by the student and the respondent, the Chair will direct a question period for both the student and the respondent. All committee members may participate.

4.35 All discourse from the student and the respondent will be directed to the Chair.

4.36 Following the question period, the Chair will request that the student and the respondent make brief closing statements. No new evidence can be introduced at this point.

4.37 Following closing statements, the student, respondent and their representatives will be asked to leave the room.

4.38 The committee will then deliberate on the appeal.

4.39 If a decision cannot be reached by consensus then a vote, by secret ballot, will be taken.

4.40 If the committee members require more information to make a decision, the Chair may schedule an additional meeting to allow for this.

4.41 When the decision has been made, the Chair will communicate the decision to the student and respondent in writing within 2 working days of the appeal decision.

4.42 The Chair shall advise the student that he/she has a right to appeal the UGME S.A.C. decision to the Max Rady College of Medicine S.A.C. if the student is not accepting of the decision.


5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Associate Dean, UGME with questions respecting this policy.

 

Assessment results

Policy Name:

Assessment Results

Application / Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students

Approved (Date):

May 2020

Review Date:

February 2025

Revised (Date):

February 2020

Approved By:

Progress Committee [December 2019] College Executive Council [January 2020]

Senate Committee on Instruction and Evaluation [February 2020] Senate [May 2020]

1. PURPOSE

To provide specific processes to ensure student assessment results are organized in a timely and effective manner that complement the University of Manitoba Final Examinations and Final Grades Policy and related Procedures.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Midterm Examination - A summative examination normally conducted at the approximate midpoint of a course/module. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.2 Final Examination – A summative examination at the end of a Pre-Clerkship Course/Module. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.3 Course/Module - A Course/Module is a course of study or educational unit, which covers a series of interrelated topics and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the M.D degree. The UGME curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal courses occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.4 Assignment - Take home work as defined in the syllabus of each course.

2.5 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE-type) – an examination used to assess the clinical skills of students.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by a comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by their congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of eight of twelve OSCE stations to pass the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills Courses.
  • The Remedial Examinations for the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills courses will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial exam. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial OSCE.

2.6 Comprehensive Clinical Exam (CCE) – An objective structured clinical-type examination used to assess the clinical skills of students in Clerkship.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by the comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by the congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations in order to pass the CCE.
  • The Remedial Examinations for Med IV CCE will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial CCE. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial CCE.

2.7 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program. For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.

2.8 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – A comprehensive summary of student performance as a necessary component of their Clerkship training which documents the full range of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) required of a physician. This is electronically distributed at the start of each rotation and must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This must include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.9 Monitored Status – A student will be placed on Monitored Status as follows:

  • Modular Courses –Achieving a result between 60.0% and 62.9% (No rounding of scores will take place).
  • Longitudinal Courses–Achieving a result less than sixty percent (60.0%) on any exam worth twenty-five percent (25.0%) or more of the total Longitudinal Course assessment weight.
  • A Failure of one (1) Clerkship Exam.
  • A Borderline Pass on a FITER.

A student on Monitored Status is encouraged to participate in remediation. This description is not punitive; the sole purpose is to identify students early who may be having some difficulty (and who therefore may be at risk for future difficulty), so that timely assistance can be provided.

2.10 Probationary Status - Would be applied to a student after a failure of any of the following:

  • One (1) Course/Module
  • The CCE
  • Two (2) Clerkship examinations
  • One (1) FITER
  • One (1) assignment integral to either the Professionalism or Population Health courses in Clerkship

A student on Probationary Status is required to participate in Remediation.

2.11 Pre-Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee (PSEC)/Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee(s) (CSEC) – Committees responsible for the development and approval of assessment policies and rules. PSEC/CSEC bodies are responsible for the overall management and administration of examination questions, the review and evaluation of results and recommendation to Progress Committee for approval.

2.12 Coaching/Strengths and Opportunities Report – A report which displays information about a participant's performance in a particular assessment. Used for coaching and feedback purposes, it is provided to a participant in a controlled format for reference purposes.

2.13 Working Day – A day when the University of Manitoba is open for regular business.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Students will receive results for all examinations within a reasonable amount of time following completion of the examination. The following timelines will be adhered to:

  • Mid-Term/Final Exams – Results will be reported via the Pre-Clerkship Exam System Student Portal typically within two working days of the completion of the exam.
  • Course Results – Results will be reported via Curriculum Management System typically within five (5) days of course completion.
  • Clerkship Exam– Results will be reported via email correspondence typically within two (2) weeks of completion.
  • OSCE-type – Given the complexity in marking this practical assessment, which often includes a comprehensive review of individual recorded performance, results will be reported as soon as practicable. Typically, results will be made available to students no later than four (4) weeks from completion.
  • FITER - Notification of the FITER (for those that demonstrate either a fail or borderline pass) must occur within five working days of completion of the rotation. Electronic submission of all FITER must occur within six weeks of completion of the rotation.

3.2 Student input on Internal Examinations will be taken into consideration when making decisions related to examination results.

3.3 The Chair of the applicable PSEC/CSEC will work with the respective Administrators Evaluation in reviewing and preparing examination results.

3.4 The applicable PSEC/CSEC will meet to review and approve Internal Examination results on a monthly basis for exams/courses completed during the previous month.

3.5 Final scores for all Internal Examinations will not be rounded.

3.6 A pass is considered as follows:

  • Course/Module - attaining a score of 60.0% or higher. No rounding of scores will take place.
  • OSCE-type Examinations/Courses - A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by the comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by the congregate score in each case individually.
    • Med I and Med II Clinical Skills Courses: Students will be required to pass a minimum of eight of twelve OSCE stations to pass.
    • CCE: Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations in order to pass.
  • Clerkship Exams – For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.
  • FITER
    • Pass - A grade of “meets expectations” or higher in all major and minor criteria
    • Borderline pass (counted as a ‘Pass’ for summative purposes) - A combination of grades below “meets expectations”, that does not otherwise constitute a fail, as explained below.
    • Fail - A grade of ‘unsatisfactory’ in one (1) major criterion, or  ‘unsatisfactory’ on any two (2) minor criteria, or a grade of ‘below expectations’ or worse in any three (3) major or minor criteria.

3.7 This policy will be reviewed every five years following the approval date.


4. PROCEDURES

MID-TERM EXAMINATIONS, FINAL, COURSE EXAMINATIONS

4.1 Typically within two (2) working days of completed examinations:

  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship will organize the scoring of all components of the examination
  • Without direction, all examination questions with less than a thirty (30) percent success rate will be removed from the scoring of an exam.
  • An Exam Summary Report, Item Analysis, Question Notes/Feedback and Exam Taker Results report will be distributed to the Coordinator, Evaluations Pre- Clerkship and Course Leader.
  • All information on reporting provided to Course Leaders will not include student names or any specific identifying information which would allow the identity of students to be ascertained.
  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship, will receive instructions from the respective Coordinator, Evaluations on changes to examination scoring structure, if any, based on the scoring and reporting information relevant to the exam.
  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship will release results of adjusted exam results, as appropriate, to the Pre-Clerkship Exam System.

4.2 The respective Course Leader, will in accordance with the academic schedule:

  • Based on the results of the exam, determine if a review session focusing on the information provided within the respective Exam Summary/Item Analysis Report is required.
  • Course Leaders should be prepared to respond to questions from students on their respective individualized Coaching/Strength and Opportunities Report without divulging confidential examination content.

COURSE SCORES

4.3 Typically within two (2) working days of completion of the Final Examination for a course:

  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship will organize the scoring of all components of the course in accordance with the weighting established in the Pre-Clerkship Master Assessment Plan.
  • Information on individual exam scores and assignments for the course will be distributed to the respective Coordinator, Evaluations and Course Leader.

4.4 Typically within one (1) working day of distribution to Course Leaders:

  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship will organize and verify the formulae to ascertain final course scores and upload all results to Curriculum Management System.
  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship, will receive instructions from the respective Coordinator, Evaluations on changes to course scoring structure, if any, based on the scoring information and Question Notes/Feedback reports.

4.5 Typically within one (1) days of receipt of instructions from the Coordinator, Evaluations:

  • The Administrator, Evaluations will finalize the scoring and conduct an internal review of the scores and scoring formulae and upload all remaining results to Curriculum Management System such that final course results are provided to students typically within five (5) days of course completion.

4.6 Summary information will be prepared by the Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship for the Chair, PSEC to include the following psychometric data obtained from the Pre- Clerkship Exam System Item Analysis Report:

  • Component (raw and percent) scores, final (percent) scores, pass/fail status based on final percent scores, Probationary/ Monitored Status based on final percent scores for each student.
  • Summary of component and final percent scores for the entire class, which includes mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, maximum scores, and bar graph. The total number of students on Probationary Status and Monitored Status.
  • Summary of component and final percent scores for two preceding classes, which includes mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, maximum scores, by class.

4.7 The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship, will prepare Probationary and Monitored Status letters for the perusal and signature of the Associate Dean, UGME ensuring that the Director, Evaluations, Director, Remediation and Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME are included on the distribution list and then, once approved, distribute electronically to each affected student.

4.8 The respective Course Leader, will in accordance with their academic schedule:

  • Conduct a review session of exam results with their course committee which integrates information contained within the Exam Summary Report, Item Analysis Report and Question Notes/Feedback Report with the intent of revising questions where appropriate.

OSCE-TYPE EXAMINATIONS

4.9 In a given academic year, the Assistant to Administrators, Evaluations will organize, in collaboration with the Chair of CSEC and the Director of Evaluations, dates for OSCE- type examinations for the next academic year.

4.10 Typically within three (3) working days of completed examinations:

  • The Assistant to Administrators Evaluations will organize the scoring of all components of the examination.

4.11 Typically within seven (7) working days of receipt of examination scores:

  • The Assistant to Administrators, Evaluations will organize and verify the formulae to ascertain final examination scores.

4.12 Typically within seven (7) working days of ascertaining final examination scores:

  • The Administrator, Evaluations will finalize the scoring and conduct an internal review of the scores and scoring formulae which will be subsequently reviewed. The Chair CSEC will certify the reviewed results.

4.13 The following summary information shall be prepared by the Assistant to Administrators

Evaluations for the Chair CSEC:

  • Component (raw and percent) scores, final (percent) scores, pass/fail status based on final percent scores, Probationary/Monitored Status based on final percent scores for each student.
  • Summary of component and final percent scores for the entire class, which includes mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, maximum scores, and histogram. The total number of students on Probationary Status and Monitored Status is included.

4.14 The Assistant to Administrators, Evaluations will prepare individual student examination reports for electronic distribution as well as prepare Probationary and Monitored Status letters for the perusal and signature of the Associate Dean, UGME ensuring that the Director, Evaluations, Director, Remediation, Director Clinical Skills, and Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME are included on the distribution list and then, once approved, distribute electronically to each affected student.

4.15 Typically within five (5) days of distribution of scores, the Administrator, Evaluations will update the class master sheet with the new set of scores for the respective examinations and examinations and ensure that they are distributed to the class via the Curriculum Management System.

CLERKSHIP EXAMINATION SYSTEM

4.16 In a given academic year, the Administrator, Evaluations Clerkship organizes the process of determining the supplementary dates on which Clerkship Examination System will be administered for the next academic year.

4.17 Typically within one (1) working day of a completed Clerkship Examination:

  • The Administrator, Evaluations will organize the dispatch of all completed

Clerkship Examinations.

4.18 Typically within seven (7) working days of mailing of Clerkship Examination:

  • The Administrator, Evaluations will check for results of scoring of Clerkship Examinations.

4.19 Typically within seven (7) working days of receipt of results of Clerkship Examinations:

  • The Administrator, Evaluations will prepare individual student examination reports for electronic distribution and will prepare the Probationary and Monitored Status letters for the perusal and signature of the Associate Dean, UGME ensuring that the Director, Evaluations, Director, Remediation, Director Clerkship Clinical, and Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME are included on the distribution list and then, once approved, distribute electronically to each affected student.
  • The Administrator, Evaluations will update the class master sheet with the new set of scores for the respective Clerkship Examinations and ensure that results are uploaded to the Curriculum Management System.

FITERS

4.20 Preceptor will complete a FITER for each assigned student as per policy statement 3.1.

This may require coordination of input from multiple preceptors.

4.21 The completed FITER will be available for student review on the curriculum management system as soon as it is submitted.

4.22 Students will complete the student component of the FITER within one (1) working day of receiving the evaluation. Students have the opportunity to comment on the contents of the FITER before it is returned to Undergraduate Medical Education.

4.23 If the FITER is pass the evaluation is complete. If the FITER is a borderline pass or fail the curriculum management system generates an email alert to the Administrator, Clerkship Evaluations, Clerkship Director and Associate Deans of Professionalism, Student Affairs and UGME.

4.24 The Administrator, Clerkship Evaluations will review both scores and the narrative comments and determine appropriate evaluation with the agreement of the preceptor.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 UGME Policy and Procedures – Examination Conduct

5.2 UGME Policy and Procedures – Deferred Examinations

5.3 UGME Policy and Procedures – Supplemental Examinations

5.4 UGME Policy and Procedures – Promotion and Failure

5.5 UGME Policy and Procedures - Invigilation of Examinations

5.6 UGME Policy and Procedures – Communicating Methods of Evaluation in the Undergraduate Medical Education Program.

5.7 University of Manitoba- Final Examinations and Final Grades Policy

5.8 University of Manitoba- Deferred and Supplemental Examinations Procedures

5.9 University of Manitoba- Final Examinations Procedures

5.10 University of Manitoba- Final Grades Procedures


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Director, Evaluations with questions respecting this policy.

Assignment guidelines

Name:

Assignment Guidelines

Application / Scope:

Year I to Year II Undergraduate Medical Education Students

Approved (Date):

August 14, 2020

Review Date:

May 2024

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

PSEC (May 2020)

Progress Committee (August 2020)

This document provides further information on assignments. It is associated with the following UGME policies:

  • Promotion and Failure
  • Communicating Methods of Evaluation

1.  All assignments are mandatory. Any missing or incomplete assignments will result in an incomplete on the student’s record for the corresponding course. Students are expected to submit all assignments on time, as this is an element of professionalism.

2.  A late assignment can be submitted up to three consecutive business days after the original deadline but will receive partial credit:

  • First day late = 10% deducted from final assignment mark
  • Second day late = 30% deducted from final assignment mark
  • Third day late = 50% deducted from final assignment mark

If original mark surpasses the pass mark set by the Course Leader, the student will pass the assignment but the actual mark recorded will be the deducted mark.

3.  After the third day, late assignments receive an automatic zero grade and an incomplete on the student’s record.

  • Students must submit a reasonable attempt assignment to remove the incomplete from their record. Reasonable attempt to be defined by the Course Leader.

4.  Pass mark for assignments is at the discretion of the Course Leader and must be posted in the syllabus

  • Students must submit a reasonable attempt at all parts and questions of an assignment or it will be incomplete.
  • The Course Leader defines reasonable attempt.
  • In case of dispute, assignment sent to the Pre-Clerkship Evaluations

Committee for independent review and final decision.

  • If the assignment result is below the set pass mark, it is up to the discretion of the Course Leader if a supplemental assignment or revisions to original assignment are required. Supplemental or revised assignment must receive a pass in order for the incomplete to be removed. Original grade will be retained in the gradebook.

5.  Assignment deadlines

  • All deadlines and/or timelines for assignments must be published in the syllabus.
  • In case of missing/incomplete assignments, students will be contacted and asked to submit their assignment in order to remove the incomplete from their record. Date to be determined by the Evaluations Program Administrator.
  • Students who do not submit their assignments will be asked to meet with the Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education.
  • Extensions to deadlines may be given at the discretion of the Office of Student Affairs. The deadline date will be discussed with Course Leaders.
  • All requests for extensions must be made before the assignment deadline.
  • Exceptional, unforeseen circumstances will be considered on an individual basis.
  • Assignments will not be accepted past the last day of July.

Career development and performance feedback

Policy Name:

Career Development and Performance Feedback

Application/ Scope:

Applicable to all Geographic Full Time (GFT) or Nil-Salaried Academic

Appointments in the Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba

Approved (Date):

December 10, 2013

Review Date:

Five years from revised date

Revised (Date):

June 19, 2018

Approved By:

Dean’s Council, Max Rady College of Medicine: June 19, 2018

Reviewed at Department Heads´ Council, Max Rady College of Medicine: June 22, 2018

1. PURPOSE

1.1 To provide for the regular documented assessment of Faculty Members’ academic and clinical accomplishments, and to support their Career Development and progress towards promotion. This Policy is intended to complement existing performance management processes.

1.2 To provide for the manner by which regular feedback will be provided and received by both Faculty Members and their Department Heads, in order to facilitate a culture of support and development within the College, in accordance with the College’s commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion.


2. CONTEXT

2.1 Faculty Members governed by this Policy shall ensure compliance with all professional standards, laws and policies applicable to their profession and employment.


3. DEFINITIONS

3.1 Appeals Process: The process set out in this Policy for Faculty Members to request that a disagreement over Performance Feedback and procedural fairness be reviewed and resolved.

 3.2 Assignment of Duties: The scope of activities that may be set out in a Faculty Member’s letter of offer, letter of agreement, other contract and/or job description, which may, from time to time, be updated or changed by mutual agreement between the College and the Faculty Member so as to ensure certainty regarding their relationship as it relates to the University.

3.3 Career Development: The proactive planning and implementation of action steps towards a Faculty Member’s career goals as mutually agreed upon between the Department, College and the Faculty Member through Performance Feedback.

3.4 College: The Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba.

3.5 Department: an academic and administrative subdivision of the Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba established by the Board of Governors, usually on the recommendation of the Senate, for the purpose of conducting teaching and research in specified fields of study.

3.6 Department Head: the head of a Department of the Max Rady College of Medicine within the University of Manitoba, who acts as the chief executive officer of the Department.

3.7 Faculty Member: A Geographic Full Time (GFT) or Nil-Salaried Academic Appointment in the College.

3.8 Geographic Full Time (GFT) Academic Appointment: refers to a faculty member whose professional activities are based at the University of Manitoba’s Max Rady College of Medicine or its affiliated teaching hospitals, who may receive income from professional practice and from sources other than the University and its affiliated teaching hospitals, and who is signatory of a Geographical Full-Time Agreement with the University (the “GFT” Member) and who may only carry on a clinical practice inside University approved facilities.

3.9 Nil-Salaried Academic Appointment: refers to a faculty member whose professional activities may or may not be based at the Max Rady College of Medicine or its affiliated teaching hospitals, who may receive income from professional practice and from sources other than the University and its affiliated teaching hospitals, and who is signatory of a Letter of Offer for Nil-Salaried Appointees with the University. All nil-salaried appointments with rank carry the expectation of contributions to the academic activities of the College in teaching, scholarly activity and/or scholarship (research) and service.

3.10 Performance Guidelines: Guidelines provided on the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Academic Affairs website, that may be used to guide Career Development and Performance Feedback, which are intended to complement a Faculty Member’s Assignment of Duties, as may be applicable and reasonable in the circumstances.

3.11 Performance Feedback: The regular review, assessment and consideration of the following matters, which are intended to identify a Faculty Member’s strengths and to provide direction for improving his or her future performance - about which both the Faculty Member and his or her Department Head or designate may give and receive feedback:

(a) a Faculty Member’s accomplishments, relating to his or her Assignment of Duties;

(b) the College’s needs; and

(c) the Faculty Member’s documented Performance Feedback history.

3.12 Policy: This Career Development and Performance Feedback Policy.

3.13 Procedures: The procedures and methods by which this Policy is operationalized.


4. POLICY STATEMENTS

Performance Feedback:

4.1 The College and Faculty Members shall ensure Performance Feedback occurs in accordance with the Procedures.

4.2 Performance Feedback will be both formative and summative and will be documented using, wherever possible, objective criteria.

4.3 Performance Feedback will be taken into consideration when reviewing the Assignment of Duties, as well as letters of agreement, letters of offer, contracts and/or appointments.

Career Development:

4.4 Performance Feedback shall be used to support Faculty Members in their Career Development through candid and constructive feedback and the development of plans intended to meet the needs of both Faculty Members and the College.

4.5 Career Development requires involvement by the College and Department.

4.6 Performance Feedback involves establishing and regularly reviewing career goals to support Career Development.

Performance Guidelines:

4.7 Performance Guidelines may be used as a guide when assessing a Faculty Member’s performance, as applicable to his or her Assignment of Duties.

For Faculty Members with Cross-Appointments:

4.8 For Faculty Members with a cross-appointment to one or more Departments, their Performance Feedback will be conducted in the Department where the primary appointment is held.

4.9 In order to consider the accomplishments of a Faculty Member with a cross- appointment to one or more Departments, the Head of the primary Department (or designate) will consult with supervisors in the other Departments as applicable.

For Faculty Members with a Nil-Salaried Academic Appointment:

4.10 For Faculty Members with a Nil-Salaried Academic Appointment, their Performance Feedback shall be carried out, at minimum, prior to the time of re-appointment.

For Faculty Members Whose Performance Feedback Falls Below Expectations

4.11 A Faculty Member whose Performance Feedback does not meet the satisfactory threshold shall be required to meet with his or her Department Head (and/or designate) to reevaluate his or her Career Development plan to incorporate achievable performance targets for the next year or other shorter time period as required by the Department Head.

4.12 A Faculty Member whose Career Development plan has been reevaluated with supports from the College to enable him or her to perform satisfactorily but continues to have difficulty meeting the established targets, may, where appropriate, have his or her Assignment of Duties amended in order to further enable his or her ability to perform as required.

Ability to Record Disagreement with Performance Feedback:

4.13 In the event a Faculty Member disagrees with what is reflected on his or her documented Performance Feedback, he or she may set out a rebuttal in writing to be appended to the documented Performance Feedback.

Ability to Appeal Matters of Procedural Fairness:

4.14 Meaning of Procedural Fairness: For the purposes of this Policy, references to “procedural fairness” shall mean fairness in how the Performance Feedback process was carried out.

4.15 Ability to Appeal Matters of Procedural Fairness: A Faculty Member who feels that his or her treatment pursuant to this Policy was procedurally unfair may appeal such treatment in writing to the Dean of the College within twenty (20) working days of the completion of the documented Performance Feedback.

4.16 Request for Binding Arbitration: If the matter is not resolved to the satisfaction of the Faculty Member within twenty (20) working days of writing to the Dean, the Faculty Member will then have an additional twenty (20) working days to request that the matter be submitted to binding arbitration.

4.17 Choosing the Arbitrator: One arbitrator shall be chosen by agreement between the College and the Faculty Member to resolve the procedural fairness matter in dispute.

4.18 Arbitrator’s Decision Final: The arbitrator’s decision shall be final and binding upon the College and the Faculty Member.

4.19 Expenses: The College and the Faculty Member shall each be responsible for their own expenses involved in the appeal and arbitration process and any costs for the arbitrator shall be equally shared by the College and the Faculty Member.

4.20 Exclusions to Appeals Process: This appeals process does not apply to the following:

  • matters unrelated to procedural fairness;
  • matters that may be specifically addressed by other University dispute resolution policies and / or the principles of contract law;
  • clinical issues unrelated to the College’s jurisdiction.

5. GENERAL

In the Event of Conflict with other Policies, Standards and/or Agreements:

5.1 In the case of conflict between this Policy and another policy, standard or agreement, the policy, which creates the higher standard, agreement or requirement shall prevail.

Confidentiality:

5.2 All documents considered pursuant to this Policy are confidential and will be subject to the provisions of The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, and The Personal Health Information Act, as applicable.


6. PROCEDURES

6.1 Performance Feedback Process

1) For GFT Faculty Members: Documented Performance Feedback must be carried out at least once a year, at any point during the year that the GFT Faculty Member and Department Head or designate agree upon, and is conducted for work performed during the preceding year, taking into consideration the career stage of the Faculty Member and the fact that it may take several years to reach career goals.

2) For Faculty Members with a Nil-Salaried Academic Appointment: Documented Performance Feedback must be carried out at minimum, prior to the time of re-appointment at any point during that period, as mutually agreed upon by said Faculty Member and the Department Head or designate, and is conducted for work performed since the most recent appointment.

6.2 Responsibilities of Department Heads: Department Heads shall ensure:

1) Accurate Assignment of Duties: That the Assignment of Duties for each Faculty Member accurately reflects his or her current academic and/or clinical role.

2) Performance Feedback Occurs as Required: That Performance Feedback is provided to Faculty Members on a regular basis through the Performance Feedback process.

3) Supports Provided: That career guidance and mentorship are provided to Faculty Members, including specific strategies and the resources and support necessary to allow Faculty Members to perform their responsibilities with excellence. Further, for Faculty Members whose performance falls below expectations, to ensure that such performance is documented and to inform the Faculty Member, in writing, of any area(s) that require improvement, and to create a development plan with clear objectives to support improved performance in the upcoming year.

4) Department Head Delegation: The responsibilities of the Department Head may be delegated to a Section Head or to a Faculty Member with a recognized leadership role, however the Department Head shall be accountable for ensuring that documented Performance Feedback, is completed for all Faculty Members within his or her Department, and submitted annually to the Dean’s Office for all GFT Faculty Members and at minimum, once prior to the time for re-appointment, for those with Nil-Salaried Academic Appointments.

5) Update of Assignment of Duties: The Department Head shall ensure that a Faculty Members’ Assignment of Duties is updated to accurately reflect the current scope of activities of the Faculty Member.

6.3 Responsibilities of Faculty Members: Faculty Members shall:

1) Participate: Participate in the Performance Feedback process.

2) Comply with Assignment of Duties: Maintain satisfactory performance of his or her Assignment of Duties.

3) Provide Evidence of Performance: Provide evidence of performance (i.e., CV) and input performance data into the Performance Feedback process, when requested.

4) Review Career Goals: Establish, and regularly review and update, career goals and objectives.

5) Follow Through: Follow through on recommendations when opportunities for Career Development have been identified during the Performance Feedback Process.

6.4 Responsibilities of the College: The College must ensure the following responsibilities are carried out in compliance and furtherance of its commitments to equity, diversity and inclusion as set out in applicable policies, from time to time, and in accordance with accreditation requirements. In particular, the College shall:

1) Educate and Support: Provide education and support in developing, implementing and maintaining this Policy and the Performance Feedback process.

2) Support Department Heads: Provide leadership support to Department Heads and designates through all aspects of the Career Development and Performance Feedback process.

3) Support Faculty Members: Provide the resources and support that allow Faculty

Members to perform their responsibilities with excellence.


7. REFERENCES

7.1 University of Manitoba - University of Manitoba Faculty Association 2017 – 2021 Collective Agreement

7.2 Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Academic Affairs website


8. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Vice-Dean Academic, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences with questions respecting this policy.

Computer policy

Policy Name:

Computer Policy

Application/Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education Students

Approved (Date):

February 2021

Review Date:

February 2025

Revised (Date):

January 2021

Approved By:

UGME Management Committee

College Executive Council

Senate

1. PURPOSE

The Max Rady College of Medicine has integrated the use of online examinations for all aspects of Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Final and Midterm Examinations. It is expected that UGME students will have their own laptop computer to use during examinations. This policy will ensure students have the most current requirements resulting in system compatibility and reduction of errors.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program. The NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.

2.2 ExamSoft – An examination management system adopted by the Max Rady College of Medicine, which enables students to conduct exams on a personal computer while locking out all other programs and internet access. This system also provides discrete and precise feedback on student results and performance across a range of categories linked to the curriculum.

2.3 Examplify – The application downloaded to a student’s computer that interfaces with ExamSoft.

2.4 ExamSoft Password - A student’s personal ExamSoft password is created by ExamSoft. It is used to access Examplify and the ExamSoft secure website.

2.5 Exam Password - A password assigned to open a specific exam in Examplify. All Students will use the same Exam Password when accessing the same exam in Examplify. Students will be given the password at the beginning of their exam.

2.6 Chief Invigilator (CI) – The person responsible for the administration of the examination who ensures strict compliance with UGME examination policies and procedures and/or NBME testing regulations.

2.7 Chief Proctor – The Chief Proctor is deemed equivalent to the Chief Invigilator as established by the University of Manitoba Registrar’s Office. The term “Chief Proctor” may be used interchangeably with and means “Chief Invigilator” or “Invigilator in Charge”.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

GENERAL

3.1 All Med I and Med II summative examinations will be conducted utilizing the Pre-clerkship Examination System.

3.2 Med III and Med IV students will be tested using the Clerkship Examination System at the end of each clinical rotation.

3.3 Any attempt to begin exam early, disable or tamper with security features will be considered a violation of the integrity of the exam.

3.4 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITY OF A STUDENT

4.1 Review Computer Policy Standard Work (Appendix 1).

4.2 Review Pre-Exam Notification before every exam (Appendix 2)


5. REFERENCES

UGME – Examination Conduct Policy

University of Manitoba – Use of Computer Facilities Policy


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Business Manager, UGME with questions respecting this policy.


Appendix 1: Computer Policy Standard Work

Prior to your exams, you will need to ensure that you are familiar with the Examination Policy

COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS

Before purchasing a new computer/hardware or updating your operating system please refer to the following:

For the latest information regarding computer system requirements it is mandatory that you visit the ExamSoft website.

For the latest information regarding computer system requirements it is mandatory that you visit the NBME website.

TECHNICAL SUPPORT

UGME staff will not provide technical support for Examplify or computer issues during an exam but issues must be presented to the invigilator for record. Problems with computers are not the responsibility of the Max Rady College of Medicine Faculty or Support Staff. Problems with Examplify software need to be addressed by ExamSoft. Problems with your computer must be addressed by your computer vendor/manufacturer/provider. Any of the above issues need to be communicated to the Chief Invigilator for recording purposes.

Should there be an unexpected failure with the student’s computer, UGME does have a small number of computers that can be provided in an emergency. These computers are provided on a first-come, first-served basis and students should not assume that one will be available should it be required.

EXAMPLIFY Support

For the most recent information regarding Examplify support from ExamSoft, please visit their website.

Telephone: 1-866-429-8889
Email: support@examsoft.com

NBME Support

For the most recent information regarding NBME support, please visit their website.

Email: assessmentservices@nbme.org

PRE-CLERKSHIP:

EXAMSOFT EXAMINATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

It is the responsibility of the students to familiarize themselves with their equipment, the Examplify software and instructions provided on the ExamSoft website prior to the start of examination. Ensure sufficient time to become familiar with your personal computer and the application.

Pre-Clerkship students must register with ExamSoft at the UGME ExamSoft portal as follows:

  • Log in using your Student ID number and password provided at registration
  • Download/Install Examplify.
  • Restart Examplify. Once registered, students will receive a confirmation email at their University of Manitoba email address.
  • Complete a Trial/Test Exam. On completion of the familiarization training during Orientation Week, all students will complete and submit a trial/test exam to provide computer functionality and outline the capabilities of the Examplify system.

Prior to all scheduled exams students must ensure the following:

  • Examplify is registered and updated prior to all exam(s). Examplify may be installed on multiple devices for use as a backup. Exam files should only be downloaded to the computer you intend to use on exam day.
  • Ensure that the computer meets the specifications outlined on the ExamSoft portal to support Examplify. ExamSoft advises students to utilize mock exams periodically to optimize their testing environments and to adjust their device that they see best fits their preferences.
  • Touch screens should be disabled so only the external mouse or trackpad has mouse priority.
  • Once Examplify is installed and registered, students shall familiarize themselves with the software by utilizing the built-in Practice Exam feature.
  • Ensure that the computer’s battery is charged.
  • Disable the sleep/hibernate mode on your computer during the exam. Some computers go into sleep/hibernate mode during extended periods of nonuse. During an exam, it can be difficult to exit this mode. Refer to the instructions for your operating system to modify these settings
  • Download the assigned exam. When writing multiple exams, make sure all exams are downloaded prior to the start of the exam.

For days on which an examination is scheduled:

  • Students should bring their WIFI-enabled laptop with fully charged battery, power cord, Bannatyne Campus Login and Password (to access the secure UofM –WPA wireless network), student card and ExamSoft password.
  • Immediately before Examplify launches an exam, students will be provided with a warning screen indicating that you should not begin the exam until instructed to do so.
  • Read the Pre-Exam Notification that appears before the start of the exam. This may contain information pertinent to the examination.
  • During the exam, use care when highlighting and deleting.
  • Once you are finished your exam, check your answers, save and exit the exam. Computers will seek to acquire a wireless signal. Do not leave the exam room until you have uploaded your exam and you receive a message stating “Your exam has been successfully uploaded.” Failure to upload your exam before leaving the exam room may result in your exam not being graded.
  • When writing multiple exams in one sitting they must be completed before you leave. If you exit the exam area before uploading all exams, you cannot re-enter and complete the missing component. Any exams not uploaded before exiting the writing area are scored at 0.

CLERKSHIP:

EXAM DAY PREPARATION FOR NBME

  • Computer labs will have setup stations already configured for NBME on site exams.
  • Use the instructions that will be provided to you on exam day to download exam.
  • The exam is self-timed and will end when you end the exam or the amount of time in the exam expires. A web based exam typically includes an optional tutorial, the exam section(s) and an optional untimed post-test survey
  • You will be prompted to read and accept the “Secure Browser Security Notice” to proceed to the Secure Browser download instructions page.

Appendix 2: Pre-Exam Notification

Today, you are writing Class 20XX xxxxxxx Midterm/Final

This exam is XX hours long, and has XX multiple-choice questions. Please download the exam/s before sign-in. Extra time is not allowed once the exam begins to do this.

 If there are additional handouts, please do not write on them, returning to invigilators at the end of the exam.

If you are using a laptop with a touchscreen function, please make sure you double check your answers before submitting the exam or disable this function.

Pencil cases, other pouches, and containers are discouraged. Simple calculators are allowed (no internet functioning, no Apple watches, etc.). Please show your calculator to an invigilator before proceeding to your seat. The ExamSoft calculator is enabled as well. 

Hats, headphones or ear buds are not allowed. Ear plugs are allowed – please show them to an invigilator before using. No cell phones or other electronic devices are permitted when writing the exam. Time is displayed on the overhead screen after the exam begins. You can also use the time reminder within the Examplify system.

Optional: you may provide comments and feedback on questions at the bottom of each question. No extra time is given for this, so make sure you manage your time accordingly. These comments are provided to the course leader after each exam.

In accordance with the Examination Conduct policy, no student may enter the examination after the first half hour. Depending on how many students remain with ten minutes left, invigilators will decide if those who are done can leave before the official end of the exam.

In order to maintain a quiet environment for all students, when you have finished the exam, please quietly leave the immediate area outside of the space.

When you have completed the exam, please display the confirmation screen of your exam upload to an invigilator before leaving. If there is an issue with your computer, please contact an invigilator for assistance.

Conflicts of interest in student academic assessment or advancement

Policy Name:

Conflicts of interest in student academic assessment or advancement

Application / Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) students

Approved (Date):

February 2018

Review Date:

January 2023

Revised (Date):

January 2018

Approved By:

College Executive Council, Max Rady College of Medicine

1. PURPOSE

1.1 Accreditation standard 12.5 of the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Schools (CACMS) and Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) provides: 12.5 Non-Involvement of Providers of Student Health Services in Student Assessment: The health professionals who provide health services, including psychiatric/psychological counseling, to a medical student have no involvement in the academic assessment or promotion of the medical student receiving those services. A medical school ensures that medical student health records are maintained in accordance with legal requirements for security, privacy, confidentiality, and accessibility.

1.2 The purpose of this policy is to ensure that individuals that have provided, or currently provide, health services to a medical student, or have another relationship with a medical student that may be considered a conflict of interest, have no influence on the academic assessment or promotion of that medical student.

1.3 This policy is supplemental to the University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy and Procedures. It is not intended to act as a substitute or duplicate forum to address issues over which the University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy has jurisdiction.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Academic Assessment or Advancement- Any academic, clinical or in-person assessment of a Medical Student including without limitation assessment in courses, modules, or rotations; midpoint in-training evaluations (MITER); final in-training evaluations (FITER); or recommendations/decisions respecting Medical Student promotion or graduation.

Exclusion: For the purpose of this policy, objective forms of assessment (e.g. multiple choice exams) are not considered Academic Assessment or Advancement. For objective forms of assessment, the assessment should proceed as planned.

2.2 Conflict of Interest- Specific to this policy, a situation where:

a) a health professional who provides, or has provided, health services, including without limitation psychiatric/psychological counseling, to a Medical Student; or

b) a family member of a Medical Student (e.g. 1st degree relative; aunt or uncle); or c) a spouse of a Medical Student; becomes involved in the Medical Student’s Academic Assessment or Advancement.

2.3 Medical Student- A student registered in the UGME program at the Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba.

2.4 UGME- Undergraduate Medical Education.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Family members and spouses of Medical Students, as well as health professionals who provide health services to Medical Students, including without limitation psychiatric/psychological counseling shall have no involvement in the Academic Assessment or Advancement of that Medical Student.

3.2 Medical Student personal health information is governed by provincial legislation respecting privacy and confidentiality (The Personal Health Information Act (Manitoba)) and Medical Student personal information is governed by provincial legislation (The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (Manitoba)) as well as University of Manitoba policies and processes designed to protect the privacy of its students.

3.3 The Review Date for this Policy and Procedure is five (5) years from the date it is approved by the Dean’s Council, Max Rady College of Medicine. In the interim, this document may be revised or repealed if:

(a) The Dean, Max Rady College of Medicine, with appropriate approvals, deems it necessary or desirable to do so;

(b) It is no longer legislatively or statutorily compliant; and/or

(c) It comes into conflict with another governing document of the Max Rady College of Medicine, the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences or the University of Manitoba.

If this document is revised or repealed, any related Max Rady College of Medicine documents shall be reviewed as soon as possible to ensure that they comply with the revised document, or are in term revised or repealed.

This Policy supersedes all previous governing documents dealing with the subject matter addressed in this document.


4. PROCEDURES

Proactive Disclosure – Conflict of Interest

4.1 The UGME office should inform preceptors of this policy on an annual basis.

4.2 Preceptors should review the Medical Students lists provided to them by the UGME office well in advance of Academically Assessing or Advancing Medical Students. Preceptors should proactively disclose any perceived or actual Conflict of Interest to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, the Associate Dean, UGME or the Pre-Clerkship/Clerkship Director..

4.3 Medical Students should review individual course outlines provided to them well in advance, where possible of being Academically Assessed or Advanced by a preceptor. Medical Students should proactively disclose any perceived or actual Conflict of Interest to the course administrator.

4.4 For forms of Academic Assessment or Advancement in which there may be potential for subjectivity in the assessment, the course administrator shall arrange for an alternative assessment to be made.

Reactive Disclosure – Conflict of Interest

4.5 Preceptors who identify a perceived or actual Conflict of Interest while Academically

Assessing or Advancing a Medical Student shall cease the assessment immediately and inform one of: the Rotation Director, the Director, Clerkship or the Associate Dean, UGME.

4.6 Medical Students who identify a perceived or actual Conflict of Interest while being Academically Assessed or Advanced shall inform the preceptor who in turn shall cease the assessment. Both parties shall inform one of: the Rotation Director, the Director, Clerkship, or the Associate Dean, UGME of the occurrence.

4.7 For forms of Academic Assessment or Advancement in which there may be potential for subjectivity in the assessment, the individual notified above shall arrange for an alternative assessment to be made.

Post-Assessment Disclosure – Conflict of Interest

4.8 Medical Students who identify a perceived or actual Conflict of Interest after having been

Academically Assessed will be assigned the grade submitted by the preceptor. Should a Medical Student be dissatisfied with the assigned grade, the case will be reviewed on an individual basis; as well, the Medical Student may access the appeal mechanisms pursuant to the UGME Student Appeals Policy.

Committee Member – Conflict of Interest

4.9 Any member of a Committee involved in the Academic Assessment or Advancement of a

Medical Student (e.g. Progress Committee) who has a perceived or actual Conflict of Interest shall declare the Conflict of Interest, recuse himself/herself from that portion of the meeting, and abstain from commenting or voting on the Medical Student’s Academic Assessment or Advancement.

4.10 If quorum cannot be obtained due to multiple Conflicts of Interest, the Associate Dean, UGME, shall temporarily appoint faculty member(s) to serve as designate(s) for the Committee member(s) who declared a Conflict of Interest. The designate(s) are authorized to consider and vote upon the Academic Assessment or Advancement of the Medical Student where the Conflict of Interest was declared. The designate(s) will be recused from the Committee immediately after.

Medical Student Health Records

4.11 The UGME office shall store any Medical Student health-related information voluntarily submitted by a Medical Student in the Medical Student’s Student Affairs file and not in the Medical Student’s academic file.


5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education, Max Rady College of Medicine with questions regarding this document.


6. REFERENCES

University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy

Essential skills and abilities (technical standards) for admission, promotion and graduation in medicine

Policy Name:

Essential Skills and Abilities (Technical Standards) for Admission, Promotion and Graduation in Medicine

Application/ Scope:

Candidates for Admission, Promotion or Graduation in the MD and the MPAS Program

Approved (Date):

April 2009

Review Date:

One year from the last revised date

Revised (Date):

June 26, 2019

Approved By:

Reviewed at Dean’s Council, Max Rady College of Medicine: June 19, 2018

Reviewed at MPAS Curriculum Committee: June 22, 2018

Reviewed at UGME Curriculum Executive Committee: July 3, 2018

College Executive Council, Max Rady College of Medicine: August 21, 2018

Faculty of Graduate Studies: February 14, 2019

Senate: June 26, 2019

1. PURPOSE

1.1 The Max Rady College of Medicine at the University of Manitoba is responsible to society to provide a program of study so that graduates have the knowledge, skills, professional behaviours, and attitudes necessary to enter the regulated practice of medicine in Canada. Graduates must be able to diagnose and manage health problems, and provide comprehensive, compassionate care to patients across the spectrum of the health care system. Accordingly, students must possess the cognitive, communication, sensory, motor, and social skills necessary to interview, examine, and counsel patients, and competently complete certain technical procedures in a reasonable time, all the while ensuring patient safety.

1.2 In addition to obtaining an MD degree and completing an accredited residency training program, an individual must pass the examinations of the Medical Council of Canada in order to be eligible for licensure to practise medicine. Prospective candidates should be aware that cognitive, physical examination, management skills, communication skills, and professional behaviours are all evaluated in timed simulations of patient encounters. Critical skills needed for the successful navigation of core experiences are outlined below, and are referred to as technical standards.

1.3 Graduates of the Masters of Physician Assistant Program (MPAS) are awarded their degree from the Faculty of Graduate Studies and must meet the CPSM Physician Assistant requirements to practise in Manitoba. Prospective candidates should be aware that all categories of skills and abilities are evaluated in timed simulations of patient encounters.

1.4 On occasion, reasonable accommodations may be required by individual candidates to meet these technical standards. Requests for University-provided accommodations will be granted if the requests are reasonable, do not cause a fundamental alteration of the medical education program, do not cause an undue hardship on the University, are consistent with the standards of the medical profession, and are recommended by Student Accessibility Services of the University of Manitoba. The Max Rady College of Medicine is required to follow the Accessibility Policy and Student Accessibility Procedure.


2. POLICY STATEMENTS

2.1 All students must have the following essential skills and abilities (“Technical Standards”):

Observation and Perception Skills: A student must be able to acquire required information as presented through demonstrations and experiences in the basic sciences. The student must also participate progressively in patient encounters and observe a patient accurately and acquire relevant health and medical information from written and electronic documents, images, and digital or analog representations of physiologic data. The required observation and information acquisition and analysis necessitate the functional use of visual, auditory and somatic sensation. Candidates may demonstrate the ability to acquire essential observational information with or without accommodation that may include the use of assistive technology.

Communication Skills: In the course of study for the MD and MPAS degree the student must be able to progressively create rapport and develop therapeutic relationships with patients and their families, and establish effective communication with all members of the medical school community and healthcare teams. A student must be able to effectively elicit and clarify information from individuals and groups of individuals. A student must also be able to progressively acquire the ability to coherently summarize and effectively communicate a patient’s condition and management plan verbally, and in written and electronic form. Candidates may demonstrate effective communication with patients and teams with or without accommodation that may include the use of assistive technology.

Motor Skills: A student must possess sufficient motor function to develop the skills required to safely perform a physical examination on a patient, including palpation, auscultation, percussion, and other diagnostic maneuvers. The examination must be done independently and competently in a timely fashion. Such actions may require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, and functional use of the senses of touch. A student must be able to execute motor movements reasonably required to attain the skills necessary to perform diagnostic procedures, and provide general and emergency medical care to patients in outpatient, inpatient and surgical venues. Candidates may demonstrate the ability to complete and interpret physical findings with or without accommodation that may include the use of assistive technology.

Intellectual-Conceptual and Integrative Skills: A student must demonstrate higher- level cognitive abilities necessary to measure, calculate, and reason in order to conceptualize, analyze, integrate and synthesize information. In addition, the student must be able to comprehend dimensional and visual-spatial relationships. All of these problem-solving activities must be achieved progressively in a timely fashion. These skills must contribute to sound judgment based upon clinical and ethical reasoning.

Behavioural Attributes, Social Skills and Professional Expectations: A student must consistently display integrity, honesty, empathy, compassion, fairness, respect for others, professionalism, and dedication. Students must take responsibility for themselves and their behaviours. The student must promptly complete all assignments and responsibilities attendant not only to the study of medicine, but also to the diagnosis and care of patients. It is essential that a student progressively develop mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients and their families, all members of the medical school community, and healthcare teams. The student must be able to tolerate the physical, emotional, and mental demands of the program and function effectively under stress. It is necessary to adapt to changing environments, and function in the face of uncertainties that are inherent in the care of patients. A student must care for all individuals in a respectful and effective manner regardless of gender, age, race, sexual orientation, religion, or any other protected status identified in the University of Manitoba Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy.

2.2 All applicants to the undergraduate program of the Max Rady College of Medicine and the MPAS program are required to review this document to assess their ability to meet these standards. All applicants offered admission will be required to acknowledge such review and assessment.

2.3 Any candidate for the MD degree or MPAS degree who cannot attain the required skills and abilities through their course of study may be requested to withdraw from the program.

2.4 Students requesting accommodation shall register with Student Accessibility Services and follow the process in accordance with the University of Manitoba Student Accessibility Procedure. The Max Rady College of Medicine will consider each Student’s accommodation request in accordance with the University of Manitoba Student Accessibility Procedure. Given the clinical nature of our programs, additional time may be needed to implement accommodations. Accommodations are never retroactive; therefore, timely requests are essential and encouraged.

2.5 Students are expected to complete the MD degree within four years. Students may request an extension of time within which to complete the MD program; such requests are considered on a case-by-case basis. Students should refer to the UGME Promotion and Failure Policy for guidance. The MPAS degree requirements are identified in the MPAS Supplemental Regulations.

2.6 Regulations are issued from time to time by the Medical Council of Canada regarding the accommodation of candidates undertaking examinations as a component of eligibility for licensure: such regulations are supplemental to general information available to all candidates. Accordingly students are encouraged to contact the Medical Council of Canada regarding accommodations for disability.


3. REFERENCES

3.1 This policy document is guided by the following AAMC documents including:

  • Special Advisory Panel on Technical Standards for Medical School Admission. 1979.
  • Medical Students with Disabilities: A Generation of Practice. 2005.
  • Accessibility, Inclusion, and Action in Medical Education Lived Experiences of Learners and Physicians with Disabilities. March 2018.

3.2 The following documents have been reviewed in the creation of this policy:

  • The Council of Ontario Faculties of Medicine (COFM) Policy Document: Essential Skills and Abilities Required for Entry to a Medical Degree Program. October 2016.
  • The University of Michigan Medical School Technical Standards 2016
  • Medical Schools’ Willingness to Accommodate Medical Students with Sensory and Physical Disabilities: Ethical Foundations of a Functional Challenge to “Organic” Technical Standards. McKee M et al.

3.3 Medical Council of Canada

3.4 Student Accessibility Services

3.5 The University of Manitoba Accessibility Policy

3.6 The University of Manitoba Student Accessibility Procedure

3.7 UGME Promotion and Failure Policy


4. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education or the Director, Master of Physician Assistant Studies with any questions respecting this policy.

Formative assessment

Policy Name:

Formative Assessment

Application/

Scope:

Year I to Year IV Undergraduate Medical Education Students

Approved (Date):

May 2018

Review Date:

May 2023

Revised (Date):

February 2018

Approved By:

Progress Committee [January 2018]

Dean’s Council [February 2018]

College Executive Council [February 2018]

Senate Committee on Instruction and Evaluation (SCIE) [March 2018] Senate Executive Committee [May 2018]

Senate [May 2018]

1. PURPOSE

To ensure that students have an opportunity to participate in formative assessment experiences in each course or rotation and receive feedback on performance. In preparation for the summative evaluations administered at the end of each Course/Module and Rotation in accordance with University of Manitoba Final Examination and Final Grades policy and related procedures.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME program

2.2 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.3 Course/Module – A Course/Module is a course of study or educational unit, which covers a series of interrelated topics and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the M.D. degree. The UGME curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal courses occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.4 Rotation – A unit of clinical work in Clerkship.

2.5 Formative Assessment – An assessment designed to provide feedback to students in order to improve performance. May consist of multiple choice, short answer, or assignments which in some cases may be used in assessing summative progress in a course.

2.6 Midpoint In-Training Evaluation Report (MITER) – Is a formative assessment report completed by the student, and then reviewed by the preceptor. It is electronically distributed at the start of each core Rotation that is of at least four (4) weeks duration and must be completed and submitted electronically. This must include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.7 Formative-OSCE-type Examination (FOSCE) – A formative Objective Structured Clinical Examination used to assess the clinical skills of students.

2.8 The Pre-Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee and Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee(s) (PSEC/CSEC) - Are responsible for the development and approval of assessment policies and rules. Responsible for the overall management and administration of examination questions; the review and evaluation of results and recommendations to the Progress Committee for approval.

2.9 UM Learn (UML) – UM Learn is a University of Manitoba adopted eLearning solution.

2.1 Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship - Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship — takes all of the components of the current Clerkship and disperses them over an academic year allowing students to follow the course of illness.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 In the first week of each course/module within Pre-Clerkship and Clerkship rotation, students will be informed of the format, date and time of each Formative Assessment.

3.2 Formative Feedback will be provided to all students at least every six weeks in Longitudinal, Year-Long Courses.

3.3 For shorter preclerkship courses, one or more formative assessments may be developed and administered for each course/module in the Preclerkship Program at the discretion of the course leader.

3.4 A FOSCE will be developed, organized and administered to Year I students prior to completion of the Year I program.

3.5 A MITER will be completed by each student for each Clerkship rotation of four (4) weeks or more duration.

3.6 The Clerkship Director/designate will review each student’s completed MITER in a timely and efficient manner.

3.7 Students enrolled in the Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship must receive formative feedback at least every six weeks.

3.8 This policy will be reviewed every five years following the approval date.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT

4.1 Avail of each opportunity to participate in the course formative assessments at the Pre- Clerkship level.

4.2 Avail of each opportunity to discuss the results of each course formative assessment at a time set by the Course Leader.

4.3 Participate in each opportunity to prepare for FOSCE’s.

4.4 Participate in FOSCE’s at the designated time and under the designated conditions.

4.5 Complete MITER’s as required and participate in the meeting to address the information submitted in the MITER.

4.6 Actively engage in addressing deficiencies in knowledge and experience identified through the formative assessment process in the Pre-Clerkship and Clerkship programs.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF COURSE LEADERS

4.7 Inform students of number, types and dates of formative assessments.

4.8 Inform the Course Assistant of the times and dates of formative assessments.

4.9 Develop a bank of formative assessment questions.

4.10 Ensure that the Course Assistant has a copy of the bank of formative assessment questions for the course if administrative assistance is required in administering formative assessments.

4.11 Choose formative assessment questions for each assessment and provide them to the Course Assistant at least two (2) weeks before the scheduled assessment such that questions may be input and structured within the University of Manitoba's Learning Management System (D2L,UMLEARN).

4.12 Ensure each formative assessment is administered on the specified date and time.

4.13 Provide students with written or oral feedback on their performance on each formative assessment as appropriate.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DIRECTOR, CLINICAL SKILLS

4.14 Identify the date and time of FOSCEs.

4.15 Inform the Administrator, Pre-Clerkship and Assistant to Administrators, Evaluation of the date and time of FOSCEs in support of scheduling.

4.16 Develop cases for FOSCE.

4.17 Oversee the execution of FOSCE in collaboration with the Assistant to Administrators, Evaluations and CLSP personnel.

4.18 Ensure the FOSCE is corrected in accordance with the requirements of the Examination Results Policy and Procedures.

4.19 Ensure each student receives feedback on his/her performance on FOSCEs. RESPONSIBILITY OF THE CLERKSHIP DIRECTORS

4.20 Meet with each student at the midpoint of the rotation, if applicable, to review the MITER and identify ways the student can address areas of concern.

RESPONSIBILITY OF DIRECTOR, PRE-CLERKSHIP, DIRECTOR, CLERKSHIP, AND DIRECTOR, EVALUATION

4.21 Work collaboratively to ensure each Course Leader, Pre-Clerkship Director, Clinical Skills and Clerkship Director is aware of his/her responsibilities related to formative assessments.

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, PRE-CLERKSHIP

4.22 Ensure the scheduled formative assessments are included in the OPAL schedule for each course within the module.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF COURSE ASSISTANTS

4.23 Prepare formative assessments under the direction of the Course Leader as required.

4.24 Score and reports results for formative assessments for the Course Director if required. ASSISTANT TO ADMINISTRATORS, EVALUATION

4.25 Organize FOSCE under the direction the Director, Clinical Skills and with CLSP personnel as required.

4.26 Support the Coordinator, OSCE-type Evaluations with the scoring and distribution of results of FOSCE in accordance with the requirements of the Examination Results Policy and Procedures.


5.  REFERENCES

5.1 Shute, V. (2008). Focus on Formative Feedback. Review of Education. Research. 78 (1), 154-189

5.2 University of Manitoba Examination Policy and Procedures

5.3 UGME Policy and Procedures - Examination Results

5.4 UGME Policy and Procedures - Midpoint In-Training Evaluation and Final In-Training Evaluation Preparation, Distribution and Completion and Essential Clinical Presentation Preparation, Distribution, Audit, and Remediation

5.5 UGME Policy and Procedures – Communicating Methods of Evaluation in the Undergraduate Medical Education Program.

5.6 UGME Policy and Procedures – Deferred Examination

5.7 UGME Policy and Procedures – Supplemental Examinations

5.8 UGME Policy and Procedures – Promotion and Failure

5.9 UGME Policy and Procedures - Accommodation for Undergraduate Medical Students with Disabilities

5.10 University of Manitoba – Final Examination and Final Grades Policy

5.11 University of Manitoba – Deferred and Supplemental Examinations Procedures

5.12 University of Manitoba – Final Examination Procedures

5.13 University of Manitoba – Final Grades Procedures


6. POLICY CONTACT

Director, Evaluation

Forward feeding clerkship summative evaluation information

Policy Name: Forward Feeding Clerkship Summative Evaluation Information
Application / Scope: Year III and Year IV Medical Students; Clinical Preceptors/Clerkship, Directors/Designates
Approved (Date):  
Review Date: February 2021
Revised (Date): February 2016
Approved By: Senate, January 4, 2017

1. PURPOSE
To set out a process for student evaluation data to be fed forward to subsequent course directors to facilitate targeted academic assistance.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – A comprehensive summary of student performance as a necessary component of their Clerkship training which documents the full range of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) required of a physician. This is electronically distributed at the start of each rotation and must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This must include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.2 Forward Feeding – Sharing summative evaluation information from a rotation the student has completed with the Clerkship Director for a rotation or rotations to which the student is scheduled in the future.

2.3  Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee (CSEC) – Is responsible for the development and approval of assessment policies and rules. Responsible for the overall management, and administration of examination questions. The review and evaluation of results provide a basis for recommendations to be approved by the Progress Committee


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Forward Feeding may only occur respecting a student who has failed a FITER, has received two or more borderline passes on FITERs, or about whom significant professionalism or patient safety concerns (not otherwise indicated on the FITER) have been identified.

3.2 CSEC discusses and votes on Forward Feeding and then the Chair, CSEC brings the vote results to Progress Committee for discussion and decision.
 
3.3 Progress Committee makes a final decision on Forward Feeding student summative evaluation information from one rotation to another rotation.

3.4 Progress Committee’s decisions on Forward Feeding may include:

  • The number of rotations for which summative evaluation information will be forward fed.
  • The areas of concern that will be forward fed; and general recommendations for remediation.
  • Progress Committee makes decisions on Forward Feeding student summative evaluation information on a case-by-case basis.

3.5 Each student, for whom a decision is made to Forward Feed summative evaluation information, will be notified of such a decision. In these instances, students retain the right to view the completed Forward Feeding Reports and any personal information contained therein.

3.6 The Director, Student Assessment or designate is responsible for Forward Feeding the approved summative evaluation information to the Clerkship Director for the next clinical rotation to which the student is assigned.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT

4.1 Complete the Midpoint In-Training Evaluation Report (MITER).

4.2 Participate in the midpoint meeting with faculty.

4.3 Seek support to improve academic success when presented with evaluation information that indicates there are academic concerns i.e. Student Affairs, Faculty of Medicine; Student Accessibility Services, University of Manitoba.

4.4 Participate in the Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) meeting.

4.5 Actively engage in addressing identified deficiencies that are forward fed.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR

4.6 Monitor student progress throughout the rotation, ensuring the Midpoint In-Training Evaluation (MITER) meeting of the preceptor and student takes place.

4.7 Complete the Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) identifying all areas of concern.

4.8 Inform the Director, Clerkship Curriculum and Chair, CSEC that Forward Feeding must be considered within 2 working days of finalizing the FITER. In the case of shorter rotations that do not use a FITER for evaluation, this notification must occur within 2 working days of the end of the rotation.

4.9 Inform the student in question that a request to forward feed summative information has been made.

4.10 Participate in discussion and voting at CSEC with respect to Forward Feeding of summative evaluation information on identified student(s).

4.11 Distribute any information that has been forward fed from the previous rotation to the relevant faculty.

4.12 Review the academic progress reports of students whose summative evaluations have been forward fed, and report outcomes of remediation to CSEC.

RESPONSIBILITY OF MEMBERS OF CSEC

4.13 Participate in the discussion and vote at CSEC with respect to each situation presented related to forward feeding of summative evaluation information.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF CHAIR, CSEC

4.14 Ensure that all relevant information is available for CSEC member discussion and voting.

4.15 Oversee the CSEC voting process. This may occur electronically.

4.16 Bring the decision of CSEC to the attention the Director, Evaluation/Chair, Progress Committee within 3 working days after a vote by CSEC.

4.17 Participate in the discussion at the Progress Committee with respect to each situation presented and related to forward feeding of summative evaluation information

RESPONSIBILITIES OF MEMBERS OF PROGRESS COMMITTEE

4.18 Participate in the discussion and vote at Progress Committee with respect to each situation presented and related to forward feeding of summative evaluation information.

4.19 Render a decision on the request to forward feed within three working days of receipt of this request.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, STUDENT ASSESSMENT/CHAIR, PROGRESS COMMITTEE

4.20 Organize a Progress Committee meeting to discuss the CSEC results. This may occur electronically.

4.21 Ensure that all relevant summative evaluation information is available for Progress Committee member discussion and voting.

4.22 Oversee the Progress Committee voting process.

4.23 Forward feed the summative evaluation information, as indicated by the Progress Committee to the clerkship director of the next scheduled rotation, within three working days of the Progress Committee vote.

4.24 Inform the student in question of the decision of the Progress Committee.

4.25 Review the FITER from the next scheduled rotation with the Progress Committee, in order to determine if identified deficiencies have been remediated, and if further forward feeding is required.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF EVALUATION PERSONNEL

4.26 Ensure that all FITER information is recorded in a timely manner and in accordance with other UGME policies related to Student Evaluation.

4.27 Maintain the database that tracks summative evaluation information.

4.28 Inform the Director, Progress Committee of cases where a student has two borderline passes on FITERs.

4.29 Provide support to the Chair, CSEC and Director, Evaluation/Chair, Progress Committee in their work of preparing for meetings that involve discussion and voting on student summative evaluation information and preparing and distributing documents when committee decisions are made.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 UGME Policy & Procedures - Midpoint In-Training Evaluation & Final In-Training Evaluation Preparation, Distribution and Completion and Essential Clinical Presentations Preparation, Distribution, Audit, and Remediation

5.2 UGME Policy & Procedures – Remediation

5.3 Frellsen SL, Baker EA, Papp KK, Durning SJ. Medical school policies regarding struggling medical students during the internal medicine clerkships: results of a national survey. Acad Med 2008 Sep;83(9):876-81.

5.4 Cleary L. "Forward feeding" about students' progress: the case for longitudinal, progressive, and shared assessment of medical students. Acad Med 2008 Sep;83(9):800.


6. POLICY CONTACT

Director, Evaluation

Midpoint In-Training Evaluation (MITER) and Final In-Training Evaluation (FITER)

Policy Name:

Midpoint In-Training Evaluation (MITER) and Final In-Training Evaluation (FITER) Preparation, Distribution and Completion and Essential Clinical Presentation (ECP) Preparation, Distribution, Audit, and Remediation

Application / Scope:

Year III and Year IV Medical Students; Clinical Preceptors/Clerkship

Directors/Designates

Approved (Date):

May 2020

Review Date:

February 2025

Revised (Date):

February 2020

Approved By:

Progress Committee [August 2019] College Executive Council [January 2020]

Senate Committee on Instruction and Evaluation [February 2020] Senate [May 2020]

1. PURPOSE

To outline the process for providing accurate and timely feedback to students and for gathering data that supports the continued development of a high quality educational program.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.2 Essential Clinical Presentations (ECP) – Are Rotation-specific experiences that define the types of patients and clinical conditions that students must encounter, the appropriate clinical setting of the educational experience(s), and the expected level of student responsibility, which must be part of each particular rotation. This listing of presentations is distributed in electronic format at the start of each core rotation and must be completed electronically.

2.3 Midpoint In-Training Evaluation Report (MITER) – A formative assessment report completed by the student, and then reviewed by the preceptor. Distributed at the start of each core rotation that is at least four (4) weeks duration, the MITER must be completed and submitted electronically. This must include a narrative description of medical student performance

2.4 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – A comprehensive summary of student performance as a necessary component of their Clerkship training which demonstrates the full range of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) required of a physician. Electronically distributed at the start of each rotation, FITERs must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This must include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.5 FITER Approval Confirmation and ECP Remediation Completion (FACERC) - The FITER Approval Confirmation and ECP Remediation Completion survey.

2.6     Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee (CSEC) – Is responsible for the development and approval of assessment policies and rules. Responsible for the overall management and administration of assessments/examination questions and the review and evaluation of results and their recommendation to Progress Committee for approval.

2.7 Working Day – A day when the University of Manitoba is open for regular business.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Each student involved in a core rotation is responsible for completing all rotation specific ECPs, completing a MITER, where applicable, participating in meeting(s) related to the MITER, FITER and ECP, completing the student component of the FITER and completing the ECP remediation plan, as well as a remedial rotation based on a FITER failure, if required.

3.2 Each Clerkship Director/Designate is responsible for meeting with each student with respect to the MITER (if required), completing a FITER for each student, and meeting with each student to discuss his/her evaluation prior to the completion of the rotation.

3.2.1  For FITERs that demonstrate either a fail or a borderline pass, notification of the FITER must occur within five working days of completion of the rotation.

3.2.2  Electronic submission of all FITERs must occur within six weeks of completion of the rotation.

3.3 Each Clerkship Director/Designate is responsible for auditing each assigned student’s ECPs throughout the core rotation to identify gaps in learning, organizing a remediation plan to address the learning gaps and ensuring the student completes the remediation.

3.4 Each Clerkship Director/Designate is responsible for developing a standard list of strategies that can be used in ECP remediation plans.

3.5 Each student must complete all assigned ECP remediations by the date of submission of the Official Graduand list (no later than the College Executive Council session scheduled in early to mid-April of the academic year). Failure to meet this deadline will result in a delay of graduation.

3.6 This policy and its procedures will be on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENTS

4.1 Track all learning experiences related to the ECP throughout each core rotation.

4.2 Complete the MITER (if required) prior to the midpoint of the rotation and submit it for viewing by the Clerkship Director/Designate.

4.3 Attend scheduled meetings with Clerkship Director/Designate to discuss the MITER, the FITER, and any learning gaps related to the ECP.

4.4 Ensure the rotation evaluation is completed no later than the last day of the rotation to initiate release of the FITER for the student’s personal file.

4.5 Ensure the ECP is submitted no later than the end of the day on the last day of the rotation.

4.6 Complete the student component of the FITER within one (1) working day of receiving the FITER from the Clerkship Director/Designate.

4.7 Ensure any ECP remediation is completed as directed by the Clerkship Director/Designate within nineteen (19) working days from the end of the rotation.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR/DESIGNATE

4.8 Audit each assigned student’s ECP throughout the core rotation.

4.9 Meet with each student at the midpoint of the rotation, if applicable, to review the MITER and discuss the ECP with the student.

4.10 Organize a plan for remediation of ECP if gaps in learning are identified at the midpoint of the rotation.

4.11 Examine each student’s ECP before the rotation is complete and state on the FITER the plan for ECP remediation if gaps in learning experiences are identified.

4.12 Complete a FITER for each assigned student as per policy statement 3.2. This may require coordination of input from multiple preceptors.

4.13 Meet with each student to discuss the FITER and to discuss the ECP remediation plan if one is required.

4.14 Ensure the student completes the remediation plan within fifteen (15) working days of the end of the rotation.

4.15 Within nineteen (19) days of the end of the rotation submit the FACERC Survey to the Administrator, Clerkship.

4.16 Develop a standard list of strategies that can be incorporated into a remediation plan.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, CLERKSHIP/ADMINISTRATOR EVALUATIONS CLERKSHIP PRIOR TO THE START OF EACH CORE ROTATION

4.17 Prepare the electronic ECP, MITER, FITER and rotation evaluation in accordance with each core rotation requirements.

4.18 Prepare the electronic ECP remediation reflection for each department.

4.19 Inform the Department Assistant, where appropriate, for each rotation that the electronic documents are ready.

ESSENTIAL CLINICAL PRESENTATIONS - ECPS

4.20 Send students a reminder e-mail two (2) days before the rotation ends informing them that they are required to complete and submit the ECP on the last day of the rotation.

4.21 Generate and print the ECP Gap Report on the morning of the second day of the new rotation.

4.22 Within five (5) working days:

  • Cross reference the ECP Gap Report with the completed FITERs.
  • Create and distribute the ECP Gap Notification letter to the Clerkship Directors and Department Assistants indicating where required that the FITERs have not yet submitted.
  • Notify Clerkship Directors and Department Assistants who have no ECP gaps.

ROTATION EVALUATION

4.23    Send students a reminder e-mail two (2) prior to a rotation ending, informing them that they are required to complete and submit the rotation evaluation on the last day of the rotation.

MITER

4.24 Send a template reminder e-mail to students, Clerkship Directors and Assistants two (2) working days prior to the midpoint of the rotation for all rotations that have a MITER.

4.25 Run the MITER Status Report five (5) working days after the midpoint of the rotation and distribute it to the Clerkship Directors and Department Assistants for action.

4.26 Prior to the end of the rotation, send a report identifying outstanding MITERs to Clerkship Directors, Department Assistants, Director, Clerkship Curriculum and Director, UGME Curriculum.

FITER

4.27 Send a template reminder e-mail to Clerkship Directors, Department Assistants and students five (5) working days prior to the end of the rotation.

4.28    Run the FITER Status Report one (1) working day and five (5) working days into the new rotation and distribute each to the Clerkship Directors and the Department Assistants for action.

FACERC SURVEY

4.29 In the ECP Gap Notification, identify the date for completion of the FACERC Survey.

Ensure every rotation is notified of requirement to complete the FACERC irrespective of ECP gaps. FACERC completion is nineteen (19) working days into the current rotation.

4.30 Send a reminder e-mail to Clerkship Directors and Department Assistants five (5) working days prior to the required completion date of the FACERC.

4.31 On the required FACERC completion date, check to see that all FACERC have been submitted.

4.32 Immediately inform the Clerkship Director and Department Assistant for any departments where the required FACERC has not been submitted on the required date.

4.33 Prior to the end of the current rotation, provide Clerkship Directors, Department Assistants, Director, Clerkship Curriculum and Director, UGME Curriculum the following information related to the previous rotation:

  • The status of FACERC completion

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT ASSISTANT

4.34 At the beginning of each rotation, organize the electronic distribution of:

  • The ECP, MITER (if applicable), FITER (view only access), and rotation evaluation to each student.
  • The FITER, MIITER (if applicable and view only) and ECP (view only) to each Clerkship Director/Designate.

4.35 Audit the completion of MITERs at the midpoint of the rotation and remind each Clerkship Director/Designate of his/her responsibility to meet with the assigned student(s).

4.36 Audit the completion of FITERs and remind each Clerkship Director/Designate of his/her responsibility to meet with the assigned student(s) prior to the end of the rotation.

4.37 Audit the student submission of ECPs and email any student(s) who has not submitted their ECP progress ensuring that all ECPs are submitted by the end of the day on the final day of the rotation.

4.38 If notified by the UGME office that inconsistencies exist between the ECP Gap Report and FITERs, have the Clerkship Director/Designate indicate the appropriate ECP remedial plan on the FITER and resubmit the FITER.

4.39 Upon completion of all of the above, ensure the Clerkship Director/Designate submits the FACERC to close the period. The deadline for submission is nineteen (19) working days into the current rotation.


5. REFERENCE

5.1 UGME Policy and Procedures - Program Evaluation

5.2 UGME Policy and Procedures – Communicating Methods of Evaluation in the Undergraduate Medical Education Program

5.3 UGME Policy and Procedures – Promotion and Failure

5.4 UGME Policy and Procedures – Formative Assessment


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Director, Evaluations with questions respecting this policy.

Program evaluation

Policy Name:

Program Evaluation

Application/ Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education Faculty and Students

Approved (Date):

August 2018

Review Date:

August 2023

Revised (Date):

August 2018

Approved By:

Curriculum Executive Committee [August 2018] College Executive Council [August 2018]

1. PURPOSE

To provide Max Rady College of Medicine specific processes to ensure all components of the curriculum are evaluated in accordance with accreditation standards and to improve teaching, courses and programs.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME program.

2.2 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.3 Rotation – A unit of clinical work in the Clerkship component (Year III and Year IV) of the undergraduate medical education program.

2.4 Elective – An opportunity for self-education in an area of the student`s own interest.

2.5 Course – A course is the study of a particular topic within a wider subject area and is the basic building block of undergraduate medical education. A typical course includes lectures; assessment such as assignments, essays, reports, tests and exams; and either tutorials or laboratories referred to as sessions. Most courses are taught by a team of lecturers and tutors.

2.6 Session – A set period designated for teaching/learning including but not limited to a lecture, tutorial, laboratory, and clinical skills session.

2.7 Working Day – Any day, other than a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday on which academic business may be conducted. Max Rady College of Medicine usual workday hours are Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

2.8 Final In- Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – An evaluation report that is completed at the end of each core and elective rotation at the Clerkship level. This is electronically distributed at the start of each rotation and must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This must include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.9 Transition to Clerkship (TTC) – A module scheduled at the beginning of Year III, prior to the commencement of Core Clerkship.

2.10 Transition to Residency (TTR) – A module scheduled in Year IV after the completion of mandatory electives and CaRMS Interviews that encompasses selectives, an Evidence Based Course and Capstone Project, Advance Cardiac Life Support Course (ACLS) and Comprehensive Course Reviews in preparation for the MCCQE Pt. 1 examination.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Program evaluation will include evaluation of courses, sessions, instructors, primary preceptors, primary residents, and elective supervisors to ensure congruence with the program’s objectives.

3.2 Program evaluation will be conducted on a regular basis throughout each academic year.

3.3 Student involvement in Pre-Clerkship course evaluations, Clerkship Rotation evaluations and Student Elective evaluation is mandatory. In Pre-Clerkship and Clerkship, students will be provided protected instructional time to complete such evaluations.

3.4 Student non-compliance with the requirement to complete course, rotation and elective evaluations will result in a hold on final grades and/or FITERs.

3.5 All data from program evaluation, except Instructor Evaluation data for UMFA Instructors, will be shared with respective faculty, governing committees and the Manitoba Medical Student Association for analysis and review.

3.6 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES – PRE-CLERKSHIP

SESSION EVALUATION

4.1 The Session Evaluation can be completed electronically by students and/or instructors on a voluntary basis or at the request of an instructor for all sessions in any Pre-Clerkship course. The approved Session Evaluation is located within the curriculum management system and can be requested from Pre-Clerkship staff.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PRE-CLERKSHIP ADMINISTRATORS

4.2 Ensure the approved Session Evaluation form is available to students and instructors at the beginning of each course.

4.3 Inform students and instructors that this form can be completed on a voluntary basis for any specific session within the course.

4.4 Collate session evaluation data with the course evaluation data and distribute to each respective Course Director as well as respective faculty and governing committees.

INSTRUCTOR EVALUATION

4.5 The approved instructor evaluation will be used to evaluate instructors who teach three or more lectures in a course within the Pre-Clerkship curriculum. Each class will be divided into two randomly selected groups for participation in the instructor evaluations within a course. The approved Instructor Evaluation is located within the curriculum management system and can be requested from Pre-Clerkship staff.

RESPONSIBILITY OF STUDENT

4.6 Complete electronically the assigned Instructor Evaluation(s) within the five (5) working day limit.

RESPOSIBILITY OF DEPARTMENT REPRESENTATIVES/ASSISTANTS

4.7 Enter all instructors into the curriculum management system by the first day of each course.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATORS, PRE-CLERKSHIP

4.8 Use the reporting engine to query the instructors who teach three or more lectures in a specific course.

4.9 Organize the instructors being evaluated into two groups, UMFA members and non- UMFA members.

4.10 Randomly organize each class into two groups at the beginning of the academic year.

4.11 Send an e-mail to all students in each class stating that they will be randomly selected to participate in the Instructor Evaluation process and identify the instructors who will be evaluated in the course. This e-mail will be sent within seven (7) days after the course begins.

4.12 Send an e-mail to the instructors who will be evaluated in the course stating how and why they were chosen for the Instructor Evaluation. This e-mail will be sent within 7 days after the course begins.

4.13 Ensure the Instructor Evaluation is closed after five (5) working days.

4.14 Collate all data from each Instructor Evaluation within five (5) working days after the course ends.

4.15 For instructors who are UMFA members, distribute the collated data to the instructor only within ten (10) working days of the end of the course. Prior to distribution, the Associate Dean, UGME can view the collated data.

4.16 For instructors who are non-UMFA, distribute the collated data no later than 10 working days after the end of the course, to the following individuals:

  • Instructors
  • Course Director, course specific
  • Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum
  • Director, UGME Curriculum
  • Associate Dean, UGME

RESPONIBILITY OF DIRECTOR, PRE-CLERKSHIP CIRRICULUM

4.17 Review and discuss the Instructor Evaluation results with individual instructors as required.

COURSE EVALUATION

4.18 The approved course evaluation will be distributed by UGME staff for each course. The evaluation may include three additional questions specific to the stated course at the request of the course leader. A sample course evaluation is is located within the curriculum management system and can be requested from Pre-Clerkship staff.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENTS (INCLUDING COURSE REPRESENTATIVES)

4.19 All students are required to complete all course evaluations within the five (5) working day limit designated for each course.

4.20 Course Representatives will participate in a one (1) hour post Course Evaluation Session with the course director.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF COURSE DIRECTORS

4.21 Provide three (3) course specific questions for inclusion in the Course Evaluation, prior to the beginning of the course. (Optional)

4.22 Review the collated data for the course in preparation for the meeting with the student course representative(s).

4.23 Participate in the one (1) hour post evaluation meeting with student reps.

4.24 Present report on course at Pre-Clerkship Curriculum Committee meeting.

4.25 Report progress on action items to the Pre-Clerkship Curriculum Committee until actions are complete.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATORS, PRE-CLERKSHIP

4.26 Coordinate and prepare the course evaluations. Include the optional three (3) course specific questions from Course Directors who provide such information.

4.27 Organize the distribution of the course evaluations with the exception of Medicine Special.

4.28 Organize the distribution of the course evaluations on the last day of the course.

4.29 Ensure course evaluations are closed after five (5) working days.

4.30 Collate all data from each course evaluation and distribute it to the Office of Educational and Faculty Development. This department analyze the data and presents their findings to the Pre-Clerkship Curriculum Committee.

RESPONSIBILITES OF THE OFFICE OF EDUCATIONAL AND FACULTY DEVELOPMENT

4.31 Analyze the data and present their findings to the Pre-Clerkship Curriculum Committee.

4.32 Prepare longitudinal data reports for UGME faculty leaders as required.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, PRE-CLERKSHIP CIRRICULUM

4.33 Report all actions developed from course evaluations to the Director, UGME Curriculum and Associate Dean, UGME through the Curriculum Executive Committee, which meets monthly.

4.34 Report the progress on action items to the Director of Curriculum on an ongoing basis to monitor implementation of the Curriculum Executive Committee approved actions.

4.35 Report decisions from Curriculum Executive Committee to Pre-Clerkship Administrators.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME

4.36 Report all changes to UGME curriculum as a result of any type of program evaluation at

Department Head meetings and Dean’s Council meetings as required.

4.37 Report all changes to UGME curriculum as a result of any type of program evaluation to

College Executive Council.


5. PROCEDURES – CLERKSHIP

TRANSITION TO CLERKSHIP (TTC)

RESPONSIBILITY OF STUDENTS (INCLUDING STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES)

5.1 Students are expected to complete the TTC evaluation on the last day. RESPONSIBILITY OF TTC DIRECTORS

5.2 Provide a meeting summary with questions and comments to the Director, Clerkship Curriculum for presentation at Clerkship Curriculum Committee meeting and TTC planning meeting.

RESPONSIBILITY OF ADMINSTRATOR, CLERKSHIP

5.3 Assist in the distribution of evaluations to students. RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, CLERKSHIP ACADEMIC

5.4 Ensure the TTC Evaluation written summary is presented at Clerkship Curriculum Committee meeting

5.5 Ensure the TTC Evaluation written summary is presented at the TTC planning meeting for discussion, decision(s) and action.

5.6 Report all actions developed from TTC Evaluation to the Director, Clerkship Clinical, Director, UGME Curriculum and Associate Dean, UGME through the Curriculum Executive Committee which meets on a monthly basis.

5.7 Report the progress on action items to the Director of Curriculum on an ongoing basis to monitor implementation of the Curriculum Executive Committee approved actions.

CLERKSHIP

5.8 The approved Rotation Evaluation tool is comprised of three components - General Overview, Principal Preceptor Evaluation, and Principal Resident Evaluation. A sample Rotation Evaluation is located in the curriculum management system.

RESPONSIBILITY OF STUDENTS

5.9 Complete the Rotation Evaluation electronically on the last day of the Rotation. This is required in order to receive a FITER.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF CLERKSHIP DIRECTORS

5.10 Provide, if desired, three (3) Rotation specific questions for inclusion in the General Rotation component of the Rotation Evaluation.

5.11 Review the collated data from the Rotation Evaluation on a Rotation basis.

5.12 Bring Rotation Evaluation reports to the Clerkship Curriculum Committee for discussion and possible action.

5.13 Report progress on action items to the Clerkship Curriculum Committee until actions are complete.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATORS, CLERKSHIP

5.14 Coordinate and prepare the Rotation Evaluations. Include the three (3) Rotation specific questions from the Clerkship Directors who provided such information.

5.15 Ensure the department administrative personnel have the Rotation Evaluation prior to the beginning of each period for inclusion in the Rotation workflow.

5.16 Collate all data from each Rotation Evaluation within fifteen (15) working days of the end of each Rotation and distribute as follows:

  • Clerkship Director, Rotation specific
  • Director, Clerkship Clinical
  • Director, Clerkship Academic
  • Director, UGME Curriculum
  • Associate Dean, UGME
  • Department Heads
  • Student Clerkship Representatives
  • MMSA Vice-Stick, Academic
  • Associate Dean, Students
  • Associate Dean, Professionalism & Diversity

5.17 Prepare the specific Principal Preceptor Report within fifteen (15) working days of the end of the Rotation and distribute the cumulative data after Period 8, as follows:

  • Course Director, Rotation specific
  • Director, Clerkship Clinical
  • Director, Clerkship Academic
  • Director, UGME Curriculum
  • Associate Dean, UGME
  • Department Heads, Rotation specific

5.18 Distribute the cumulative Principal Resident Reports after each period, as follows:

  • Course Director, Rotation specific
  • Director, Clerkship Clinical
  • Director, Clerkship Academic
  • Director, UGME Curriculum
  • Associate Dean, UGME
  • Department Heads, Rotation specific

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, CLERKSHIP CLINICAL AND DIRECTOR, UGME CURRICULUM

5.19 Review all Rotation Evaluation data after each Rotation for discussion and action through the Curriculum Executive Committee.

5.20 Review longitudinal specific Principal Preceptor Report and Principal Resident Report data for discussion and action through the Curriculum Executive Committee.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ASSOCIATE DEAN, PGME AND PROGRAM DIRECTORS, PGME

5.21 Review longitudinal specific Principal Resident Report data provided on a cumulative basis for discussion and action.

5.22 Report decisions from review of Principal Resident data to the Associate Dean, UGME on an annual basis.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME

5.23 Report all changes to UGME curriculum as a result of any type of program evaluation at Department Head meetings and Dean’s Council meetings as required.

5.24 Report all changes to UGME curriculum as a result of any type of program evaluation to College Executive Council.

ELECTIVES

RESPONSIBILITY OF STUDENTS

5.25 Complete the Student Elective Evaluation Form electronically by the last day of the

Elective. This is required in order to receive a FITER.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, ELECTIVES

5.26 Review the collated data from the Student Elective Evaluation Forms as necessary.

5.27 Bring Student Elective Evaluation Form reports, as necessary, to the Clerkship

Curriculum Committee for discussion and possible action.

5.28 Report progress on action items to the Clerkship Curriculum Committee until actions are complete.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATOR, ELECTIVES AND ADMINISTRATOR, EVALUATIONS, CLERKSHIP

5.29 Coordinate and prepare the Student Elective Evaluation Form and Preceptor Evaluation Form.

5.30 Ensure the department administrative personnel have access to the evaluation forms prior to the beginning of each Elective period for inclusion in the Elective workflow.

5.31 Collate all data from the Student Elective Evaluation Form within fifteen (15) working days of the end of each Elective period and distribute the Director, Electives.


6. REFERENCES

6.1 University of Manitoba – University of Manitoba Faculty Association 2010-2013 Collective Agreement.


7. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Director, UGME Curriculum with questions respecting this policy.

Narrative assessment

Policy Name:

Narrative Assessment

Application / Scope:

Year I to Year IV Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students

Approved Date:

May 2018

Review Date:

May 2023

Revised (Date):

August 2018

Approved By:

Progress Committee [January 2018]

Dean’s Council [February 2018]

College Executive Council [February 2018]

Senate Committee on Instruction and Evaluation (SCIE) [March 2018] Senate Executive Committee [May 2018]

Senate [May 2018]

1. PURPOSE

To ensure that students receive written narrative feedback of their performance related to the CanMEDS competencies (professional, communicator, collaborator, leader, health advocate, and scholar).


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME program

2.2 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.3 Course/Module – A course/module is a course of study or educational unit, which covers a series of interrelated topics and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the M.D. degree. The UGME curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal courses occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.4 Rotation – A unit of clinical work in Clerkship.

2.5 Formative Assessment – An assessment designed to provide feedback to students in order to improve performance. May consist of multiple choice, short answer, or assignments which in some cases may be used in assessing summative progress in a course.

2.6 Midpoint In-Training Evaluation Report (MITER) – Is a formative assessment report completed by the student, and then reviewed by the preceptor. It is electronically distributed at the start of each core rotation that is of at least four (4) weeks duration and must be completed and submitted electronically.


4. PROCEDURES – Pre-Clerkship

 

 

 

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT

4.1 Participate in the course formative assessments at the Pre-Clerkship level.

4.2 Prepare for FOSCEs, OSCEs and CCE examinations. 

4.3 Participate in FOSCEs, OSCEs and CCE at the designated time and under the designated conditions.

4.4 Review the written feedback provided.

4.5 Actively engage in addressing deficiencies in knowledge and experience identified through the formative assessment process in the Pre-Clerkship programs.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF COURSE LEADERS

4.6 Provide students with written narrative feedback on their performance on each formative assessment as appropriate.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DIRECTOR, CLINICAL SKILLS

4.7 Ensure each student receives written narrative feedback on his/her performance on clinical examinations.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ASSISTANT TO ADMINISTRATORS, EVALUATION AND THE ADMINISTRATOR, EVALUATIONS (PRE-CLERKSHIP)

4.8 Organize clinical examinations under the direction the Director, Clinical Skills and with CLSF personnel as required.

4.9 Support the Coordinator, OSCE-type Evaluations with the scoring and distribution of results of clinical examinations in accordance with the requirements of the Examination Results Policy and Procedures.


5. PROCEDURES - Clerkship

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT

5.1 Participate in the MITER process and complete a self-evaluation at the midpoint of the clinical rotation.

5.2 Review the MITER2 completed by the preceptor that contains a narrative assessment.

5.3 Participate in a meeting with the preceptor to address the information submitted in the self-evaluation.

5.4 Participate in the formative assessment at the end of the clinical rotation.

5.5 Review the end of clinical rotation evaluation which includes a narrative assessment provided by the preceptor.

5.5.1 If the student agrees with the evaluation a FITER 2 is completed.

5.5.2 If the student does not agree with the evaluation the student will complete their FITER 2 and provide rationale for their reasoning.

5.6 Actively engage in addressing deficiencies in knowledge and experience identified through both the MITER process and the formative assessment process in the Clerkship programs.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PRECEPTOR

5.7 Review and audit each assigned student’s ECP throughout the rotation.

5.8 Meet with each assigned student at the mid-point of the rotation, if applicable, to review the MITER and discuss the ECP with the student(s).

5.9 Meet with each student at the midpoint of the rotation, if applicable, to review the MITER and identify ways the student can address areas of concern.

5.10 Organize a plan for remediation of the ECP if gaps in learning are identified at the mid-point of the rotation.

5.11 Examine each assigned student’s ECP before the rotation is complete and state on the FITER the plan for ECP remediation if gaps in learning experiences are identified.

5.12 Complete a FITER for each assigned student no later than five (5) working days of the end of the rotation. This may require coordination of input from multiple preceptors.

5.13 Meet with each assigned student at the end of the rotation to discuss content of the evaluation.

5.14 Where a concern in narrative content is raised by a student, review to resolve/explain reasoning.

RESPONSIBILITY OF DIRECTOR, CLERKSHIP, AND DIRECTOR, EVALUATION

5.15 Work collaboratively to ensure each Director is aware of his/her responsibilities related to narrative assessments.

RESPONSIBILITY OF ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME

5.16 Resolve issues related to content in individual student MSPRs throughout the completion process.

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, CLERKSHIP

5.17 MITER Process

5.17.1 At the midpoint of each core rotation run Workflow Status Report in the Curriculum Management System for each discipline to identify outstanding surveys.

5.17.2 Issue reminder emails to students and preceptors where necessary. If response is not provided escalate to Departmental Administrators and if necessary Clerkship Directors/Designate. 

5.18 Formative Assessment

5.18.1 At the end of each core clinical and elective rotation run a Workflow Status Report in the Curriculum Management System for each discipline to identify outstanding surveys.

5.18.2 Issue reminder emails to students and preceptors where necessary. If response is not provided escalate to Departmental Administrators and if necessary Clerkship Directors/Designate.

5.18.3 When a concern is raised by a student with regards to the narrative content of an evaluation, review the evaluation and, if necessary bring to the attention of the preceptor.

5.18.4 When the student feels the comment is not congruent with performance or based on an unfair judgement, the student may ask the Associate Dean, UGME to review it. The Associate Dean, UGME will discuss any changes with the author of the comment.

5.18.5 In cases where the preceptor is unwilling to revise the content, inform the student accordingly.

5.18.6 In cases where the preceptor is willing to the revise the content, make revisions as appropriate.

5.18.7 Upon compilation of a student’s Medical Student Performance Report, narrative assessment from core clinical and elective rotations will appear.


6. REFERENCES

6.1 University of Manitoba Examination Policy and Procedures

6.2 UGME Policy and Procedures - Examination Results

6.3 UGME Policy and Procedures - Midpoint In-Training Evaluation and Final In- Training Evaluation Preparation, Distribution and Completion and Essential Clinical Presentation Preparation, Distribution, Audit, and Remediation

6.4 UGME Policy and Procedures – Communicating Methods of Evaluation in the

Undergraduate Medical Education Program.

6.5 UGME Policy and Procedures – Promotion and Failure

6.6 University of Manitoba – Final Examination and Final Grades Policy

6.7 University of Manitoba – Deferred and Supplemental Examinations Procedures

6.8 University of Manitoba – Final Examination Procedures

6.9 University of Manitoba – Final Grades Procedures


7. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Director, Evaluation with questions respecting this policy.

 

 

Peer-to-peer tutoring

Policy Name:

Peer to Peer Tutoring

Application/

Scope:

Students undergoing Remediation

Approved (Date):

April 2018

Review Date:

March 2023

Revised (Date):

May 2020

Approved By:

Progress Committee [January 2018] Dean’s Council [February 2018]

College Executive Council [February 2018]

 

1. PURPOSE

Peer to Peer Tutoring is intended to provide an additional level of academic support to students wishing to receive help in remediating exams outside of the classroom environment. It represents a supplement to academic support services provided by the Course Leader, Faculty and the Office of Student Affairs. The UGME Peer to Peer Tutoring program serves the dual purpose of providing an opportunity for medical students to reinforce their knowledge and critical thinking skills while simultaneously helping their peers achieve the same goal and progression within the UGME program.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Remediation - The provision to students on Probationary Status by the Undergraduate Medical Education Faculty of reasonable academic supports, educational resources and protected time for studying and review including Supplemental Examination and additional clinical exposures as may be deemed appropriate following a Remediation Assessment.

2.2 Probationary Status - Failure on any one (1) Course, OSCE-type examination, two (2) NBME examinations, failure of a FITER, or when a student receives a total of three (3) or more borderline passes on FITER evaluation, whether on consecutive clinical rotations or not. A student on Probationary Status is required to participate in Remediation.

2.3 Remediation Assessment – Completed by the Director, Remediation in conjunction with the student, and taking into account input from such other Undergraduate Medical Education faculty and staff as may be available or requested. The Remediation Assessment may include a review of:

  • FITERs or failed examinations resulting in the current Probationary Status;
  • Other relevant prior Undergraduate Medical education results;
  • Prior or ongoing Remediation efforts;
  • Prior or ongoing professionalism issues;
  • Prior or ongoing accommodation or access issues including the completion of a meeting with the Dean of Students.

2.4 Tutor (Peer Tutor) – Tutors, also known as Peer Tutors, are students who can help students by sharing their own study strategies and techniques. They are familiar with the course materials and have excelled in summative assessment of the course content. Tutors are not teaching assistants and will not lecture nor re-teach course materials; their job is to help students think about their learning and to provide them with opportunities to review in an organized setting. Peer tutors will be approached by the Director, Remediation based on their academic performance, specific skill set or experience, or the recommendation of Faculty.

2.5 Tutee – A student, who in accordance with the Promotion and Failure Policy, has failed any one (1) Course, Module, or NBME Examination, and is required to participate in Remediation.

2.6 Module– A module is a course of study or educational unit, which covers a series of interrelated topics and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the M.D degree.

2.7 Mid-term Examination - A summative multiple-choice and/or short answer examination normally conducted at the midpoint of a course. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.8 Final Examination – A multiple choice and/or short answer examination at the end of a unit of work (Course) at the Pre-Clerkship level of the UGME program commencing with the Class of 2018. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.9 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program. For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 A student must be on Probationary Status, have sought specific tutoring assistance or has been recommended by the Director Evaluations, Director Remediation or Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME in order to be eligible for tutoring support within this program.

3.2 Peer Tutors will be identified by the Max Rady College of Medicine based on proven academic performance. Potential Peer Tutors will have demonstrated general high academic standing across multiple subject areas, or excellent academic standing in the subject area assigned. In certain circumstances, the Director, Remediation will identify a student or resident physician with specific experiences or skill sets that make him or her a suitable Peer Tutor.

3.3 Probationary Students wishing to participate as Tutees in this program will be matched with a Peer Tutor for one-to one-tutoring for an approved number of hours. There will be no charge to Tutees.

3.4 In order to provide the best possible experience for both Tutors and Tutees, prospective Tutors shall complete a University affiliated peer tutoring course unless specifically waived by the Director, Remediation. The objective of this course is to formally develop an approach to peer tutoring and to develop specific peer teaching skills. Tutees should expect Tutors to strongly encourage them to conceptualize their understanding on whiteboards, and practice integration and application of their knowledge utilizing test questions.

3.5 Tutors will serve as a facilitator of the learning process, filling content gaps as needed, assessing/modifying the tutee's reasoning and problem solving skills.

3.6 Peer Tutors agree to keep all information regarding student sessions, including the Tutee’s Probationary Status entirely confidential. Tutors are encouraged to contact the Office of Student Affairs directly if they have concerns about a Tutee’s personal and/or professional success.

3.7 This Peer to Peer Tutoring program endeavors to assist students in remediating and improving academic performance but does not guarantee that a Tutee will ultimately succeed. Students seeking assistance may experience different levels of success based on factors including, but not limited to current academic progress, relative effectiveness of study skills, and timeliness in seeking academic support services. Participation in the tutoring program does not imply nor guarantee success in remediation. As such, participating students are expected to proactively seek assistance from the Director Remediation, Course Leader, Student Affairs or Associate Dean as required.

3.8 This policy will be reviewed every five years following the approval date.


4. PROCEDURES

4.1 This program matches remediation students on Probationary status with a trained peer tutor for one-to one-tutoring on a weekly basis for an approved number of hours.

4.2 Student participation in this program is entirely voluntary. Both the Tutor and Tutee may decline further participation in this program with appropriate notice to the office of the UGME. The Tutee may indicate in advance of the matching process if there are students within the faculty that they are unable to work with.

4.3 Tutoring sessions are intended to last a maximum of two (2) hours. These sessions may offer students an opportunity to:

  • Discuss an approach to the course
  • Discuss course content
  • Work through specific course questions
  • Solve practice problems
  • Develop study and examination strategies

4.4 Tutors will use their best efforts to provide explanations, suggestions, and clarification.

Tutors will be expected to share their experiences and to offer strategies that may be useful for other learners. Tutors will not be expected to redeliver the original course material or to be a definitive content expert.

4.5 Tutors will be paid for the hours they work with students up to a maximum of eight (8) hours per student. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE TUTOR

4.6 In order to ensure timely and effective execution of this program, tutors are responsible for the following:

a. Completing Tutor training. Students interested in tutoring must attend training as outlined at paragraph 5.1.

b. Read, comprehend, and sign the Max Rady College of Medicine Tutor Code of Ethics as outlined at Annex A.

c. Provide reasonable availability for scheduling, subject to previously booked and mandatory UGME commitments. Be on time for all sessions. Cancellations should be made no later than two (2) days prior to scheduled meeting dates.

d. Plan and review material prior to tutoring sessions Use best efforts to support the Tutee to the extent reasonably possible.

e. Complete the Tutor Session Evaluation at the end of each session in order to receive payment.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE TUTEE

4.7 In order to ensure timely and effective execution of this program, the Tutee is responsible for the following:

a. Meet with the Director of Remediation. Confirm interest of participation in the Peer toPeer Tutoring Program.

b. Establish a schedule with the identified Tutor that is mutually workable.

c. Be on time for all sessions. Cancellations should be made no later than two (2) days prior to scheduled meeting dates.

d. Interact with the Tutor in a respectful and professional manner.

e. Be prepared for all tutoring sessions, including identifying in advance of the first meeting knowledge deficits or areas where additional clarity can be explored with the Peer Tutor.

f. Study independently and review the original material

g. Tutees shall continue to seek assistance from course instructors and course coordinators where suitable, or for definitive statements on course content.

h. Complete the Tutee Session Evaluation at the end of each session as part of their Remediation Contract.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 Academic Learning Center – Tutor Training

5.2 Max Rady College of Medicine – Tutor Code of Ethics


6. POLICY CONTACT

Director, Remediation


Annex A – Max Rady College of Medicine Tutor Code of Ethics

Please read the following PDF carefully and sign in pen:

Annex A – Max Rady College of Medicine Tutor Code of Ethics (PDF)

Promotion and failure

Policy Name:

Promotion and Failure

Application / Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students

Approved (Date):

Aug 2020

Review Date:

June 2025

Revised (Date):

August 2021

Approved By:

Progress Committee [June 2020]

College Executive Council [July 2020] Academic Advisory Subcommittee [July 2020] Senate [Aug 2020]

1. PURPOSE

To set out the process for promotion and failure of Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) students, which complements extant University of Manitoba Examination and Final Grades policy and related procedures.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME program

2.2 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.3 Course/Module – A Course/Module is a course of study or educational unit, which covers a series of interrelated topics and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the MD degree. The UGME curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal courses occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.4 Rotation – A unit of clinical work in Clerkship.

2.5 Midterm Examination - A summative examination normally conducted at the approximate midpoint of a Course/Module. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.6 Final Examination – A summative examination at the end of a Pre-Clerkship Course/Module. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.7 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program.

For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.

2.8 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE-type) – an examination used to assess the clinical skills of students.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by a comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by their congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of eight of twelve OSCE stations to pass the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills Courses.
  • The Remedial Examinations for the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills courses will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial exam. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial OSCE.

2.9 Comprehensive Clinical Exam (CCE) – An objective structured clinical-type examination used to assess the clinical skills of students in Clerkship.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by the comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by the congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations in order to pass the CCE.
  • The Remedial Examinations for Med IV CCE will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial CCE. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial CCE.

2.10 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – A comprehensive summary of student performance as a necessary component of their Clerkship training in order to ensure that students acquire the full range of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) required of a physician. This is electronically distributed at the start of each rotation and must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This must include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.11 Maximum Allowable Failures - The number of Pre-Clerkship modular courses which, if exceeded, would result in the immediate failure of a Pre-Clerkship year, and preclude the writing of supplemental examinations. The maximum allowable failures score is based on the sum of the weights (course weights (CW)) assigned to each course. Weightings assigned to each course are based on the amount of contact time spent with students and a breakdown of weightings assigned to each course within the Pre-Clerkship curriculum is included at Annex A. In order to be eligible to write supplemental exams, students cannot exceed nine (9) CW in Year One or ten (10) CW in Year Two.

2.12 Pre-Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee and Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee(s) (PSEC/CSEC) - Are responsible for the development and approval of assessment policies and rules. PSEC/CSEC bodies are responsible for the overall management and administration of examination questions; the review and evaluation of results and recommendations to the Progress Committee for approval.

2.13 Progress Committee - The overseeing body for student evaluations in the Undergraduate Medical Education Program. The Progress Committee assists in the design of a cohesive plan and standardized process for student assessment that follows the principles of the curriculum. Responsibilities include ensuring continuity of student monitoring, the direction of student remediation, and development of terms for promotion and failure at all stages of the curriculum.

2.14 Working Day – A day when the University of Manitoba is open for regular business.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

A. Pre-Clerkship

3.1 Successful completion of an academic year is deemed as follows:

Year One and Two (MED I and II)

  • Case One: Attaining a pass on each course/module and successfully completing all the required coursework in a given year.
  • Case Two: Failing a number of Courses/Modules up to the maximum allowable failures, successfully completing the corresponding supplemental examination(s) and successfully completing all the required coursework in a given year.

3.2 Failure of an academic year is deemed as follows:

Year One and Two (MED I and II)

  • Case One: Failing a number of Course/Modules in excess of the maximum allowable failures. Students may fail up to nine (9) Course Weights (CW) Year One (I) or ten (10) Course Weights (CW) in Year Two (II). A listing of CW is outlined in Annex A. Beginning on March 16, 2020, course weights accumulated during the Covid-19 Pandemic will not count towards the total course weights accumulated by a student in their particular academic year. This policy statement will be in effect until the end of the 2020-2021 academic year.
  • Case Two: Failing a modular course plus a first and second supplemental exam for the course.
  • Case Three: Failing any three (3) longitudinal courses, or the supplemental assessment in a longitudinal course.

B. CLERKSHIP

Students commencing Clerkship in 2013 or earlier

3.3 Successful completion of an academic year is deemed as follows:

  • Case One: Attaining a pass on each of the six (6) required NBME examinations, a pass on all clerkship rotation evaluations (FITERs), and a pass on the Comprehensive Clinical Examination (CCE).
  • Case Two: Successful remediation of core/elective rotations and/or CCE and/or attaining a pass on all necessary supplemental NBME examinations.

3.4 Failure of an academic year is deemed as follows

Failure of Clinical Assessments

The student who has received failing evaluations in one or more of the following:

  • Two major clerkships in different disciplines (Core Medicine, Surgery, Surgery Selective, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Family Medicine, and Obstetrics/Gynecology)

OR

  • One major clerkship and one or more of the following:
    • Its remedial
    • An ITC remedial
    • A remedial in any of the components of the Multiple Specialty Rotation (Anesthesia, Emergency Medicine, Community Health Sciences, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology)
    • An Elective remedial

OR

  • A remedial in two of the following:
    • Anesthesia
    • Emergency Medicine
    • Otolaryngology
    • Ophthalmology
    • Elective
    • Community Health Sciences
    • ITC
  • Failure of Examinations: The student has failures in one or more of the following:
    • A single NBME subject examination three (3) times

OR

A total of five (5) NBME examinations

OR

The CCE after remediation

  • Remediation Period:
    If a remediation period recommended for a student, for whatever cause, requires more than eight (8) weeks. Failure of a core clinical rotation would require remediation of the full six weeks, the student will be deemed to have failed the Clerkship Program. An outline of the minimum remediation period for Clerkship is outlined at Annex B.

Students commencing Clerkship in 2014 or later

3.5 Successful completion of an academic year is deemed as follows:

  • Case One: Attaining a pass on each of the six (6) required NBME examinations, a pass on all clerkship rotation evaluations (FITERs), and a pass on the Comprehensive Clinical Examination (CCE).
  • Case Two: Successful remediation of core/elective rotations and/or CCE and/or attaining a pass on all necessary supplemental NBME examinations.
  • Successful pass on all Longitudinal Courses

3.6 Failure of an academic year is deemed as follows:

Failure of Clinical Assessments: The student who has received failing evaluations in one or more of the following:

  • Two major clerkships in different disciplines (Core Medicine, Surgery (i.e. combination of Core Surgery and Surgical Specialties), Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Family Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Emergency Medicine, Anesthesia)

OR

  • One major clerkship and:
    • Its remedial, a Medicine Selective remedial, or, the Musculoskeletal course remedial, or,
    • A remedial in any of the assignments integral to either the Professionalism or the Population Health courses.
    • A Public Health remedial, or
    • A remedial in the Evidence-Based Medicine Practice Course, or
    • A TTR Selective remedial, or
    • An Elective remedial

OR

  • A remedial in two of the following:
    • Medicine Selective
    • Musculoskeletal Course
    • Any of the assignments integral to either the Professionalism or the
    • Population Health courses.
    • Public Health
    • The Evidence-Based Medicine Practice course
    • TTR Selective
    • Elective

Failure of Examinations: The student has failures in one or more of the following:

  • A single NBME subject examination three (3) times

OR

  • A total of five (5) NBME examinations. OR
  • The CCE after remediation.
  • Remediation Period: If a remediation period recommended for a student, for whatever cause, requires more than ten (10) weeks, the student will be deemed to have failed the Clerkship Program. An outline of the minimum remediation period for Clerkship is outlined at Annex B.

3.7 FITER Pass/Fail Criteria

FITERs will be automatically assessed, based on preceptor input, as a Pass, Borderline Pass, or Fail. The following situations constitute a FAIL:

  • If a student receives a grade of "unsatisfactory" in ONE MAJOR criterion.
  • If a student receives a grade of "unsatisfactory" in TWO MINOR criteria.
  • If a student receives a grade of "2 - Below expectations" (or worse) in ANY THREE MAJOR or MINOR criteria.

The following situation constitutes a BORDERLINE PASS:

  • If a student receives any combination of grades below "3 - meets expectations" that does not otherwise constitute a fail, as above. PLEASE NOTE: For summative purposes, a grade of "Borderline Pass" constitutes as a "Pass". This designation serves merely to flag students that are experiencing difficulty in a non-punitive manner.

The following constitutes a PASS:

  • If a student receives grades of "3 - Meets expectations" or better in ALL criteria.

GENERAL POLICY STATEMENTS

3.8 A student who fails Year One or Two will be required to repeat that particular year.

3.9 Until a student successfully completes all of the required coursework in a given year, they will not proceed to the next year.

3.10 A student, who fails Clerkship due to failure of clinical assessments, failure of examinations, or failure of remediation, immediately ceases in the program, and will be required to repeat the entire Clerkship Program.

3.11 A student, who has failed any repeat year, or the Repeat Clerkship, will be required to withdraw from the Max Rady College of Medicine program.

3.12 Acceptance of student results for Course, NBME, OSCE-type Examinations, and FITERs is the responsibility of the PSEC and CSEC Committees. The Chairs of these committees present these results to Progress Committee for review and approval.

3.13 The Progress Committee does not hear student appeals.

3.14 Students can appeal any evaluation decision to the Undergraduate Medical Education Student Appeals Committee.

3.15 This policy will be reviewed every five years following the approval date.


4. PROCEDURES

4.1 Pre-Clerkship — Course/Module Examinations, OSCE-type examinations

  • Each course must have at least two assessments; and the final exam is to be no more than 70% of the course. Course leaders may add points for written assignments, formative assessments, attendance, and lab exams. Assessment criteria shall be articulated in the respective course syllabus.
  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship will track longitudinal student performance on all assessments within each year/module of the Pre-Clerkship Program. Longitudinal tracking of performance is reported to PSEC as required.
  • For the CV1 and RS1 courses, the remediation periods will begin immediately after the course has been failed, and will therefore occur at the same time as other mandatory curricular time. For all other courses, remediation periods will take place in the summer. Students should only remediate one course at a time and supplemental exams will be scheduled to follow breaks within the academic schedule. Three (3) summer remediation periods will be created following each year to allow students to continue with their academic progress.
  • Students required to remediate within Pre-Clerkship will be encouraged to access the College of Medicine UGME peer-to-peer mentoring program.
  • At the end of the academic year, PSEC will determine whether a student has passed or failed based on cumulative performance.
  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship will prepare a letter for the signature of the Associate Dean, UGME, which will be sent, within three (3) working days after decision of PSEC, to each student who did not meet the criteria for promotion to the following year.
  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship will provide the Administrator, Enrolment within three (3) working days after the decision of PSEC of students who:
    • Have successfully completed the academic year.
    • Are required to write supplemental examination(s) or,
    • Have failed the academic year.
  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship will send a listing to the Associate Dean, UGME, Associate Dean Student Affairs, UGME, Director, Remediation, Administrator, Pre-Clerkship, and in case of MED II students to Administrator, Clerkship of students who:
    • Are writing supplemental examination(s) or,
    • Have failed the academic year.
  • At the end of designated supplemental examination periods, PSEC will determine whether a student has passed or failed based on the performance on the supplemental examination(s).
  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship will prepare a letter for the signature of the Associate Dean, UGME, which will be sent, within three (3) working days after the decision of the PSEC, to each student who did not successfully complete the supplemental examination informing him/her that he/she has failed the academic year.
  • The Administrator, Evaluations Pre-Clerkship will send a listing to the Administrator, Enrolment, the Associate Dean, UGME, Associate Dean Student Affairs, UGME, Director, Remediation, Administrator, Pre-Clerkship, and in case of Year II students to Administrator, Clerkship, within three (3) working days after the decision of the PSEC for students who wrote the supplemental examination(s) and:
    • Successfully completed the academic year.
    • Failed the academic year.
  • The Chair of PSEC will bring all information pertaining to the conduct of assessment within Pre-Clerkship to Progress Committee for discussion and approval when necessary.

4.2 Clerkship - FITERs, NBME Examinations, CCE

  • The Administrator, Evaluations Clerkship will track student performance on evaluation criteria integral to the Clerkship Program. Tracking of longitudinal assessment data will be reported to the CSEC.
  • CSEC and Progress Committees will determine whether a student has passed or failed the Clerkship program based on the cumulative performance of the student on all evaluation criteria.
  • Clerkship remediation periods will be scheduled on consultation with the Director, Clerkship, and Director, Remediation. Students will only remediate one (1) rotation at a time and supplemental exams will be scheduled as required.
  • Clerkship Remediation will in some instances occur during other mandatory curricular time. In some instances remediation will occur during the year concurrent with other rotations.
  • In October of each academic year, the Program Manager, UGME will begin to prepare a preliminary graduation listing of Med IV students together with the Administrator, Enrolment, Administrator, Clerkship, and Administrator, Electives based on the criteria established within this policy.
  • When a student meets the criteria for a failure of Clerkship, the Administrator, for Evaluations-Clerkship will prepare a letter for the signature of the Associate Dean, UGME, which will be sent to the student required to repeat the clerkship program.
  • Students who pass the Repeat Clerkship program will be included in the spring or fall graduation listing depending on the time of the year that they successfully completed all requirements for the clerkship program and filed for graduation.
  • The Chair of CSEC will bring all information pertaining to the conduct of assessment within Clerkship to Progress Committee for discussion and approval when necessary.

5.1 UGME Policy and Procedures – Communicating Methods of Evaluation

5.2 UGME Policy and Procedures – Accommodation for Undergraduate Medical Students with Disabilities

5.3 UGME Policy and Procedures – Deferred Examination

5.4 UGME Policy and Procedures – Supplemental Examinations

5.5 UGME Policy and Procedures – Examination Results

5.6 UGME Policy and Procedures – Invigilation of Examiners

5.7 UGME Policy and Procedures – Examination Conduct

5.8 University of Manitoba – Final Examination and Final Grades Policy

5.9 University of Manitoba – Deferred and Supplemental Examinations Procedures

5.10 University of Manitoba – Final Examination Procedures

5.11 University of Manitoba – Final Grades Procedures


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Director, Evaluations with questions respecting this policy.


Annex A to Promotion and Failure Policy

COURSE WEIGHTINGS – CLASS OF 2018 AND BEYOND

Commencing with the Class of 2018, course weights (CW) are as follows:

Year One

  • Foundation of Medicine – 4
  • Blood and Immunology One – 3
  • Cardiovascular One – 3
  • Respiratory One – 3
  • Neuroscience One – 4
  • Musculoskeletal One – 2
  • Endocrine One – 2
  • Women’s Reproductive Health/Obstetrics One – 2
  • Gastro-Intestinal/Hepatology/Nutrition One – 2
  • Urinary Tract One – 2
  • Introduction to Infectious Disease Two – 2
  • Cardiovascular Two - 3.5
  • Respiratory Two - 3.5

Year Two

  • Oncology Two – 1
  • Blood and Immunology Two - 3
  • Neuroscience Two – 6
  • Women’s Reproductive Health Two – 3
  • Endocrine Two – 3
  • Gastro-Intestinal/Hepatology/Nutrition Two – 3
  • Urinary Tract Two – 3
  • Musculoskeletal Two – 4
  • Consolidation – 6
  • Dermatology Two - 1

Annex B to Promotion and Failure Policy

WEEKS ASSIGNED TO CLERKSHIP REMEDIATION

Students required to remediate Clerkship rotations

  • Anesthesia – 4 weeks
  • Any Population Health Course Assignment – 0.5 week
  • Any Professionalism Course Assignment – 0.25 week
  • CCE - 2 weeks
  • Core Medicine – 6 weeks
  • Elective – A period of weeks equal to the length of the elective requiring remediation
  • Emergency Medicine – 4 weeks
  • Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) Course - 2 weeks
  • Family Medicine – 5 weeks
  • Medicine Selective – 2 weeks
  • Musculoskeletal Course – 2 weeks
  • Obstetrics/Gynecology – 6 weeks
  • Pediatrics – 6 weeks
  • Psychiatry – 6 weeks
  • Public Health – 1 week
  • Repeat NBME Failure – 4 weeks
  • Surgery – 6 weeks
  • Transition to Residency (TTR) Selective – A period of weeks equal to the length of the TTR selective

Remediation

Policy Name:

Remediation

Application/

Scope:

Year I through Year IV Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students

Approved (Date):

January 2017

Review Date:

February 2021

Revised (Date):

May 2020

Approved By:

Senate

1. PURPOSE

To set out the process for remediating students who fail summative assessments.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Course/Module - A Course/Module is a short course of study or educational unit, which covers a single topic or a small section of a broad topic and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the M.D. The UGME Curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal courses occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.2 Rotation – A unit of clinical work in the Clerkship component (Year III and Year IV) of the Undergraduate Medical Education Program.

2.3 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program. For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.

2.4 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE-type) – an examination used to assess the clinical skills of students.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by a comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by their congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of eight of twelve OSCE stations to pass the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills Courses.
  • The Remedial Examinations for the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills courses will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial exam. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial OSCE.

2.5 Comprehensive Clinical Exam (CCE) – An objective structured clinical-type examination used to assess the clinical skills of students in Clerkship.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by the comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by the congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations in order to pass the CCE.
  • The Remedial Examinations for Med IV CCE will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial CCE. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial CCE.

2.6 Final Examination – A summative examination at the end of a Pre-Clerkship Course/Module. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.7 Midpoint In-Training Evaluation Report (MITER) – Is a formative assessment report completed by the student, and then reviewed by the preceptor. It is electronically distributed at the start of each core Rotation that is of at least four (4) weeks duration and must be completed and submitted electronically. This is electronically distributed at the start of each Rotation and must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the Rotation.

2.8 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – Is a comprehensive summary of student performance as a necessary component of their Clerkship training in order to ensure that students acquire the full range of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) required of a physician. This is electronically distributed at the start of each Rotation and must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the Rotation.

2.9 Remediation – The provision to students on Probationary Status by the Undergraduate Medical Education Faculty of reasonable academic supports, educational resources and protected time for studying and review, and additional clinical exposures as may be deemed appropriate following a Remediation Assessment.

2.10 Remediation Assessment – Completed by the Director, Remediation in conjunction with the student, and taking into account input from such other Undergraduate Medical Education faculty and staff as may be available or requested. The Remediation Assessment may include a review of:

a) FITERs or failed examinations resulting in the current Probationary Status;

b) Other relevant prior Undergraduate Medical education results;

c) Prior or ongoing Remediation efforts;

d) Prior or ongoing professionalism issues;

e) Prior or ongoing accommodation or access issues including the completion of a meeting with the Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME.

2.11 Remediation Contract – A written agreement, signed by the student, the Director, Remediation, and the relevant Course Leader/Clerkship Director setting out the specific student deficiencies, Remediation Assessment findings, Remediation requirements, additional resources and timeframes for completion of Remediation.

2.12 Supplemental Examination – an opportunity to rewrite an examination that was failed.

2.13 Probationary Status – Would be applied to a student after a failure of any of the following:

  • One (1) Course/Module
  • The CCE
  • Two (2) NBME examinations
  • One (1) FITER
  • One (1) assignment integral to either the professionalism or population health courses in Clerkship

A student on Probationary Status is required to participate in Remediation

2.14 Monitored Status - A score between 60.0% and 62.9%, with no rounding of scores, on a Course, or Module Examination, a failure on one (1) NBME examination, or a borderline pass on a FITER. A student on Monitored Status is encouraged to participate in Remediation.

2.15 Working day – A day when the University of Manitoba is open for regular business.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

GENERAL

3.1 The Remediation policy has been developed and is maintained with the objective of identifying and supporting students within the faculty who are experiencing difficulty. The terms “Probationary” and “Monitored” are not meant to imply punitive status.

3.2 Student Remediation with respect to Essential Clinical Presentations (ECP) is covered in the Midpoint In-Training Evaluation & Final In-Training Evaluation Preparation, Distribution and Completion and Essential Clinical Presentation Preparation, Distribution, Audit, and Remediation Policy and Procedures document.

3.3 The Remediation policy governs the process of student Remediation in situations of failures and borderline pass results. Additional policies of the UGME program and Undergraduate Academic Calendar are applicable to students during any Remediation period. Where any conflict exists between policies, this document shall have precedence in regard to student Remediation only.

MONITORED STATUS

3.4 A student meeting the criteria for Monitored Status will be notified in writing of such a status as outlined in the Procedures section of this document.

3.5 A student meeting the criteria for Monitored Status maintains this status for the remainder of their UGME program unless the student moves to Probationary Status.

3.6 A student receiving first written notification of Monitored Status may initiate a meeting with the Director, Remediation and/or the Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME or designate to discuss educational resources and supplemental readings.

3.7 A student receiving a second and subsequent notification of Monitored Status is required to initiate a meeting with the Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME or designate.

PROBATIONARY STATUS

3.8 A student meeting the criteria for Probationary Status will be notified in writing of such a status as outlined in the Procedures section of this document.

3.9 A student meeting the criteria for Probationary Status is required to participate in Remediation in order to advance in the UGME curriculum

3.10 A student receiving notification of Probationary Status is required to initiate a meeting with the Director, Remediation for a Remediation Assessment, and to the Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME or designate. The specific Remediation requirements for each student shall be dependent on the student deficiencies identified in the Remediation Assessment.

3.11 The Director, Remediation shall establish the nature and timeframe of the Remediation with the objective that Remediation will be initiated and completed in a timely manner.

3.12 Subject to the discretion of the Director, Remediation, a student on Probationary Status may be required to sign a Remediation Contract prior to commencing a Remediation Rotation.

3.13 The Director, Remediation is responsible for monitoring student progress throughout the Remediation period.

3.14 A faculty member, who is identified as a remedial tutor for a student partaking in the Remediation program, is required to support the assigned student in accordance with the procedures outlined in this document.

3.15 A student who satisfactorily meets the requirements of a Remediation, and passes any Supplemental Examination, remedial Rotation or subsequent FITER required, moves from Probationary Status to Monitored Status.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT – MONITORED STATUS

4.1 On the first instance of notification of Monitored Status, the Student may consider initiating a meeting with the Director, Remediation and/or Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME or designate to discuss educational resources and supplemental readings that are available.

4.2 On the second and subsequent notification of Monitored Status, the Student shall initiate a meeting with the Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME or designate within ten (10) working days of receiving the notification.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT – PROBATIONARY STATUS

4.3 The Student shall initiate a meeting with the Director, Remediation within ten (10) working days of receiving the notification of Probationary Status.

4.4 The Student shall initiate a meeting with the Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME or designate within ten (10) working days of receiving the notification of Probationary Status.

4.5 The Student shall complete all Remediation requirements as outlined in any of the Remediation policy, the Remediation Assessment, the Remediation Contract, or by the Director, Remediation, including attendance at Remediation sessions, planning meetings, and responding to requests for updates on student progress. Failure to meet the requirements of this policy or the requirements of any of the foregoing may result in a suspension of the Remediation process, including the opportunity to complete the Block, Course, Module or Rotation.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATORS, EVALUATION

4.6 Prepare detailed notification template letters for distribution to each student who meets the criteria for Monitored or Probationary Status.

4.7 Ensure that the Director Remediation is informed within one (1) working day of all students meeting the criteria for Monitored or Probationary Status if the Director, Remediation is not available to participate in the decision about such student status.

4.8 Ensure each student receives the notification of Monitored or Probationary Status within two (2) working days of the decision that the student meets the requirements for Monitored or Probationary Status.

4.9 Ensure appropriate contact information for the Associate Dean Student Affairs UGME, the Director, Remediation, or other relevant individual is included in each student notification letter.

4.10 Place a copy of the Monitored or Probationary Status notification in the appropriate section of the student active file.

4.11 Place a copy of any documentation received from the Director, Remediation or other UGME faculty in support of the Remediation, including any Remediation Assessment summary, Remediation Contract, or other correspondence in the appropriate section of the student active file.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, REMEDIATION

4.12 Meet with each student on Monitored Status who wishes to discuss Remediation.

4.13 Meet with the Course/Clerkship Directors as necessary to gather information and names of remedial tutors, if necessary, for each Probationary Status student requiring Remediation.

4.14 Identify the time and nature of appropriate Remediation in consultation with Course Director(s)/Clerkship Director(s) and/ UGME Evaluation and Clerkship administrators as necessary.

4.15 Respond to requests for initial and ongoing meetings with students in a timely fashion with each student identified as under Probationary Status, perform a Remediation Assessment, monitor progress, and review the completion of Remediation objectives.

4.16 Prepare documentation to support the Remediation in a timely fashion, including a written summary of the Remediation Assessment, or where required, a Remediation Contract.

4.17 Ensure the applicable Administrator, Evaluations receives a copy of documentation produced pursuant to this policy for the student active file as follows:

  • Administrator, Pre-Clerkship and OSCE-type Examinations – Remediation related to Year I, Year II, OSCE or CCE examinations.
  • Administrator, Clerkship - Remediation related to NBME Examinations or Rotation FITER.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ASSOCIATE DEAN STUDENT AFFAIRS UGME OR DESIGNATE

4.18 Meet with each student on Monitored Status who wishes to discuss educational resources and supplemental readings.

4.19 Meet with each student who is identified for Monitored Status a second or subsequent time throughout the Undergraduate Medical Education program.

4.20 Meet with each student who meets the criteria of Probationary Status within ten working days of receiving contact from the student.

4.21 Provide support and/or counseling to any student who meets the criteria of Monitored or Probationary Status as the need arises.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF COURSE DIRECTOR/CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR/REMEDIAL TUTOR

4.22 Work with the Director, Remediation to provide resources, expertise, and/or other information to the Student in the time frame identified by the Director, Remediation.

4.23 Meet with or otherwise communicate with the Student, and provide such resources, supplemental materials or tutorials to the Student as is deemed appropriate.


5. RESOURCES

5.1 Max Rady College of Medicine Student Affairs Website

5.2 University of Manitoba Student Accessibility Services

5.3 University of Manitoba Academic Learning Center

5.4 University of Manitoba Student Counseling and Career Center

5.5 Services for Student – Bannatyne Campus


6. REFERENCES

6.1 UGME Policy & Procedures - Midpoint In-Training Evaluation & Final In-Training Evaluation Preparation, Distribution and Completion and Essential Clinical Presentation Preparation, Distribution, Audit, and Remediation

6.2 UGME Policy & Procedures – Promotion & Failure

6.3 UGME Policy & Procedures – Supplemental Examinations

6.4 UGME Policy & Procedures – Deferred Examinations

6.5 UGME Policy & Procedures – Examination Conduct

6.6 UGME Policy & Procedures – Invigilation of Examinations

6.7 UGME Policy & Procedures – Examination Results

6.8 UGME Policy & Procedures - Accommodation for Undergraduate Medical Students with Disabilities


7. POLICY CONTACT

Director, Remediation

Attendance and absence

Clerkship student attendance

Policy Name:

Clerkship Student Attendance

Application/Scope:

Clerkship Students

Approved (Date):

September 2020

Review Date:

August 2025

Revised (Date):

February 2020

Approved By:

Curriculum Executive Committee [February 2020] College Executive Council [September 2020]

1. PURPOSE

In the Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) program students are encouraged to attend all learning events. Attendance at certain designated learning events is required in order to show adherence to professionalism and respect for both patient (actual, standardized and those who have donated their bodies to science) and instructor/preceptor time.

This policy provides guidance and clarifies expectations for attendance at required learning events, describes procedures for tracking, recording and reporting student absences and outlines consequences of nonadherence. For prolonged leave, please refer to the Leave of Absence Policy.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.2 Anticipated Absence – An absence whereby the student has prior knowledge of an event or appointment that is happening in the future that the student wishes to attend.

Examples include:

  • Personal: Examples include a student’s own marriage, medical appointments, academic advising or counseling, representation at an elite level (provincial, national or international) of sports, arts or other activity.
  • Family (relates to immediate family member): Examples include birth of a child, marriage, or illness.
  • Professional: Examples include conference attendance, presentation of a paper, receipt of an award, or a national/international organization meeting for which the student is a voting/invited member.
  • CaRMS Interviews: The National Interview Period is in January/February, but in some instances, there may be exceptions when attendance for an interview(s) is required during November/December.
  • Observance of Religious Holy Days

2.3 Unanticipated Absence – An absence that occurs whereby there is no prior knowledge of an event or appointment.

2.4 Approved Absence – An absence that has been approved by the Administrator, Clerkship, Director, Clerkship and/or, the Program Director, Clerkship of the affected rotation.

2.5 Unauthorized Absence – An absence that is not reported by the student to the UGME Office or is categorized as denied in the Curriculum Management System. Unauthorized absences are considered a failure of professional responsibility. These absences may be dealt with by Professionalism and the University Discipline Policy.

2.6 Maximum Allowable Absence /Leave from a Rotation/Module – Time allowed being absent from an individual module or rotation, regardless of the reason, without penalty of repeating the module/rotation in whole.

2.7 Half Day Unit – A measure of time used for tracking attendance.

2.8 Leave of Absence (LOA) – A leave which extends beyond the maximum allowable absence/leave from an individual year/rotation that will require the student to defer the full affected module/rotation to a later period in their medical education and may involve a delay in graduation.

2.9 Rotation – For the purposes of this policy, rotations encompass clinical and classroom based learning during a specific scheduled period of time. Rotations include the following:

  • Clinical Rotation: a hospital and/or medical clinic that involves patient care
  • UGME Professional Development Curriculum (PDC) – Academic teaching sessions scheduled by UGME
  • Academic Half Day (AHD) – Academic teaching sessions scheduled by departments

2.10 Elective – An elective is an opportunity for self-education in an area of the student’s own interest. The aim of an elective is to improve a student’s ability to function as a physician, thus the experience can be of a clinical, research or self-directed nature. There are five types of electives: internal, external, research, early and self-directed

2.11 Transition to Clerkship (TTC) – A formative module at the beginning of Clerkship where students are prepared for rotations and the remainder of Clerkship.

2.12 Transition to Residency (TTR) – A module at the end of Clerkship where students are prepared for residency. TTR includes a February 3 week selective, Match Week, a March 3 week selective, Comprehensive Clinical Review (CCR) sessions, Advance Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM), and other didactic/simulation sessions.

2.13 Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (LInC) – UGME Clerkship that is administered in rural sites in Manitoba.

2.14 Immediate Family – For the purpose of this policy "immediate family" means a spouse (including common law or same sex), child, brother, sister; parent, grandparent, grandchild, mother-in-law, father-in-law, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, aunt, uncle, nephew, or niece.

2.15 Working Day – Any day, other than a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday on which academic business may be conducted. Max Rady College of Medicine usual workday hours are Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

  • Clerkship rotation hours may vary from this and will be communicated to the student at the start of each rotation.

2.16 Medical Student Performance Report (MSPR) – An institutional assessment considered a component of a student’s academic record and thus, will be made available for student review. Students will be permitted to correct factual errors on the MSPR. Students are encouraged, when required to engage Student Affairs in supporting advocacy efforts in addressing perceived MSPR discrepancies.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

GENERAL

3.1 All sessions in Clerkship are mandatory and students are required to be punctual.

For TTC, Core Rotations, Electives and Selectives:

  • Students must, at minimum, attend 75%. It is important to note that absences are discouraged.
  • Cumulative absences of greater than 25% will result in an incomplete.

Students are expected to report any delays or absences. Approval for absences will be granted only for those students who are performing well academically and who have an exemplary attendance record and will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

3.3 Absence requests may necessitate further review to ensure student wellness.

3.4 Students must obtain approval for an absence request prior to making travel arrangements.

  • In the case of travel related to student government. MMSA leadership will inform the UGME Office via the absence form. Ordinarily, only elected officers, students seeking or holding leadership positions in the organization hosting the conference or presenters may receive an approved absence in order to attend a conference.
  • The norm for leave is one working day plus travel time where required when a student is presenting at a conference. It is expected that students will try to arrange leave requests adjacent to weekends.
  • Students attending a conference for interest will generally only be granted leave for a weekend.

3.5 Students with accommodation requirements will be considered at the discretion of the Associate Dean, UGME.

3.6 A student is not permitted to make-up missed time during another subsequent Clerkship rotation and not usually during scheduled vacation time.

3.7 No tolerance exists for unauthorized absences. Failure to obtain an approved absence from any required Clerkship session, didactic or clinical, will be considered as an unauthorized absence and thereby constitute a failure of professional responsibility which will be subject to review.

3.8 A student failing to maintain the requisite level of attendance in their respective curricular program and/or with unauthorized absences will be reported to the Associate Dean, UGME.

  • If the reasons for the absences are not approved or the number of absences are significant, the student's attendance record will be considered by the appropriate Student Evaluation Committee, and Progress Committee if required. The student may be deemed to have failed the rotation or module as appropriate.
  • All unauthorized absences shall be recorded within the student’s academic file.
  • Dependent on the circumstances, attendance issues will be noted in the student’s Medical Student Performance Report (MSPR).

3.9   A student disagreeing with a decision related to the interpretation or execution of the Student Attendance Policy has the right to appeal, in writing, to the Director, Clerkship and Associate Dean, UGME.

3.10 Should the student not accept the final decision of an appeal, students have the right of appeal to the UGME Student Appeals Committee.

3.11 A student participating in Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship is expected to adhere to this policy.

  • For the purposes of absence calculation the absence percentage is shown in Appendix 2.
  • Schedule adjustments will occur in order to ensure that sufficient time is spent in each discipline area in order to complete the academic requirements for the year.
  • Disciplines that are not completed will be repeated in a block rotation format.

3.12 If a student is placed in a rural or international location during a rotation, elective or selective they are expected to adhere to this policy.

3.13 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.

TRANSITION TO CLERKSHIP (MODULE 4)

3.14 Lower attendance may require meeting with the Director Clerkship and Associate Dean, UGME and could result in delayed start of clerkship rotations.

3.15 All unanticipated absences must be reported to the UGME Office.

3.16 Requests for anticipated absences are not accepted during TTC.

CORE ROTATIONS (MODULE 5)

3.17 Half day units, for a rotation, will be counted as follows:

  • During Clinical time, a half day unit is counted when a student is absent for 2 to 4 hours.
  • Academic Half Days (AHD) – These sessions are mandatory and are included in the 75% requirement for completion of a rotation. Students are not to schedule appointments during this time. A half day unit will be counted when a student misses two or more hours of academic half day sessions.
  • Physician Development Curriculum (PDC) – These sessions are mandatory and are included in the 75% requirement for completion of a rotation. Students are not to schedule appointments during this time. A half day unit will be counted when a student misses one session. Students are allowed to have a maximum of three absences during PDC within a 12 week block.

3.18 For the purposes of absence calculation per rotation the absence percentage will be calculated as follows (please refer to Appendix 1):

  • Numerator: number of absence days (calculated by summing half day units).
  • Denominator: Total number of rotation days (number of weekdays scheduled plus Friday call shifts plus Saturday call shifts minus statutory holidays not worked).

3.19 Students must report unanticipated absences to the UGME Office and to the Department Program Administrator.

3.20 Students must request anticipated absences at least six weeks in advance of their intended absence and, where possible, six weeks prior to the start of their rotation.

3.21 Students who miss time will be required to make up the learning experiences. Students who have been approved for a Leave of Absence must make alternative arrangements to complete any necessary requirements that were missed as determined by the Director, Clerkship Rotation and/or the Director, Clerkship.

3.22 Students who have been granted an approved absence are responsible for making alternate arrangements for examinations and/or on-call shifts that may be affected within the rotation.

3.23 In the event that the educational content in a rotation cannot be made up prior to the rotation end-date, the student will receive a grade of incomplete until the outstanding work is completed.

3.24 If a student misses an NBME Exam it will be counted as a half day unit for the rotation in which it occurred.

3.25 Clinical rotation personnel are responsible for following up immediately with students who have not reported for clinical duties within one (1) hour. If Clinical rotation personnel are not successful, they shall contact the Administrator, Clerkship or Student Affairs as soon as reasonable.

ELECTIVES (MODULE 6)

3.26 A half day unit is counted when a student is absent for 2 to 4 hours of clinical time.

3.27 For the purposes of absence calculation per rotation the absence percentage will be calculated as follows (please refer to Appendix 1):

  • Numerator: number of absence days (calculated by summing half day units).
  • Denominator: Total number of rotation days (number of weekdays scheduled plus Friday call shifts plus Saturday call shifts minus statutory holidays not worked).

TRANSITION TO RESIDENCY (MODULE 7)

SELECTIVES

3.28 A half day unit is counted when a student is absent for 2 to 4 hours of clinical time.

3.29 For the purposes of absence calculation per rotation the absence percentage will be calculated as follows (please refer to Appendix 1):

  • Numerator: number of absence days (calculated by summing half day units).
  • Denominator: Total number of rotation days (number of weekdays scheduled plus Friday call shifts plus Saturday call shifts minus statutory holidays not worked).

MATCH WEEK

3.30 Any sessions scheduled during match week are mandatory.

3.31 Students must report unanticipated absences to the UGME Office.

EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE

3.32 All Evidence Based Medicine sessions are mandatory.

3.33 Students who miss one or more of the three sessions will be at risk of having to repeat this course at the discretion of the course leader.

3.34 Students must report unanticipated absences to the UGME Office.

ADVANCED CARDIAC LIFE SUPPORT

3.35 All Advanced Cardiac Life Support sessions are mandatory.

3.36 Students are assigned one of the three date offerings and are not allowed to change dates once they are set.

3.37 Students must report unanticipated absences to the UGME Office.

3.38 Should a student miss this course due to an unanticipated absence, UGME will make efforts to assign the student to a different date.

COMPREHENSIVE CLINICAL REVIEW

3.39 Comprehensive Clinical Review sessions are mandatory for students who have signed up for them. A minimum of 30 students must be signed up for each session to take place.

3.40 Students must report unanticipated absences to the UGME Office.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENTS

4.1 Request all absences in accordance with the following:

TTC:

  • Unanticipated: UGME Clerkship Administrator
  • Anticipated: Not allowed during TTC

Core Rotations, Electives and TTR:

Unanticipated:

  • UGME Clerkship Administrator, Department Program Administrator, Preceptor/Resident

Anticipated:

  • Appointments: Discuss absence with preceptor/supervisor and follow up in writing to
  • Department Program Administrator and UGME Clerkship Administrator
  • Recurring Appointments: submit absences request form with details to UGME

Other:

  • Submit absence request form. If request is approved, remind preceptor/supervisor in writing one week prior to absence

4.2 Arrange to cover any missed work due to absence.

4.3 Should a student develop an illness they should contact the department as early as possible.

4.4 In the case of a student needing to rewrite an NBME, the student should contact their respective rotation Program Administrator to make arrangements.

4.5 Ensure all written requests include all of the relevant information required to make an informed decision. Failure to provide a clear and cogent reasoning will result in delays in having requests approved.

4.6 Appeal in writing within two (2) working days of receiving an unfavorable decision to the Director, Clerkship.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR

4.7 Update shared database with denominator for each student, where absence is a concern.

4.8 Track attendance with half day units on shared database for the following Clerkship components:

  • TTC
  • Core Rotations including Academic Half days
  • Electives
  • Selectives

4.9 Ensure that adjustments are made to student’s schedules when absences occur.

4.10 Schedule a remediation when needed as directed by Clerkship Administrator.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CLERKSHIP ADMINISTRATOR

4.11 Oversee attendance records and tracking for Clerkship students.

4.12 Review each request for leave for completeness and inform the student if additional information or clarity is required. Advise the Director, Clerkship as appropriate of the student’s request, including the total number of days absent for which the student has already received approval, if applicable.

4.13 Inform the affected department/rotation if the Director, Clerkship approves the student’s request for absence to determine if the department can accommodate the approved request.

4.14 Notify the student and affected Department/Rotation Administrator by email of the decision(s).

4.15 File all written requests for leave whether approved or denied, in the student’s academic file.

4.16 Record all absences in tracking database.

4.17 Schedule a remediation when needed in accordance with decision made by the Associate Dean, UGME.

4.18 Submit appeal documentation as required to the Director, Clerkship for review.

4.19 Notify Rotation Director, Clerkship and UGME Directors, Clerkship when a student has exceeded allowable absences and discuss arrangements for a remediation plan.

4.20 Report atypical absences to Director, Clerkship, Associate Dean, UGME and/or Associate Dean, Student Affairs, as appropriate, to ensure student wellness.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PROGRAM DIRECTORS, CLERKSHIP

4.21 Review and approve or deny student requests for absence based on submitted information within one week of receiving the request.

4.22 Evaluate each student’s absences and total days to determine whether rotation is complete.

4.23 Review student absences and bring excessive absences to the attention of Director, Clerkship UGME and discuss arrangements for remediation plan.

4.24 Review each appeal and issue a final decision within two (2) working days of receiving the student’s request appealing the initial decision.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, CLERKSHIP UGME

4.25 Review and approve or deny student requests for absence based on submitted information within one week of receiving the request.

4.26 Inform the UGME Office in concert with the Clerkship Program Director when a student has exceeded allowable absences and discuss arrangements for a remediation plan.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME

4.27 Review atypical absence requests.

4.28 Decide on remediation plans when a student has exceeded allowable absences.

4.29 Review accommodation requirements.


5. STUDENT WELLNESS CHECK

5.1 A UGME Administrator may, at their discretion, refer any student wellness concerns to the Student Support Coordinator, at Bannatyne Campus (with notification provided to the Associate Dean, UGME, and Associate Dean, Student Affairs (UGME).

5.2   Student Support Coordinator may reach out to any student for whom wellness concerns are present, and ask for a response by a certain time. If a response is not received, the Student Support Coordinator shall contact the UGME Associate Dean and Associate Dean, Student Affairs (UGME) immediately for further direction.


6. REFERENCES

5.3 Professionalism

5.4 Discipline Policy


7. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Director, Clerkship UGME with questions respecting this policy.


Appendix 1: Table of Approximate Values

The table below outlines requirements for Clerkship. Please note that individuals student calculations may vary (refer to definition of working days).

Type of Learning Event

Duration

Total Days

Requirement of Days
for 75% Completion

Module 4: TTC

 

3 Weeks

15

11

Module 5: Core Rotations (includes PDC and AHD)

Medicine Selective

2 Weeks

10-12

7.5-9

MSK

2 Weeks

10-12

7.5-9

General Surgery

3 Weeks

15-17

11-13

Surgery Selective

3 Weeks

15-17

11-13

Anesthesia /
PeriOp

4 Weeks

19-20

14-15

Emergency Medicine

4 Weeks

16-17

12-13

Family Medicine /
Public Health

6 Weeks

30-32

22.5-24

Pediatrics

6 Weeks

30-32

22.5-24

Medicine CTU

6 Weeks

30-32

22.5-24

Obstetrics/Gynecology

6 Weeks

30-32

22.5-24

Psychiatry

6 Weeks

30-32

22.5-24

Module 6: Electives

 

2 Weeks

9-12

7.5-9

3 Weeks

14-17

11-13

4 Weeks

16-20

13-15

Module 7: TTR

 

TTR Selective

3 Weeks

14-17

11-13

 

ACLS

-

2

2

 

EBM

-

3

2

 

CCR

-

-

Sessions are mandatory for students who have signed up for them.


Appendix 2: Table of Approximate Values for Brandon Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship

The table below outlines requirements for Clerkship. Please note that individuals student calculations may vary (refer to definition of working days).

Type of Learning Event

Total Days

Requirement of Days for 75% Completion

Surgery

24

18

Brandon GP

20

15

Obstetrics /
Gynecology

20

15

Rural GP

20

15

Internal Medicine (IM)

9.5

7.125

Hospital Medicine (HSP MED)

 

26.5

 

19.875

Pediatrics (PEDS)

16.5

12.375

Respiratory Therapy

1

0.75

Radiology

1

0.75

Emergency Medicine (EM)

14

10.5

Anesthesia (ANES)

11

8.25

Psychiatry (Psych)

20

15

Mental Health

1

0.75

Ortho

5

3.75

Urology

1

0.75

Cancer Care

0.5

0.375

Public Health

1

0.75

Ophthalmology / ENT

2.5

1.875

Pre-op

1.5

1.125

Cast Clinic

0.5

0.375

Physical Therapy (PT)

1

0.75

Teen Clinic

1

0.75

Addictions Foundation of MB

1

0.75

Leaves of absence

Policy Name:

Leaves of Absence (LOA)

Application / Scope:

All students registered in the UGME Program

Approved (Date):

April 30, 2014

Review Date:

5 years from the last Revised Date

Revised (Date):

October 24, 2018

Approved By:

Reviewed at UGME Progress Committee: September 14, 2018

College Council, Max Rady College of Medicine: October 24, 2018

1.  PURPOSE

To provide guidance and expectations for a medical student’s (“Student”) leave(s) of absence (“LOA”) from the Pre-Clerkship and Clerkship phases of the Undergraduate Medical Education (“UGME”) program.


2.  DEFINITIONS

2.1. Leave of Absence (LOA) – A period of leave which extends beyond the maximum allowable absence/leave from an individual module/rotation that will require the Student to defer the full affected module/rotation to a later period in their medical education and may involve a delay in graduation.

2.2. Course/Module - A course/module is a course of study or educational unit, which covers a series of interrelated topics and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards the completion of the M.D. degree. The UGME curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal course occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.3. Clinical Clerkship Rotations - A hospital and/or medical based practicing clinic that involves patient care for which Students participate for a specified time period during their third and fourth year of the Program.

2.4. Medical Student Performance Report (MSPR) – An institutional assessment considered a component of a Student’s academic record and thus, will be made available for Student review. Students will be permitted to correct factual errors on the MSPR. Students are encouraged, when required to engage Student Affairs in supporting advocacy efforts in addressing perceived MSPR discrepancies.

2.5. Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the Program.

2.6. Program – the four-year Doctor of Medicine program at the Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba.

2.7. Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the Program.

2.8. Authorized Withdrawal – an authorized withdrawal in accordance with the UGME Authorized Withdrawal or Program Withdrawal Policy.

2.9. Program Withdrawal – a program withdrawal in accordance with the UGME Authorized Withdrawal or Program Withdrawal Policy.


3.  POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1. A request for a LOA is not automatically granted and may be declined or modified by the Max Rady College of Medicine based on the circumstances and conditions of the request.

3.2. A Student may, at any time, consult with the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME for guidance as it relates to absence from a Pre-Clerkship or Clerkship component of the Program.

3.3. The Max Rady College of Medicine reserves the right to impose a limitation on the number of leaves, as well as their total duration, relating to the Student’s ability to meet the academic criteria, essential skills and abilities, and the technical standards requirements of the Program. LOA(s) may be granted for up to a maximum of one (1) year total duration.

3.4. If a Student is not returning after one (1) year total duration, the Student shall be contacted by the Associate Dean, UGME, to convert his/her status to a Program Withdrawal or Authorized Withdrawal, as applicable, in accordance with the processes in the Authorized Withdrawal or Program Withdrawal Policy.

3.5. Should an extension of a LOA be requested by a Student or his or her health care provider, the College reserves the right to request a second opinion from a College-designated physician.

3.6. A Student’s course of study, which is interrupted due to a LOA, will be reflected on his or her MSPR.

3.7. During a LOA, the Student is not permitted to receive academic credit pertaining to the progress of their MD degree.

3.8. In the event that the educational content in a course/clerkship cannot be made up prior to the course end-date due to an approved LOA, the Student will receive a grade of incomplete until the coursework is completed. Year I and Year II Students returning from an approved LOA will be scheduled to join the beginning of the next respective class.

3.9. A LOA will be considered for approval on a case-by-case basis by the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME in consultation with the Associate Dean, UGME, in circumstances involving:

  • Academic or education leave (other than for advanced or graduate studies at the University of Manitoba);
  • Maternity or parental leave;
  • Medical illness or injury;
  • Provision of care for an immediate family member;
  • Bereavement leave for a family member;
  • Other crisis or personal circumstance affecting the Student’s educational commitments, taking into consideration the impact of an LOA on the Student’s ability to meet the academic criteria, essential skills and abilities, and the technical standards requirements of the Program.

3.10. The period of time spent on LOA will not be included in the time period allowed for the completion of the MD degree.

3.11. An approved LOA shall set out the procedures and conditions required to facilitate the Student’s return to the Program after the leave. This will include a plan for remediation, reintegration, deferred exams, meetings with key academic leaders, and any documentation necessary to support the Student’s wellness and ability to return to studies (including any restrictions or accommodations). Formative clerkship rotations and/or written/OSCE examinations may be required as a condition of re-entry.

3.12. A Student disagreeing with a decision relating to the approval of the LOA or its conditions has the right to appeal, in writing, to the UGME Student Appeals Committee.


4.  PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES - GENERAL

4.1. All requests for LOA must be submitted in writing to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME who will forward the materials received and consult with the Associate Dean, UGME. The following details must be included in the LOA request:

  • The reason for the leave (if the leave is for medical reasons, a Certificate of Illness from the Student’s physician must accompany the notification or be submitted as soon as possible thereafter containing the elements outlined in 4.3);
  • Any relevant supporting documentation;
  • The proposed commencement date of the LOA;
  • The expected date of return to training (if this is not known at the time the leave is being arranged, a subsequent letter must be provided with these details).

Failure to provide clear and cogent reasoning will result in requests for LOA being delayed.

4.2. Upon receipt of a LOA request, arrange to meet with the Student requesting the LOA in a timely manner. A Student in Year III Medicine or Year IV Medicine seeking a LOA from a clerkship rotation, must meet with the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME, Associate Dean, UGME and Director Clerkship, Clinical in order to develop a comprehensive plan for reintegration.

4.3. All Students requesting a LOA as a result of a medical illness or injury must produce a medical certificate to:

  • Verify that medical care is being received; and
  • Establish the anticipated duration of the LOA.
  • If the duration of the LOA is uncertain, documentation by the treating physician is required.

4.4. In consultation with the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME an approved LOA due to medical illness/injury may contain conditions such as:

  • The affected Student receives appropriate care and support;
  • A written medical certificate or declaration of readiness to return to the Program, from the physician involved in the Student’s care;
  • An additional, independent medical opinion to ensure the Student’s capability to resume his/her studies.

4.5. Students proceeding on a LOA should contact the Office of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, for further clarification on how the LOA may affect current loans and interest free programs prior to contacting their lenders.

4.6. Prior to commencing the process in 4.7, a Student intending to return from a LOA for medical reasons must provide documentation to the Office of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME as further outlined above, including any documentation from their treating physician/professional counsellor of their readiness to resume studies, if applicable.

4.7. A minimum of six (6) weeks prior to returning to the Program, the Student shall contact the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME in order to arrange a meeting to ensure that all conditions for re-enrollment have been met. This meeting, attended by the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME and Associate Dean, UGME, is intended to ensure that the Student is adequately prepared to resume his or her studies, based on the procedures and conditions set out at the time of LOA approval. In addition to the foregoing, additional requirements established by Student Counseling Services, Faculty Counseling Services, the Student’s health care provider, or the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba may need to be met prior to the Student’s reentry to the Program.

4.8. Where an LOA involves conditions which may impact patient safety or addiction, or for any LOA longer than four (4) weeks duration, the Max Rady College of Medicine shall notify the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba of the LOA, such that the College may take whatever action it deems necessary, including when necessary, suspension of the Student’s registration with the College.

4.9. The Progress Committee must be notified of all LOAs such that they may provide guidance on the academic suitability of a request for LOA. The Progress Committee will, from time to time, provide clarification on the criteria and conditions to be enacted in support of LOA requests.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN, STUDENT AFFAIRS, UGME

4.10. Approves or denies an LOA request in writing to the Student.

4.11. Notifies the Associate Dean, UGME once an LOA has been granted to a Student, providing relevant enrolment details relating to Student LOAs such as anticipated start and return date if such information is available.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME

4.12. Upon receipt of an LOA notice from the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME, draft a letter to the Administrator, Enrolment to provide information about the LOA which has been granted noting the effective start date of the LOA and, if known, anticipated return date. Copy the Administrator, Clerkship, Administrator, Pre-Clerkship, Administrator, Clerkship Evaluations, Administrator, Pre-Clerkship Evaluations on the letter as required.

4.13. Request the Administrator, Clerkship/Pre-Clerkship to develop an academic schedule for the Student’s return.

4.14. Provide updates to UGME Staff as available in regard to the status of Students who are on LOA or proposing to return from LOA.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, ENROLMENT

4.15. Record all LOAs upon receipt in respective tracking database within the curriculum management system, including updating the graduation date for the Student in the curriculum management system.

4.16. Inform the Registrar’s Office of the LOA, dates and notation to be placed on the Student’s academic transcript

4.17. Liaise with the Student by email with regards to fee/registration actions that the Student must take. Inform the Student of the Registrar’s Office processes (i.e. fee appeal processes) if applicable.

4.18. Draft a letter on behalf of the Associate Dean, UGME to notify CPSM of the LOA.

4.19. Correspond with Students on LOA prior to their return to ensure that all aspects of registration are completed (both University and CPSM requirements).

4.20. Communicate with CPSM, Registrar’s Office and UGME staff once the return date for a Student on a LOA is known in order to configure the Student’s registration.

4.21. File LOA documentation in the Student’s active file.

4.22. Submit appeal documentation as required to the Associate Dean, UGME for review.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, CLERKSHIP/PRE-CLERKSHIP

4.23. Remove the Student who is on a LOA from any academic schedules, groups and/or clinical rotations. Notify the affected clinical department staff as necessary.

4.24. Upon notification that the Student is returning from a LOA, reinstate Student in appropriate academic schedules, groups and/or clinical rotations. Notify the affected clinical department staff as necessary.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT AFFAIRS STAFF

4.25. Record decisions on LOA upon receipt and record in respective tracking database.

4.26. Schedule meetings for Students seeking an LOA or Students seeking to return from an LOA with the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME.


5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Associate Dean, UGME or the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME with questions respecting this policy.

Pre-clerkship student attendance

Policy Name:

Pre-Clerkship Student Attendance Policy

Application/Scope:

Pre-Clerkship Students

Approved (Date):

 

Review Date:

June 2025

Revised (Date):

July 31, 2020

Approved By:

Pre-Clerkship Curriculum Committee [August 12, 2019] Curriculum Executive Committee [August 13, 2019] College Executive Committee [September 17, 2019]

1. PURPOSE

In the Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) program students are encouraged to attend all learning events. Attendance at certain designated learning events is required in order to show adherence to professionalism and respect for both patient (actual, standardized and those who have donated their bodies to science) and instructor time.

This policy provides guidance and clarifies expectations for attendance at required learning events, describes procedures for tracking, recording and reporting student absences and outlines consequences of nonadherence.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME program.

2.2 Required Learning Events – A learning event for which student attendance and/or completion is required and tracked. These learning events are denoted in the Curriculum Management System. Required learning events include one or more of the following elements:

2.2.1 Patient (or Family) involvement (includes actual, standardized and those who have donated their bodies to science)

2.2.2 Small group or interactive teaching

2.2.3 Clinical Skills

2.2.4 Anatomy/Gross Lab

2.2.5 Special educational learning events (includes off-site sessions, orientations, interprofessional collaboration sessions, Service Learning, any learning event which requires special resources or set-up, guest lecturer etc.) unique learning opportunities whereby absences will be subject to additional levels of review or approval

2.3 Absence – nonattendance at a learning event, arriving more than 20 minutes late to a learning event, or failure to sign in to a learning event. There are three types of absences: Flex Days, Sanctioned Leave and Unauthorized Absence. Absences may be anticipated or unanticipated.

2.4 Flex Day – A requested, discretionary anticipated or unanticipated absence from a required learning event. Flex days may be taken as full or half days. Half days are considered as hours from 8:00 – 12:59 and 13:00 – 16:59. Examples include:

2.4.1 Personal e.g., marriage, legal appointments, etc.

2.4.2 Health e.g., illness, medical appointments, mental health days, counseling etc.

2.4.3 Family (relates to immediate e family member) e.g., birth of a child, marriage, illness, etc.

2.4.4 Professional e.g., unprotected conference attendance, academic advising, etc.

2.5 Sanctioned Leave – a requested anticipated or unanticipated absence from a required learning event that is authorized by the program. This includes:

2.5.1 Bereavement: in the case of first and second degree family

2.5.2 Medical or personal emergencies (including first-degree family)

2.5.3 Religious observances

2.5.4 Protected student government initiatives (e.g., CFMS AGM Conferences, Western Medical Schools Conference, governance committees)

2.5.5 National and International research presentations

2.5.6 Inter-university, provincial, inter-provincial, national and/or international athletic or artistic pursuits

2.6 Anticipated Absence – An absence whereby there is prior knowledge of an event or appointment. There are two types of anticipated absences:

2.6.1 Absences known three weeks prior (e.g., religious observances, student government initiatives, conferences, research presentations, athletic pursuits, medical appointments, planned family commitments);

2.6.2 Absences known within three weeks (e.g., shorter notice appointments, planned study days).

2.7 Unanticipated Absence – An absence that occurs whereby there is no prior knowledge of an event or appointment.

2.8 Unauthorized Absence – An absence that is not reported by the student to the UGME office or is categorized as denied in the Curriculum Management System. Unauthorized absences are considered a failure of professional responsibility.

2.9 Leave of Absence (LOA) – A period of leave which extends beyond the maximum allowable absence/leave from an individual year/rotation that will require the student to defer the full affected module/rotation to a later period in their medical education and may involve a delay in graduation.

2.10 Medical Student Performance Report (MSPR) – An institutional assessment considered a component of a student’s evaluation file and thus, will be made available for student review. Students will be permitted to correct factual errors on the MSPR.

Students are encouraged, when required to engage Student Affairs in supporting advocacy efforts in addressing perceived MSPR discrepancies.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Students are required to be on time for all learning events and to report any delays or absences.

3.2 Students are required to sign in at required learning events to demonstrate attendance.

3.2.1 Students arriving more than 20 minutes late for a required learning event will be considered absent and the absence will be recorded as unauthorized.

3.2.2 Students who fail or forget to sign attendance sheets will be considered absent and the absence will be recorded as unauthorized.

3.2.3 Students must remain within the group to which they are assigned. Students changing groups without prior approval from the UGME office will be marked as absent. This absence will be considered unauthorized.

3.3 Students may not sign attendance documents on behalf of their peers or misrepresent their attendance for a required learning event. Students who have forged attendance documents or misrepresented their full attendance will be found in violation of this policy and will be referred to the Associate Dean, Professionalism. The incident will be noted in the student’s evaluation file.

3.4 Curricular absences must be requested through the Curriculum Management System to the UGME office. Absences from examinations are handled in accordance with the UGME Examination Conduct Policy.

3.5 Absences for required learning events will be tracked and categorized. Approved absences will be classified as either Flex Days or Sanctioned Leaves.

3.6 Flex Days can be requested for anticipated or unanticipated absences.

3.6.1 Pre-Clerkship students are permitted a maximum of five Flex Days per academic year, or 10 half days, or a combination of such.

3.6.2 Anticipated Flex Days from a unique learning opportunity will only be approved in extenuating circumstances with appropriate notice and where alternate arrangements cannot reasonably be made.

3.6.3 Anticipated Flex Days may not be requested to receive extensions for

assignments, quizzes or other assessments. Requests for extensions will be subject to the deferral guidelines.

3.6.4 Maximum number of consecutive Flex Days that may be used is three. Durations of more than three consecutive days must be approved by the Associate Dean, UGME or Associate Dean, Student Affairs UGME.

3.7 Sanctioned Leave can be requested for anticipated or unanticipated absences.

3.7.1 Pre-Clerkship student requests for Sanctioned Leave are subject to review and may be based on the student’s evaluation file to date, attendance record to date, and/or an estimation of the impact of missing the specific course learning event(s).

3.8 Students with extenuating circumstances or chronic illness should contact the Student Affairs office to discuss individual modifications to Flex Day or Sanctioned Leave limits.

3.9 A maximum of 10% of the class can request an anticipated absence (either a Flex Day or Sanctioned Leave) for the same day. Approval for planned absences will be provided on a first come, first served basis. Unanticipated absences in excess of the 10% maximum due to unforeseen health or personal circumstances (e.g., illness or emergency) can be approved, subject to review.

3.10 Anticipated absences must be reported to the UGME office three weeks in advance of the absence or promptly once an absence is foreseen, whichever comes first. Requests received fewer than three weeks in advance of a planned absence are less likely to be approved if reasonable notice is not provided. Requests received after the start of a required learning event will only be approved in cases of emergency where advance notice could not reasonably be provided.

3.11 An absence (anticipated or unanticipated) from a required learning event without any form of notice to the UGME office will be considered an unauthorized absence.

Requested absences that are denied yet still taken will be considered an unauthorized absence. All unauthorized absences shall be recorded within the student’s evaluation file.

3.12 The escalation process for absences is as follows:

3.12.1 Students will receive a notice when the maximum of Flex Days has been reached and will be asked to meet the Associate Dean, UGME and the Program Administrator, Pre-Clerkship to discuss their attendance record.

3.12.2 Persistent disregard of this policy will result in a referral to meet with the Associate Dean, Professionalism.

3.12.3 Any further breach in professionalism may result in a notation on the student’s MSPR.

3.13 Absences may necessitate further review to ensure student wellness and/or progress within the UGME program.

3.14 A student disagreeing with a decision related to the interpretation or execution of this policy has the right to appeal, in writing, to the Associate Dean, UGME.

3.15 Students who do not accept the final decision of an appeal, have the right of appeal to the UGME Student Appeals Committee.

3.16 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.1 Attendance sign in sheets are the primary record of student attendance at required learning events and it is incumbent upon all students to sign in individually to their assigned location. Students may be assigned to collect/return attendance sheets by the UGME Course Administrators. Students responsible for collecting/returning attendance sheets should ensure all present members of their group have signed in before submitting to the UGME office.

4.2 Students are encouraged to schedule appointments or meetings during times that do not interfere with required learning events. Students requesting the use of a Flex Day for a unique learning opportunity may be asked for supporting documentation.

4.3 Students must submit all absence requests through the Curriculum Management System.

Submitted requests should include all of the relevant information required to make an informed decision. If requested by the UGME office, supporting documentation may be attached to the Curriculum Management System submission or submitted separately by email. Failure to provide clear and cogent reasoning will result in delays in having requests approved.

4.4 If absence approval is granted, students are responsible to ensure that relevant faculty members, including preceptors, are informed of their anticipated absence. Arrangements to cover any missed course work such as assignments or quizzes must be made with the respective Course Leader(s).

4.5 Anticipated absences must be reported to the UGME office three weeks in advance of the absence or promptly once an absence is foreseen, whichever comes first. If the learning event(s) is part of a recurring series (e.g., Clinical Skills sessions), a request to reschedule to a future date should be included in the absence report.

4.6 Students with unanticipated absences should notify the UGME office prior to the learning event start time. In cases of serious illness or emergency, students should notify the UGME office as soon as it is safe or reasonable to do so.

4.7 Students with unanticipated absences for required learning events involving patients or standardized patients must, in advance of the learning event, contact the appropriate department program assistant listed in the Curriculum Management System event details to inform them of the absence. Sufficient notice is necessary to allow for cancellation of the patient, standardized patient or instructor as necessary.

4.8 Students with extenuating circumstances or chronic illness should contact the Student Affairs office for attendance related accommodations.

4.9 A student must make certain they have the financial resources for all anticipated conference and travel expenses before committing to any travel. Only after obtaining absences approval may students make arrangements for their travel (purchase tickets, secure accommodations, pay conference registration fees, etc.). No student should make any purchases until they have received approval from the UGME office to miss class to attend the conference.

4.10 A student disagreeing with a decision related to the interpretation or execution of this policy must appeal, in writing, within two business days of receiving the decision, to the Associate Dean, UGME.

4.11 Students are expected to monitor their own attendance throughout the academic year to ensure accurate records and personal compliance with this policy. If discrepancies are identified by students in their individual absence record, students must contact the UGME office in a timely fashion to address the concern.

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE COURSE LEADER(S), UGME

4.12 The designation of required learning events remains at the discretion of the Course Leader(s) and will be indicated via the Curriculum Management System.

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE UGME OFFICE

4.13 Members of the UGME office will denote required learning events within the Curriculum Management System.

4.14 Members of the UGME office will record attendance at the start of or during each required learning event and report attendance through the Curriculum Management System.

4.15 UGME Course Administrators will report the number of anticipated absences to Course Leaders and Session Leaders to make adjustments to patient or instructor resources as required.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF CLINICAL SKILLS DEPARTMENT REPRESENTATIVES, PRE- CLERKSHIP

4.16 Report student attendance for offsite learning events to the UGME office within five business days.

4.17 Inform the appropriate Pre-Clerkship UGME Administrator of the department’s ability to accommodate each approved request for rescheduling.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR, PRE-CLERKSHIP

4.18 Ensure students receive an orientation to the UGME Pre-Clerkship Student Attendance policy and the method for reporting absences from required classes.

4.19 Review each absence notification submission for completeness and inform the student if additional information or clarity is required.

4.20 Advise the Associate Dean, UGME of student requests as appropriate, including the total number of days absent.

4.21 Approve or deny absence submissions within the online Attendance Portal. Requests will typically be reviewed within one week of submission.

4.22 Meet with students identified as reaching the maximum number of Flex Days to review and discuss their attendance.

4.23 Refer students to Associate Dean, UGME and/or Associate Dean, Professionalism for review or meetings as required:

4.23.1 When the maximum number of allowed Flex Days has been reached in an academic year, the Curriculum Management System will notify students and they will be scheduled for a check in meeting with the Associate Dean, UGME.

4.23.2 For students requiring referral to the Associate Dean, Professionalism, a letter will be emailed to the student and a copy sent to the Associate Dean, UGME, and the Associate Dean, Student Affairs UGME. A copy will be placed within the student’s evaluation file.

4.23.3 Any other professional concerns that arise.

4.24 Submit appeal documentation to the Associate Dean, UGME for review as required.

4.25 Ensure student evaluation files contain appropriate documentation related to attendance.

4.26 Provide attendance statistics (including unauthorized absences) to Associate Dean, UGME or Associate Dean, Student Affairs UGME throughout the academic year as required.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME

4.27 Review and approve or deny complex student absence requests as requested by the Pre-Clerkship Program Administrator within one week of receiving the request.

4.28 Meet with students identified as reaching the maximum number of Flex Days to review and discuss their attendance.

4.29 Review each appeal and issue a final decision within two working days of receiving the student’s request appealing the initial decision.

4.30 In consultation with the Associate Dean, Professionalism provide a directive for a professionalism notation on the MSPR and notify student. A letter of notification will be dispatched informing the student that the attendance issue has been noted in their Medical Student Performance Report (MSPR). This letter will be emailed to the student and a copy sent to the appropriate Administrator, Evaluations and the Associate Dean, Student Affairs UGME. A copy will also be placed in the student’s evaluation file.

4.31 Submit a copy of any decisions to the Program Administrator, Pre-Clerkship. RESPONSIBILITIES OF ASSOCIATE DEAN, PROFESSIONALISM

4.32 Meet with students identified as exceeding the maximum number of Flex Days and/or who have unauthorized absences to review and discuss their attendance.

4.33 Report any required student remediation in writing to the Associate Dean, UGME for inclusion in the student’s evaluation file.

4.34 In consultation with the Associate Dean, UGME provide a recommendation for a professionalism notation on the MSPR.


5. STUDENT WELLNESS CHECK

5.1 A UGME Administrator, may, at their discretion, refer any student wellness concerns to the Student Support Coordinator at Bannatyne Campus (with notification provided to the Associate Dean, UGME, and Associate Dean, Student Affairs UGME).

5.2 Student Support Coordinator, may reach out to any student for whom wellness concerns are present, and ask for a response by a certain time. If a response is not received, the Student Support Coordinator shall contact the Associate Dean, UGME and Associate Dean, Student Affairs UGME immediately for further direction.


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Associate Dean, UGME with questions respecting this policy.

Courses and curriculum

Clerkship duty hours

Policy Name:

Clerkship Duty Hours

Application/Scope:

Clerkship Students

Approved (Date):

September 2020

Review Date:

September 2025

Revised (Date):

February 2020

Approved By:

Clerkship Curriculum Committee [February 2020] Curriculum Executive Committee [March 2020] College Executive Council [September 2020]


1. PURPOSE

Clinical medicine is best learned by active experience in the care of patients at the hospital bedside or in the office. This experience should include On-Call periods including Overnight Duty where required. The inevitable service demands of patient care however, do not replace the requirement for educational sessions. In order to provide adequate service and care to patients, and enhance the medical education of students, duty hours must be structured to provide a balance of clinical experience, patient service, and academic achievement and consolidation. Duty Hours for Clerkship candidates shall consist of both Regular Duty Hours and On-Call Duty Hours.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME Program.

2.2 PARIM – Professional Association of Residents and Interns of Manitoba.

2.3 Statutory Holidays – The following dates shall be considered statutory as outlined in the Manitoba Employment Standards Code and PARIM contract:

  • New Year’s Day (January 1st);
  • Louis Riel Day (3rd Monday in February);
  • Good Friday;
  • Easter Monday;
  • Victoria Day (in the month of May);
  • Canada Day (July 1st);
  • Terry Fox Day (in the month of August);
  • Labour Day (in the month of September);
  • Thanksgiving Day (in the month of October);
  • Remembrance Day (November 11th) as a general holiday in accordance with the Remembrance Day Act;
  • Christmas Day (December 25th);
  • Boxing Day (December 26th).

 2.4 Duty hours – Refers to time when a student is scheduled to participate in patient care or educational events, such as seminars, lectures, and rounds. It does not refer to study time.

2.5 Regular Duty Hours – Regular duty hours are, in general, between 0700 - 1700 hours Monday through Friday. In some clinical services these regular duty hours may vary due to circumstances and conditions inherent within the clinical environment. As professionals, Clerks should view these hours as guidelines and understand that patients, staff and colleagues should not be compromised by rigid adherence to work hours.

2.6 Weekends – Weekends are considered to be from 1700 Friday until 0700 Monday.

2.7 On-Call Duty Hours – Are considered time where the Clerkship student carries clinical responsibilities beyond regular duty hours. This will include evenings/overnight Monday to Friday, weekends and designated recognized holidays. For example:

  • Weekday (Monday through Friday) On-Call Duty Hours commence at the end of Regular Duty Hours and are normally 14-17 hours in duration.
  • Weekend and designated recognized holiday On-Call Duty Hours are twenty-four (24) hour periods of time with a maximum of two (2) hours of additional time allotted for transfer of care purposes.
  • After completion of an In-Hospital Call Shift, the student will not be required to return to the rotation prior to 0600 of the following calendar day.

2.8 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program.

For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Two types of On-Call Duty Hours are recognized for Clerkship students in support of their educational responsibilities:

  • Home Call. Home Call refers to clinical service, or immediate availability for such service, where the student is not required to remain within the hospital environment. Home Call may result in the student returning to the hospital. Home Call is not to be more frequent on average than one (1) day in three (3) and shall not exceed more than ten (10) days within a twenty-eight (28) day period. Where a Clerkship student is required to work within a hospital during a Home Call period for more than four (4) hours, of which more than one (1) full hour is after midnight and prior to 0600, the entire Home Call Duty Hour time period shall be included in calculating consecutive hours worked. Where Home Call is included in calculating consecutive hours worked the student may, at their option, elect to work on the Post-Call day.
  • In-Hospital Call. In-Hospital Call refers to clinical service, or immediate availability for such service, where the student is required to remain in the hospital for the entire time period. In these instances, students are expected to use assigned call room(s) for rest periods. Specific limitations on In-Hospital Call include:
    • A Clerkship student shall not be scheduled for In-Hospital Call more than seven (7) times over a twenty-eight (28) day period. In-Hospital Call shall not average more than one (1) day in four (4) throughout a clinical rotation.
    • Clerkship students must have two (2) weekends out of every four (4) off.
    • Students shall not be on In-Hospital Call for more than twenty-six (26) hours continuously (Twenty-four (24) hours of call and two (2) hours of transfer care). Clerkship students who have spent an In-Hospital Call Overnight shall sign over their cases to the next On-Call Clerk during the morning work round.

3.2 Clinical Clerks who have been On-Call may wish to stay for educational purposes. In these instances, they must not be expected to respond to service duties or calls on their patients. Clerks who do not stay for academic educational sessions are responsible for obtaining the missed information from their fellow Clerks.

3.3 In circumstances, with respect to post-call transportation, where a Clerkship student believes that fatigue will hinder their ability to drive and call rooms are unavailable for rest prior to travelling home, they are advised to seek alternate transportation. Clerkship students are eligible to claim the following taxi reimbursement costs through the Max Rady College of Medicine:

  • Taking a taxi home (one way) after being On-Call and/or taking a taxi back to retrieve their own vehicle the day after being on call
  • Taking a taxi home (one way) after completing a scheduled late night shift that ends after 12am

3.4 A Clinical Clerk who is pregnant shall not be required to take Overnight Call after thirty- one (31) weeks gestation. The student, in conjunction with the respective Clerkship Administrator, shall ensure that affected rotations are given as much notice as possible to prepare call schedules accordingly.

3.5 When a Clerkship student is On-Call on a Statutory Holiday for at least an eight (8) hour period, they must be given a day off during the rotation in which the statutory holiday has occurred. Statutory holiday substituted days off shall not be carried over to another rotation. This does not apply to a shift that a student does on a STAT during an Emergency Medicine rotation, as this is not considered On-Call.

3.6 Students shall not be placed On-Call the night prior to an NBME Examination.

3.7 Students scheduled to write NBME exams in the afternoon seating will not be required to perform clinical duties the morning of the NBME exam, but may be required to attend to other duties (for example exit interviews) prior to 10 am.

3.8 Students shall not be placed On-Call past 11:00 pm on Wednesday evenings prior to Thursday academic day.

3.9 Students shall not be placed On-Call on the last evening/night of their rotation.

3.10 Rotations do not end with the exam. Clerks are expected to return to their rotation upon completion of their exam unless specifically directed by their assigned preceptor.

3.11 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

4.1 This policy will be monitored for compliance by the Director Clerkship, Director Electives, Associate Dean, Students and Associate Dean, Professionalism. If it is found that students have worked beyond the allowable time frame as described above during the monitoring process via the course evaluations, the Associate Dean, UGME will meet with the specific Clerkship Director to assure compliance to the policy.

4.2 Students must complete and submit the claim form for post-call transportation reimbursement along with the receipt to the Clerkship Program Administrator in 260 Brodie within 7 days of the call shift.

 REPORTING VIOLATIONS

4.3 Should a violation of the On-Call policy occur, Clerks may seek remediation via the following procedure(s):

  • The Clerk should first approach the Clerkship Director for the affected rotation with the intent of rectifying the inequity. If a student reports a violation directly to the Clerkship Director, the Clerkship Director is required to investigate the situation and attempt to remedy it.
  • If the student is unable to come to a resolution with the Clerkship Director, the Director, Clerkship Curriculum should be contacted by the student with the circumstances of the violation.
  • Should the Clerk remain dissatisfied or uncomfortable approaching either the Clerkship Director of the affected rotation or the Director, Clerkship Curriculum, the student shall contact the Associate Dean, Students. When a violation of this policy is reported to Associate Dean, Students, the Clerkship Director will be required to investigate the situation and provide a report to the Associate Dean, UGME describing the violation and indicating how the situation has been remedied.
  • In the instance where a Clerk does not accept the final decision, the student has a right of appeal to the Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Student Appeals Committee.

5. REFERENCES

5.1 PARIM Collective Agreement: 2014-2018 Collective Agreement

5.2 UGME Policy and Procedures - Undergraduate Medical Education Student Appeals

5.3 UGME Policy & Procedures – Examination Conduct

5.4 UGME Policy & Procedures – Deferred Examinations

5.5 UGME Policy & Procedures – Supplemental Examinations

5.6 UGME Policy & Procedures – Examination Results

5.7 UGME Policy & Procedures – Promotion & Failure

5.8 UGME Policy & Procedures – Accommodation for Undergraduate Medical Students with Disabilities

5.9 UGME Policy & Procedures – Invigilation of Examinations

 


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Director, Clerkship with questions respecting this policy.

Course or clerkship and session objective change

Policy Name:

Undergraduate Medical Education Course or Clerkship and Session Objective Changes, Changes to Curriculum, and Changes to Evaluation

Application / Scope:

Instructors, Course Directors, Program Directors, Coordinators

Approved (Date):

August 2018

Review Date:

August 2023

Revised (Date):

May 2020

Approved By:

Curriculum Executive Committee [August 2018] College Executive Council [August 2018]

1. PURPOSE

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) understands the importance of rooting its curriculum in the mission of UGME with its related goals and objectives. This policy and procedures outlines the framework for the development, review and implementation of general program objectives, Pre- Clerkship and Clerkship course and program objectives, session objectives, curriculum changes, and changes to student evaluation.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME program.

2.2 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.3 Session – lecture, tutorial, small group tutorial, self-directed learning, experiential learning, lecture followed by small group tutorial, academic half-day.

2.4 Working day – Any day, other than a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday on which academic business may be conducted. Max Rady College of Medicine usual workday hours are Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

2.5 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – A comprehensive summary of student performance as a necessary component of their Clerkship training which demonstrates the full range of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) required of a physician. Electronically distributed at the start of each rotation, FITERs must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This should include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.6 Midpoint In-Training Evaluation Report (MITER) – Is a formative assessment report completed by the student, and then reviewed by the preceptor. It is electronically distributed at the start of each core rotation that is of at least four (4) weeks duration and must be completed and submitted electronically.

2.7 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE-type) – an examination used to assess the clinical skills of students.

  • The mini-OSCE and Comprehensive Clinical Examination (CCE) are OSCE- type examinations.
  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by a comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by their congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of eight of twelve OSCE stations to pass the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills Courses.
  • The Remedial Examinations for the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills courses will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial exam. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial OSCE.

Comprehensive Clinical Exam (CCE) – An objective structured clinical-type examination used to assess the clinical skills of students in Clerkship.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by the comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by the congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations in order to pass the CCE.
  • The Remedial Examinations for Med IV CCE will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial CCE. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial CCE.

2.8 Type of Evaluation Instrument – Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) Examination, Short Answer Examination, OSCE-type Examination, Take-home Examination, Reflective Exercise, FITER, MITER.

2.9 Change to Curriculum – the addition, deletion, replacement of one or more of the following:

  • Course, session, tutorial, lecture, essential clinical experience
  • Content of a course or rotation, if substantive, and results in changes to objectives
  • Location of course material within a Block at the Pre-Clerkship level
  • Alteration of session hours
  • Clinical teaching site(s)

2.10 Change to Evaluation – the addition, deletion, or change in the content or weighting of one or more of the following:

  • Evaluation Item
  • Type of Evaluation Instrument
  • A specific course within the Block examination
  • MITER
  • FITER
  • MCQ
  • OSCE

3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 The UGME Learning Objectives Policy approved by Max Rady College Executive Council in June 2010 governs UGME learning objectives.

3.2 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.

PRE-CLERKSHIP COURSE AND CLERKSHIP ROTATION OBJECTIVES

3.3 All Pre-Clerkship and Clerkship course and session level objectives must be mapped to the General Education Program Level Objectives.

3.4 Course and Rotation objectives are developed by Course Directors, and/or Clerkship Directors, with representation from those involved in the specific curriculum and under the direction of the Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum and Director, Clerkship Curriculum.

3.5 These objectives must be reviewed on an annual basis under the direction of Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum and Director, Clerkship Curriculum with representation from all parties involved in the specific course and/or program.

3.6 Recommendations from the annual review will be reviewed by the Pre-Clerkship Curriculum Committee or the Clerkship Curriculum Committee with final approval for change from the Curriculum Executive Committee.

3.7 Approved changes to these objectives will be communicated to Undergraduate Management Committee, instructors and students under the direction of the Director, UGME Curriculum.

SESSION LEVEL OBJECTIVES

3.8 All session level objectives must be mapped to the specific Pre-Clerkship Course or Clerkship rotation objectives.

3.9 The development of these objectives is the responsibility of the instructor with input from the Pre-Clerkship Course Director, or Clerkship Director.

3.10 These objectives must be reviewed on an annual basis under the direction of the Pre- Clerkship Course Director, or Clerkship Director.

3.11 Recommendations from the annual review will be reviewed by the Pre-Clerkship Curriculum Committee or the Clerkship Curriculum Committee with final approval for change from the Curriculum Executive Committee.

3.12 Approved changes to these objectives will be communicated to Undergraduate Management Committee, instructors and students under the direction of the Director, UGME Curriculum.

PRE-CLERKSHIP AND CLERKSHIP EVALUATION

3.13 All evaluation items organized within the Max Rady College of Medicine must be mapped to the respective Course/Clerkship and Session Level Objectives.

3.14  The development and mapping of evaluation items is the responsibility of Course and Clerkship Directors, with representation from those involved in the specific evaluation and under the direction of the Chairs, Committees of Evaluation.

3.15 Evaluation items are reviewed on an annual basis in parallel with the review of course and session level objectives. The Chairs, Pre-Clerkship Student Evaluation and Clerkship Student Evaluation Committees work with the Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum or Director, Clerkship Curriculum with representation from all parties involved in the specific course and/or program.

3.16 Recommendations from the annual review will be reviewed by the Pre-Clerkship Student Evaluation, Clerkship Student Evaluation Committees and/or Progress Committee with final approval from the Rady Faculty Executive Council.

3.17 Approved changes to evaluation will be communicated to the Undergraduate Management Committee, instructors and students under the direction of the Director, Evaluation.

CHANGES TO CURRICULUM

3.18 Any changes to the curriculum as stated in the definition “Changes to Curriculum” must be done with the knowledge and review of the Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum or Director, Clerkship Curriculum and the Director, UGME Curriculum.

3.19 Any reviewed curriculum change must be approved by the Curriculum Executive Committee and communicated to the Undergraduate Management Committee and students under the direction of the Director, UGME Curriculum.

CHANGES TO EVALUATION

3.20 Any changes to evaluation as stated in the definition “Changes to Evaluation” must be done with the knowledge and review of the Chair, Pre-clerkship Student Evaluation Committee (PSEC), Chair, Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee (CSEC) and/or Director, Evaluations

3.21 Any reviewed evaluation change must be approved by the Rady Faculty Executive Committee, and communicated to the Curriculum Executive Committee, Progress Committee, Undergraduate Management Committee and students under the direction of the Director, Evaluation.


4. PROCEDURES

4.1 The UGME Learning Objectives Procedures approved by Max Rady College Executive

Council in June 2010 governs UGME Learning Objectives.

PRE-CLERKSHIP COURSE AND CLERKSHIP ROTATION OBJECTIVES

ANNUAL REVIEW PROCESS

4.2 The Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum and Director, Clerkship Curriculum will inform the Director, UGME Curriculum and Associate Dean, UGME of the schedule of planned course/rotation reviews including a review of the course learning objectives.

4.3 The Director Pre-Clerkship/Clerkship Curriculum Committee will establish an ad hoc committee representative of instructors, departments and members of the Manitoba Medical Student Association (MMSA) to review the Course/Clerkship, including the objectives. This committee will ensure the objectives are appropriately linked to the reviewed UGME Program Learning Objectives. This committee’s work, including recommendations for changes to Course/Clerkship Level Objectives must be completed by 14 days preceding the course review at Pre-Clerkship/Clerkship Committee.

4.4 Each Course/Clerkship Director will report to the committee at scheduled date for review.

4.5 The recommended Course/Clerkship Level Objective changes will be approved by the Curriculum Executive Committee on an ongoing basis and communicated to the UGME Management Committee by the Director of Curriculum.

4.6 The Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum and Director, Clerkship Curriculum will oversee the process of communicating approved Course/Clerkship Objective changes to all stakeholders involved in UGME, including instructors, preceptors and students by June 30 of the same academic year.

4.7 The Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum and Director, Clerkship Curriculum will report completion the course change implementation to the Director of Curriculum.

4.8 The UGME Pre-Clerkship and Clerkship Administrators will be responsible for making approved changes within the Curriculum Management System in preparation for the next academic year.

PRE-CLERKSHIP COURSE AND CLERKSHIP SESSION OBJECTIVES ANNUAL REVIEW PROCESS

4.9 The Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum and Director, Clerkship Curriculum will inform the Director, UGME Curriculum and Associate Dean, UGME of the schedule of planned course/rotation reviews that will include a review of the session learning objectives.

4.10 Each Course/Clerkship Director will communicate with instructors regarding the instructor’s responsibility to review session objectives within 14 days of the completion of the course.

4.11 Each instructor must report recommendations for change to session objectives to the Course/Clerkship Director within 14 days of the completion of the course/rotation.

4.12 The Course/Clerkship Director must bring recommended changes to session objectives to the next scheduled Pre-Clerkship Curriculum Committee or Clerkship Curriculum Committee for approval.

4.13 The Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum and Director, Clerkship Curriculum will communicate recommended session objective changes to the next Curriculum Executive Committee for approval. Once approved, the recommended session level objective changes will be communicated to the UGME Management Committee that immediately follows the Curriculum Executive Committee meeting by the Director, Curriculum.

4.14 The UGME Pre-Clerkship and Clerkship Administrators will be responsible for incorporating session objective changes into the Curriculum Management System in preparation for the next academic year.

CHANGES TO CURRICULUM

4.15 A Course/Clerkship Director or instructor who wishes to make a change to the curriculum as stated in the definition “Changes to Curriculum” must complete and sign the Curriculum Change Request Form (Appendix 1). If the change to the curriculum required a change to evaluation as stated in the definition “Changes to Evaluation”, the Course Director must complete and sign the Evaluation Change Request Form and submit it in accordance with the procedures for Changes to Evaluation.

4.16 The completed and signed Curriculum Change Request Form must be submitted to the Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum or Director, Clerkship Curriculum within 14 working days of completion of the course.

4.17 The Director, Pre-Clerkship Curriculum or Director, Clerkship Curriculum will bring the request for change to the curriculum to the next respective curriculum committee meeting for discussion.

4.18 In the case where a change to the curriculum does not require input from either the Pre- Clerkship Curriculum Committee or the Clerkship Curriculum Committee, the request will be submitted to the Director, UGME Curriculum for review within 14 days

4.19 The Director, UGME Curriculum will sign all reviewed requests for changes to the curriculum within 14 working of receipt of the completed form from the Director, Pre- Clerkship Curriculum or Director, Clerkship Curriculum.

4.20 The Director, UGME Curriculum will report all recommendations to approve/non- approve changes at the next Curriculum Executive Committee. Decisions on approval of changes will be communicated to the UGME Management Committee at the next meeting by the Director, Curriculum.

CHANGES TO EVALUATION

4.21 A Course/Clerkship Director who wishes to make a change to an evaluation item as stated in the definition “Changes to Evaluation” must complete and sign the Evaluation Change Request Form (Appendix 2).

4.22 The completed and signed Evaluation Change Request Form must be submitted to the appropriate Chair (Pre-Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee or Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee), within 14 working days of the course completion.

4.23 If necessary, the Chair, Pre-Clerkship or Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee will bring the request for change to the next meeting of the appropriate Student Evaluation Committee and/or Progress Committee for discussion.

4.24 In the case where a change to evaluation does not require input from the appropriate Student Evaluation Committee and/or Progress Committee, the reviewed request will be submitted to the Director, Evaluation for signing within 14 days of the completion of the course.

4.25 The Director, Evaluation will sign all reviewed requests for changes evaluation within 14 working of receipt of the completed form from either Chair, Student Evaluation Committee

4.26 The Director, Evaluation will report all recommendations for change at the next Curriculum Executive Committee and Rady Faculty Executive Committee. Decisions on approval of changes will be communicated to the UGME Management Committee at the next meeting by the Director of Evaluation.


5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Director, UGME Curriculum with questions respecting this policy.

Curricular time

Policy Name:

Curricular Time in Pre-Clerkship Courses (Year 1/Year 2) and Clerkship Academic Teaching (Year 3/Year4)

Application / Scope:

Year I to Year IV Undergraduate Medical Education Students

Approved (Date):

February 2018

Review Date:

February 2023

Revised (Date):

January 2018

Approved By:

College Executive Council

1. PURPOSE

To establish the limits on the time that medical students are expected or required to spend in educational and clinical activities. Additionally, this policy serves as a guide for curricular planners to ensure sufficient time in the curriculum allows for balance among academic learning events, independent study time, and personal time.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Pre-Clerkship Curricular Time – time in Year 1 and 2 between 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday to Friday inclusive that is required for teaching activities. The exceptions to this definition are statutory holidays as outlined by the University of Manitoba Academic Calendar. There are no scheduled academic learning events on Saturday or Sunday.

2.2 Clerkship Academic Teaching – non-patient related time in Year 3 and 4, Monday to Friday inclusive, which is required for teaching activities. The exceptions to this definition are statutory holidays as outlined by the University of Manitoba Academic Calendar. There are no scheduled academic learning events on Saturday or Sunday.

2.3 Independent Learning Time - time in the academic schedule deliberately set aside for students to use for their own specific needs, which may include activities such as volunteer work, service learning, projects, or any other independent study.

2.4 Curricular Learning Events – events that are required learning activities that are part of a course, recognized by the Curriculum Executive Committee and reflected in OPAL. See Appendix 1 for a list of types of Curricular Learning Events.

2.5 OPAL – Online Portal for Advanced Learning.

2.6 UGME – Undergraduate Medical Education.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS – GENERAL

3.1 Independent Learning Time will be protected; i.e. nothing will be scheduled in this time except in extenuating circumstances.

3.2 Extenuating circumstances may include:

  • at the discretion of the Associate Dean, UGME, in consultation with the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, during circumstances such as:
    • the cancellation of classes due to storms or other emergency closures.
  • at the discretion of the Director Pre-Clerkship, Director Clerkship Academic, departmental Clerkship Directors during circumstances such as:
    • when an instructor is unable to teach (e.g. death in the family, unexpected urgent clinical commitment, etc.)
  • at the discretion of the Curriculum Executive Committee during circumstances such as:
    • curricular learning events involving more than one (1) cohort of students or students from other colleges that may need to be scheduled outside of curricular time.
  • with respect to Clinical Skills teaching, where students will receive an equivalent or greater amount of protected time.

3.3 Students will be granted a 10-minute break after every Curricular Learning Event.

3.4 Weekends are normally free of Curricular Time and Clerkship Academic Teaching, but may be used for special exams (e.g., OSCEs) or in the event that scheduled exam time was lost due to storm or other emergency closure

3.5 Holidays, as specified in the University Academic Calendar are free of any scheduled teaching or exams.

3.6 This policy is to be reviewed five years following its initial approval and every five years thereafter.


4. POLICY STATEMENTS – PRE-CLERKSHIP

4.1 In a given week, a student will have an average of six (6) hours of Independent Learning Time.

4.2 Independent Learning Time will be scheduled in blocks. Blocks will typically be scheduled in three (3) hour increments where possible.

4.3 Time allocated for meals within the working day is considered in addition to Independent Learning Time. Curricular events will not normally be scheduled during the student lunch hour, which normally falls between 1100 and 1400.

4.4 Not all students will necessarily have the same six (6) hours of Independent Learning Time; it will vary according to small group schedules and individual schedules based on group work, labs, etc.

4.5 In weeks which include a statutory holiday, the normal allotment of Independent Learning Time will not be provided.


5. POLICY STATEMENTS – CLERKSHIP

5.1 All rotations, electives and selectives start on a Monday and end on a Friday.

5.2 The hours of required responsibilities (clinical or academic) should not exceed ten (10) hours per day when averaged over an entire rotation (excluding call days).

5.3 On-call hours are addressed in the UGME Clerkship Duty Hours policy.


6. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PROGRAM ADMINISTRATORS, PRE-CLERKSHIP AND CLERKSHIP

6.1 Ensure Independent Learning time is integrated into each week of curricular time.

6.2 Review and address concerns from students, teachers or administrative staff regarding breaches of this policy with the respective Director, Pre-Clerkship or Clerkship.

6.3 Annually report on the Independent Learning Time in Pre-Clerkship Curricular Courses and Clerkship Academic Teaching to the respective committees.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME AND/OR STUDENT AFFAIRS

6.4 Determine exceptions to the protected Independent Learning Time to allow for rescheduling cancelled classes due to storms or other emergency closures.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT

6.5 Bring concerns regarding breaches of this policy to the attention of the respective Director, Pre-Clerkship or Director, Clerkship.

6.6 If concerns are not resolved satisfactorily, request secondary review by the Director, UGME Curriculum.

6.7 If concerns are not resolved at the secondary review stage, requests to appeal the decision may be sent to the Curriculum Executive Committee.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR PRE-CLERKSHIP, DIRECTOR CLERKSHIP AND/OR DEPARTMENTAL CLERKSHIP DIRECTORS

6.8 Determine exceptions to the protected Independent Learning Time to allow for rescheduling cancelled classes when an instructor is unable to teach.

6.9 Provide direction and guidance to Course Leaders, Clerkship Directors and Program Administrators regarding the application of this policy to curricular scheduling.

6.10 Review and address concerns from students, teachers or administrative staff regarding breaches of this policy with the respective Program Administrator, Pre-Clerkship or Clerkship.

6.11 Review annual curricular time report with their respective committees. RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, UGME CURRICULUM

6.12 Review appeals to the decision made by the Director Pre-Clerkship or Director, Clerkship with respect to breaches of this policy.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CURRICULUM EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

6.13 Determine exceptions to the protected Independent Learning Time involving multi- program learning events held outside of normal curricular time.

6.14 Annually review reports of Independent Learning Time in Pre-Clerkship Curricular Courses and Clerkship Academic Teaching to determine if changes are necessary and the course of action.

6.15 Review appeals to the decision made by the Director Pre-Clerkship, Director, Clerkship or the Director, UGME Curriculum with respect to breaches of this policy.


7. REFERENCES

7.1 UGME Policy and Procedures – Promotion and Failure

7.2 UGME Policy and Procedures – Undergraduate Medical Course/Clerkship, and Session

Objective Changes, Changes to Curriculum and Changes to Evaluation

7.3 UGME Policy and Procedures – Clerkship Duty Hours


8. POLICY CONTACT

Director, Curriculum

Electives

Policy Name:

Electives

Application/Scope:

Clerkship Students

Approved (Date):

September 2020

Review Date:

September 2025

Revised (Date):

November 2019

Approved By:

Clerkship Curriculum Committee [November 2019] Curriculum Executive Committee [March 2020] College Executive Council [September 2020]

1. PURPOSE

This policy provides guidance and direction for the following electives related activity contained within the Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) program:

  • Internal Electives;
  • External Electives;
  • Self-Directed Study Electives;
  • Early Electives;
  • Research Electives and,
  • Three (3) Different Disciplines Requirements.

2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.2 Elective – An elective is an opportunity for self-education in an area of the student’s own interest. The aim of an elective is to improve a student’s ability to function as a physician, thus the experience can be of a clinical, research or self-directed nature.

2.3 Internal Elective – An elective within the Province of Manitoba.

2.4 External Elective – An elective outside the Province of Manitoba, within Canada and international.

2.5 Self-Directed Study Elective – A one-week elective organized in accordance with the

Self-Directed Study Elective guidelines.

2.6 Early Elective – An elective scheduled during the two week August vacation in Year III in place of an elective in Period Nine of the Elective Program.

2.7 Research Elective – An elective that can involve case reports, chart reviews, laboratory research or participation in ongoing research studies. It must involve planned scholarly work; examples include chart reviews, laboratory research, or participation in ongoing research studies/trials.

2.8 Preceptor - A faculty member of the Max Rady College of Medicine (Physician or Scientist).

  • A preceptor for the purpose of the UGME Electives Program cannot be any of the following: a graduate student, postdoctoral fellow, research assistant, research or professional associate, resident or clinical fellow.
  • If the faculty mentor is not appointed within the Max Rady College of Medicine, such as from the Faculty of Science or College of Pharmacy or a health professional employed by one of our teaching hospitals, or whose field of study is outside of the health care or biomedical research arenas, a co-preceptor from the Max Rady College of Medicine must be named.

2.9 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – A comprehensive summary of student performance as a necessary component of their Clerkship training which demonstrates the full range of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) required of a physician. Electronically distributed at the start of each rotation, FITERs must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This should include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.10 Midpoint In-Training Evaluation Report (MITER) – Is a formative assessment report completed by the student, and then reviewed by the preceptor. It is electronically distributed at the start of each core rotation that is of at least four (4) weeks duration and must be completed and submitted electronically.

2.11 Vacant Elective Time – Time within the Elective Program when the student has no confirmed elective scheduled or unable to identify an elective placement.

2.12 Working day – Any day, other than a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday on which academic business may be conducted. Max Rady College of Medicine usual workday hours are Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

2.13 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Examination – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program. For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the

11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.

2.14 AFMC Student Portal – The AFMC Student Portal is a bilingual information hub and centralized application service for visiting electives for all Canadian faculties of medicine. Services are offered for Canadian and international undergraduate medical students.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

GENERAL

3.1 Generally, the Electives Program consists of seventeen (17) weeks duration and contained within Year IV of the UGME program.

3.2 The Elective Program is organized into two periods as follows:

  • Period Nine – From early September to December Holidays Break
    • Each elective within Period Nine can be of two (2) to four (4) weeks in duration, with the exception of Self-Directed Study Electives, which are a maximum of one (1) week in duration.
  • Period Ten – The first two weeks of January
    • Within Period Ten, each elective is two (2) weeks in length.

3.3 Each student must complete electives in three (3) different disciplines in accordance with the three different discipline requirements outlined in statements 3.38-3.43. Electives in three (3) different disciplines must be completed prior to the end of Period Ten. Refer to the UGME Electives webpage for the disciplines list. Effective with the Class of 2021, the maximum number of weeks in an elective/selective discipline is 8 weeks

3.4 Beginning with the Class of 2021, student elective opportunities cannot exceed a maximum of eight (8) weeks in any single entry-level discipline. An entry-level discipline is an Entry Route in the PGY-1 (R1) match. Electives in subspecialties that are part of a PGY-3 (R3) match (such as the subspecialties in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics) are counted as separate disciplines. As such, electives in these subspecialties do not count towards the 8-week maximum in the general specialty.

3.5 Each student must receive approval through the Curriculum Management System prior to the commencement of each elective. Retroactive approval and evaluation credit will not be granted for any elective not approved prior to the start date.

3.6 The Curriculum Management System will open for Year IV medical students to view and/or apply for electives at the end of February in their third year of the program. A training session outlining how to use the system will take place in mid-September and mid-January each year.

3.7 For each elective, a FITER must be completed and in the case of an elective of four weeks’ duration or longer, a MITER is required.

3.8 All elective FITERS, and MITERS if applicable, must be completed and submitted electronically to the UGME program office in order to meet graduation requirements. Electronic MITER and FITER forms are distributed via the Curriculum Management System to the preceptor of the student’s elective through the Curriculum Management System for Internal Electives and distributed to the student for External Electives. It is the responsibility of students participating in External Electives to distribute the relevant MITER/FITER link to their preceptor.

3.9 In the event a student has unscheduled time within the Elective Program, the UGME office will assign an elective four (4) weeks prior to the start of the unscheduled time. Student participation in assigned electives is non-negotiable.

3.10 Each student is required to electronically complete and submit the Student Elective Evaluation which will be distributed electronically to the student through the Curriculum Management System at the end of each elective in accordance with the requirements of the program Evaluation Policy.

3.11 No student is permitted to participate in electives during the December holidays break period.

INTERNAL ELECTIVES

3.12 The UGME office oversees the entire process of organizing all Internal Electives.

3.13 Student applications for Internal Electives must be submitted in accordance with the procedures and dates identified in this document.

3.14 Each student will receive confirmation of each Internal Elective a minimum of four (4) weeks prior to the start date of the requested elective.

3.15 If cancelling a confirmed elective, the student must abide by the procedures outlined in this policy and request cancellation no less than four (4) weeks prior to the elective start date.

3.16 If a Max Rady College of Medicine department must cancel a confirmed elective, the student and the UGME office must be informed at least four (4) weeks prior to the start of the elective.

EXTERNAL

3.17 Each student is encouraged to participate in External Electives throughout the Elective Program.

3.18 Each student is required to submit written confirmation of each External Elective to the UGME office in a timely and efficient manner. Submission of confirmation of acceptance for an External Elective may consist of an email from the external University or confirmation from the AFMC Student Portal forwarded to the Administrator, Electives by the student if necessary.

3.19 If cancelling an External Elective, the student is required to abide by the cancellation policy of the specific university and remains responsible to contact the host University to cancel the elective if necessary. The student is also required to cancel External Electives applied for via Curriculum Management System.

SELF-DIRECTED STUDY ELECTIVES

3.20 These electives are designed to provide students with the opportunity to organize study, on a self-directed basis, outside clinical and research settings. Self-Directed Study Electives are available for a period not exceeding one (1) week in duration and may be used only once within the Electives period.

3.21 This week may be used to mitigate the need to re-organize two (2) or more electives when scheduling arrangements do not permit a student’s entire electives period to be filled. In special circumstances, the Self-Directed Study Elective may also be used to allow study time in the remediation of an outstanding NBME Examination.

3.22 In the event that the self-study week is used to prepare for an outstanding NBME Examination, the week taken must be prior to the exam and within a reasonable period of time to the expected exam

3.23 As a Self-Directed Study Elective is considered an academic activity, students selecting this option must provide a specific topic of study for consideration, along with specific objectives to be obtained, for approval when choosing to pursue this option.

3.24 A student participating in a Self-Directed Study Elective within the Elective Program must adhere to the Self-Directed Study guidelines contained within this policy.

EARLY ELECTIVES

3.25 These electives are designed to address the issue of students wishing to complete an Early Elective, especially those students who are considering extremely competitive residency programs. A student who applies to replace his/her vacation with an elective must take the vacation time prior to the December vacation break period contained at the end of Period Nine.

3.26 A student must take a two-week (2) vacation within the Electives Program if participating in an Early Elective.

3.27 . A student is eligible to participate in the Early Elective if they have completed and passed all Clerkship rotations and have one NBME Exam failure or fewer up to the time the application for Early Elective is submitted.

3.28 Student participation in an Early Elective cannot interfere with core Clerkship responsibilities contained within Period Seven and/or Period Eight.

3.29 The deadline for the submission of an application for the Early Elective is June 1st the academic year preceding the commencement of Period Nine. Applications must be submitted electronically using the Curriculum Management System interface.

3.30 Students are responsible for organizing External Early Electives in accordance with the Electives Policy and Procedures contained herein.

3.31 A student participating in an Early Elective must adhere to the Early Elective guidelines contained within this policy.

RESEARCH ELECTIVE

3.32 Research Electives are designed to provide students with the opportunity:

  • To learn about research design, hypothesis generation, and the development of research questions/problem formulation;
  • To learn to access, assimilate, and critically evaluate the medical literature pertaining to the research topic;
  • To learn about research ethics, informed consent, and the regulatory processes that must be followed in the conduct of research;
  • To learn about statistics and data analysis;
  • To conduct research and acquire any skills needed to do so (e.g. laboratory techniques, computer skills);
  • To gather data for a project, interpret the data, and integrate the data with information obtained from a literature review; and
  • To learn about manuscript preparation.

3.33 A student can participate in a Research Elective from three (3) to six (6) weeks in length, noting that the length of the elective must be consistent with the learning objectives undertaken.

3.34 A student can participate in more than one Research Elective during the Electives Program so long as they conform to the Electives policy.

3.35 A student participating in a Research Elective generally does so at the University of Manitoba and affiliated institutions. In some instances, exceptions may be granted by the Director, Electives.

3.36 A Research Elective can involve case reports, chart reviews, laboratory research or participation in ongoing research studies. Conducting a literature review does not constitute a Research Elective.

3.37 A student participating in a Research Elective must adhere to the guidelines for Clerkship Research Electives contained within this policy.

THREE DIFFERENT DISCIPLINES REQUIREMENTS

3.38 The intent of this policy statement is to ensure that each student participates in experiences across a variety of disciplines offered within a general medical education.

3.39 Each student is required to participate in a clinical elective experience in a minimum of three (3) different disciplines.

3.40 The Discipline Listing used by the Max Rady College of Medicine is based on the AFMC Student Elective Diversification Policy and does not infer that all listed disciplines are available for electives at the University of Manitoba.

3.41 The Discipline Listing of available electives at the University of Manitoba are contained in Appendix A of this policy will be reviewed on a yearly basis and updated as required.

3.42 Student is required to complete electives in at least three (3) different disciplines prior to the end of Period Ten.

RENEWAL PERIOD

3.43 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

GENERAL

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, ELECTIVES:

4.1 Oversee the organization and execution of student information sessions related to Electives.

4.2 Review student application, as required, to address issues or concerns.

4.3 Review completed elective FITER, as required, to address issues or concerns. INTERNAL ELECTIVES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.4 Complete and submit the Electives Application through the Curriculum Management System according to the dates set by the Administrator, Electives which are emailed to the students as the application process ensues.

4.5 If seeking to cancel a confirmed Internal Elective for an External Elective, ensure that the External Elective is confirmed for the same time period.

4.6 The student must request a change within the Curriculum Management System in order to cancel an elective. This must be completed and submitted to the Administrator, Electives no less than four (4) weeks prior to the start of the confirmed External Elective.

4.7 If cancelling an Internal Elective for an alternate Internal Elective, the change request must be received through the Curriculum Management System no less than four (4) weeks prior to the start of the stated elective.

4.8 If the student does not receive reporting instructions prior to the start of your Internal Elective, the student must contact the respective Department Coordinator at least one (1) week prior to the start of the elective to obtain first day reporting instructions and/or other applicable documentation. This information is easily accessible/available within the Curriculum Management System:

  • Proceed to Curriculum Management System
  • Select your Class
  • Select the Introduction to Clerkship (ITC) option
  • Open the “Department Contacts” file contained within the Learning Resources section

4.9 Students must follow department instructions for the start of the elective.

4.10 Students must complete the electronic MITER (if required) prior to the midpoint of the elective and submit it for viewing by the preceptor.

4.11 Students participating in electives must attend scheduled meeting(s) with the preceptor to discuss the MITER (if required) and the FITER.

4.12 Students must complete the student component of the electronic FITER within five (5) working days of receiving the FITER from the preceptor.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PRECEPTOR

4.13 Document and communicate any significant concerns such as professionalism to the Director, Electives and Associate Dean, UGME.

4.14 Perform an informal (verbal) mid-point evaluation for electives of less than four (4) weeks.

4.15 Meet with the student at the midpoint of the elective to review the electronic MITER for electives of four (4) weeks duration or longer.

4.16 Complete electronically the preceptor component of the MITER and submit it no less than five (5) days following the midpoint of the elective.

4.17 Complete an electronic FITER no less than three (3) days prior to the end of the elective. This may require compilation of input from multiple preceptors.

4.18 Meet with the student on or before the last day of the elective to discuss the completed FITER.

4.19 Submit the completed FITER electronically through the Curriculum Management System. RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATOR, ELECTIVES

4.20 Prepare electronic application by end-February of the academic year and make the period catalog viewable for students and email students informing them.

4.21 Prepare electives planning schedule on the Electives Portal homepage for students/coordinators to view. Allow students two (2) weeks to apply for each iteration and departments two (2) weeks to schedule for each iteration.

4.22 Send students an e-mail through the Curriculum Management System informing them that the Electives Portal is available for applications.

4.23 Send the Department Coordinators an email through the Electives Portal informing them that the student’s applications are ready for review and scheduling.

4.24 If there are students who are not placed for the specific time period, liaise with each student and departments to find appropriate placement as required.

4.25 Monitor student’s schedules, that they have all elective time booked and have completed three (3) disciplines by the end of Period Ten.

4.26 Finalize each Electives Period no later than four (4) weeks prior to the effective start date.

4.27 Prepare the evaluation workflow in the Curriculum Management System for each department for each elective period when the period has been finalized.

4.28 In the event of an Elective cancellation, inform the student that their elective cancellation request has been received. If within the deadline, indicate that department will be advised accordingly if new elective can be confirmed.

4.29 Inform students requesting a cancellation that their request is denied if cancellation does not meet deadline requirements.

4.30 Forward cancellation request email that are received via Curriculum Management System to the appropriate Department Coordinator and make sure they are aware.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR ELECTIVES

4.31 Oversee the organization and execution of student information sessions related to Electives.

4.32 Approve Self-Directed Study Elective requests, research requests and review/approve student’s work that results from these electives.

4.33 Review special case student applications, as required, to address issues or concerns.

4.34 Review completed Elective FITERs, as required, to address issues or concerns.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DEPARTMENT COORDINATORS

4.35 Login to the Curriculum Management System Electives Portal and schedule the student’s application when you are prompted by email

4.36 Ensure that each student is assigned a site and preceptor in the Electives Portal no later than four (4) weeks prior to the start of the electives.

4.37 Prepare the FITER distribution within Curriculum Management System and distribute the FITERS as required.

EXTERNAL ELECTIVES RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.38 Prior to applying to External Electives, review that university’s policy and procedures related to application process, refunds and cancellations on their AFMC Institution Profile.

4.39 Apply for the elective through the AFMC Student Portal.

4.40 Students are required to forward email confirmation from external University to the Administrator, Electives confirming External Elective placement a minimum of four (4) weeks prior to the start of the confirmed elective. Until written confirmation is submitted the elective is documented as pending by the UGME office.

4.41 If seeking to cancel a confirmed External Elective for another External Elective, ensure that the new External Elective is confirmed for the same time period. Request the change through the Curriculum Management System and the student must inform the external University according to their specific cancellation policy through the AFMC Student Portal.

4.42 Follow the accepting university’s stated policies and procedures with respect to the start of the External Elective.

4.43 Copy and paste the FITER link and the MITER link (if required) from “My Front Page” into an email to the assigned preceptor.

4.44 Complete the electronic MITER (if required) prior to the midpoint of the elective and submit it for viewing by the preceptor.

4.45 Attend scheduled meeting(s) with the preceptor to discuss the MITER (if required) and the FITER.

4.46 Complete the student component of the electronic FITER within five (5) working days of receiving the FITER from the preceptor.

4.47 Ensure the completed FITER and MITER (if required) are submitted to the Administrator, Electives within ten (10) working days of completion of the elective.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PRECEPTOR

4.48 Document and communicate any significant concerns such as professionalism to the Director, Electives and Associate Dean, UGME.

4.49 Perform an informal (verbal) mid-point evaluation for electives of less than four (4) weeks.

4.50 Meet with the student at the midpoint of the elective to review the electronic MITER for electives of four (4) weeks duration or longer.

4.51 Complete electronically the preceptor component of the MITER and submit it no less than five (5) days following the midpoint of the elective.

4.52 Complete an electronic FITER no less than three (3) days prior to the end of the elective. This may require compilation of input from multiple preceptors.

4.53 Meet with the student on or before the last day of the elective to discuss the completed FITER.

4.54 Submit the completed FITER electronically. RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATOR, ELECTIVES

4.55 Complete the verification request for each student’s AFMC application that is sent by email to the Administrator, Electives.

4.56 Update the Curriculum Management System to “approved” upon receipt of confirmation from the stated university.

4.57 Prepare the evaluation workflow in the Curriculum Management System for External Elective for each department and distribute to students at the appropriate time to ensure that each student has access to the appropriate link for the FITER and MITER (if required).

4.58 Collate evaluations and file electronically. Keep record of any negative feedback from students and bring any concerns to the Director, Electives.

RESPONSIBILITY OF DIRECTOR, ELECTIVES AND ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME

4.59 Address any concerns around professionalism, as needed. SELF-DIRECTED STUDY ELECTIVES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.60 The student is required to submit an application through the Curriculum Management System and include a topic and three (3) learning objectives in which the student wants study.

4.61 The student is required to submit a report/journal to the Director, Electives upon completion of the Self-Directed Study Elective. The report/journal must indicate how the stated objectives were achieved and emailed directly to the Administrator, Electives by email.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATOR, ELECTIVES

4.62 Ensure that the Electives Director has reviewed/approved all outstanding Self-Directed Study Electives requests in the Curriculum Management System.

4.63 Ensure that all students have submitted the required Journal/Report at the conclusion of their Self-Directed Study Elective week.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, ELECTIVES

4.64 Approve Self-Directed Study Elective Applications.

4.65 Review the submitted report/journal to determine if the student has achieved the stated Electives objectives.

EARLY ELECTIVES RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.66 Email Administrator, Electives requesting approval for an Early Elective providing reason for request.

4.67 Once approval is given, student applies for Internal Elective through the Curriculum Management System or applies for an External Elective through the AFMC Student Portal.

4.68 If approved for an External Early Elective, student must email confirmation to Administrator, Electives.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATOR, ELECTIVES

4.69 Review student progress in Period Six and Period Seven core rotations prior to the start of the Early Elective window to determine if the student meets the evaluation requirements to participate in an Early Elective.

4.70 Informs the Director, Electives if a student does not meet the stated requirements. RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, ELECTIVES

4.71 If necessary, reviews each request for an Early Elective in collaboration with the Associate Dean, UGME and Associate Dean, Students.

4.72 Informs the affected student if a request for Early Elective is denied due to non- compliance with Early Elective requirements.

RESEARCH ELECTIVES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.73 A student must meet with the preceptor to discuss learning objectives and receive the preceptor’s approval to conduct the research. In some cases, approvals may be required from Research Ethics Board, Research Resource Impact Committee, animal care, etc.

4.74 A student wishing to participate in a Research Elective must complete an application through the Curriculum Management System in accordance with the Electives Policy and Procedures.

4.75 The student is required to meet with the preceptor at the midpoint of the Research

Elective to discuss progress in achieving the stated research objectives.

4.76 The student is required to meet with the preceptor upon completion of the Research Elective to review the Elective Research Summary and to discuss the FITER.

4.77 Each student completing a Research Elective is required to complete a typed one (1)- page summary (no title page) of the elective, meeting the following requirements:

  • The report will be in 11 point Arial or 12 point Times New Roman font, with minimum 2 cm margins (top, bottom, left, right).
  • Minimum word count (excluding the title, authors and affiliations, references, acknowledgments) is five-hundred (500) words.
  • Suggested headings will include:
    • Objective(s);
    • Methods;
    • Results;
    • Conclusions and,
    • Future Directions.
  • Figures and tables are considered acceptable but are limited to one (1) supplementary page.
  • References/cited literature are limited to one supplementary page.
  • A title page is not necessary.

4.78 The student is required to sign and date the Research Elective Summary.

4.79 The student receives credit for the Research Elective when the preceptor has completed and submitted the evaluation of the student’s performance through the Curriculum Management System.

4.80 Each student participating in a Research Elective is encouraged to present their work at laboratory meetings (if applicable) or at meetings, symposia and conferences at the discretion of their preceptor.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PRECEPTOR

4.81 Meet with the student to discuss and assist in developing specific learning objectives.

4.82 Reviews the Student Learning Objectives.

4.83 Meet with the student at the midpoint of the Research Elective, providing the student with feedback on the achievement of stated objectives; identify if specific objective(s) will be achieved by completion of the elective; etc. This meeting must be documented on the final Evaluation Form through the Curriculum Management System.

4.84 Meet with the student at the completion of the elective to review and sign the Research Elective Summary.

4.85 Provide an evaluation of the student’s performance within four weeks after completion of the Research Elective.

RESPONSIBILITY OF DIRECTOR, ELECTIVES

4.86 Review each application for a Research Elective and if necessary, have the application reviewed and approved by the Director, Advanced Degrees in Medicine.


5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Administrator, Electives UGME with questions respecting this policy.


APPENDIX A

List of updated electives disciplines

Anatomical Pathology

Neurology Pediatric

Anesthesiology

Neurosurgery

Cardiac Surgery

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Community Health Sciences

Ophthalmology

Dermatology

Orthopedic Surgery

Diagnostic Radiology

Otolaryngology

Emergency Medicine

Pediatric Allergy

Family Medicine

Pediatric Child Development

General Surgery

Pediatric Child Protection

Internal Medicine Cardiology

Pediatric Endocrinology

Internal Medicine Clinical Immunology & Adult Allergy

Pediatric Gastroenterology

Internal Medicine Clinical Teaching Unit

Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

Internal Medicine Endocrinology

Pediatric Infectious Diseases

Internal Medicine Gastroenterology

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)

Internal Medicine Geriatric Medicine

Pediatric Neonatology

Internal Medicine Hematology

Pediatric Nephrology

Internal Medicine Hepatology

Pediatric Palliative Care

Internal Medicine ICU/Critical Care

Pediatric Respiratory

Internal Medicine Infectious Diseases

Pediatric Rheumatology

Internal Medicine Nephrology

Pediatric Cardiology

Internal Medicine Oncology

Physical Medicine & Rehab

Internal Medicine Palliative Care

Plastic Surgery

Internal Medicine Respiratory

Psychiatry

Internal Medicine Rheumatolgy

Radiation Oncology

Medical Genetics

Research

Neurology

Urology

 

Vascular Surgery

 

 

Extension to clerkship

Policy Name:

Extension to Clerkship

Application/ Scope:

Students who have completed the MD program and are seeking to extend their

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) program

Approved (Date):

August 2018

Review Date:

August 2023

Revised (Date):

August 2018

Approved By:

Curriculum Executive Committee [July 2018] College Executive Council [August 2018]

1. PURPOSE

To provide students who have fulfilled all the requirements for the MD degree the opportunity to have their undergraduate program lengthened in support of enrichment studies (e.g., research, advanced degree, etc.), international electives, and/or the addition of clinical electives to help in career selection particularly for those individuals who may have failed to secure a residency position.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.2 Special Student – A student category designated by the Office of the Registrar of the University of Manitoba.

2.3 Medical Student Performance Report (MSPR) - An institutional assessment considered a component of a student’s academic record and thus, will be made available for student review. Students will be permitted to correct factual errors on the MSPR. Students are encouraged, when required to engage Student Affairs in supporting advocacy efforts in addressing perceived MSPR discrepancies.

2.4 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – An evaluation report that is completed at the end of each core and elective rotation at the Clerkship level. This is electronically distributed at the start of each rotation and must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This must include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.5 Canadian Residency Matching Service (CaRMS) – A national, independent organization providing application and match services to the Canadian medical education community.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Requests for Extension to Clerkship shall be considered for students who have met all the requirements for the MD degree.

3.2 Requests for Extension to Clerkship will only be accepted from students who have completed their MD program at the University of Manitoba. Students are able to convocate before pursuing an extension to clerkship.

3.3 Students must request an Extension to Clerkship in writing to the Associate Dean, UGME.

Requests will only be considered if received within 60 (sixty) days of meeting the requirements for the MD degree. The student must submit the rationale and goals of the requested Extension to Clerkship as well as the proposed academic schedule.

3.4 In order to be considered for an Extension to Clerkship as a student who failed to match with CaRMS, the student must demonstrate that they have:

  • Complied with the requirements for diversity of electives as established by the Max Rady College of Medicine; and
  • Made a concerted effort during the second iteration of the CaRMS match to obtain a residency position in at least one of the three specialties which have offered the largest number of openings.

3.5 The Associate Dean, UGME, shall have the authority to accept or deny a request for Extension to Clerkship, and must approve the rationale and goals of the requested Extension to Clerkship as well as the proposed academic schedule.

3.6 Students participating within the Extension to Clerkship must meet the requirements to qualify as a Special Student. Special Student requirements may be revised from time to time.

3.7 The Registrar of the University of Manitoba will determine a registration fee and other fees that may be applicable to the student’s status; the payment of the fee(s) shall be the student’s responsibility.

3.8 Students must meet the requirements for, and maintain registration with, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba on the Educational Registry throughout their Extension to Clerkship.

3.9 The process of approval for each component of the Extension to Clerkship must comply with the requirements established for Clerkship students irrespective of the student’s status as having completed the requirements for the MD program.

3.10 The duration of an Extension to Clerkship is a maximum of forty-six (46) weeks, and may commence as early as June 1st following convocation. The minimum duration of an Extension to Clerkship is twenty (20) weeks. An Extension to Clerkship may not extend beyond April 15th of the year following completion of all requirements for the MD program regardless of the student’s graduation or convocation status. Exceptions to these timelines will only be made under special circumstances such as medical illness or compassionate grounds.

3.11 A failure on any evaluation within an Extension to Clerkship will result in a review of the FITER. Should the failure stand, the student will have to remediate the failed component as per the policy for Remediation of Clerkship Electives. A student may appeal any result in accordance with standard university appeals processes.

3.12 Terms for failure of a component within an Extension to Clerkship, will be the same as during Clerkship.

3.13 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT

4.1 Students are to request an Extension to Clerkship in writing to the Associate Dean, UGME. This request must include the rational and goals of the requested Extension to Clerkship.

4.2 Students undertaking an Extension to Clerkship are encouraged to meet with an advisor from the office of Student Affairs, and with the Associate Dean, UGME.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATOR, CLERKSHIP EVALUATION

4.3 A student’s MSPR shall include the activities undertaken and academic achievements achieved during the Extension to Clerkship.

4.4 Narrative comments on progress within an Extension to Clerkship will be added to the Medical Student Performance Record (MSPR).

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DIRECTOR, ELECTIVES

4.5 The Director, Electives will supervise all students undertaking an Extension to Clerkship and will meet with students at the commencement of the Extension to Clerkship and at intervals mutually agreeable to both parties.

4.6 When a failure on an evaluation occurs, the Director, Electives will review and discuss with the preceptor and student, and make a final determination regarding the FITER assessment.

REPONSIBILITIES OF PRECEPTOR

4.7 Preceptor evaluators will use the standard Clerkship Elective Evaluation Form for the Extension to Clerkship program.

4.8 Preceptors must send evaluation reports for all components of the Extension to Clerkship to the UGME office. These reports must be in a format established by or acceptable to the Progress Committee.

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, ELECTIVES

4.9 Under the direction of the Director, Electives and Associate Dean, UGME will support the student by organizing proposed academic schedule.

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME

4.10 The Associate Dean, UGME will approve or deny any request for Extension to Clerkship.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 University of Manitoba Governing Documents: Academic – Academic Examination Regulations.

5.2 UGME Policy & Procedures - Accommodation for Undergraduate Medical Students with Disabilities.

5.3 UGME Policy & Procedures - Electives

5.4 UGME Policy & Procedures - Midpoint In-Training Evaluation & Final In-Training Evaluation Preparation, Distribution and Completion and Essential Clinical Presentation Preparation, Distribution, Audit, and Remediation

5.5 UGME Policy & Procedures - Remediation

5.6 UGME Policy & Procedures - Medical Student Performance Report (MSPR)


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Director, Electives with questions respecting this policy.

 

Length of teaching sessions

Policy Name:

Length of Teaching Sessions

Application/ Scope:

Pre-Clerkship Faculty

Approved (Date):

June 2018

Review Date:

June 2023

Revised (Date):

June 2018

Approved By:

UGME Management Committee [June 2018]

1. PURPOSE

To ensure the promotion of class participation and student interaction in Pre-Clerkship.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME Program.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Class participation and student interaction in lectures or small group tutorials should be promoted by planning for and allowing sufficient time for questions in Pre-Clerkship.

3.2 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PRE-CLERKSHIP FACULTY

4.1 Ensure that class participation and student interaction are promoted.

4.2 Time for questions should be allowed either during or at the end of each session.

4.3 Lecturers and tutors are further encouraged to complete their lecture at 10 minutes before the hour, allowing for a break before the next session begins.


5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Associate Dean, UGME with questions respecting this policy.

Summer early exposure

Policy Name:

Summer Early Exposure

Application/ Scope:

Pre-Clerkship Students

Approved (Date):

August 2018

Review Date:

August 2023

Revised (Date):

November 2019

Approved By:

Curriculum Executive Committee [July 2018] College Executive Council [August 2018]

1. PURPOSE

To ensure that medical students who have successfully completed Pre-Clerkship (Year I and Year II of the MD program) have an opportunity to explore clinical experiences during the summer months.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Summer Early Exposure Program – A voluntary, extracurricular summer clinical exposure program, hereafter referred to as the “program”.

2.2 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME program.

2.3 Visiting Medical Student – Students who are in their pre-clinical years and are attending medical school outside of the University of Manitoba within or outside of Canada.

2.4 Clinical Exposure - An experience in a clinical setting, hereafter referred to as an “exposure”.

2.5 Immediate Family – For the purpose of this policy "immediate family" means a spouse (including common law or same sex), child, brother, sister; parent, grandparent, grandchild, mother-in-law, father-in-law, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, son-in-law, daughter- in-law, aunt, uncle, nephew, or niece.

2.6 Medical Student Performance Report (MSPR) – An institutional assessment considered a component of a student’s academic record and thus, will be made available for student review. Students will be permitted to correct factual errors on the MSPR. Students are encouraged, when required to engage Student Affairs in supporting advocacy efforts in addressing perceived MSPR discrepancies.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Student participation in the program is voluntary, meaning it is not a required course. All participants are expected to represent the Max Rady College of Medicine in a professional manner in all aspects of the program.

3.2 Participation in the program is open to Pre-Clerkship students who have successfully completed their respective academic program.

3.3 Since evaluation by the student and the preceptor is an integral component of the experience, an exposure cannot be undertaken with immediate family.

3.4 Applicants, who are in the pre-clinical years of other national or international medical schools, may be accepted into the program if they comply with the specific requirements for visiting students.

3.5 The program is a recognized University of Manitoba course with associated registration fees. Course outcomes are assessed as Pass/Fail.

3.6 Program participation must be of a clinical nature at the local, provincial, national or international level.

3.7 Program participation in a specific summer may be composed of a number of exposures.

Each exposure will have a required number of work hours and work days. A minimum acceptable commitment of time for an exposure consists of ten (10), eight (8) hour days that are not necessarily consecutive.

3.8 Program participation requires completion of a written application, registration and acceptance. Final approval for acceptance in the program rests with the Associate Dean, UGME.

3.9 Written preceptor evaluation of each experience is required. A passing grade will only be awarded to students who have submitted a Preceptor Evaluation Form and demonstrated satisfactory performance.

3.10 Only exposures with a passing grade will be included in a MSPR.

3.11 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

PRE-CLERKSHIP

4.1 Ensure the selected exposures are in clinical setting at the community clinic, private practice, provincial, national and/or international level.

4.2 Identify a preceptor who is a licensed physician, in good standing with their applicable College of Physicians and Surgeons. A listing of physicians within each province is accessible on each College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba website: cpsm.mb.ca. The preceptor must also have an appointment with the University of Manitoba.

4.3 Complete a Summer Early Exposure Application Form with appropriate/required signatures for each anticipated exposure and submit to the Administrator, Electives no later than two (2) weeks prior to the beginning of an exposure. The final deadline for receipt of all exposure applications is June 30th of each academic year in which an exposure is to be taken.

4.4 Pay the registration fee to cover liability and malpractice insurance to the University of Manitoba prior to the commencement of the first exposure. Accept that all costs related to each exposure are the responsibility of the student.

4.5 Complete the Student Evaluation Form and ensure the preceptor completes a Preceptor Evaluation Form at the end of each exposure and return the completed evaluation(s) to the Administrator, Electives as soon as practicable after the completion of the exposure. The final deadline for submission of completed evaluations is August 30th of the academic year in which the exposure was taken.

VISITING MEDICAL STUDENTS

4.6 Ensure that the requested exposure is within a clinical setting.

4.7 Identify a preceptor who is a licensed physician, in good standing with the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba. A listing of physicians within Manitoba is available on the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba website: cpsm.mb.ca/. The preceptor must also have an appointment with the University of Manitoba.

4.8 Complete a Summer Early Exposure Application Visiting Students Form with appropriate/required signatures for the anticipated exposure and submit it to the Administrator, Electives no later than thirty (30) days prior to the beginning of an exposure with the final deadline for receipt of all applications being June 30th of the academic year in which the exposure is to be taken.

4.9 Complete the Student Evaluation Form and ensure the preceptor completes a Preceptor Evaluation Form at the end of each exposure and return the completed evaluation(s) to the Administrator, Electives as soon as practicable after the completion of the exposure. The final deadline for submission of completed evaluations is August 30th of the academic year in which the exposure was taken.

4.10 Follow the instructions provided by the Administrator, Electives. RESPONSIBILITIES OF SUMMER EARLY EXPOSURE PRECEPTOR

4.11 Sign the application form provided by the student or email the Administrator, Electives confirmation of the student’s exposure.

4.12 Complete the Max Rady College of Medicine Summer Early Exposure Preceptor Evaluation Form for each student supervised under this program.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ELECTIVES ADMINISTRATOR

4.13 Inform the students of the Summer Early Exposure policy no later than the beginning of April of each academic year.

4.14 Ensure that the Associate Dean, UGME has all required information for approval of each student application.

4.15 Register all applicants who meet the stated requirements for admission in the program.

4.16 Inform registered students to pay their enrollment fees through Aurora.

4.17 Remind students of their responsibility to return completed Preceptor Evaluation Form and Student Evaluation Form by the required deadline.

4.18 Assign students a Pass/Fail Status as indicated on the Preceptor Evaluation Form.

4.19 Ensure the Summer Early Exposure website contains current information.

RESPONSIBILITY OF ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME

4.20 Review each application and approve/deny student application for admission in the program.

RESPONSIBILITY OF DIRECTOR, ELECTIVES

4.21 All completed documentations will be reviewed by the Electives, Director. Following this, a students will be assigned a pass or fail grade. Incomplete documentation will be treated as a failure.

RESPONSIBILITY OF ADMINISTRATOR, ENROLLMENT

4.22 Upon receipt of completed exposure assessments from the Administrator, Electives, ensure that completed exposure results are entered into Aurora no later than October 1st of each academic year.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 Summer Early Exposure website

5.2 Summer Early Exposure Application Form

5.3 Summer Early Exposure Student Evaluation Form

5.4 Summer Early Exposure Preceptor Evaluation Form

5.5 Summer Early Exposure Visiting Student Forms 

5.6 University of Manitoba – University Governance Policy – Nepotism

5.7 College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba website


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Director, Electives with questions respecting this policy.

 

Repeat clerkship

Policy Name:

Repeat Clerkship

Application / Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students

Approved (Date):

May 2018

Review Date:

May 2023

Revised (Date):

May 2020

Approved By:

Progress Committee [January 2018]

Dean’s Council [February 2018]

College Executive Council [February 2018]

Senate Committee on Instruction and Evaluation (SCIE) [March 2018] Senate Executive Committee [May 2018]

Senate [May 2018]

1. PURPOSE

Students who fail clerkship for the first time are required to repeat it. This policy describes the terms of such a repeat clerkship.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.2 Course/Module – A course/module is a course of study or educational unit, which covers a series of interrelated topics and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the M.D degree. The UGME curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal courses occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.3 Final Examination – A summative multiple choice and/or short answer examination at the end of a Pre-Clerkship Course/Module. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.4 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program. For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.

2.5 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE-type) – an examination used to assess the clinical skills of students.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by a comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by their congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of eight of twelve OSCE stations to pass the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills Courses.
  • The Remedial Examinations for the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills courses will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial exam. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial OSCE.

2.6 Comprehensive Clinical Exam (CCE) – An objective structured clinical-type examination used to assess the clinical skills of students in Clerkship.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by the comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by the congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations in order to pass the CCE.
  • The Remedial Examinations for Med IV CCE will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial CCE. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial CCE.

2.7 Rotation – A unit of clinical work in Clerkship.

2.8 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – A comprehensive summary of student performance as a necessary component of their Clerkship training in order to ensure that students acquire the full range of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) required of a physician. This is electronically distributed at the start of each rotation and must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This must include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.9 Clerkship Student Evaluation Committee(s) (CSEC) – Is responsible for the development and approval of assessment policies and rules; management and administration of examination questions; and the review and evaluation of results and recommendations to the Progress Committee for approval.

2.10 Progress Committee - The overseeing body for student assessments in the Undergraduate Medical Education Program. The Progress Committee assists in the design of a cohesive plan and standardized process for student assessment that follows the principles of the curriculum. Responsibilities include ensuring continuity of student monitoring, the direction of student remediation, and development of terms for promotion and failure at all stages of the curriculum.

2.11 Advanced Cardiac Life Support Course (ACLS) – The ACLS course is mandatory part of clinical Clerkship and used to prepare students for the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination.

2.12 Licentiate of the Medical Council of Canada Refresher Course (LMCC Refresher Course) – A course designed to prepare students for upcoming Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Exams.

2.13 Elective – A course of clinical study selected according to a student’s own interest.

2.14 Transition to Residency Selective - A course of clinical and/non clinical study that students rank from a prescribed list provided to them by UGME.


3. POLICY ST ATEMENTS

3.1 A student who fails the Clerkship Program for the first time be it because of failure of clinical assessments, examinations, or remediation, immediately ceases in the program, and will be required to repeat the Clerkship Program.

3.2 The repeat Clerkship will commence as soon as is logistically feasible in the schedule.

3.3 The repeat Clerkship will consist of the following:

i. Six (6) week rotations in each of Internal Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, Psychiatry, and Obstetrics/ Gynecology.

ii. If the failure occurred prior to the completion of the Medicine Selective, Musculoskeletal Rotation, Emergency Medicine Rotation, Anesthesia Rotation, Population Health Course, Professionalism Course, TTR Selectives, or Evidence-Based Medicine Practice Course, then these will be required components of the repeat of clerkship.

iii. Fourteen (14) weeks of Electives; this requirement may be reduced by the number of Electives weeks previously successfully completed.

iv. The ACLS Course (0.5 weeks) and the LMCC Refresher Course (4.5 weeks), if not already completed.

3.4 The student will be granted three (3) weeks for CARMs interviews, two (2) weeks in August and two (2) weeks in December for vacation if the repeat clerkship coincides with those dates.

3.5 The student must satisfactorily meet all clinical assessments and examinations regardless of whether they had been passed previously. This includes the CCE and Remedial Rotations (as appropriate).

3.6 The terms of the Repeat Clerkship for a particular student will be submitted to the Progress Committee for review and final approval.

3.7 The terms for failure of the Repeat Clerkship are the same as listed in Policy statement

3.7 of the Promotion and Failure Policy.

3.8 A student who fails the Repeat Clerkship is required to withdraw from the Max Rady College of Medicine Program.

3.9 This policy will be reviewed every five years following the approval date.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT

4.1. The student will meet with the Associate Dean, and the Associate Dean Student Affairs, UGME, to discuss reasons for failure prior to beginning Repeat Clerkship.

4.2. Upon receipt of notification of failure of clerkship, the student will liaise with the Administrator, Clerkship regarding scheduling of the Repeat Clerkship.

RESPONSIBILTY OF THE CHAIR OF CURRICULUM STUDENT EVALUATION COMMITTEE

4.3. The Chair of CSEC will bring all information pertaining to the conduct of assessment within

Clerkship to Progress Committee for discussion and approval when necessary.

RESPONSIBILTY OF THE CHAIR OF PROGRESS COMMITTEE

4.4. The Chair of the Progress Committee will present the information to the Progress Committee, in order to determine whether a student has passed or failed the Clerkship program based on the cumulative performance of the student on all evaluation criteria.

RESPONSIBILTY OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN, STUDENT AFFAIRS

4.5. Meet with the student and Associate Dean, UGME to discuss reasons for failure of Clerkship and to plan for Repeat Clerkship. RESPONSIBILTY OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME

4.6. Meet with the student and Associate Dean, Student Affairs to discuss reasons for failure of Clerkship and to plan for Repeat Clerkship.

4.7. Compose letter to student advising terms of Repeat Clerkship.

RESPONSIBILTY OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, CLERKSHIP

4.8. Liaise with departments to determine the schedule for the students Repeat Clerkship.

4.9. Communicate the new schedule to the student.

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, CLERKSHIP EVALUATIONS

4.10. The Administrator, Evaluations Clerkship will track student performance on evaluation criteria integral to the Clerkship Program. Tracking of longitudinal assessment data will be reported to the CSEC.

4.11. Inform Administrator, Enrollment of student progress on Repeat Clerkship. RESPONSIBILITY OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, ENROLLMENT

4.12. Include students who pass the Repeat Clerkship program on the spring or fall graduand listing, depending of the time of the year that they successfully completed all requirements for the clerkship program and filed for graduation.


5. REFERENCES

5.1. UGME Policy and Procedures – Promotion and Failure Policy


6. POLICY CONTACT

Program Administrator, Clerkship Evaluations Administrator, Clerkship Associate Dean, UGME

Video recording of lectures

Policy Name:

Video Recording of Lectures

Application/ Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students, UGME Faculty and Leadership

Approved (Date):

September 2018

Review Date:

September 2023

Revised (Date):

September 2018

Approved By:

UGME Management Committee [April 23, 2019]

1. PURPOSE

To provide guidance and expectations for the recording, storage, transmission, and deletion of lectures within the Curriculum Management System.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Recording - Any audio or visual recording of a lecture or other teaching session using any type of audio or visual recording device.

2.2 Course Materials - Outlines, slides, PowerPoint’s, readings, or other content made available to students by the instructor through the Curriculum Management System /UM Learn.

2.3 Copyright - The rights described in the Copyright Act (Canada), as amended from time to time.

2.4 Intellectual Property – Works or other intellectual property.

2.5 Lecture - Includes address, speech and supporting materials including images, audio and video recordings. Lectures are referred to as Whole Group Sessions” in the curriculum management system.

2.6 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME program.

2.7 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 The University recognizes that students desire access to recorded lectures to support, and where possible augment, their learning. Although there are good academic reasons to record lectures, it is imperative that the protection of the intellectual and privacy rights of staff and students are also maintained. A careful balance of the relevant legislation concerning copyright and data protection including the principles outlined in the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) and the Public Health Information Act (PHIA) is therefore required.

  • Lectures and any information contained in recordings are protected under copyright laws and will not be copied, displayed, broadcast or published without the consent of the instructor and proper attribution.
  • Recording of lectures or class presentations is solely authorized for the purposes of individual or group study with other students enrolled in the same class. Permission to allow the recording of a lecture is not considered a transfer of any copyrights in the recording. Recordings may not be reproduced or uploaded to publicly accessible web environments. Any recordings made are for personal academic use only. Public distribution of such materials constitutes copyright infringement which will be considered as a violation of federal and provincial laws, and University policy. Students who are found to be contravening this requirement will be deemed to have committed an offence under the Max Rady College of Medicine Charter on Professionalism. Violation of this policy may subject a student to disciplinary action.
  • Students are not permitted to make any unauthorized recordings of lectures or teaching sessions.

3.2 Recordings are deemed as a vital resource for medical students as it allows for efficient use of time and provides an opportunity to go over difficult topics at one’s own pace. To increase student knowledge, enhance learning, and to sustain outstanding educational programs, recording of most lectures during Pre-Clerkship will be conducted.

3.3 Recordings are intended for the exclusive use of students enrolled at the time of the recording along with the faculty and administrative staff involved in the delivery and administration of the curriculum at the time of recording. Individuals, other than the intended users, must receive permission from the instructor in writing in order to access a recording.

3.4 Registration as a student and attendance at or participation in classes and other faculty and university activities constitutes an agreement by the student to the university's use and distribution of the student's image or voice in photographs, video or audio capture, or electronic reproductions of such classes and other campus and university activities.

3.5 The recording of lectures is entirely at the discretion of the individual instructor. A lecture is considered the intellectual property of the instructor, and copyright guidelines and regulations are considered to apply to recordings.

3.6 Absent an instructor’s express revocation of permission, in writing, the Max Rady College of Medicine assumes that faculty members agree to the policy that their lectures may be recorded without additional authorization. Faculty members further agree that a prior recording of a lecture may, with approval from the instructor and relevant course leader, be used in instances where an instructor is unable to attend a scheduled lecture due to unforeseen circumstances or illness.

3.7 The recording of tutorials, practical and laboratory classes and particularly sessions where other students are presenting or discussing topics is not permitted.

3.8 Recorded lectures will be made available via the Curriculum Management System three (3) hours after the lectures are delivered. Lectures will not be livestreamed.

3.9 Instructors will have one week after the lecture video is posted to ask that portions of the lecture be edited and/or removed.

3.10 The recordings may only be accessed through the secure university-controlled Curriculum Management System site. The Max Rady College of Medicine will take reasonable measures to prevent the inappropriate use of such recordings by individuals with access to the web site on which the recorded lectures are posted. Incidents of contravention of this policy will be communicated to the faculty and individuals affected as soon as they are identified.

3.11 All users of the recordings (students, faculty and administration) must agree to the terms and conditions outlined within this policy prior to accessing the Curriculum Management System.

3.12 Recorded lectures will be stored on the Curriculum Management System for a period not exceeding two (2) years. During this time, recordings will be accessible to the students enrolled in the course at the time of the recording along with the faculty charged with delivering the lectures and administering the course at the time of recording.

3.13 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.1 If any student in a class where such photographing or recording is to take place does not wish to have his or her image or voice so used, the student should raise the matter in advance with the instructor and appropriate Pre-Clerkship or Clerkship administrator such that suitable arrangements can be made to accommodate.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FACULTY

4.2 Instructors who do not wish to be audio or video recorded in OPAL must, at least two (2) weeks prior to their lecture, complete and submit the Max Rady College of Medicine “Denial of Authorization to Record and Post Lecture(s)” form (Appendix 1) to the Program Administrator, Pre-Clerkship.

4.3 Instructors who do not wish to be audio or video recorded in Entrada must personally update video recording permissions within their Curriculum Management System (Entrada) account at least two (2) weeks in advance of their lecture.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PROGRAM ADMINISTRATORS, PRE-CLERKSHIP/CLERKSHIP AND COURSE ADMINISTRATORS, PRE-CLERKSHIP/CLERKSHIP

4.4 Provide instructors with this policy and instructions for opting out of recording prior to the commencement of each course.

4.5 Ensure that each lecture will be recorded during the curriculum unless otherwise directed.

4.6 Upon receipt of completed Max Rady College of Medicine “Denial of Authorization to Record and Post Lecture(s)” form for OPAL (Appendix 1), update the instructor’s OPAL user preferences to remove video recording for the instructor.

4.7 Follow up with instructors if opt out of video recording occurs less than two (2) weeks prior to a lecture.

4.8 Notify relevant student course representatives of known changes to the recording status of lectures at least 24 hours in advance.


5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Associate Dean, UGME with questions respecting this policy.

Ethics, conduct and professionalism

Conscience-based exemptions

Policy Name:

Conscience-Based Exemptions

Application/ Scope:

Learners in the Max Rady College of Medicine

Approved (Date):

June 26, 2019

Review Date:

Two years from the review date (will lapse two years from June 26, 2019)

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

College Executive Council, Max Rady College of Medicine: August 21, 2018

Faculty of Graduate Studies: December 13, 2018

Senate: June 26, 2019

1. PURPOSE 

1.1 To ensure the health and safety of patients through timely and acceptable medical care notwithstanding any Conscience-Based Objections or Conscience-Based Exemptions;

1.2 To accommodate the Conscience-Based Objections of Learners in the Max Rady College of Medicine;

1.3  To ensure Learners meet the Program Objectives of their medical education program;

1.4  To set out a process for approval and administration of Conscience-Based Exemptions.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Learners: registrants in the programs offered by The University of Manitoba’s Max Rady College of Medicine (e.g., undergraduate, postgraduate, and physician assistant programs). 

2.2 Conscience-Based Objection: An objection, by a Learner, to participation in certain health care activities related to their medical education program, based on ethical, religious or core moral beliefs. 

2.3 Conscience-Based Exemption: An approved exemption, for a Learner, based on ethical, religious or core moral beliefs from:

(a) participation in certain health care activities;

(b) a personal offer of specific information about it; and/or

(c) referral of the patient to a physician who will provide the health care activities. 

2.4 Program Objectives: The bona-fide academic requirements and/or essential competency requirements of a medical education program of the Max Rady College of Medicine, including core goals, objectives and competencies required to meet the current standard of care requirements.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 A Conscience-Based Objection shall be accommodated by granting a Conscience-Based Exemption, subject to the provisions of this Policy.

3.2 A Conscience-Based Exemption shall be granted if:

(a) the Conscience-Based Objection is in compliance with the University of Manitoba’s Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy, The Human Rights Code (Manitoba) and the Code of Ethics of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba taking into consideration the College of Physicians and Surgeons policy on Conscience-Based Objections; and

(b) the Learner continues to be able to meet the Program Objectives.

3.3 Any Learner unable to meet the Program Objectives due to a Conscience-Based Objection for which a Conscience-Based Exemption is denied may be required to withdraw from the program or may be dismissed in accordance with applicable promotion and failure requirements. The Learner may appeal to the College Academic Appeals Committee.

3.4 A Learner who is granted a Conscience-Based Exemption must provide timely information to the Learner’s clinical preceptor or supervising physician so as to ensure that all patients continue to have all available information relating to their treatment options and health care needs, notwithstanding the Learner’s Conscience Based Objection.

3.5 A Learner must not promote his or her ethical, religious or core moral beliefs respecting the Conscience-Based Objection when interacting with patients. 

3.6 A Conscience-Based Exemption does not relieve a Learner from his or her professional responsibilities, including:

(a) To meet the Program Objectives including the current standard of timely and acceptable medical care;

(b) To meet the standards of practice, the Code of Ethics, and Practice Directions of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba;

(c) To engage in professional behavior;

(d) To meet the general standards of the medical profession. 

3.7 Notwithstanding a Conscience-Based Exemption, a Learner is responsible to learn and, through standard evaluative practices, demonstrate knowledge of indications, contraindications, benefits and risk pertaining to the procedure or service to which the Learner’s Conscience-Based Objection relates.  

3.8 When a Conscience-Based Exemption prevents a Learner from participation in regular Program learning activities, the Max Rady College of Medicine will make reasonable efforts to provide alternative learning opportunities to the Learner to ensure all Program Objectives are met.


4 PROCEDURE STATEMENTS

4.1 A Learner requesting a Conscience-Based Exemption shall submit the request to their program director, or, if applicable, to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs of the Learner’s program. Other College representatives may also be consulted (e.g., the Associate Dean of the Learner’s program (e.g., UGME; PGME) and/or the College’s Associate Dean of Professionalism.

4.2 If the request for a Conscience-Based Exemption cannot be addressed by the Learner’s program director in consultation with College Associate Deans as applicable, College of Medicine shall establish an ad hoc committee (“Committee”) from its membership to receive and review the unresolved request from the Learner for consideration of a Conscience-Based Exemption.

(a) The Committee shall consist of, at a minimum, a. a Clinician; b. an Individual with training in medical ethics; and c. a Learner.

(b) The Committee shall have the authority to grant or deny a Conscience-Based Exemption based on the Conscience-Based Objection.

(c) The Committee shall advise the Learner’s program director (and Associate Dean as applicable) regarding the granting of a Conscience-Based Exemption.

4.3 If a Conscience-Based Exemption is denied by the Committee, or otherwise, the Learner may appeal to the College Academic Appeals Committee.

4.4 No Learner shall be subject to intimidation, harassment or discrimination based on any Conscience-Based Objection or Conscience-Based Exemption.

4.5 The Max Rady College of Medicine shall inform the applicable Health Authority if a postgraduate Learner has been granted a Conscience-Based Exemption.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 Max Rady College of Medicine Academic Appeals Committee Policy

5.2 The University of Manitoba Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy

5.3 The Human Rights Code (Manitoba)

5.4 College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba Practice Directions

5.5 College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba Code of Ethics

5.6 College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba, Standards of Practice https://cpsm.mb.ca/about-the-college/standards-of-practice-of-medicine


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Associate Dean, Professionalism with questions respecting this policy.

Interactions between the Max Rady College of Medicine and Health-Related Industries

Policy:

Interactions between the Max Rady College of Medicine and Health-Related Industries

Effective Date:

January 1, 2017

Revised Date:

June 19, 2018

Review Date:

Five years from the revised date

Approving Body:

Dean’s Council, Max Rady College of Medicine

1 BACKGROUND

The Max Rady College of Medicine (the "College") of the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences strives to service the healthcare needs of the people of Manitoba and beyond; improving health and patient care through partnerships, leadership and innovation in medical education, research, clinical practice and community engagement.

This mission requires that College members interact with representatives of the pharmaceutical industry and with representatives of companies in the fields of pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, health information technology, hospital and research equipment, and health care supply and services (“Industry”). Interactions with Industry occur in a variety of contexts, including marketing of new pharmaceutical products, medical devices and/or equipment; on-site training for newly purchased devices; educational support of medical students, residents, graduate students, and practitioners; and in the support of research activities including clinical trials and scholarly publication.

Interactions with Industry are important and can be beneficial to the University. They help ensure timely and broad access to medical advances and new technologies and to clinical trials that are industry-initiated.

Collaboration with industry is also essential to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic products, devices and technology. However, these interactions must avoid any actual, potential or perceived conflicts

of interest that may affect the integrity of the College's education, training and research programs, or the reputation of either the College member or the College itself.

This policy is intended to provide a set of guiding principles that College faculty, staff, students, and trainees will use to ensure that their interactions result in optimal benefit to clinical care, education and research, and t ha t maintain the public trust.

This policy is meant to be consistent and compliant with the University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy and the Gifts and Gratuities Offered to University Employees Policy. Where any portion of this policy conflicts with these University policies, the latter will govern. Where this policy is silent on a matter, University policies shall govern the matter.


2 DEFINITIONS

Industry: Representatives of pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device, health information technology, hospital and research equipment, and health care supply and service companies, that are doing or seeking to do business with Persons affiliated with the Max Rady College of Medicine. This applies also to representatives of companies acting on behalf of the above. This definition does not include commercial entities in other sectors, such as financial services, nor does it include private medical corporations or charitable foundations.

Person: A Person is defined as individuals included in at least one of the following categories:

(A) An individual who falls into one of the categories defined in the University's Procedure entitled "Employee Organizations and Employment Groups," as an "employee" of the Max Rady College of Medicine, including:

  • Academic and Support Staff Excluded from Bargaining Units as Members of the Board;
  • Executive Staff;
  • Senior Administrative Academic Staff;
  • Administrative Academic Staff;
  • GFT Staff;
  • Research Academic Staff;
  • Other Academic Staff;
  • Sessional Professional Academic Staff;
  • Excluded Management, Administrative and Professional Staff;

(B) An individual with an academic appointment in the College, commonly called a faculty member, including those with nil-salaried and emeriti appointments.

(C) A post-doctoral fellow or clinical postgraduate trainee, a graduate or undergraduate student, a visiting student, or a visiting scientist;

(D) Any other individual, such as an independent contractor, involved in any activity under the auspices of the University.

Related Party: Any individual with whom a Person shares a financial interest or personal interest, either directly or indirectly. This includes a Person's immediate family, household members or dependents.

Conflict of Interest (COI): A situation in which the private interests (financial or personal) of a Person or Related Party compromise, or have the appearance of compromising, or have the potential to compromise a Person's independence and objectivity of judgment in the performance of his or her obligations to the University. This includes teaching, research and service activities, including clinical care.

Gifts: Items of any value that are given

  • By a business or individual that does, or seeks to do, business with the Max Rady College of Medicine or Persons affiliated with  it
  • To a Person or Related Party and for which the recipient neither paid nor provided services.

This includes, but is not limited to, items such as food, drink, pens, textbooks, electronic media, gift certificates, tickets to sports or cultural events, devices, products or services, travel, hotel accommodations, entertainment, research equipment or funding, and payments for attending a meeting.

3.0 Interactions with Industry

3.1 Preamble

Interactions with Industry are important and can be beneficial to the College. This policy is not intended to inhibit such interactions, but to ensure transparency in these relationships, the absence of undue influence, and to ensure that real or potential conflicts of interest are managed in the best interests of the College and its members.

The College benefits from financial and in-kind support provided by Industry in a variety of forms. Such support must always be governed by a written agreement with the University that stipulates the intended use of the support, and which is transparent to both parties and, when required, to the public. These funds or donated products must be provided to the College, to an individual Department, or to an account held by a Regional Health Authority or Shared Health, and not be held by an individual Person. Departments or Units within the College must ensure that these monies are held separately from other funds to ensure compliance with the standards that follow.

Faculty members must ensure that all industry-derived funding intended for individuals or groups is administered through project-specific accounts at the University of Manitoba or at an affiliated institute, Centre, or hospital. The Max Rady College of Medicine requires that all affiliated institutes, Centres and hospitals must provide statements that disclose all expenditures, transfers and transactions from these accounts to the Department Head of the principal investigator on a regular basis, as determined by the Department.

Persons affiliated with the College also participate in a variety of external professional organizations and societies. Because the status that accompanies affiliation with the College is an inseparable element of such involvement, Persons are held to these same standards in those activities.

3.2 Gifts

Persons shall not accept Gifts (as defined in Section 2.0) from representatives of Industry regardless of their nature or value. This includes gifts of food and drink.

3.3 Food, Drink and Social Events

3.3.1 In the Context of Continuing Professional Development

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) programs are those educational events, activities and conferences designed primarily to address the learning needs of practicing physicians and other health providers. While the main concern of this policy are those events offered in Manitoba in which Persons act as members of scientific planning committees, speakers, moderators or attendees, Persons are expected to behave in a manner consistent with the principles of this policy when attending programs outside of Manitoba.

Persons are permitted to participate in accredited or unaccredited CPD programs that receive financial support from Industry. Such programs may be held on- or off-campus, but must not be held in a restaurant or lounge, including those located in private clubs.

Accredited CPD Programs Receiving Industry Support

  •  A registration fee must be charged to practicing physicians attending a CPD event accredited by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, or by accrediting bodies in other countries, which receives support from Industry in the form of sponsorship or exhibitor fees. A minimum fee will be set from time to time by the College. Support from Industry is helpful to defray the costs of these events and reduce the cost of registration, but a fee is required in order to avoid a perceived or real influence on educational content and to cover hospitality costs.

Unaccredited Learning Activities Receiving Industry Support

  • Persons may participate in learning activities, programs and conferences that are unaccredited, but must pay the full cost of any food and drink provided. Organizers are expected to offer registration systems that facilitate such payment by attendees.
  • It is expected that speakers and moderators would receive their food and drink as part of the written agreement governing their compensation for involvement in the event.

3.3.2 In the Context of Regularly Scheduled Series (i.e. Journal Clubs)

Food and drink provided at regularly scheduled series (Grand and Section Rounds, Quality Assurance Rounds, Journal Clubs, etc) must not be purchased with funds provided directly or indirectly by Industry. These events are viewed as part of the academic mission of the University and commonly are key learning events for postgraduate, graduate and undergraduate learners.

3.3.3 In the Context of Visiting Professors

In Visiting Professor events, experts from outside Manitoba share their insights and knowledge in the course of Rounds, workshops and other educational events. These are organized under the auspices of a Department or Section or Program in the College. The control of content, planning and budget rests with that Unit. Funds may be received from Industry in support of Visiting Professor events that are governed by a written agreement as stipulated in 3.1. As part of the hospitality extended to visiting professors, a social event in honour of the visitor may be paid for from such funds for three University faculty members and the visiting professor, similar to the guideline for faculty recruitment visits.

3.3.4 Social Events

Persons may not accept free admission to receptions, dinners, sporting or cultural events from Industry. This applies both to stand-alone hospitality events and to those associated with a conference or educational program. Attendance is permitted at dinners and social events associated with a conference or other education event when admission is restricted to persons purchasing tickets or paying registration fees for the conference or event.

Social events at educational programs supported by Industry must not compete with nor take precedence over the educational elements. In general, such arrangements should be in keeping with those that would normally be made without such sponsorship.

3.3.5 In the Context of Procurement Contracts

Persons may accept food, drink, and travel related expenses provided in the context of contracts with Industry for medical devices, equipment and other technologies. Such benefits must be stipulated in the contract and be provided in the context of educational and programs designed to ensure that Persons acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to safely and effectively use such devices or equipment.

3.4 Speaking, Moderating and Consulting Relationships

When Persons are engaged by Industry for consulting or speaking services, including service on advisory boards, a contract must be provided that includes specific tasks and deliverables and identifies payments commensurate with the tasks assigned. These agreements must link deliverables and payments to specific scheduled or planned events or projects to be completed within a specified term.

Contracts between Persons or Units of the College and Industry must be reviewed in a timely fashion by the Department Head or, in a matter affecting the Department Head, by the Dean. The Department Head may require Persons to request changes to the terms of such contracts to bring them into compliance with University and/or Max Rady College of Medicine policies before approving them.

The Department Head may decline approval of a Person’s request for Industry engagement if the proposed conditions including duties and time commitments are deemed likely to interfere with the Person’s duties and responsibilities to the Department and/or the College.

When Persons are engaged in the commercialization of new technologies through partnership or ownership, more latitude may be allowed, in discussion with the Department Head, to facilitate the Person's role in ensuring the success of the venture.

While receiving compensation is acceptable for providing substantial professional services, Persons may not accept compensation unless the individual has played a substantial role. Individuals shall not accept compensation in exchange for listening to a promotional talk, for attending a continuing education event, or for any other activity in which the attendee has no other role except that of a participant.

3.4.1 Speakers or Moderators

Persons engaged by Industry as speakers or moderators of scientific sessions must comply with the following conditions:

  • They must have recognized expertise in the topic area.
  • They must prepare the content of their talks themselves.
  • They must provide a fair and balanced discussion of the current evidence and treatment options.
  • They or the sponsor must disclose the fact of financial support to the participants.

3.4.2 Consultants

Persons engaged by Industry as consultants, including membership on advisory boards, must have recognized expertise related to the services being purchased. These services may include scientific, medical, technical or methodological advice or the preparation of educational programs. They must comply with the following conditions:

  • Purchased services cannot include deliberations or activities directly related to the marketing of products.
  • Persons asked by government, Shared Health regional health authorities, hospitals or the Max Rady College of Medicine to provide advice or to participate in deliberations relevant to the selection, evaluation and or purchase of drugs or devices must disclose all Industry compensation within the previous two years, or other time period stipulated by the purchasing organization.
  • Compensation must be consistent with schedules provided in Appendix A.

3.5 Drug, Instrument and Device Samples and Patient Educational Materials

Persons should utilize clinical evaluation packages (drug samples), instrument and device samples and patient educational materials only within the policies and procedures established by Shared Health, the relevant healthcare facility or regional health authority. They are expected to ensure that the distribution and clinical use of these samples and materials is consistent with established ‘best practices’ and should utilize samples only when appropriate and within the standards of care in Manitoba. Written agreements are generally not needed to govern these samples and materials.

3.6 Access by Industry Representatives

Industry representatives are welcome to meet with Persons affiliated with the College in all non-patient care areas, usually on an appointment basis. All interactions between students or trainees and Industry representatives must be mentored and monitored by a faculty member.

There are circumstances in which it is helpful to have Industry representatives present in a clinical care or educational setting, such as an operating suite and a simulation facility, respectively. This access will be governed by relevant site policies and procedures, and should ensure that such interaction is focused on education and training for staff and trainees, and not include promotional activity.

3.7 Support for Undergraduate, Graduate and Postgraduate Educational Programs and Retreats

Support may be accepted from Industry or related entities for resident or student academic days, retreats, meetings or similar events. However, such support can only be used for educational aspects of the event (speaker fees, printing, learning materials, audiovisual costs etc) and not for food, drink, lodging, social events or other hospitality aspects. Student interactions with Industry representatives must be mentored and monitored by a faculty member.

Support by Industry that is provided for undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate educational programs in the form of funding or a donated product must be free of any actual or perceived Conflict of Interest. It must be governed by a written agreement that stipulates the intended use of the support. This also applies to support received from educational companies or other entities that act as intermediaries for Industry.

Such written agreements must receive prior approval by the Department Head or appropriate Associate Dean, or in the case of agreements concluded by a Department Head or an Associate Dean, by the Dean. The Department Head or Associate Dean may require Persons to request changes to the terms of such agreements to bring them into compliance with University and/or Max Rady College of Medicine policies.

3.8 Support for Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

Industry support for CPD programs must be free of any actual or perceived conflict of interest and must be provided to the Max Rady College of Medicine, to one of its Education Programs, or to an individual Department, and not to an individual Person. Such support must conform to the CPD Commercial Support Policy which provides a fuller description, and is also addressed in Section 3.3.1 of this policy.

Grants to fund CPD programs must be governed by written agreements with the University that stipulate the intended use of the support and that are completed prior to the event occurring. Such agreements should be in a format acceptable to the University. Funds that are provided by educational groups or other entities that act as intermediaries for Industry such as medical education companies must be managed in the same way. Financial support specifically designated for hospitality is not permitted.

Every accredited CPD program must have a scientific planning committee. It may consider data or advice from all sources, but must ensure that it has exclusive control of all decision-making related to the activity, including:

  • identification of educational needs, topics and learning objectives
  • selection of educational methods
  • selection and recruitment of speakers, facilitators and authors
  • gathering and managing Conflict of Interest declarations
  • development and delivery of content
  • evaluation of the activity and of the participants' perception of balance and bias
  • accountability for and oversight of all financial aspects of the activity, including payment of honoraria and expenses for speakers and planning committee members (if applicable) and for all food and drink

Industry representatives, or organizations hired by Industry must not participate in the activities of scientific planning committees. Honoraria amounts must comply with the schedule in Appendix A.

Commercial exhibits intended to present Industry products are welcome and must comply with the CPD Policy on Commercial Exhibits. Industry representatives who are sponsoring and/or exhibiting may attend the CPD program, but may not speak during question and answer periods or engage in sales activities in the room where the educational activity takes place.

3.9 Scholarships or Other Educational Funds for Students and Trainees

Industry support for students’ and trainees’ participation in education programs and conferences must be free of any actual, potential or perceived Conflict of Interest. All financial support for students and trainees must be specifically for the purposes of education and must comply with the following requirements:

  • The Department, Program or Unit must select the student(s) or trainee(s) for participation;
  • The funds must be provided to the Department, Program or Unit and not directly to the student or trainee, and be governed by a written agreement;
  • The Department, Program, or Unit determines that the education conference or program has educational merit; and
  • There is no implicit or explicit expectation that the participant must provide something in return for participation in the educational program.

3.10 Support for Research

All Persons who participate in the design, conduct, analysis, or reporting of Industry-funded research shall ensure a signed multi-partner agreement is in place which is satisfactory to the researcher, the head of the Department in which the researcher holds his/her primary appointment, the Industry partner, and the institution(s) where the research will be conducted. All research projects must be approved by the Research Ethics Board of the University of Manitoba and comply with policies of the Office of Research Services.

Research receiving such financial support must be carried out independently and objectively for the purposes of the advancement of scientific knowledge or clinical efficacy. Persons shall not enter into agreements that limit their right to publish or disclose results of the study or report adverse events which occur during the course of the study.

Because of the potential to influence judgment, remuneration for serving as participants in research studies must not constitute enticement. Remuneration may cover reasonable time and expenses and must be approved by the relevant research ethics board. Finder’s fees, whereby the sole activity performed by the faculty or staff is to submit the names of potential research subjects, are not acceptable.

Faculty members must ensure that all research contracts and grants funded by Industry are administered as stipulated in Section 3.1.

4.0 Disclosure of Relationships with Industry

Relationships between members of the Max Rady College of Medicine and Industry can be beneficial to the College itself, to the quality of health care provision, and to the impact that College members can make in teaching, research and innovation. However, actual, potential, or perceived conflicts of interest may arise as a consequence of such relationships. In order to encourage transparency and to ensure that such conflicts of interest are managed in the best interests of all, open disclosure of such relationships is an essential first step.

4.1 Disclosure to Department Head, Director or other Supervisor

Consistent with the University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy and the University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Procedures, and with any pertinent collective agreements, faculty and staff of the Max Rady College of Medicine will formally disclose financial and other relationships with Industry in a confidential manner to their Department Head, Director or Supervisor. This disclosure must occur at the time of their first appointment or hiring and thereafter as soon as they become aware of the existence of an emerging actual, potential or perceived Conflict of Interest.

As noted above, written agreements are required when Persons are engaged by Industry for consulting, speaking or research services, and the Department Head is required to approve all such agreements. This affords the Head the ongoing opportunity to be aware of such relationships and ensures the interests of the College and the member are safeguarded.

The confidential disclosure form (Appendix B) includes the following information:

  • INCOME: All compensation received from Industry sources in the preceding two years
  • HOLDINGS: Financial interests or ownership interests held by Persons, their Related Parties or by their partnerships, personal professional corporations or family trusts in businesses operating in areas related to the Person’s practice, research, or other professional activity. Holdings in mutual funds are not reportable in this category.

The Department Head, Director or Supervisor acts as the Initial Reviewer for these disclosures. He or she will identify any potential risks to academic independence, integrity or reputation that may arise from the disclosures, and will work with the Person in a discrete manner to manage any real, potential or perceived conflicts of interest in any of their professional roles in the College.

Each Department Head, Director or Supervisor will report all declarations in a confidential manner to the Dean or designate who will act as the Secondary Reviewer. Details on the expected procedure to be followed regarding Conflict of Interest disclosure can be found in the University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Procedure.

Disclosures by a Department Head, Director or Supervisor will be reviewed by the Dean as the Initial Reviewer. The Provost will act as the Secondary Reviewer. If the Conflict of Interest involves the Dean, the Provost will adjudicate.

4.2 Disclosure to Learners

The presence of relationships with Industry must be disclosed in a general manner to undergraduate, graduate, postgraduate and CPD learners by faculty or staff prior to any educational activity such as lectures, seminars or workshops. This includes all relationships over the previous two years, such as

  • Any direct financial payments including honoraria
  • Membership on advisory boards or speakers bureaus
  • Industry-funded grants or clinical trials
  • Patents on a drug, product or service
  • All other investments or relationships that could be seen by a reasonable participant as having the potential to influence the content of the educational activity.

Information provided in this manner includes the name of the commercial interest and the nature of the relationship the person has with each commercial interest. Information that an individual has no relevant financial relationship must also be disclosed in advance to the learners.

Faculty or staff with supervisory responsibilities for students, trainees, or staff should ensure that any Conflict of

Interest they might hold does not affect or appear to affect his or her supervisory role.

4.3 Disclosure in the Context of Procurement Decisions

Persons having a direct role in any purchasing or procurement decision by the College, government, Shared Health, regional health authorities, hospitals or other professional associations must, prior to participating in any such decision, disclose in writing to their Department Head, Director or Supervisor and to the Chair of the procurement committee any relationship with Industry that they or a Related Party have had over the previous two years, or other time period stipulated by the purchasing organization.

Such a disclosure would be with regards to companies that may derive an actual, potential, or perceived benefit from the decision. These relationships can include, but are not limited to, equity ownership, compensated positions on advisory boards, a paid consultancy, or other forms of compensated relationship.

4.4 Disclosure to Research Participants

Persons leading research involving human participants must inform them whether the researcher will or will not receive a fee for their participation. If the researcher will be receiving such a fee for this participation, the individuals leading the research must also disclose by whom the fee will be paid. In addition, Persons may not conduct research with human subjects if they or a Related Party have a financial or personal interest in an existing or potential product or a company that could be affected by the outcome of the research.

Exceptions may be permitted only if it is determined through reasonable and independent scrutiny that a Person’s participation is essential for the conduct of the research and an effective mechanism for managing the conflict and protecting the integrity of the research, as well as the integrity, interests, and reputation of the Person and the University has been established.

5.0 Ghostwriting

All Persons addressed in this policy are prohibited from publishing or producing articles, presentations or other forms of media solely under their own name that are written in whole or in part by Industry representatives.

6.0 Education and Curricula regarding Interactions with Industry All Persons within the College shall receive appropriate awareness training regarding this policy and related policies as part of their initial orientation and on a regular, at least annual basis thereafter. The College will develop appropriate education materials in each of its Educational Programs, and each Program will oversee such training and ensure its quality.

7.0 Reporting and Non-Compliance

Persons who become aware of suspected contraventions of this Policy must report such concerns to their Department Head, Director or Supervisor, who shall determine what actions, if any, shall be taken. Suspected contraventions by Department Heads, Directors or Supervisors must be reported to the Dean.

Breaches of this policy may result in any of the following actions (singly or in any combination) that are at the full discretion of the Department Head, Director or Supervisor:

a) Counseling of the Person involved;

b) Written reprimand, entered into the Person’s employment, faculty or student record;

c) Banning the Person from any further outside engagements for a period of time;

d) Requiring that the Person return any monies received from the improper relationship with a third party in contravention of this policy;

e) Requiring the Person to complete additional training on conflict of interest;

f) Removing the Person from supervision of trainees or students;

g) Termination for cause.

The action taken will depend upon the seriousness of the breach, whether the breach is a first or repeat occurrence and whether the Person knowingly breached the policy or attempted to conceal the breach. Any disciplinary action taken hereunder shall follow the established procedures of the University of Manitoba.

All disciplinary actions described in 7.0 d,e,f and g above must be reported in a timely fashion to the Dean.

Violations of this policy and related policies and procedures by Industry representatives will be managed by the Department Head through progressive warnings and restrictions on access. Such violations and warnings will also be reported to Shared Health, the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority and/or other affected regional health authority.

8.0 Review of Policy

This policy will be reviewed every five years.

9.0 Questions

Questions about this policy should be directed to the Dean, Max Rady College of Medicine.

Relevant University of Manitoba policies:

  • University of Manitoba Conflict of Interest Policy, June 16, 2009
  • Division of CPD CME/CPD Honoraria Policy
  • Division of CPD Commercial Support Policy
  • Gifts and Gratuities Offered to University Employees Policy Guidelines on Responsibilities of Research Ethics
  • Nepotism Policy
  • Research Agreement Policy
  • Responsibilities of Academic Staff with Regards to Students Policy
  • CPD Policy on Commercial Exhibits

Relevant Regional Health Authority policies:

  • Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA) Conflict of Interest Policy March 2011
  • Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA) Industry Relationships Policy September 2010

Related documents:

National Standard for Support of Accredited CPD Activities (CFPC, RCPSC, CMQ) 2016 

University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine “Relationships with Industry and the Educational Environment in

Undergraduate and Postgraduate Medical Education." 2013

Exemplary Policies: Managing Interactions between Physicians and Industry at Academic Medical Centers. October 2013. IMAP

Innovative Medicines Canada (Formerly Rx&D)

Western University “Policy and Guidelines for interactions between Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry and […] Industry. October 2011

Association of American Medical Colleges. “Industry Funding of Medical Education: Report of an AAMC Task Force” (2008)

Canadian Medical Association. “Guidelines for Physicians in Interactions with Industry” (2007) 

St. Boniface General Hospital. “Relationship with Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Industry Policy” (2006) Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba. “Policy Governing Relationships Between the

Pharmaceutical Industry and Physicians” (2005)

College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba. Guideline 106: Conflict of Interest: Relationship with the pharmaceutical industry 2002


Appendix A: Guidelines for compensation for services provided to Industry

1. Honoraria and expense reimbursement for CME/CPD activities supported by Industry

For speaking engagements that require overnight travel, the provided honoraria shall not exceed $3,000 per day plus reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses documented with receipts.

For speaking engagements that do not require overnight travel, the provided honoraria shall not exceed $1,500 per day plus reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses documented with receipts.

For the development of enduring materials, the provided honoraria shall not exceed $1,500 per day plus reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses documented with receipts.

For the review of enduring materials, the provided honoraria shall not exceed $1,000 per day plus reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses documented with receipts.

2. Compensation for acting as a consultant to Industry

Compensation for consulting work shall not exceed $3,000 per day plus reimbursement of reasonable out-of- pocket expenses documented with receipts.

3. Compensation for work related to Industry-sponsored research

Compensation to an investigator for administrative activities required to initiate a research study (including budgeting, ethics submission, etc.) shall not exceed $1,500 in total.

Compensation for attendance at an investigators’ meeting shall not exceed $1,500 per day. If the meeting is held face to face this should include reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses documented with receipts.

Payments to an investigator for study-related procedures, examinations, follow-up visits required by protocol may not exceed the Manitoba Health tariff for these services and may not be double-billed.

Payments to an investigator for research-related services required for the conduct of a study not covered by Manitoba Health tariffs (administrative work, letters, reports, etc.) may not exceed $750 per patient enrolled in the study.


Appendix B

Disclosure Form (PDF)

This form is confidential when completed.

The information collected will be used by Department Chairs, Directors and Supervisors in the Max Rady College of Medicine to record and assess potential Conflicts of Interest of the individual making the disclosure. These reports will be shared confidentially with the Dean, Max Rady College of Medicine. De-identified data may be used for aggregated reports.

Prevention of learner mistreatment

Policy Name:

Prevention of Learner Mistreatment

Application/ Scope:

Faculty, staff and learners of the Max Rady College of Medicine

Approved (Date):

June 5, 2018

Review Date:

5 years from the approval date

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

Dean’s Council, Max Rady College of Medicine

1. PURPOSE

The purpose of this Policy is to:

(a) Define Learner mistreatment in the teacher-learner relationship and to set out clear mechanisms and procedures for Learners to report mistreatment against them, or mistreatment that Learners observe against others, without fear of retaliation.

(b) Ensure compliance with relevant accreditation standards applicable to the educational programs offered by the Max Rady College of Medicine.

(c) Be aligned with existing policies at the University of Manitoba.


2 DEFINITIONS

2.1 The terms in this Definition section are defined for the purposes of this Policy.

“Academic Staff” refers to all individuals whose primary assignment is instruction, research, and/or service/academic administration. This includes employees who hold an academic rank such as professor, associate professor, assistant professor, instructor, lecturer, librarian, or the equivalent of any of those academic ranks.

The category also includes a dean, director, associate dean, assistant dean, chair or head of department, visiting scholars, senior scholars, and those holding unpaid academic appointments, insofar as they perform instructional, research, and/or service/academic administrative duties.

“College” means the Max Rady College of Medicine.

“Faculty Member” means all unionized and non-unionized academic staff of the Max Rady College of Medicine, visiting professors, clinicians with academic appointments and including academic staff whose salary or stipend may be paid, in whole or in part, by another organization.

“Staff Member” means administrative or support staff employed by the College that are not Faculty Members.

“Learner” means an individual registered, enrolled, or classified as a student within or with the University of Manitoba, participating in the Max Rady College of Medicine programs.

“Mistreatment” means an intentional, or unintentional, disrespectful treatment of a Learner, trainee, or colleague that has or may have the effect of creating an intimidating, humiliating, hostile or offensive work or learning environment for Learners in that circumstance. It entails a behaviour that shows disrespect for the dignity of others and can take the form of physical or psychological punishment, harassment or discrimination.

Examples of mistreatment include, but are not limited to:

  • Actions or criticism conducted in public that can be interpreted as embarrassing or humiliating.
  • Verbally abusing, belittling, ridiculing or yelling at a student or trainee in public or private.
  • Speaking to a Learner in a sarcastic or insulting manner.
  • Subjecting the Learner to racially or ethnically offensive remarks or names.
  • Requiring a Learner to perform personal services (i.e. babysitting, shopping).
  • Pressuring Learners to exceed established restrictions on work or duty hours.
  • Not providing Learners with clear work expectations yet holding them responsible for the expectations.
  • Directing Learners to perform an unreasonable number of routine hospital procedures where performing those activities interferes with a student’s attendance at educational activities, (e.g. rounds, classes).
  • Disparaging the Learner’s choice of residency, profession, or other career aspirations.
  • Committing an act of physical abuse or violence of any kind (e.g. throwing objects, aggressive violation of personal space).
  • Intentional physical contact such as pushing, shoving, slapping, hitting, tripping.
  • Subjecting the Learner to threatening gestures.
  • Subjecting the Learner to unwanted sexual advances.
  • Asking the Learner to exchange sexual favours for grades or other rewards. 
  • Making unwelcome sexual comments, jokes, innuendos, or taunting remarks about one’s body, attire, age, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, marital status, or any other Protected Characteristic.
  • Excluding a Learner from reasonable learning opportunities.
  • Using grades as punishment rather than as an objective evaluation of performance.
  • Assigning duties as punishment rather than education.
  • Threatening to fail, give lower grades, or give a poor evaluation for anything other than documented performance issues.
  • Denying opportunities for training based on gender, or any other Protected Characteristic.
  • Intentionally neglecting or excluding the Learner from communications.
  • Intentionally singling out a Learner for arbitrary treatment that could be perceived as punitive.

"Discrimination" means an intentional or unintentional act or omission resulting in:

(a) Differential treatment of:

  • An individual on the basis of the individual’s actual or presumed membership in or association with some class or group of persons, rather than on the basis of personal merit;
  • An individual or group on the basis of any Protected Characteristic;
  • An individual or group on the basis of the individual or group’s actual or presumed association with another individual or group whose identity or membership is determined by any Protected Characteristic;

(b) Failure to make Reasonable Accommodation for the special needs of an individual or group, if those needs are based upon a Protected Characteristic.

"Harassment" refers to:

(a) "Personal Harassment", which means offensive behaviour directed towards another person and not connected to a Protected Characteristic, including but not limited to:

  • A severe single incident or a series of incidents of objectionable and unwelcome conduct or comments, directed toward a specific person or group, which does not serve a reasonable work or academic purpose, and objectively would have the effect of creating an intimidating, humiliating, hostile or offensive work or learning environment;
  • Verbal or written abuse, threats or intimidation that objectively are humiliating or demeaning;
  • Objectionable and unwelcome conduct or comments that objectively impact the mental or physical health of another person;

(b) "Human Rights Based Harassment", which means offensive behaviour connected to a Protected Characteristic, including but not limited to:

  •  A severe single incident or a series of incidents of objectionable and unwelcome conduct or comments, directed toward a specific person or group, which objectively would have the effect of creating an intimidating, humiliating, hostile or offensive work or learning environment;
  • Verbal or written abuse, threats or intimidation that objectively are humiliating or demeaning;
  • Objectionable and unwelcome conduct or comments that objectively impact the mental or physical health of another person;
  • Sexual Harassment.

(c) "Sexual Harassment”, which is a form of Human Rights Based Harassment and refers to a course of objectionable and unwelcome conduct or comments undertaken or made on the basis of the Protected Characteristics including but not limited to:

  • Unwanted sexual attention, including persistent invitations for dates, by a person who knows or ought reasonably to know that such attention is unwanted or unwelcome;
  • Gender-based abusive or unwelcome conduct or comments that would objectively have the effect of creating an intimidating, humiliating, hostile or offensive work or learning environment;
  • Sexist jokes or remarks, including comments regarding a person’s appearance or clothing;
  • Leering, ogling, or other sexually oriented gestures;
  • Questions about a person’s sexual history, sexuality, sexual orientation, or sexual identity by a person who knows or ought reasonably to know that the questions are unwanted or unwelcome;
  • Offensive physical contact by a person who knows or ought reasonably to know that the contact is unwanted or unwelcome;
  • A single sexual solicitation or advance or a series of solicitations or advances made by a person who is in a position to confer any benefit on or deny any benefit to the recipient, and who knows or ought reasonably to know that the solicitation or advance was unwanted or unwelcome; or
  • A Reprisal for rejecting a sexual solicitation or advance.

"Protected Characteristic" means those characteristics listed in The Human Rights Code (Manitoba) (effective as of May 18, 2018) as being protected, including:

(a) Ancestry, including colour and perceived race; (b) Nationality or national origin;

(c) Ethnic background or origin;

(d) Religion or creed, or religious belief, religious association or religious activity; (e) Age;

(f) Sex, including sex-determined characteristics or circumstances, such as pregnancy, the possibility of pregnancy, or circumstances related to pregnancy;

(g) Gender identity;

(h) Sexual orientation;

(i) Marital or family status; (j) Source of income;

(k) Political belief, political association or political activity;

(l) Physical or mental disability or related characteristics or circumstances, including reliance on a service animal, a wheelchair, or any other remedial appliance or device;

(m) Social disadvantage.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 The Max Rady College of Medicine is committed to assuring safe, respectful and supportive working and learning environments in which all of its members are enabled and encouraged to excel. This is an environment free of discrimination, harassment and mistreatment and one in which feedback regarding performance can be shared openly without concern for ridicule or reprisal. All members of our diverse community share responsibility for maintaining a positive learning environment and for taking appropriate steps to seek advice and/or address Learner mistreatment when it occurs.

3.2 Remedial measures resulting from a Learner mistreatment concern will depend on circumstances, on the seriousness of the behaviour, on any mitigating factors and on applicable University policy, bylaw, collective agreement or academic regulation. The following list provides examples of remedial measures and is not meant to be exhaustive nor necessarily represents a progression of measures:

(a) A letter of apology;

(b) Attendance at educational session(s) on professionalism;

(c) Attendance at coaching session(s) to improve communication or conflict resolution skills;

(d) Prohibited or restricted access to the learning environment and/or to Learners;

(e) Academic consequences such as remediation, probation, notation on the performance record, dismissal/expulsion from the College, termination of academic appointment.

Communication and Education

3.3 This policy will be included in Learner handbooks and posted in the College website; the topic will be addressed at orientations at matriculation and at the beginning of third year.

3.4 Mandatory educational sessions for Faculty and Leadership will be held at least once a year under the direction of the University of Manitoba Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management in collaboration with the University of Manitoba Student Advocacy Office.

3.5 A letter will be sent each year from the Dean to all Faculty (including voluntary Faculty) reminding them of the College statement on supporting a Learner mistreatment-free environment, of the Learner mistreatment prevention policy and on resources available for resolution.

3.6 A letter will be sent each year from the Dean to the Chief Executive Officer at affiliated institutions to explain the policy and to request its distribution to all staff interacting with Learners from the Max Rady College of Medicine.


4. PROCEDURES

4.1 When assessing behaviour that might represent mistreatment, Learners are expected to consider the conditions, circumstances, and environment surrounding such behaviour.

Informal Procedure to Report Mistreatment

4.2 Learners can report concerns about mistreatment in their learning environment to any of their teachers, preceptors, course/rotation directors, administrative staff members, the Associate Dean, UGME, the Associate Dean, PGME, the Associate Deans of Student Affairs, UGME, the Associate Dean of Student Affairs, PGME, the Associate Dean of Professionalism, the University Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management or the University Student Advocacy office according to personal comfort and preference. Learners should recognize that not all the College teachers, leaders, or staff members are equally well placed to provide assistance or other support in response to a Learner mistreatment behavior, nor are they all equally capable of acting on the report to effectively address the particular incident or the system as a whole.

4.3 Learners may also make reports via the student representatives. Student representatives can discuss reports of Learner mistreatment with the relevant course/rotation director, curriculum committee, the Associate Dean, UGME, the Associate Dean, PGME, the Associate Dean of Student Affairs, UGME, the Associate Deans of Student Affairs, PGME, or the Associate Dean of Professionalism while maintaining the anonymity of the complainant.

4.4 Individuals to whom an informal report is made must make the Learner aware of this policy and are encouraged to suggest to Learners to also complete a Mistreatment Report Form to ensure that all appropriate follow-up takes place. Alternatively, the individual receiving an informal report of Learner mistreatment may complete a Learner Mistreatment Report Form anonymously on the reporting Learner’s behalf.

Formal Procedure to Report Mistreatment

4.5 Mistreatment Report Form: Speak Up button.

In order to provide Learners with a convenient, effective, and confidential means to make a report of Learner mistreatment; an electronic Mistreatment Report Form has been created, and is available online.

Although there is an option for anonymous reporting of Learner mistreatment, the College’s response to anonymous reports may be limited when the College cannot follow up with the person making the report. Learners are encouraged to make reports that are not anonymous.

4.6 The Dean has appointed a Learner Mistreatment Advisor to review and manage all mistreatment reports. In making the appointment of the Learner Mistreatment Advisor, the Dean has been guided by considerations of continuity, experience, and sensitivity to concerns of professionalism from Learners, Faculty, and the College community.

4.7 All Mistreatment Report Forms will be reviewed within 10 working days by the Learner Mistreatment Advisor. The Learner Mistreatment Advisor will determine if the reported incident falls within this Policy or if immediate reporting to the Office of Human Rights and Conflict Management is required for incidents that may breach the Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy and the Sexual Assault Policy. In cases where the Learner Mistreatment Advisor determines not to proceed, the Learner Mistreatment Advisor will notify the complainant in writing. In making these determinations, the Learner Mistreatment Advisor may seek advice, as appropriate. If the Learner Mistreatment Advisor finds him or herself to be in a conflict of interest with a complaint, the Advisor will immediately inform the Dean who will appoint another individual to review the incident.

4.8 The Learner Mistreatment Advisor will meet with the appropriate Senior Leadership (e.g.: Associate Dean, UGME; Associate Dean, PGME; Department Head, etc.) to inform about the complaint and to conduct an investigation. The Learner Mistreatment Advisor along with the Senior Leadership will conduct an investigation by interviewing the complainant, informing the respondent about the matter of the complaint, interviewing the respondent, and interviewing any other persons who might have insight into the situation, such as witnesses and individuals in relevant positions. All such individuals will be bound to strict confidentiality regarding all aspects of the case.

4.9 The Learner Mistreatment Advisor and the Senior Leadership will review all of the information gathered in the course of the investigation and within 20 working days of their initial meeting will submit a report to the Dean that includes the summary of the evidence and facts of the case and recommendations for corrective/remedial action.

4.10 The Dean will review the report and make a decision on the corrective/remedial action to take. The Dean may meet with both the complainant and the respondent to discuss the report prior to rendering a decision. The Dean will inform the parties in writing of his or her decision within 20 working days after receiving the report. The Dean will work with the appropriate department head, program director, associate dean, or chief executive officer to ensure that corrective action is taken and that the Dean’s report and corrective action becomes part of the respondent’s performance evaluation.

4.11 Special note regarding post graduate medical Learners.

Residents may report incidents of Learner mistreatment using the formal procedure described in this policy or using a Learner mistreatment tool in a curriculum management system and any mistreatment incident report form as per the College of Medicine Post Graduate Medical Education (CPGME) Resident Safety Policy. In any case and for any report made using either procedure points 4.8, 4.9 and 4.10 will apply.

4.12 The complainant has a right to withdraw the complaint at any stage. However, the Learner Mistreatment Advisor and the Dean may elect to continue the formal investigation and decision process in compliance with obligations to ensure an environment free from Learner mistreatment.

4.13 Appeals.

In cases where either the complainant or the respondent is dissatisfied with the Dean’s decision, that person must submit his or her appeal in writing to the Dean within 10 working days of the report and refer to the applicable University Policy, Procedure or Bylaw or collective agreement.

4.14 Retaliation.

A complainant, respondent, witness, and/or any other person who has sought advice regarding Learner mistreatment, who has brought forward allegations, who has made a report or who has cooperated with an investigation, is entitled to be protected from retaliation. Retaliatory action of any sort during or following the investigation is prohibited and will not be tolerated. Accusations that retaliation has occurred will be subject to investigation and may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination or expulsion.

4.15 False Accusations.

A complainant or witness found to have been dishonest in making allegations with a conscious design to mislead or deceive, or with a malicious or fraudulent intent may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination or expulsion.

4.16 Confidentiality & Record Keeping.

Any communication of information gathered in any case is confidential. The College will not disclose the name of a complainant of respondent or the circumstances related to a complaint except to the extent that disclosure is necessary to effectively implement this policy or to undertake any disciplinary or remedial action arising from a decision made under this policy. Records will be kept pursuant to any applicable relevant University Policy and Procedure.

4.17 Institutional Responsibility.

Aggregate and de-identified data on formal and informal reports of mistreatment of Learners will be shared with Dean’s Council and Department Heads Council in a quarterly basis. The Associate Dean Professionalism along with the Associate Dean, UGME and the Associate Dean, PGME are jointly responsible for actively addressing concerning rates of trends of Learner mistreatment.


5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Associate Dean, Professionalism, Max Rady College of Medicine with questions respecting this policy.


6. REFERENCES

6.1 The University of Manitoba Respectful Work and Learning Environment (RWLE) Policy

6.2 The University of Manitoba Sexual Assault Policy

6.3 The University of Manitoba RWLE and Sexual Assault Procedure 

6.4 The University of Manitoba Student Discipline Bylaw and Procedures 

6.5 The University of Manitoba Violent or Threatening Behaviour Policy and Procedure

6.6 The University of Manitoba Responsibilities of Academic Staff with Regard to Students Policy and Procedure 

6.7 The Human Rights Code, C.C.S.M.c. H175

Supervision of learners

Policy Name:

Supervision of Learners (engaged in Clinical Activities)

Application / Scope:

All learners in the UGME, PGME and MPAS programs in the Max Rady College of Medicine

Approved (Date):

June 19, 2018

Review Date:

5 years from the approval date

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

Dean’s Council, Max Rady College of Medicine

1. PURPOSE

1.1 To clarify the roles and responsibilities of Learners while engaged in clinical activities for educational purposes.

1.2 To ensure Learner participation in clinical activities appropriate to their level of education, training and abilities.

1.3 To clarify the roles and responsibilities of Supervising Physicians/Preceptors to ensure that Learners are provided with appropriate supervision.

1.4 To ensure the safety and proper care of patients in educational settings.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1. AFC Learner – a learner enrolled in an AFC (Diploma) Program.

2.2. Area of Focused Competence (Diploma) Program (AFC) – a highly-focused discipline of specialty medicine that represents supplemental competencies that enhance the practice of specialist physicians. AFC programs are accredited by RCPSC.

2.3. Clinical Setting – the location(s) where a Learner is engaging in clinical activities.

2.4. CFPC – College of Family Physicians of Canada.

2.5. Clinical Supervisor/Preceptor – the physician to whom a Learner reports during a given interval of time, such as an on-call shift. Residents or fellows often serve in the role of Clinical Supervisors, but they do not act as the Most Responsible Provider for patient care.

2.6. Competency-Based Medical Education – an outcomes-based approach to the design, implementation, assessment and evaluation of a medical education program using an organizing framework of competencies.

2.7. Competence Continuum – the series of integrated stages in competency-based medical education curriculum. The four stages/phases which apply to residency training include: 1. Transition to Discipline; 2. Foundation of Discipline; 3. Core of Discipline; 4. Transition to Practice.

2.8. CPGME – the Max Rady College of Medicine Postgraduate Medical Education Office.

2.9. CPSM – College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba.

2.10. Direct Supervision – a process of assessment whereby the assessor must witness the Learner performing the specific activity in order to identify whether specific competencies were demonstrated and performed correctly (e.g. physical examination of a patient).

2.11. Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA) - a “unit of professional practice” that is comprised of measurable tasks and abilities (milestones). Once sufficient competence is achieved, this task is “entrusted to the unsupervised execution by the trainee”.

2.12. Fellow – an individual who has completed sufficient training for specialty qualification in Canada or in a foreign country. The fellowship is intended to permit the Learner to acquire additional experience over and above his/her basic specialty requirement. Often the fellowship provides the Learner the opportunity to acquire specific or more specialized expertise that will not normally be acquired during residency training.

2.13. Formative Assessment – is a process of assessment that provides real-time feedback to trainees and faculty about how well the Resident is progressing in each area being assessed. This information supports the ongoing learning and development for the Residents. Furthermore, it may provide diagnostic information regarding the need for Remediation.

2.14. Faculty Appointment – a formal University of Manitoba academic appointment.

2.15. Graded Responsibility – the provision of safe patient care matched with the individual Learner’s level of advancement and competence, based on formative and summative assessments of the Learner’s clinical experience, judgment, knowledge, and technical skills. Learners carry out activities under close supervision of a designated preceptor, and as they become more proficient, graduate to performing activities independently, with supervision as appropriate.

Competency Based Medical Education (CBME) is part of the learning process the Learners stage within the competence continuum and achievement of EPAs provide a framework for Graded Responsibility and clinical supervision.

2.16. Indirect Supervision - is a process of assessment whereby the assessor utilizes documented information such as that recorded in a patient chart in order to identify whether specific competencies were attained by the Learner (e.g. patient chart review).

2.17. Learner - a Medical Student, Physician Assistant Student, Resident, Fellow and AFC Learner registered within the Max Rady College of Medicine.

2.18. Medical Student - a student registered in the UGME program. The years of training of a Medical

Student are further categorized as:

  • Pre-Clerkship – year 1 or 2 of training of a Medical Student registered in the UGME program;
  • Clerkship – year 3 or 4 of training of a Medical Student registered in the UGME program.

2.19. Moonlighting – the extracurricular practice of medicine for remuneration by a Resident enrolled in a postgraduate medical education program leading to certification with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) or the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC). The Royal College and the College of Family Physicians do not encourage nor prohibit moonlighting and have outlined principles which must be considered.

2.20. MPAS – Master of Physician Assistant Studies at the Max Rady College of Medicine.

2.21. PGME - Postgraduate Medical Education at the Max Rady College of Medicine.

2.22. Physician Assistant Student - a student registered in the MPAS program or a physician assistant student placed pursuant to a University of Manitoba contract.

2.23. Physician Assistant (PA) - holds a certificate of practice and is on the CPSM Physician Assistant Registry. A Physician Assistant working within their approved practice description may supervise a Physician Assistant Student.

2.24. Provider of Record/Most Responsible Provider – the practitioner who has final accountability for the medical care of a patient when the Learner is providing care. One practitioner must always be designated the Most Responsible Provider or Provider of Record for every patient to ensure continuity of care and appropriate monitoring and management of care. Whether a practitioner is on site or not, he/she remains responsible for the care of the patient and would be expected to come in if the need arose.

2.25. Resident – a Learner enrolled in one of the Residency Programs under the authority of the Associate Dean, PGME. The following is a listing of Resident categories within PGME at the Max Rady College of Medicine:

  • A postgraduate learner who has obtained a Doctorate of Medicine (MD) and has an educational or a general license from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba (CPSM)
  • A learner enrolled in the Clinical Health Psychology Program
  • A learner enrolled in one of the non-medical Residency Programs:
    • Clinical Biochemistry
    • Molecular Genetics and Cytogenetics
    • Clinical Microbiology
  • A learner enrolled in one of the College of Dentistry Programs
    • Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
    • Dental Internship
    • Pediatric Dentistry

2.26. RCPSC – Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada

2.27. Supervising Physician/Preceptor – a physician who oversees, and is the Most Responsible Provider for, the clinical activities of one or more Learners, and has the appropriate privileges at the Clinical Setting.

2.28. Summative Assessment - is a process of assessment that is based on multiple sources of feedback on the global performance of the trainee over a specified period of time or over a stage of training

2.29. UGME - Max Rady College of Medicine Undergraduate Medical Education.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

Faculty Appointment

3.1. A Supervising Physician/Preceptor requires a Faculty Appointment in order to educate or supervise Learners engaged in clinical activities.

3.2. Before having any patient contact, all Learners engaging in clinical activities, including elective clinical experiences and Moonlighting activities must have an identified Supervising Physician/Preceptor who is licensed in the province of Manitoba and has the appropriate medical staff privileges in the Clinical Setting(s).

3.3. The final responsibility for any medical acts performed by Learners rests with their Supervising Physician/Preceptor.

3.4. The Supervising Physician/Preceptor must provide appropriate supervision to the Learner, including without limitation:

  • ensuring the Learner, to whom he/she is delegating, has the appropriate skills, knowledge and judgement to perform the delegated act and that an appropriate level of supervision is provided;
  • providing assistance with management of patients under their care when action is requested by a Learner;
  • ensuring ongoing, timely assessment of the Learner to determine their clinical competence and educational requirements;
  • meeting regularly with the Learner to discuss their assessment, management and documentation of patient care and to provide timely formative and summative feedback;
  • reporting to the respective preceptor or Residency Program Director when a Learner exhibits behaviour that would suggest incompetence or incapacity; fails to behave in a professional or ethical manner; or otherwise engages in inappropriate behaviour; and
  • maintaining a professional Supervising Physician-Learner relationship.

3.5. A Learner shall immediately inform the Supervising Physician if the Learner believes an assigned task is beyond his/her level of ability or learning.

Enrolment on the Educational Register

3.6. The following Learners must be enrolled on the Educational Register of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba (CPSM):

  • Medical Students;
  • Physician Assistant Students;
  • Residents who do not yet qualify for registration for a general license from the CPSM.

3.7. A Learner registered on the Educational Register is entitled to practice in an approved program but only under the supervision of the medical staff of that program.

Identification of Learners

3.8. All Learners engaging in clinical activities must wear appropriate identification that clearly designates their level of training in all encounters with patients and Clinical Setting staff. Medical Students and Physician Assistant Students shall wear their University of Manitoba student photo ID badges. Residents shall wear Winnipeg Regional Health Authority HSC photo ID.

Engagement in Clinical Activities

3.9. See Appendix 1 for a summary of approved clinical activities of Learners.

Medical Students

3.10. At the discretion of the Supervising Physician/Preceptor, Medical Students may attend rounds, observe care being delivered, and participate in the hands-on delivery of care including conducting and documenting a history and a physical exam, writing progress notes in patient charts or providing limited assistance in the operating room.

3.11. Medical Students are not permitted to submit prescriptions to a pharmacist.

3.12. Medical Students are not permitted to complete death certificates.

3.13. Pre-Clerkship Medical Students are not permitted to write medical orders of any kind.

3.14. Pre-Clerkship Medical Students are not permitted to complete forms for application to long term care facilities or the home care program.

3.15. Clerkship Medical Students, at the discretion of the Supervising Physician/Preceptor and guided by the principles of Graded Responsibility, may carry out technical procedures on patients under direct or remote supervision of a Supervising Physician/Preceptor, depending on the student's level of competence and individual pace of achievement as determined by the preceptor. These procedures should be restricted to those previously discussed and agreed upon with the Provider of Record/Most Responsible Provider.

3.16. Clerkship Medical Students may write or give orders concerning investigation or treatment of a patient, however, these orders cannot be executed until they have been reviewed and countersigned by a physician.

3.17. Clerkship Medical Students may complete forms for application to a long-term facilities or to the home care program, however these forms must be reviewed and countersigned by a licensed physician.

Physician Assistant Students

3.18. At the discretion of the Supervising Physician, Physician Assistant Students may attend rounds, observe care being delivered, and participate in the hands-on delivery of care including conducting and documenting a history and a physical exam, writing progress notes in patient charts or providing limited assistance in the operating room.

3.19. Physician Assistant Students are not permitted to submit prescriptions to a pharmacist.

3.20. Physician Assistant Students are not permitted to complete death certificates.

3.21. Year I Physician Assistants Students are not permitted to write medical orders of any kind.

3.22. Year I Physician Assistants Students are not permitted to complete forms for application to long term care facilities or the Home Care Program.

3.23. At the discretion of the Supervising Physician, and guided by the principles of Graded Responsibility, Year II Physician Assistant Students may carry out technical procedures on patients under direct or remote supervision of a Supervising Physician, depending on the Physician Assistant’s level of competence and individual pace of achievement as determined by the preceptor. These procedures should be restricted to those previously discussed and agreed upon with the Provider of Record/Most Responsible Provider.

3.23.1. A Physician Assistant may provide educational supervision of Physician Assistant Students at the direction of the Supervising Physician.

3.24. Year II Physician Assistant Students may write or give orders concerning investigation or treatment of a patient, however these orders cannot be executed until they have been reviewed and countersigned by a licensed physician

3.25. Telephone orders of Year II Physician Assistant Students may be noted but may not be executed until they have been reviewed and countersigned by a licensed physician.

3.26. Year II Physician Assistant Students may complete forms for application to a long-term care facility or the home care program, however these forms must be reviewed and countersigned by a licensed physician.

Residents

3.27. At the discretion of the Supervising Physician/Preceptor and based on the degree of entrustment responsibilities, Residents may attend rounds, observe or participate in the hands-on delivery of care including conducting and documenting a history and a physical exam, writing progress notes in patient charts and providing supervised assistance in the operating room.

3.28. At the discretion of the Supervising Physician/Preceptor and guided by the principles of graded responsibility and entrustment, a Resident may carry out technical procedures on patients under direct or remote supervision of a licensed physician, depending on the Resident's level of competence. These procedures should be restricted to those previously discussed and agreed upon with the Provider of Record/Most Responsible Provider.

3.29. Residents may write or give verbal diagnostic and therapeutic orders, which do not require a countersignature by the Supervising Physician before implementation. It is expected, however, that since the Supervising Physician is responsible for all orders written by their Resident, that they should make clear to the individual Resident the types of decisions and orders which require prior approval. The responsibility for the content of the orders lies with the Supervising Physician/Preceptor.

3.30. Residents are permitted to submit prescriptions to a pharmacist.

3.31. Residents are not permitted to complete death certificates.

3.32. Residents may complete forms for application to a long-term care facility or the home care program. These forms do not require counter signature by a licensed physician.

Documentation in the Health Record

3.33. Documentation in the Health Record may be designated to Learners as prescribed by their respective training programs. Learners must indicate their designation after their entry.

3.34. The Clinical Supervisor/Preceptor is responsible for the quality of history and physical, order writing, progress notes and operative notes, ensuring that any documentation designated to a Learner is accurate, succinct and completed on time.

3.35. Medical Students and Physician Assistant Students may record histories, physicals and orders on the chart according to arrangements with the individual supervising attending staff physician. All signatures should be further identified with the words "Medical Student" or “Physician Assistant Student”, as applicable.

3.36. The Supervising Physician/Preceptor, or Resident delegate must review all documentation by

Medical Students and Physician Assistant Students such as:

  • patient's history
  • physical examination
  • diagnosis and progress in hospital in a timely manner

Furthermore, the Supervising Physician/Preceptor must review and appropriately countersign all transcribed orders concerning the investigation or treatment of a patient.

3.37. Residents may dictate reports, document on the chart and write orders according to arrangements with the individual supervising attending staff physician. Counter-signatures are not required. In circumstances where the Resident is no longer available, the Supervising Physician/Preceptor is responsible to complete all documentation and signatures.

Learner Placements Agreements

3.38. The UGME, CPGME and MPAS Programs shall ensure that Learner placement affiliation agreements with Clinical Setting sites are in place.


4. PROCEDURES

N/A


5. REFERENCES

5.1. University of Manitoba Academic Appointments Policy

5.2. Max Rady College of Medicine Conflict of Interest Student Assessment or Advancement Policy

5.3. College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba Categories of Registration

5.4. CPGME Resident Moonlighting Policy

5.5. RCPSC – Terminology in Medical Education


6. POLICY CONTACT

6.1. Associate Dean, Postgraduate Medical Education

6.2. Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education

6.3. Program Director, Master of Physician Assistant Studies Program


Appendix 1: Summary of Clinical Activities of Learners

SUMMARY OF CLINICAL ACTIVITIES OF LEARNERS

APPROVED DUTIES

MEDICAL STUDENT In PRE-CLERKSHIP

MEDICAL STUDENT in CLERKSHIP

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT STUDENTS

RESIDENT

History & physical

Yes, countersigned by supervising MD

Yes, countersigned by supervising MD

Yes, countersigned by supervising MD or PA

Yes

Progress notes in patient chart

Yes; with designation after their entry

Yes; with designation after their entry

Yes; with designation after their entry

Yes; with designation after their entry

Medical orders: written or telephone

No

Yes, countersigned by supervising MD

Year 1 – No; Year 2 – Yes, countersigned by supervising MD or PA

Yes

Submit prescription to Outpatient Pharmacy

No

No

No

Yes - Only postgraduate trainees who have a full licence or have completed 18 months of residency, passed their Medical Council of Canada, MCCQE II exam, and attended the PGME Core Curriculum Prescription Writing Course. Otherwise, prescription must be countersigned by supervising MD

Operative reports

No

No

No

Yes, countersigned by supervising MD

Discharge summary

No

Yes, countersigned by supervising MD

Year 1 – No; Year 2 - Yes, countersigned by supervising MD

Yes

Death certificate

No

No

No

No

Forms for Home Care or long - term care facility

No

Yes, countersigned by supervising MD

Year 1 – No; Year 2 - Yes, countersigned by supervising MD

Yes

 

 

Waiting for instructors

Policy Name:

Waiting for Instructors

Application/ Scope:

Pre-Clerkship Students and Faculty

Approved (Date):

June 2018

Review Date:

June 2023

Revised (Date):

June 2018

Approved By:

UGME Management Committee [June 2018]

1. PURPOSE

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) organizes all teaching sessions and has an expectation that instructors and students arrive for each session at the designated time.


2. DEFINITION

2.1 Pre-Clerkship - Year I and Year II of the UGME program

2.2 Instructor – Lecturer (whole group session) or tutor (small group session)


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 The Max Rady College of Medicine expects all instructors to arrive promptly for their teaching sessions. However, situations may occur that prevent the timely delivery of such sessions.

3.2 It is the students’ responsibility to inform the UGME Office of an instructor absence for a specific session.

3.3 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILIITES OF STUDENTS

4.1 Students must wait 10 minutes for their instructors to arrive.

Waiting for Instructors 2.  

4.2 After 10 minutes a student representative must:

  • Inform the Pre-Clerkship personnel in the UGME Office.
  • In the case that Pre-Clerkship personnel are unavailable, the student must inform the Course/Program Assistant listed in Curriculum Management System as responsible for the session.

4.3 If a tutor is absent for a small group session, in addition to notifying the UGME office, the group is asked to divide themselves evenly among the remaining groups.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PRE-CLERKSHIP COURSE ADMINISTRATOR

4.4 Once informed of an instructor’ absence by the student representative, the Pre-Clerkship

Course Assistant will determine if an instructor is available.

4.5 The Pre-Clerkship Course Administrator must inform the student representative of this availability.

4.6 If an instructor is absent for a lecture, the Pre-Clerkship Course Administrator will coordinate with the instructor/Course Leader to find an alternative method of delivering the content, including, but not limited to, rescheduling the lecture or posting the session video from a previous year (with permission of instructor).

4.7 Notify the Pre-Clerkship Program Administrator of the missing instructor and outcome of above.

RESPONSIBILITY OF INSTRUCTOR

4.8 An instructor is responsible for finding a replacement instructor to take on the original teaching commitment. If a substitute cannot be found for this time period, then the instructor will notify the Course Leader about the changes required and together agree to an internal course change of topic times and dates within the subject. This information must be changed in Curriculum Management System, which may require contact in writing to by the Pre-Clerkship Course Administrator in UGME.


5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Associate Dean, UGME with questions respecting this policy.

Exams

Apply for deferred examination

To apply to defer an exam, complete the Exam Deferral Form.

Deferred examination guidelines

Name:

Deferred Examination Guidelines

Application / Scope:

Year I to Year IV Undergraduate Medical Education Students

Approved (Date):

November 15, 2019

Review Date:

November 2024

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

Progress Committee [November 2019]

1. Appropriate documentation (medical or otherwise) will be required to support all deferrals. No stipulations will be made regarding which Care Providers provide this documentation. Documentation for bereavement will be at the discretion of the Associate Dean Student Affairs and may include obituaries, funeral notice/program, etc.

2. In the case of all Pre-Clerkship modular courses:

  • Any deferral of a midterm will result in a final examination that will be worth

100%, less the value of any assignments in that course, which will still be required. The final exam will occur at the originally scheduled time.

  • Any deferred final examination will take place in the summer, except for CV1 and RS1, which will take place at Christmas. It will be worth the same weight as originally stated; in other words, the midterm and any assignments will count for their original weights. The content of these deferred exams will be the same as the supplemental exams.

3. In the case of Pre-Clerkship longitudinal courses:

Those with only two exams (PH1, PH2, PF1) will be treated as above.

Those with more than two exams (CR1, CR2, PF2, CS1, CS2) –

  • Where the weight of the deferrals exceeds 40% of the course, those students will be treated as above.
  • Where the weight of the deferrals is below 40% of the course, the student’s mark will come proportionately from the remaining assessed components. These students will not sit a deferred exam. For example, the mark in PF2 consists of 15% for assignments, plus 85% for 8 exams (i.e. each exam is worth 10.625%). For a student who defers one exam, the course mark will consist of 15% for assignments, plus 85% for 7 exams (i.e. each exam worth 12.143%).
  • In the case of CS1 and CS2, the students’ grades will be based on a minimum of eight stations.

4. In the case of Clerkship NBMEs, these exams will be rescheduled as usual by the exam administrator. They will not be deferred until the summer.

5. In the case of assignments (e.g. written assignment, video assignment), a deferral due date will be set by the Associate Dean Student Affairs in consultation with the appropriate Course Director. When the assignment involves group work, the group work component will be waived at the discretion of the Associate Dean Student Affairs and the other components of the assignment grade adjusted proportionately.

6. No student will be permitted more than two deferrals per year.

7. There are five exceptions to the above rules regarding deferral limit and exam scheduling:

  • Students with scheduled planned absences for student government
  • Students with research presentations nationally or internationally. Deferral will generally not be granted for conferences if the student is not presenting research.
  • Students requesting deferral for bereavement/funeral, in the case of a first or second-degree relative. As such, for example, this will include parents, step- parents, siblings, children, spouses (including ‘common-law’), grandparents, uncles, spouse’s parents, etc. It will not include first cousins, great aunts, and friends.
  • Religious observance
  • Students participating in athletic or artistic pursuits at an inter-university, provincial, inter-provincial, national or international level.

In the case of deferred midterm under these circumstances (Rule #7), these students will not be subject to the two deferral maximum; these deferrals will still result in a final examination that will be worth 100% of the course mark, less any value of any assignments for that course, which will still be required.

In the case of deferred final examinations under these circumstances (Rule #7), these students will not be subject to the two deferral maximum; these students will be permitted to schedule their deferred examination within seven to ten working days.

Examination conduct

Policy Name:

Examination Conduct

Application / Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students

Approved (Date):

January 2017

Review Date:

February 2021

Revised (Date):

May 2020

Approved By:

Senate

1. PURPOSE

To provide a specific process to ensure that all examinations are administered in an organized, fair and equitable manner for UGME students in accordance with University of Manitoba Final Examinations and Final Grades Policy and related Procedures.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Course/Module – course/module is a course of study or educational unit, which covers a series of interrelated topics and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the M.D degree. The UGME curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal courses occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.2 Midterm Examination - A summative examination normally conducted at the approximate midpoint of a course/module. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.3 Final Examination – A summative examination at the end of a Pre-Clerkship course/module. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.4 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program. For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.

2.5 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE-type) – an examination used to assess the clinical skills of students.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by a comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by their congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of eight of twelve OSCE stations to pass the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills Courses.
  • The Remedial Examinations for the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills courses will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial exam. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial OSCE.

2.6 Comprehensive Clinical Exam (CCE) – An objective structured clinical-type examination used to assess the clinical skills of students in Clerkship.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by the comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by the congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations in order to pass the CCE.
  • The Remedial Examinations for Med IV CCE will consist of eight stations.

The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial CCE. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial CCE.

2.7   Communication Devices - Electronic devices with memory capability, cell phones, pagers, calculators, laptop computers, watches with alarms and with computer or memory capability.

2.8 Reference Materials – Books, notes, papers.

2.9 Track Staff – Individuals who oversee the running of the OSCE-type Examination for a specific group of students.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

GENERAL

3.1 All examination content is confidential to UGME Faculty and Administrative Staff. Any transmission of examination information, electronically, in writing or verbally, is expressly prohibited without prior consent of the Associate Dean, UGME. When developing, authoring, and editing exam materials and questions, proper precautions and preventative measures should be taken to ensure that the examination materials are always properly labelled and protected.

3.2 Students are not permitted to procure, use, attempt to use or distribute any improper or unauthorized materials related to examinations including exam passwords. Any intentional attempt to disable or tamper with pre-clerkship exams security features will be considered a form of academic misconduct as defined in the Academic Calendar

3.3 The following items will not be permitted in the seating area of examination room:

  • Communication devices
  • Backpacks, briefcases, luggage, coats, or brimmed hats
  • Beverages or food of any type, except for water in a clear covered container
  • Reference materials

3.4 Students are required to arrive for all examinations at the stated time.

3.5 Lateness (up to 30 minutes) will generally be accommodated for Course/Module or clerkship exams. No extra time will be given for students who arrive late.

3.6 Lateness will not be accommodated for OSCE-type examinations.

3.7 No form of communication among students is permitted during an examination.

3.8 Each student will be escorted, one at a time, on all personal breaks taken during the examination.

3.9 A student who does not attend a scheduled examination, in the absence of approved deferral, will receive a mark of 0% for that examination.

3.10 Any student with stated accessibility needs will be accommodated in accordance with the University of Manitoba Accessibility Policy and the Student Accessibility Procedures.

PRE-CLERKSHIP

3.11 The time allotted for an examination will be based on the volume of information to be tested, but will be a minimum of one hour in length.

3.12 All summative examinations will be conducted utilizing the Examination Management System. In order to be eligible to take a computer exam, a student must adhere to procedures outlined in this policy.

CLERKSHIP

3.13 Clerkship exams will be 2.15 to 2.45 hours in length unless there are specifically prescribed accommodations requiring a longer examination period.


4. PROCEDURES


5. REFERENCES

5.1 “Chief Proctor’s Manual, National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Examination

Program, Clinical Science Examinations.” United States of America. 2010.

5.2 University of Manitoba Governing Documents: Academic – Academic Examination Regulations.

5.3 UGME Policy & Procedures - Invigilation of Examinations.

5.4 UGME Policy & Procedures - Accommodation for Undergraduate Medical Students with Disabilities.

5.5 UGME Policy & Procedures - Deferred Examination.

5.6 UGME Policy & Procedures - Supplemental Examination.

5.7 UGME Policy & Procedures - Examination Results.

5.8 UGME Policy & Procedures – Formative Assessment.

5.9 UGME Policy & Procedures – Promotion and Failure.

5.10 University of Manitoba- Final Examination and Final Grades Policy

5.11 University of Manitoba- Deferred and Supplemental Examinations Procedures

5.12 University of Manitoba- Final Examinations Procedures

5.13 University of Manitoba- Final Grades Procedures


6. POLICY CONTACT

Director, Evaluation


STANDARD WORK

EXAMSOFT EXAMINATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

It is the responsibility of the students to familiarize themselves with their equipment, the Softest software and instructions provided on the Examsoft website prior to the start of examination. Ensure sufficient time to become familiar with your personal computer and the application.

Pre-Clerkship students must register with ExamSoft at the UGME ExamSoft portal as follows:

  • Log in using your Student ID# and password provided at registration
  • Download/Install SofTest.
  • Restart SofTest. Once registered, students will receive a confirmation email at their University of Manitoba email address.
  • Complete a Trial/Test Exam. On completion of the familiarization training during Orientation Week, all students will complete and submit a trial/test exam to provide computer functionality and outline the capabilities of the SofTest system.

Prior to all scheduled exams students must ensure the following:

  • SofTest is registered and updated prior to all exam(s). SofTest may be installed on multiple devices for use as a backup. Exam files should only be downloaded to the computer you intend to use on exam day.
  • Ensure that the computer meets the specifications outlined on the ExamSoft portal to support SofTest.
  • Once SofTest is installed and registered, students shall familiarize themselves with the software by utilizing the built-in Practice Exam feature.
  • Ensure that the computer’s battery is charged.
  • Disable the sleep/hibernate mode on your computer during the exam. Some computers go into sleep/hibernate mode during extended periods of nonuse. During an exam, it can be difficult to exit this mode. Refer to the instructions for your operating system to modify these settings.

For days on which an examination is scheduled:

  • Students should bring their WIFI-enabled laptop with fully charged battery, power cord, Bannatyne Campus Login and Password (to access the uofm- WPA wireless network), Student number, and ExamSoft password.
  • Immediately before SofTest launches an exam, students will be provided with a warning screen indicating that you should not begin the exam until instructed to do so.
  • Technical support will be onsite to assist with troubleshooting as required.
  • During the exam, use care when highlighting and deleting.
  • Once you are finished your exam, save and exit the exam. Computers will seek to acquire a wireless signal. Do not leave the exam room until you have uploaded your exam and you receive a message stating “Your exam has been successfully uploaded.” Failure to upload your exam before leaving the exam room may result in your exam not being graded.
  • When writing multiple exams in one sitting they must be completed before you leave. If you exit the exam area before uploading all exams, you cannot re-enter and complete the missing component. Any exams not uploaded before exiting the writing area are scored at 0.

NATIONAL BOARD OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS (NBME) EXAMINATIONS

  • Students are required to provide their own writing materials.
  • The doors of the examination room will normally be opened at least fifteen (15) minutes before the starting time.
  • As students enter the examination room, attendance will be taken.
  • The invigilator will announce the start of the examination and record it for all students to see.
  • Late-arriving students must enter the room quietly.
  • Students are not permitted to leave the examination room until thirty (30) minutes after the examination has begun, and in no case before the attendance has been taken.
  • A student who leaves before the examination is over must hand in all completed and attempted work.
  • A student needing to speak to the invigilator must do so by raising his or her hand or by approaching the invigilator.
  • Questions concerning possible errors, ambiguities, or omissions in the examination must be documented on the feedback form if provided.
  • The invigilator(s) will not provide clarification of perceived errors, ambiguities or omissions in the examination.
  • All work must be done in accordance with the examination instructions.
  • The invigilator will announce “Ten (10) minutes remaining” as appropriate within the examination.
  • After the ‘Ten (10) minutes remaining’ announcement has been made, students in the examination room must remain seated until the ‘end of examination’ announcement has been made.
  • At the end of the examination, students must stop writing and return required examination materials to the invigilator(s).
  • At the completion of each examination, students are urged to complete a feedback sheet. This is done after examination materials are collected. Ten (10) minutes will be given for students to write comments.
  • Guidance, direction and procedures contained within the NBME Chief Proctor’s Manual will supersede any policy and procedures within this or other supporting instruments.

OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED CLINICAL EXAMINATIONS (OSCE) TYPE EXAMINATIONS

  • Students must arrive for the orientation session as specified in communication from the Assistant to Administrators, Evaluation.
  • All communication devices must be deposited with track staff prior to the start of the examination.
  • Students are required to provide their own writing materials, lab coats, nametags and specified medical equipment as required to support the examination.
  • Track staff will inform students where they must place books, notes, and supporting materials prior to the examination
  • Food and drink is not permitted at any time.
  • Students who arrive late will not be permitted to conduct the examination.
  • Students must proceed from station-to-station as instructed.
  • Students needing to speak to the track staff must do so by raising his or her hand.
  • Neither examiner(s) nor track staff will provide clarification of perceived errors, ambiguities or omissions on examination case scenarios.
  • All work must be done in accordance with the examination instructions.

Invigilation

Policy Name:

Invigilation of Examinations

Application / Scope:

Year I through Year IV Undergraduate Medical Education Students

Approved (Date):

January 2017

Review Date:

February 2021

Revised (Date):

May 2020

Approved By:

Senate

1. PURPOSE

To provide the Max Rady College of Medicine specific processes that ensure examinations are organized and executed in a timely and effective manner and complement the University of Manitoba Final Examination and Final Grades policy and related procedures.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Chief Proctor – The person responsible for the administration of the examination who ensures strict compliance with UGME examination policies and procedures and/or NBME testing regulations. The Chief Proctor is deemed equivalent to the Chief Invigilator as established by the University of Manitoba Registrar’s Office. The term “Chief Proctor” may be used interchangeably with and means “Chief Invigilator” or “Invigilator in Charge”.

2.2 Invigilator(s) – Person(s) hired and assigned to assist with distribution and collection of examination materials and supervision of students during an examination and during the review of an Examination.

2.3 Midterm Examination – A summative examination normally conducted at the approximate midpoint of a course/module. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.4 Final Examination – A summative examination at the end of a Pre-Clerkship course/module No rounding will take place.

2.5 Course/Module – A course/module is a course of study or educational unit, which covers a series of interrelated topics and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the M.D degree. The UGME curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal courses occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.6 National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Exam – A multiple choice examination developed by the NBME that is administered at the end of the Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry clinical rotations at the Clerkship level of the UGME program. For students who write their NBME exam prior to May 19, 2020, attaining a mark at the 11th percentile or higher is considered a pass. For students who write their NBME exams on May 19, 2020 and thereafter, the NBME will recommend a pass mark as an equated percent correct score, and the UGME Program will determine the pass mark every September, based on this recommendation.

2.7 Communication Devices - Electronic devices with memory capability such as cell phones, pagers, calculators, laptop computers, watches with alarms, and computer or memory capability.

2.8 Reference Materials – Books, notes, papers.

2.9 Nutrition Break – A 15-minute break for students to eat a light snack the clock will stop for the duration of the Nutrition Break.

2.10 Personal Break – A break to use the restroom or to use the water fountain for a drink of water. The clock does not stop for a Personal Break.

2.11 Disruptive Behaviour – Conduct of a student that interferes with the testing conditions of other students participating in the examination.

2.12 Irregular Behaviour – Behaviour during an examination that includes, without limitation, the following:

  • Copying answers from another student, permitting answers to be copied, or in any way providing or receiving unauthorized information about the content of the examination.
  • Possessing notes or making notes on anything other than the answer sheet or test booklet.

2.13 Emergency Evacuation – The sounding of a bell or alarm is an indication that occupants are required to vacate a building.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 This policy and procedures document complements the Undergraduate Medical

Education Examination Conduct Policy and Procedures.

3.2 Undergraduate Medical Education is responsible for selecting examination Invigilators for Course/Module and NBME examinations unless there are specific accommodations requiring support from Student Accessibility Services. In such instances, Student Accessibility Services will select examination Invigilators and these Invigilators will invigilate for the entire examination accommodation time and any approved nutrition break time.

3.3 A Nutrition Break will be provided for each examination that exceeds three hours in length as outlined in the Procedures section of this document. Invigilator(s) will remain with student(s) during the Nutrition Break.

3.4 The number of Invigilators for an examination will follow a specified student-invigilator ratio and the requisite number of invigilators will be present throughout the examination. (See Appendix 1).

3.5 The Invigilator(s) will not provide clarification of perceived errors, ambiguities or omissions in the examination.

3.6 In Pre-Clerkship, the time allotted for an examination will be based on the volume of information to be tested, but will typically be a minimum of one (1) hour in length.

3.7 In Clerkship, each examination will typically be 2.15 to 2.45 hours in length unless there are specifically prescribed accommodations requiring a longer examination period.

3.8 Only the designated clock in the examination room will be used to determine the length of the examination.

3.9 The Administrator, Pre-Clerkship Evaluation and OSCE-type Examinations will act as Chief Proctor for Pre-Clerkship examinations.

3.10 The Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation will act as Chief Proctor for NBME examinations.

3.11 The Chief Proctors are responsible for organizing the training of Invigilators.

3.12 The following items will not be permitted in the seating area of the examination room:

  • Communication Devices;
  • Backpacks, briefcases, luggage, coats, or brimmed hats;
  • Beverages or food of any type, with the exception of water in a clear container
  • Reference Materials
  • Computer equipment other than authorized for exam

3.13 Communication Devices are stored outside the seating area of the examination room and must be turned off before the examination begins.

3.14 Each student will be escorted, one at a time, on all Personal Breaks taken during the examination.

3.15 Disruptive and/or Irregular Behaviour will be addressed as stated in the Procedures section of this document.

3.16 University of Manitoba Emergency Evacuation protocols will be in place in the event of Emergency Evacuation during an examination.

3.17 Chief Proctors and Invigilators are responsible for ensuring that all Emergency

Evacuation procedures are followed and that examination material is secured in the event of an Emergency Evacuation.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENTS

4.1   Be familiar with all requirements of this policy and procedures document as they relate to items identified as “not permitted” in the seating area of the examination room, disruptive and Irregular Behaviour.

4.2 Be familiar with the requirements of the related Undergraduate Medical Education Examination Conduct Policy and Procedures document.

4.3 Provide proof of personal identification and sign attendance register prior to the start of the examination.

4.4 Identify to an invigilator that a Personal Break is required and accept that an invigilator will accompany the student on the break.

4.5 Ensure all Emergency Evacuation procedures are followed when informed of such an evacuation by an invigilator.

4.6 Please see additional responsibilities for the computer based exams in the related Computer Policy

RESPONSIBILITIES OF CHIEF INVIGILATOR

4.7 Recruit suitable invigilators for each academic year.

4.8 Organize the required number of invigilators in accordance with the invigilator-student ratio.

4.9 Assign invigilators to specific areas of the examination room.

4.10 Organize all examination materials for distribution at each examination.

4.11 Train invigilators on their responsibilities as it relates to examination invigilation.

4.12 Provide each invigilator with a copy of the Examination Conduct and Invigilation Policy and Procedures documents.

4.13 Ensure invigilators and students are familiar with the Emergency Evacuations procedures in the event there is an Emergency Evacuation during an examination.

4.14 Ensure all examination related materials are accounted for at the end of each examination.

4.15 Ensure any invigilator report of Disruptive and/or Irregular Behaviour is reported to the Director, Evaluation, Associate Dean, UGME, for NBME examinations and any other individual(s) as required.

4.16 Ensure an announcement is made stating that all communication devices must be turned off before the examination begins.

4.17 Please see additional responsibilities for the computer based exams in the Disaster Recovery Plan Policy

RESPONSIBILITIES OF INVIGILATOR GENERAL

4.18 Participate in invigilator training as organized by the Chief Proctor(s).

4.19 Review the Examination Conduct and Invigilation Policy and Procedures documents and seek clarification of responsibilities as required.

4.20 Review the University of Manitoba protocols for Emergency Evacuation.

4.21 Meet Chief Proctor at 260 Brodie 30 minutes prior to the examination, unless otherwise notified.

4.22 Assist with the examination set up.

4.23 Assist with organizing examination attendance which involves checking student IDs and having each student sign the attendance register.

4.24 Inform students of the examination start and end times using the designated clock as the time reference.

4.25 Continuously observe students in the assigned area to ensure that students are recording answers as required, and are not communicating with one another in any way.

4.26 Inform chief proctor of any computer problems during ExamSoft or NBME examinations.

4.27 Assist with the collection of pink sheets, examination booklets, and other examination materials at the end of the examination. This can include organizing components of an examination for distribution to examination markers.

4.28 Assist with bringing examination materials to the UGME office.

4.29 Complete and sign time sheet.

4.30 Report any irregular incidents to the Chief Proctor.

4.31 Organize a 10-minute break for each invigilator. In the event there is only one invigilator, UGME Evaluation personnel will arrange for the invigilator to have a 10-minute break.

4.32 Contact the Chief Proctor in the event of an emergency.

4.33 Follow stated Emergency Evacuation procedures in the event of an Emergency

Evacuation during an examination. DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR

4.34 Give the student a warning that he/she is exhibiting such behaviour.

4.35 Document that a warning was given.

4.36 Collect the examination materials from the student and escort the student from the examination room with the least amount of disturbance to the other students in the event that the student does not respond to a warning.

IRREGULAR BEHAVIOUR

4.37 Allow the student to continue writing the examination.

4.38 Confirm the observation with at least one other invigilator if possible.

4.39 Complete a report of the incident including the following information:

  • Time and duration of the incident.
  • Page and/or item number that involved student(s) were working on at the time of the observation (if possible).
  • Identify all students involved in the incident by name and student number.
  • Identify the seating placement for the student(s) involved.
  • Signatures of the invigilators who made the observations.
  • Signature(s) of student(s) involved in the incident.

EMERGENCY EVACUATION

4.40 In the event of a fire alarm being activated during an examination or other emergency, making the abandonment of the examination necessary, the following steps must be followed:

  • See Examination Conduct Policy

EXAMINATIONS EXCEEDING 3 HOURS IN LENGTH

4.41 Inform each student of the time of the designated 15-minute nutrition break prior to the start of the examination.

4.42 Ensure each student is away from the examination table for the duration of the Nutrition Break.

4.43 Ensure that each student is observed for the duration of the Nutrition Break.

4.44 Inform each student of the examination end time using the designated clock as a reference.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 Chief Proctor’s Manual, National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Examination

Program, Clinical Science Examinations. United States of America. 2010.

5.2 UGME Policy & Procedures - Accommodation for Undergraduate Medical Students with Disabilities

5.3 UGME Policy & Procedures - Examination Conduct Policy and Procedures

5.4 University of Manitoba Emergency Evacuation Procedures.

5.5 University of Manitoba Procedural Guidelines for Academic and Student Misconduct.

5.6 University of Manitoba Student Academic Misconduct Procedure

5.7 UGME Policy & Procedures – Deferred Examinations

5.8 UGME Policy & Procedures – Supplemental Examinations

5.9 UGME Policy & Procedures - Examination Results.

5.10 UGME Policy & Procedures – Promotion & Failure

5.11 UGME Policy & Procedures - Formative Assessment

5.12 UGME Policy & Procedures - Communicating Methods of Evaluation

5.13 University of Manitoba- Final Examination and Final Grades Policy

5.14 University of Manitoba- Deferred and Supplemental Examinations Procedures

5.15 University of Manitoba- Final Examination Procedures

5.16 University of Manitoba- Final Grades Procedures


6. CONTACT

Administrator, Pre-Clerkship Evaluation and OSCE-Type Examinations

Administrator, Clerkship Evaluation


ANNEX A - STUDENT/INVIGILATOR RATIOS

Student – Invigilator Ratios

Number of Students Per

Number of Invigilators

1 - 20

2

21 - 45

2

46 - 70

3

71 - 95

4

96 - 120

5

Supplemental assessments

Policy Name:

Supplemental Assessments

Application/ Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students

Approved (Date):

August 2021

Review Date:

February 2025

Revised (Date):

August 2021

Approved By:

Senate

1. PURPOSE

To provide specific processes for students to complete a rewrite of a failed examination that are in accordance with University of Manitoba Final Examination and Final Grades policy and related procedures.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME program.

2.2 Clerkship – Year III and Year IV of the UGME program.

2.3 Course/Module – A Course/Module is a short course of study or educational unit, which covers a single topic or a small section of a broad topic and is studied for a given period of time which taken together with other such completed modules or courses counts towards completion of the M.D. The UGME Curriculum consists of seven (7) modules and six (6) longitudinal courses occurring over a four (4) year period.

2.4 Assignment – Take homework as it has been defined in the syllabus of each course.

2.5 Midterm Examination - A summative examination conducted at the approximate midpoint of a course/module. No rounding of scores will take place.

2.6 Final Examination – A summative examination at the end of a Pre-Clerkship course/module.  No rounding of scores will take place.

2.7 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE-type) – an examination used to assess the clinical skills of students.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by a comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by their congregate score in each case individually. Students will be required to pass a minimum of eight of twelve OSCE stations to pass the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills Courses.
  • The Remedial Examinations for the Med I and Med II Clinical Skills courses will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial exam. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial OSCE.

2.8 Comprehensive  Clinical  Exam  (CCE)  –  An  objective  structured  clinical-type examination used to assess the clinical skills of students in Clerkship.

  • A pass mark will be set for each individual station using the borderline regression model, which is informed by the comparison of the global rating score to each student’s congregate score for the station. The student’s individual pass or fail status for a case will be decided by the congregate score  in  each  case  individually.  Students  will  be  required  to  pass  a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations in order to pass the CCE. 
  • The Remedial Examinations for Med IV CCE will consist of eight stations. The passing grade will be determined using aggregate data from all eight OSCE stations, using the borderline regression model. This grade will be the passing grade for each station in the remedial CCE. Students will be required to pass a minimum of five of eight OSCE stations to pass their remedial CCE.

2.9 Deferred Examination – An approved delay in writing a summative exam

2.10 Supplemental  Assessment –  an  opportunity  to  rewrite  an  examination  and/or assignments that were failed.

2.11 Maximum  Allowable  Failures  -  The  number  of  failed  Pre-Clerkship  modular courses, which if exceeded, results in the immediate failure of a Pre-Clerkship year, and preclude the writing of supplemental examinations. The maximum allowable failures score is based on the sum of the weights (course weights (CW)) assigned to each course.  Weightings assigned to each course are based on the amount of contact time spent with students and a breakdown of weightings assigned to each course within the Pre-Clerkship curriculum is included at Annex A.  In order to be eligible to write supplemental exams, students cannot exceed nine (9) CW in Year one, or ten (10) CW in Year two.

2.12 Remediation  -  The  provision  to  students  on  Probationary  Status  by  the Undergraduate Medical Education Faculty of reasonable academic supports, educational resources and protected time for studying and review, and additional clinical exposures as may be deemed appropriate following a Remediation Assessment.

2.13 Pre-Clerkship    Student    Evaluation    Committee    (PSEC)/Clerkship    Student Evaluation Committee(s) (CSEC) – Committees responsible for the development and approval of assessment policies and rules. PSEC/CSEC bodies are responsible for the overall management and administration of examination questions; the review and evaluation of results and recommendation to Progress Committee for approval.

2.14 Working day – A day when the University of Manitoba is open for regular business.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

GENERAL

3.1 In accordance with the Promotion and Failure Policy, a student is eligible to write supplemental examinations under the following conditions:

PRE-CLERKSHIP

  • Failure of any modular courses, up to but not in excess of the Maximum Allowable Failures per year.
  • Failure in up to two longitudinal courses.
  • Failure of a first supplemental exam in any modular course.  For longitudinal courses,  students  are  only  permitted  to  complete  single  supplemental assessments in up to two such courses.

CLERKSHIP:

  • Failure in up to two (2) NBME subject examinations for the same subject.
  • Failure in up to four (4) NBME examinations provided there are no more than two (2) failures in the same subject.
  • Failure in the CCE
  • Failure in any of the assessments that are part of the Population Health or Professionalism courses

3.2 Remediation may begin immediately after a course is failed for Cardiovascular One and Respiratory One (concurrent with subsequent course(s) such that supplemental exams for these courses will be completed prior to the commencement of Cardiovascular Two and/or Respiratory Two later in Year one. All other Pre-Clerkship remediation and supplemental exams will be conducted during the summer break period.

3.3 Supplemental Assessments will cover material from the entire Course/Module or clinical rotation.   The format of all supplemental Assessments , NBME Examinations, OSCE, and CCE will be the same as the original Assessments

.Short  answer  questions  and take  home  assignments  may  be  part  of  the supplemental assessment plan for each course, up to the percentage in the original course. Course directors, if they wish can request the supplemental assessment to be 100% MCQ. FERs and group assignments will not be permitted in supplemental assessments. The plan for each course must be communicated to the relevant students in advance

3.4 All supplemental Assessments will follow requirements established within the Examination Conduct Policy and Invigilation of Examinations Policy.

3.5 The schedule for supplemental exams will be determined by the chair of the PSEC or CSEC committee in consultation with the director of remediation.

PRE-CLERKSHIP

3.6 Where the schedule permits, all deferred examinations must be completed prior to a student writing one or more Supplemental Examinations.

CLERKSHIP

3.7 Where the published Deferred and Supplemental NBME Examination schedule permits, a student will write deferred NBME Examinations prior to any Supplemental NBME Examinations.

3.8 A student may write a Supplemental NBME Examination after a failure in that NBME subject examination on a date pre-defined by the Administrator Clerkship Evaluation.

3.9 Supplemental CCE Examinations will take place during an elective period within MED IV following Remediation as stated in the Remediation Policy.


4.   PROCEDURES

PRE-CLERKSHIP

4.1 The  Administrator,  Evaluation  Pre-Clerkship  and  Assistant  to  Administrators Evaluation will maintain a list of students approved for deferred examinations and will work with Director of Student Assessment the Chair of the relevant Student Evaluation Committee, and Director, Remediation to ensure the deferred examinations are written prior to Supplemental Exams.

4.2 At the end of each course and at the end of the academic year, the Administrator, Evaluation Pre-Clerkship and Assistant to Administrators, Evaluation will liaise with the Director of Remediation and Coordinator, OSCE-type Examinations to determine dates for remediation and supplemental Assessments which correspond to established remediation plans.

4.3 The  Administrator,  Evaluation  Pre-Clerkship  and  Assistant  to  Administrators, Evaluation will provide each student requiring supplemental examination(s) the schedule for remediation and supplemental examination(s) within three (3) working days of the decision.  A copy of the Supplemental Examination schedule will also be provided to the Associate Dean Student Affairs, UGME

4.4 The  Administrator,  Evaluation  Pre-Clerkship  and  Assistant  to  Administrators Evaluations shall communicate the results of supplemental examinations to the affected student(s) within two (2) working days of writing.

4.5 The  Administrator,  Evaluation  Pre-Clerkship  and  Assistant  to  Administrators, Evaluation will communicate to the Administrator, Enrolment, the Associate Dean, UGME, Associate Dean Student Affairs, UGME, or designate, Administrator, Pre- Clerkship, and in case of MED II students to Administrator, Clerkship within (3) three working days of release of the results a listing of students who wrote the supplemental examination(s) and who:

  • Successfully completed the examination(s) and/or,
  • Failed the examination(s). CLERKSHIP

4.6 The Administrator, Evaluation Clerkship will maintain a list of students approved for deferred NBME examinations and will liaise with the Director, Evaluation, the Chair of CSEC, and Director, Remediation to ensure the deferred examinations are written prior to Supplemental Examinations as outlined in the policy statements.

4.7 The  Administrator,  Evaluation  Clerkship  shall  inform  a  student  of  his  or  her eligibility to write a supplemental NBME subject examination in accordance with a pre-defined schedule. A copy of this information shall be provided to the Associate Dean Student Affairs, UGME or designate.

4.8 The  Administrator,  Evaluation  Clerkship  shall  communicate  the  results  of supplemental examinations to the student(s) within two (2) working days of receipt of the results from the NBME.

4.9 The Administrator, Evaluation Clerkship shall send a listing of students to the Associate Dean, UGME, Associate Dean Student Affairs, UGME or designate, and Director, Remediation (in case of a second failure in the same subject) who wrote the supplemental examination(s) outlining those who:

  • Successfully completed the examination(s) or,
  • Failed the examination(s).

4.10 The Assistant to Administrators, Evaluation shall inform students of the date on which to write the supplemental CCE. A copy of this information shall also be sent to the Associate Dean Student Affairs, UGME or designate.

4.11 The  Assistant  to  Administrators  Evaluation  shall  communicate  the  results  of supplemental CCE to the student within three weeks.

4.12 The Assistant to Administrator, Evaluations shall send a listing to the Administrator, Enrolment Services, Associate Dean, UGME, and Associate Dean Student Affairs, UGME within three (3) working days of release of results to the student. of students who wrote the supplemental CCE and who:

  • Successfully completed the CCE or;
  • Failed the CCE.

REFERENCES

4.13 UGME Policy and Procedures – Promotion and Failure

4.14 UGME Policy and Procedures – Deferred Examinations

4.15 UGME Policy and Procedures – Examination Conduct

4.16 UGME Policy and Procedures – Invigilation of Examinations

4.17 UGME Policy and Procedures – Remediation

4.18 UGME Policy and Procedures – Examination  Results

4.19 UGME Policy and Procedures – Communicating Methods of Evaluation in the Undergraduate Medical Education Program.

4.20 UGME  Policy  and  Procedures  -  Accommodation  for  Undergraduate  Medical Students with Disabilities

4.21 University of Manitoba - Final Examination and Final Grades policy

4.22 University of Manitoba - Deferred and Supplemental Examinations procedures

4.23 University of Manitoba - Final Examinations procedures

4.24 University of Manitoba - Final Grades procedures


5. POLICY CONTACT

Director, Evaluations

Student wellness

Accidental exposure to infections and environmental hazards

Policy Name:

Accidental Exposure to Infections and Environmental Hazards

Application/ Scope:

All Registered Learners in the MD and MD/PhD Program

Approved (Date):

 

Review Date:

July 2026

Revised (Date):

July 2021

Approved By:

UGME Management - July 20, 2021

1. PURPOSE

This policy sets out the process related to infectious exposures and injuries, in order to protect the learner’s health and that of patients and facility staff.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1. Infectious exposure – significant contact with an infectious agent (e.g., hepatitis B, measles, tuberculosis) that has the potential of leading to infection in the learner. Infectious exposures include but are not limited to: puncture wounds or scratches due to a potentially contaminated needles or sharp instruments; splashes of blood or body fluid to non-intact, abraded or chapped skin or mucous membrane; bites.

2.2. Injury – significant contact with an environmental hazard (i.e., a substance, state or event) which has the potential to threaten the health of the learner. Injuries may include but are not limited to lacerations, burns, crush injuries, and chemical exposures.

2.3. Environmental Health and Safety Office (EHSO) – an office of the University of Manitoba.

2.4. Learner – a health professional student enrolled in the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba.

2.5. Occupational and Environmental Safety and Health (OESH) – a program of the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority.

2.6. Visiting student – a student from another university participating either in an elective or in the Summer Early Exposure Program.

2.7. Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) – a system for providing information on the safe use of hazardous products in Canadian workplaces, via product labels, material safety data sheets, and worker education.

2.8. The Workers Compensation Board of Manitoba (WCB) - a workplace injury and disability statutory corporation that insures and support safe and healthy work and workplaces.

2.9. CURIE Student Accident Coverage – a program to provide students with insurance for workplace injury or accident through the Canadian University Reciprocal Insurance Exchange.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1. All registered learners in the MD and MD/PhD Program shall receive instruction related to infection control and environmental hazards as early as practicable following registration; attendance shall be mandatory for these sessions.

3.2. All learners shall comply with the immunization and testing requirements of the Max Rady College of Medicine.

3.3. All learners shall receive a copy of hepatitis B serological results demonstrating immunity, if such is possible for the learner to achieve. Learners shall have hepatitis B serological test results readily available at all times (e.g., kept digitally on a phone, or as a pocket card in a purse or wallet), in the event of an exposure to blood or bodily fluids. See Appendix 1 for an example of a hepatitis B pocket card. Learners who are hepatitis B non-responders shall receive instructions on what to do in the event of an exposure to blood or bodily fluids.

3.4. Learners shall comply with clinical teaching sites’ respective policies related to infection control and exposure to infectious and environmental hazards, in order to protect the learner’s health and that of patients and facility staff.

3.5. All learners shall receive Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) training. If a learner has taken WHMIS training in the past this training may carry forward as long as the leaner retains a record or certificate of proof. Note that with the new provincial WHMIS legislation learners are required to receive training for “WHMIS 2015”. Students and staff at the university can access this training and certification by enrolling in the online course available on UMLearn. Instructions on how to self-register (UMNetID and password) for the training are located here.

3.6. A learner who sustains an infectious exposure or injury shall comply with the following procedures:

3.6.1. The learner shall perform or receive from another person immediate first aid:

3.6.1.1. For a puncture injury or laceration, the learner shall wash the injury site thoroughly with soap and water, and cover the area with a sterile dressing if necessary.

3.6.1.2. For an eye or mucosa splash, or exposure to non-intact, abraded or chapped skin, the learner shall flush the injury with water for 15 minutes.

3.6.1.3. For other infectious exposures or injuries, the immediate first steps will depend on the nature of the incident.

3.6.2. The learner shall immediately inform the learner’s clinical supervisor (e.g., attending physician) about the infectious exposure or injury. The clinical supervisor will assist the learner in determining appropriate next steps, which will depend on the nature of the infectious exposure or injury, as well as the time of day it occurred. Some incidents (e.g., lacerations; exposure to blood or bodily fluids) require immediate follow-up; follow-up for certain infectious exposures (e.g., exposure to tuberculosis) may be delayed until the next business day.

3.6.3. The learner shall notify the occupational health service of the clinical or educational institution in which the incident occurred. As the learner may be anxious or confused by the incident, and/or not familiar with how to access the local occupational health service, the clinical supervisor is responsible for assisting the learner with this notification. The occupational health service will provide access to immediate medical assessment and ongoing investigation of the incident. If the occupational health service is not available (e.g., after hours) and immediate follow-up is warranted, the learner shall be directed to the nearest emergency department immediately.

3.6.4. Site occupational health contacts for infectious exposures or injuries are as follows:

3.6.4.1. Infectious exposures or injuries which occur at the University of Manitoba Bannatyne Campus or Health Sciences Centre (HSC):

  • Occupational and Environmental Safety & Health (OESH)
  • SR149-700 William Avenue
  • Office hours Monday to Friday: 7:00 am to 3:00 pm
  • Call 204-787-3312 and ask to speak to the Occupational Health Nurse regarding the infectious exposure or injury.
  • If the incident occurs outside the above stated hours, call 204-787-3312 and leave a message stating the name of the learner, contact phone number, and circumstances of the incident. Then report to the HSC Adult Emergency Department as soon as possible (700 William Ave, Winnipeg, 204-787-3167).

3.6.4.2. Infectious exposures or injuries which occur at the St. Boniface General Hospital or St. Boniface Research Centre:

  • St. Boniface Occupational Health and Safety Department
  • Room TG002B, 409 Tache Avenue
  • Office hours Monday to Friday: 7:45 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
  • Call 204-237-2439 and ask to speak to the Occupational Health Nurse regarding the infectious exposure or injury.
  • If the incident occurs outside the above stated hours, call 204-237-2439 and leave a message stating the name of the learner, contact phone number, and circumstances of the incident. Then report to the St. Boniface General Hospital Emergency Department as soon as possible (409 Tache Ave, Winnipeg, 204-233-8563).

3.6.4.3. Infectious exposures or injuries, which occur at another facility, shall contact the occupational health office of the appropriate facility (WRHA  information is located here.) If the incident occurs outside the hours of the nearest occupational health office, report to the closest emergency department; follow-up with the occupational health office the next business day.

3.6.5. As soon as practical the learner shall notify the University of Manitoba Environmental Health and Safety Office (EHSO) Occupational Health Coordinator (204-474-6633), EHSO@umanitoba.ca) for all infectious exposures or injuries requiring medical follow-up. The EHSO will assist the learner with reporting the incident to Workers Compensation if required. If reporting is necessary, the EHSO will assist the learner with completion of the Notice of Injury Form.

3.6.6. The learner has the option of notifying the office of Student Affairs Medicine at the University of Manitoba regarding the incident. Student Affairs Medicine can provide the learner the following services as needed. Counseling regarding the incident; assistance with completion of documentation that may be required. Liaison with EHSO and the occupational health services of the institution in which the infectious exposure or injury occurred. Liaison with the learner’s program if there is a need to alter the curriculum or clinical rotation resulting from the incident.

3.7. Documentation of the learner’s immune status will be relevant for many post-exposure assessments involving infectious diseases, and therefore a copy of this documentation should be brought to the assessment, or requested immediately. Such documentation may include the learner’s status regarding measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, polio, hepatitis B, varicella, influenza, and tuberculosis infection:

3.7.1.1. A learner should bring hepatitis B serologic results (e.g., pocket card) to the assessment (see section 3.3 and Appendix 1).

3.7.1.2. A learner or an individual providing care to a learner can request the learner’s immune status record through the Immunization Program office: 204-480-1305, fax. 204-480-1333, immune@umanitoba.ca, P127 Pathology Building, Bannatyne Campus; office hours Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

3.7.1.3. Learners and visiting students attending a host school can access their Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC) Student Portal Immunization and Testing Form online through the AFMC Portal; learners are also encouraged to keep a copy of their records handy while visiting a host school.

3.8. The clinician providing an assessment following significant contact with an infectious agent may require additional details regarding the source of an exposure; for example, the risk level or serologic status of a client to whose blood or bodily fluids the learner was exposed. The clinician providing the assessment should liaise with the clinical supervisor for any necessary information regarding the source or incident. A learner should not approach a client or review the clinical chart to obtain information necessary for a post-exposure assessment, and a learner should not be involved with arranging testing of a client for this purpose.

3.9. If an infectious exposure or injury occurs outside of Winnipeg or Manitoba learners should promptly access all necessary care locally. If additional follow-up is warranted this can be provided by contacting WRHA OESH upon the learner’s return to Manitoba (see contact information in section 3.6.4.1). EHSO should be notified of all infectious exposures or injuries requiring medical follow-up occurring in the course of the learner’s training regardless of at which site the exposure occurred.

3.10. Financial responsibility following learner Infectious exposure or injury: all learners, including visiting students on placement who sustain an infectious exposure or injury (as defined in section 2) have full coverage through the Workers Compensation Board of Manitoba (WCB) that is governed by The Workers Compensation Act (Manitoba).

The University also has reciprocal agreements with the governing WCB authorities in the Provinces of Alberta, Ontario, and the Territory of Nunavut. For the remaining jurisdictions, the University has an Accidental Injury Coverage for the Student Placements Policy. This coverage is provided through Industrial Alliance Insurance, and is the equivalent to the WCB coverage.

Further, the Canadian University Reciprocal Insurance Exchange (CURIE) provides liability insurance to all students on placement regardless of their location.

3.11. Manitoba's Testing of Bodily Fluids and Disclosure Act enables a person who has come into contact with a bodily fluid of another person to apply for a court order requiring the other person to provide a blood sample which will be tested to determine if that person is infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C or HIV. More information on this legislation is available here.

3.12. This policy shall apply equally to all visiting students. Of note:

3.12.1.1. Visiting students have access to all local post-exposure services including occupational health offices and emergency departments.

3.12.1.2. Visiting students are expected to have received instruction related to infection control and environmental hazards prior to attending the University of Manitoba for an elective.

3.13. This policy is consistent and complimentary to the University of Manitoba Biosafety Guide (March 2005), produced by EHSO.

Note: occupational health contact information and business hours found in the current policy are more up-to-date.

3.14. This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PRE-CLERKSHIP AND CLERKSHIP ADMINISTRATORS, UGME

4.1. In each academic year Undergraduate Medical Education will provide instruction related to infectious exposures and injuries as follows:

4.1.1. Year I learners will participate in a mandatory Infection Control and Prevention session that is in accordance with the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority program for healthcare workers.

4.1.2. The UGME Administrator, Enrolment will ensure that at the beginning of Year 1 all learners receive a card outlining the procedure following infectious exposures or injuries. Learners are to wear this card on their lanyard and are expected to keep it for the full duration of their time in UGME Program (Appendix 2).

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM

4.2. Ensure learners comply with the immunization and testing requirements of the Max Rady College of Medicine; advise the Associate Dean Undergraduate Medical Education when learners are not meeting requirements.

4.3. Provide learners with a copy of hepatitis B serological results and provide advice to learners who are hepatitis B non-responders.

4.4. Provide learners an immune status orientation session, which includes information on infectious exposures and injuries.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE LEARNER

4.5. All learners shall attend the mandatory sessions related to infection control and environmental hazards offered following registration.

4.6. All learners shall comply with the immunization and testing requirements of the Max Rady College of Medicine. Learners who may have a medical or health condition necessitating a possible exemption from a specific immunization or test requirement must notify the Immunization Program of this.

4.7. A learner who experiences an infectious exposure or injury shall:

4.7.1. Perform or receive from another person immediate first aid, including referring to WHMIS as appropriate;

4.7.2. Notify the clinical supervisor of this immediately;

4.7.3. Notify the occupational health service of the clinical or educational institution in which the incident occurred, or equivalent (e.g., emergency department) as appropriate;

4.7.4. Notify EHSO (for all incidents requiring medical follow-up); and

4.7.5. Follow instructions provided by the entities listed above.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CLINICAL SUPERVISOR

4.8. All clinical supervisors shall be familiar with their responsibilities under this policy.

4.9. All clinical supervisors who are contacted by a learner regarding an infectious exposure or injury shall without delay provide the learner all necessary support; this includes:

4.9.1. Assisting the learner in determining appropriate next steps, which will depend on the nature of the infectious exposure or injury and the time of day it occurred.

4.9.2. Assisting the learner in determining the most appropriate location for an evaluation and assessment, if one is indicated.

4.9.3. Providing the learner time off from clinical duties, as necessary, to obtain an evaluation and assessment if one is indicated.

4.10. Clinical supervisors shall understand that the learner may be anxious or confused, and/or not familiar with how to access the necessary services, and therefore additional supports may be necessary.

4.11. Clinical supervisors shall be available to correspond with the clinician providing the post-exposure assessment, if additional information regarding the source or incident is necessary.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN UGME STUDENT AFFAIRS

4.12. The Associate Dean UGME Student Affairs is available to provide counseling as needed to learners regarding infectious exposures and injuries, liaison with the institution in which the infectious exposure or injury occurred, and support the learner in obtaining and completing all EHSO appropriate forms. It is not necessary for the learner to contact the Associate Dean UGME Student Affairs for all types of infectious exposures or injuries; however, support is available for learners who require it.

4.13. If, as determined by the clinician assessing the learner, a leave of absence from the scheduled curriculum is required because of an infectious exposure or injury, the clinician shall contact the Associate Dean UGME Student Affairs and confer with the appropriate faculty to develop an appropriate alternate schedule.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, ELECTIVES, UGME

4.14. Provide each visiting student a link to this policy when the visiting student accepts a clinical placement at the University of Manitoba.


5. POLICY CONTACT

5.1. Contact the Associate Dean, UGME Student Affairs with questions respecting this policy.


6. REFERENCES

6.1. Liaison Committee on Medical Education: Functions and Structure of a Medical School. Medical Students: Standard MS-30.

6.2. Winnipeg Regional Health Authority. Blood and Body Fluid – Post Exposure Management. September 2011.

6.3. UGME Policy & Procedures – Medical Learners with Blood Borne Pathogens

6.4. University of Manitoba Biosafety Guide (2005)


Appendix 1

All learners shall provide a copy of hepatitis B serological results demonstrating immunity, if such is possible for the learner to achieve. Learners will be encouraged to keep hepatitis B serological test results readily available at all times, in the event the Learner needs this information due to an exposure to blood or bodily fluids. Learners who are hepatitis B non-responders will receive instructions on what to do in the event of an exposure to blood or bodily fluids. The Leaner’s pocket cards stating hepatitis B serologic results (see sample shown below) shall be on hand with the Learner at all times.


Appendix 2

The UGME Administrator, Enrolment will ensure that at the beginning of Year 1 all learners receive a card (shown below) outlining the procedure following infectious exposures or injuries. Learners must wear this card on their lanyard and must keep it for the full duration of their time in UGME Program.

Immunization and tuberculin skin test cost recovery

Policy Name:

Immunization and tuberculin skin test cost recovery

Application/ Scope:

Max Rady College of Medicine

Approved (Date):

June 2018

Review Date:

June 2023

Revised (Date):

June 2018

Approved By:

UGME Management Committee [June 2018]

1. PURPOSE

The Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Immunization Program provides required vaccines, select optional vaccines, and Tuberculin Skin Tests to students enrolled in the following programs: College of Dentistry, College of Pharmacy, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Genetic

Counselling, Max Rady College of Medicine, Pathology Assistant, Physician Assistant Studies, and School of Dental Hygiene.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1. Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Immunization Program (”Immunization Program”) – A program which provides services to all healthcare students at the Bannatyne Campus. Activities involve assessing the immune status of students, and offering optional limited healthcare services on site to students. The Immunization Program provides services to all College of Dentistry, College of Pharmacy, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Genetic Counselling, Max Rady College of Medicine, Pathology Assistant, Physician Assistant Studies, and School of Dental Hygiene students.

2.2. Required Vaccines – Immunizations required by students as part of their healthcare program at the Bannatyne Campus; this may include one or more of the following vaccines, depending on the needs of a particular student: diphtheria, Hepatitis B, influenza, measles, mumps, pertussis, polio, rubella, tetanus, varicella.

2.3. Optional Vaccines – Immunizations not required by students as part of their healthcare program at the Bannatyne Campus, but rather requested by the student. The most common example of this is Hepatitis A vaccine, but it may also include combined Hepatitis A+B vaccine, and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

2.4. Tuberculin Skin Test – A test for latent tuberculosis infection. Tuberculin is injected under the skin of the forearm, and then the site is assessed 48 to 72 hours later by a clinician; a reaction (induration) of a particular size may indicate the presence of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis inside the body.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1. Immunizations required by students as part of their healthcare program at the Bannatyne Campus will be provided at no cost to students if the student accesses services through the Bannatyne Clinics. The Immunization Program will comply with The Workplace Safety and Health Act of Manitoba; in particular, that for “any person undergoing training or serving an apprenticeship at an educational institution or at any other place” for work in a healthcare facility, the University must provide the student “information about any vaccine recommended in the Canadian Immunization Guide published under authority of the Minister of Health (Canada)” and arrange for the student “to receive the recommended vaccine and pay any associated costs”.

3.2. Tuberculin Skin Tests required by students as part of their healthcare program at the Bannatyne Campus will be provided at no cost to students if the student accesses services through the Bannatyne Clinics.

3.3. Students who choose to access services through their own healthcare providers will need to pay the costs of any vaccines and tests.

3.4. Students who request an optional vaccine through the Bannatyne Clinics will be expected to pay all associated costs for the vaccine and service. This will include the cost of the vaccine as charged by the pharmacy, plus an administration fee per dose administered.

3.5. Students who fail to attend for a Tuberculin Skin Test without informing the Immunization Program in advance will be charged a fee.

3.6. While Hepatitis B is a required vaccine, and Hepatitis A is an optional vaccine, students who choose to receive the combined Hepatitis A+B vaccine will be expected to pay the full cost of the vaccine, although without an administration fee.

3.7. Students who have failed to pay for an invoice after 100 days will have their student University accounts frozen.

3.8. This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.1. Students who have chosen to obtain services from their own healthcare provider are expected to pay all costs of any immunizations and tests received.

4.2. Students who have chosen to obtain services from the Immunization Program must attend school clinics or attend for blood testing diligently.

4.3. Students who fail to attend for a Tuberculin Skin Test reading without informing the Immunization Program in advance must pay a fee. This charge does not apply to students who fail to attend for a Tuberculin Skin Test administration.

4.4. Students who have received invoices for immunizations or administrative fees must pay these fees within 30 days.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DIRECTOR, IMMUNIZATION

4.5. Explains to students during the first-year orientation policies regarding costs of services, required vaccines, optional vaccines, and Tuberculin Skin Tests.

4.6. Writes prescriptions for students who wish to obtain an optional vaccine (typically Hepatitis A vaccine and combined Hepatitis A+B vaccine).

4.7. Arranges for immunizations and Tuberculin Skin Tests to be administered at the Bannatyne Campus.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM ASSISTANT

4.8. Sends completed prescriptions to the pharmacy for processing.

4.9. Provides the Financial Reporting Assistant (Finance, Max Rady College of Medicine) with a list of students to be invoiced for non-required vaccines and/or missed TST readings.

4.10. Provides students with an invoice package, including information on how to pay an invoice.

4.11. Places a copy of the invoice in the student’s health file.

4.12. Works with the Financial Reporting Assistant to track students who have not yet paid for an invoice and arranges reminders.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FINANCIAL REPORTING ASSISTANT

4.13. Creates invoices for optional vaccines, administration fees, and missed Tuberculin Skin Test readings.

4.14. Provides the Immunization Program Assistant with invoices for optional vaccines, administration fees, and missed Tuberculin Skin Test readings.

4.15. Works with the Immunization Program Assistant to track students who have not yet paid for an invoice and arranges reminders.


5. REFERENCES

5.1. For more detailed information on the processes and documents used to invoice students for services refer to the document “Student Invoicing Process”, available through the Director, Immunization.


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Director, Immunization with questions respecting this policy.

Learners with bloodborne pathogens

Policy Name:

Learners with Bloodborne Pathogens

Application / Scope:

All applicants and registered learners in the MD, MD/PhD, MPAS Programs and Postgraduate Medical Trainees

Approved (Date):

June, 2011

Review Date:

Three years from the last revised date

Revised (Date):

September 2012; October 2014; April 3, 2019

Approved By:

College Council, Max Rady College of Medicine: October 24, 2018

Faculty Council, Faculty of Graduate Studies: December 13, 2018

Senate: April 3, 2019

1. PURPOSE

To outline the required communication and necessary procedures in the situation where an applicant or learner is known to be seropositive for a bloodborne pathogen.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Bloodborne Pathogens –communicable diseases including but not limited to the hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

2.2 Bloodborne Pathogens Subcommittee – a subcommittee of the Central Standards Committee of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba.

2.3 CPSM – College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba.

2.4 Learners – students in the MD, MD/PhD, MPAS Program and Trainees at the Max Rady College of Medicine.

2.5 MD Degree - four year program leading to the doctorate of medicine degree.

2.6 MD/PhD - graduate education and advanced research training in a specific discipline of the candidate’s choice, for individuals who are currently pursuing an MD Degree and who wish to develop a career as a clinician scientist.

2.7 MPAS – Master of Physician Assistant Studies.

2.8 Student Affairs – the Office of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, Max Rady College of Medicine (UGME or PGME, as applicable).

2.9 Trainee - a postgraduate resident, fellow, or AFC student participating in a training program of an accredited university based in one or more of the training sites and who is appropriately licensed by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba (CPSM) or other applicable licensing authority.

2.10 UGME - Undergraduate Medical Education.

2.11 PGME – Postgraduate Medical Education.

2.12 Visiting Student or Visiting Trainee – an external learner from another university participating in an approved elective.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 No applicant shall be denied consideration of acceptance into a Max Rady College of Medicine program on the basis of HIV, HBV, or HCV serostatus. Evaluation for admission and continuation in the programs will focus on whether the individual in his or her current state of health, with reasonable accommodations will be able to successfully complete the essential elements of the educational program.

3.2 Individuals who are known to be seropositive for a bloodborne pathogen and who are contemplating application to medical school for an undergraduate or postgraduate program should seek counsel regarding their intention. Counsel could be received from a medical doctor with expertise in infectious diseases or hepatology, or the Office of Student Affairs in a university with medical and doctoral programs.

3.3 Learners who are known to be seropositive for any blood-borne pathogen must notify Student Affairs at the time of admission.


4. PROCEDURES

4.1 Learners who become seropositive for any bloodborne pathogen at any time while registered in their training program must notify the Student Affairs as soon as practicable after the seropositive status is confirmed.

4.2 Learners who are known to be seropositive for HBV, and/or HCV, and/or HIV must notify the CPSM of their serological status at the time of registration with CPSM and annual renewal of such registration.

4.3 Student Affairs shall advise the CPSM of Learners who are known to be to be seropositive for HBV, and/or HCV, and/or HIV.

4.4 Student Affairs shall liaise with the CPSM and the Learner regarding the implementation of recommendations and/or requirements from the Bloodborne Pathogens Subcommittee of the CPSM. Student Affairs shall work with the relevant Program (UGME, MPAS, PGME) regarding recommendations of the CPSM that impact on learning objectives and clinical activities for the Learner with a bloodborne pathogen.

4.5 Confidentiality of the assessment by the Bloodborne Pathogens Subcommittee or its expert panel shall be maintained in accordance with the Personal Health Information Act (PHIA), Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) and Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act.

4.6 Student Affairs shall provide counseling for all Learners who are seropositive for bloodborne pathogens regarding selection of elective rotations. Student Affairs shall liaise with their counterparts at the host university for electives external to the University of Manitoba

4.7 The Student Affairs shall provide career counseling for all MD, MD/PhD and MPAS learners who are seropositive for bloodborne pathogens, and shall assist in identifying postgraduate program(s) and/or future field(s) of practice suitable for the Learners’ specific health condition(s). 

4.8 Visiting Students who are seropositive for bloodborne pathogens may be considered for electives however, they must notify the UGME Electives Director at the time of application. Recommendations on clinical activities must be provided from the Visiting Student’s home institution and the respective professional regulatory body. The decision to accept a Visiting Student who is seropositive for bloodborne pathogens shall be made by the Electives Director in consultation with the Clerkship Director and others as may be required.

4.9 A Visiting Trainee who is known to be seropositive for bloodborne pathogens, at the time of approval of the elective must notify Student Affairs, who shall advise the CPSM regarding recommendations and/or requirements of the Bloodborne Pathogens Subcommittee that may impact on learning objectives and clinical activities of the visiting resident.

4.10 Learners will notify Student Affairs of any significant change in his/her health status and/or practice circumstances to allow for a further review by the Bloodborne Pathogens Subcommittee , if necessary to assess whether any further modifications and/or restrictions to his/her clinical practice are required.

4.11 MD, MD/PhD, MPAS leaners and Trainees are all members of the CPSM and therefore must be familiar with, and abide by, the CPSM regulations including without limitation By- Law 11: Schedule J – Bloodborne Pathogens, at the link provided in the references section.


5. REFERENCES

5.1 College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba By-Law 11: Schedule J – Bloodborne Pathogens

5.2 Roth V, and Worthington J. Implementing a Policy for Practitioners Infected with Blood- Borne Pathogens. Health Care Quarterly: Volume 8, October 2005.


6. POLICY CONTACT

Associate Dean, Student Affairs, PGME Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME

Student immune status requirements

Policy Name:

Student Immune Status Requirements

Application/ Scope:

Max Rady College of Medicine

Approved (Date):

 

Review Date:

July 2023

Revised (Date):

July 2018

Approved By:

UGME Management Committee [June 2018] MPAS Curriculum Committee [July 2018] College Executive Council [August 2018]

Faculty of Graduate Studies Program & Guideline [November 2018] Faculty of Graduate Studies Faculty Council [December 2018] Senate Committee on Instruction and Evaluation [February 2019] Senate Executive [March 2019]

Senate [April 2019]

1. PURPOSE

The Student Immune Status Requirements policy has been developed to protect the wellbeing of healthcare students, and the health of patients and communities with whom they will have contact during the curriculum. The Immune Status Requirements are derived from recommendations found in the Canadian Immunization Guide and the Canadian Tuberculosis Standards, as well as in consultation with experts in the relevant fields.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Immune Status Requirements – Immunizations and tests necessary for students to have documented in order to ensure immunity to, or absence of infection from, a range of vaccine preventable diseases. This includes immunizations and/or tests for tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, Hepatitis B, and influenza, as well as testing for tuberculosis infection.

2.2 Rady Faculty of Health Sciences Immunization Program (”Immunization Program”) – A program which provides services to all healthcare students at the Bannatyne Campus. Activities involve assessing the immune status of students, and offering optional limited healthcare services on site to students. The Immunization Program provides services to all College of Dentistry, College of Pharmacy, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Genetic Counselling, Max Rady College of Medicine, Pathology Assistant, Physician Assistant Studies, and School of Dental Hygiene students.

2.3 Student Manual – A document updated annually which describes the Immune Status Requirements for students enrolled in the Max Rady College of Medicine. The document also provides information on vaccines, vaccine preventable diseases, privacy legislation, costs of services, and additional health information relevant to students.

3.1 All students must comply with the immunization and testing requirements of the Max Rady College of Medicine, posted online in the Student Manual. The Student Manual is required reading for all new students.

3.2 Students may be granted an exemption from a specific immunization or test requirement for a medical or health condition; such conditions will generally fall under one of the following categories: allergy, pregnancy or family planning, and immunosuppression. Different immunization or testing requirements may be indicated for such students.

3.3 The Immunization Program shall provide an information session regarding Immune Status Requirements for newly registered students in the MD, MD/PhD, or MPAS program. This information session shall be scheduled as early as practicable following registration; attendance shall be mandatory.

3.4 The Immune Status Requirements may change from time to time. The Immunization Program shall discuss and seek approval for changes from all programs whose students are monitored by the Immunization Program. The Immunization Program shall notify students of the changes in requirements. It is the responsibility of students to comply with revised and applicable requirements as soon as practicable following notification.

3.5 Students who do not comply with Immune Status Requirements may be restricted from participation in components of the academic program. A student’s continued non- compliance may result in the student being asked to withdraw from the program in which the student is registered.

3.6 The Immunization Program can assist students in meeting the requirements of a specific external teaching site if these are different from the requirements of the Max Rady College of Medicine.

3.7 Student health records are protected by The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) and The Personal Health Information Act (PHIA) of Manitoba. Only the minimal amount of health information required will be collected, used, or disclosed. On occasion records may be obtained from, or shared with, certain individuals or organizations as necessary in order to determine a student’s ability to participate in patient-related activities in the student’s current program of study.

3.8 The Immunization Program will comply with The Workplace Safety and Health Act of Manitoba; in particular, that for “any person undergoing training or serving an apprenticeship at an educational institution or at any other place” for work in a healthcare facility, the University must provide the student “information about any vaccine recommended in the Canadian Immunization Guide published under authority of the Minister of Health (Canada)” and arrange for the student “to receive the recommended vaccine and pay any associated costs”.

3.9 The immune status record for every student will be kept for a minimum of 10 years after the student’s expected date of graduation. Eventually the Immunization Program will destroy all immune status record in a secure and confidential manner, consistent with accepted methods of disposal of health records. Students may request a copy of their record at any time while the program has these records. All students shall receive a copy of their immune status record upon graduation.

3.10 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.1 All students must comply with the immunization and testing requirements of the Max Rady College of Medicine. Students who may have a medical or health condition necessitating a possible exemption from a specific immunization or test requirement must notify the Immunization Program.

4.2 Students must attend the immune status orientation session at the beginning of their first year of studies.

4.3 Students must notify the Immunization Program if they wish to receive clinical services relating to the Immune Status Requirements from their own healthcare provider, or from the Immunization Program.

4.4 Students who have decided to obtain services from their own healthcare provider must provide documentation of the relevant immunizations and tests by the deadlines provided. Students who have decided to obtain services from the Immunization Program must attend school clinics or attend for blood testing diligently.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, IMMUNIZATION

4.5 The Director, Immunization oversees and directs the operations of the Immunization Program; this includes but is not limited to:

  • Reviewing national immunization and testing guidelines; updating existing documents and health forms provided to students;
  • Reviewing all health documentation sent to or obtained by the Immunization Program;
  • Contacting students to obtain additional information or clarification;
  • Providing an immune status orientation session for new students;
  • Creating an immunization clinic schedule including individual student notices;
  • Organizing and provides training sessions for student immunizers;
  • Supervising immunization and tuberculin skin test clinic for student clients;
  • Reminding students when serological testing is overdue;
  • Editing and approving letters for students;
  • Completing immunization forms for external electives;
  • Bringing issues of concern to the attention of the Business Manager, UGME, Program Director MPAS, the Associate Dean, UGME, and/or the Dean of Medicine;
  • Remaining available to students as a source of information regarding immunizations and tests;
  • Participating on national committees regarding external elective requirements.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM ASSISTANT

4.6 The Immunization Program Assistant supports the operations of the Immunization Program; this includes but is not limited to:

  • Receiving and processing Immunization Packages from new students.
  • Receiving and processing immunization and testing documentation sent to the Immunization Program;
  • Printing off a copy of the students’ provincial immunization registry records
  • Creating student health files;
  • Distributing to students immunization clinic schedules;
  • Assisting with the organization and set up of training sessions for student Immunizers;
  • Assisting with the organization and set up of immunization and tuberculin skin test clinics for student clients;
  • Sending immunization records to public health for entry into the provincial immunization registry;
  • Copying records for students on request, and at graduation;
  • Reminding students when serological testing is overdue;
  • Creating letters for students at the request of the Director, Immunization;
  • Processing completed immunization forms for external electives;
  • Bringing issues of concern to the attention of the Director, Immunization or the Business Manager, UGME;
  • Acting as the first point of contact for students requesting additional information or assistance from the Immunization Program.

5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Director, Immunization with questions respecting this policy.

 

Respiratory protection (“mask-fit”)

Policy Name:

Respiratory Protection (“Mask-Fit”)

Application/ Scope:

All registered students in the MD and MD/PhD Program

Approved (Date):

February 2018

Review Date:

February 2023

Revised (Date):

January 2018

Approved By:

UGME Management Committee [February 2018]

1. PURPOSE

Affiliated teaching sites of the Max Rady College of Medicine have respiratory protection policies and procedures to follow when health care providers are at risk of exposure to airborne infectious agents. The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) has established guiding principles for infection control measures for health care workers in acute care, chronic care and primary care facilities. This policy has been developed to protect the health and safety of health professional students, patients and staff.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 UGME – Undergraduate Medical Education

2.2 WRHA – Winnipeg Regional Health Authority

2.3 PHAC – Public Health Agency of Canada

2.4 OPAL – Online Portal for Advanced Learning

2.5 TTC – Transition to Clerkship

2.6 FIT TESTING – The process by which an individual within the medical profession is sized for a facial mask of the proper fit and size.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 All students registered in the MD or MD/PhD Program shall receive infection control instruction as early as practicable following registration; attendance shall be mandatory for this curriculum.

3.2 The Max Rady College of Medicine shall provide fit testing for N95 respirators (or respirator type identified by PHAC) following registration and prior to patient contact.

3.3 The Undergraduate Medical Education Office shall maintain a record of respirator-fit data including model, size of respirator, expiration date of respirator-fit and site of testing for each student.

3.4 Students must comply with the clinical teaching sites’ respective policies on respiratory protection in order to protect their health and/or that of patients and facility staff.

3.5 Students must report incidents of airborne infectious exposure in accordance with the Faculty’s Accidental Exposure to Infectious and Environmental Hazards Policy and Procedures.

3.6 Visiting elective students are expected to provide evidence of respirator fit-testing at the time of application, or must provide evidence of current fit-testing with an acceptable model of respirator prior to commencing patient care activities. Failure to comply may jeopardize the student’s eligibility for the elective.

3.7 WRHA will cover the cost of fit testing Med III students.

3.8  Any student who does not get fit-tested in the scheduled time will make arrangements for such at own expense and within a period of time acceptable to UGME by liaising with the Administrator, Clerkship.

3.9 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.


4. PROCEDURES

Responsibilities of the Student:

4.1 Appear for fit-testing during TTC at the assigned time in OPAL.

4.2 If the student is unable to attend at the assigned time, make arrangements to change the time with another student and inform the Administrator, Clerkship of the change.

4.3 If fit-testing is not done in accordance with the assigned schedule, arrange to have fit- testing completed and show proof of such to Administrator, Clerkship by the end of TTC for Med III students, knowing that the related costs are the responsibility of the student.

4.4 If the student does not wish to be fit tested they must provide the reason why in writing to the Associate Dean, UGME.

4.5 If proof of fit-testing is required for electives or clinical rotations, a card is provided at the time of completing the fit-testing. A copy of this card can be used for these purposes. If you prefer, please contact the Administrator, Enrolment for a letter certifying the type and size of fit-testing obtained and date of fit-testing.

Responsibilities of the Administrator, Enrolment:

4.6 Upon request from a student, provide a letter certifying the type and size of fit-testing obtained and date of fit-testing.

Responsibilities of the Administrator, Clerkship:

4.7 Organize the schedule of fit-testing for Med III students. Generally the schedule will be as follows:

  • Med III – As assigned groups during TTC Module 4, normally over a three day period.

4.8 Contact the respective office of WRHA to confirm availability of personnel to complete fit- testing and to address changes to proposed schedule as required.

4.9 Book the appropriate room within Banner and Ad Astra.

4.10 Confirm that there are no changes to TTC schedule and send a copy of confirmed schedules to WRHA.

4.11 Enter student fit-testing schedule into the respective areas of OPAL.

4.12 Liaise with WRHA personnel to obtain completed list of students, with required information for their student files, who complied with TTC scheduled test dates.

4.13 Contact students who did not complete fit-testing during their assigned date/time and ask them to liaise with WRHA to find a suitable time to complete this requirement or make note of the reason for not participating.


5. REFERENCE

5.1 UGME Policy and Procedures – Accidental Exposure to Infectious and Environmental Hazards, 2011.


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Administrator, Enrolment with questions respecting this policy.

Transfer or withdrawal

Transfer into the Undergraduate Medical Education Program

Policy Name:

Transfer into the Undergraduate Medical Education Program

Application/ Scope:

Candidates for Transfer to Undergraduate Medical Education

Approved (Date):

November 7, 2018

Review Date:

November, 2023

Revised (Date):

 

Approved By:

Admissions Committee, Max Rady College of Medicine: May 23, 2018

Reviewed by Dean’s Council Max Rady College of Medicine: June 5, 2018

College Executive Council, Max Rady College of Medicine: August 21, 2018

Senate: November 7, 2018

1.  PURPOSE

The criteria for which the Max Rady College of Medicine accepts undergraduate medical student transfers under exceptional circumstances.


2. DEFINITIONS 

2.1 Transfer: the transfer of an undergraduate medical student into the undergraduate medical education (UGME) program at the Max Rady College of Medicine.

2.2  Manitoba Resident: for purposes of undergraduate admission to the University of Manitoba, a Manitoba Resident shall be defined as a Canadian Citizen or Permanent Resident of Canada who, at the application deadline, meets any of the following four descriptions:

1. Has graduated from a Manitoba high school.

2. Has a recognized degree from a university in Manitoba

3. Has completed either one year or two consecutive years of full time academic studies in a recognized program at a university in Manitoba, while physically residing in Manitoba. The duration shall be determined by the program of study and identified in the respective Applicant Information Bulletin or Supplemental Regulations.

4. Has resided continuously in Manitoba for any two year period following high school graduation. The two year residence period shall not be considered broken where the program’s admission committee is satisfied that the applicant was temporarily out of the province on vacation, in short-term volunteer work or employment, or as a full-time student.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 Requests for transfer will only be considered from students currently enrolled in a medical school accredited by CACMS or LCME.

3.2 Transfers will only be considered on the basis of compassionate grounds, if there are extraordinary personal or family circumstances that would be alleviated by Transfer. W here it is impossible to predict all situations for which a Transfer on compassionate grounds might be considered, some such situations may include: illness within an immediate family member or personal illness of significant magnitude requiring a move to be close to such an immediate family member or to obtain treatment in Manitoba.

3.3 Requests for Transfer based solely on financial hardship will not be considered.

3.4 Transfers will only be considered for individuals who are Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents of Canada at the time of application for transfer. In deliberation about Transfers, consideration will be given to Manitoba residents.

3.5 Given the variations in curriculum for undergraduate medical education in Canada and the USA, there will only be consideration for a transfer request from students attending a medical school with Clerkship commencing in Year 3. This will allow a transfer into Year 3 only. Transfers are not permitted into Year 1, 2 or 4.

3.6 Transfers can be considered only when there is an open position, by attrition, in the class to which the student will transfer.

3.7 Students requesting a Transfer must meet academic criteria and technical standards requirements comparable to regular applicants for admission into the Undergraduate Medical Education Program.

3.8 Letters of request to Transfer must be received by the Director, Admissions, Max Rady College of Medicine by April 1 of the academic year of anticipated enrollment. Should the applicant appear to meet the eligibility criteria for transfer the Director, Admissions shall request full documentation for adjudication. Such documentation must be received by May 1 of the academic year of anticipated enrollment, and shall consist of:

i. Cover Letter outlining reasons for transfer;

ii. Release for discussion with decanal leadership at the applicant’s present school;

iii. Medical School Performance Record or equivalent document identifying performance to date in the undergraduate medical education program, notation of any leaves of absence, schedule modifications, and accommodations of curriculum; eligibility (or expected eligibility) of the individual for promotion to the next academic year must be explicitly identified. The document should also include specific comment on any infractions of the school's code of ethical and professional conduct.

iv. Transcripts sent and received from the issuing university for all pre-medical undergraduate courses of study, and from the applicant’s present school.

v. Curriculum Vitae

vi. Two letters of recommendation from present school faculty members.

vii. A disclosure of the present school curriculum blueprint and course outlines.

3.9 The Transfer committee, a subcommittee of the UGME Admissions Committee, chaired by the Director of Admissions, Max Rady College of Medicine, and membership oftwo faculty members and one medical student who are members of the UGME Admissions Committee, and the Associate Dean, UGME will meet to review any Transfer applications, and shall conduct interviews of eligible applicants. Following the interview(s) applicant(s) will be notified whether they are eligible for Transfer into an open position. Eligibility for Transfer does not infer acceptance into the Max Rady College of Medicine; admission will be contingent on there being an open position for Transfer. 

3.10 Applicants eligible for Transfer must be aware that the Max Rady College of Medicine may not know whether there will be open positions until continuing-student registration is complete. The Max Rady College of Medicine will notify eligible applicants of open positions as quickly as possible. If no position becomes open for an eligible Transfer applicant, admission cannot be deferred to subsequent year. The Max Rady College of Medicine cannot be held liable for fees and costs incurred by an eligible Transfer applicant if no position becomes available.


4. PROCEDURE STATEMENTS

N/A


5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Director, Admissions, Max Rady College of Medicine with questions respecting this policy.

Withdrawal

Policy Name:

Authorized Withdrawal or Program Withdrawal from the MD Program

Application/ Scope:

All students registered in the UGME Program

Approved (Date):

December, 2011

Review Date:

5 years from the last revised date

Revised (Date):

January 9, 2019

Approved By:

Reviewed at UGME Progress Committee: September 14, 2018

College Council, Max Rady College of Medicine: October 24, 2018

Senate: January 9, 2019

1. PURPOSE

To define the criteria and process for Authorized Withdrawals and Program Withdrawals from the Undergraduate Medical Education Program. This Policy and Procedure is intended to complement and supplement The University of Manitoba Authorized Withdrawal Policy and Authorized Withdrawal Procedure.


2. DEFINITIONS

2.1. Authorized Withdrawal - an approved withdrawal from one or more of Med I, Med II, Med III or Med IV, (each year constituting a “Term” or course under the University’s Authorized Withdrawal Policy) for medical or compassionate grounds, in accordance with the process set out in this Policy. An Authorized Withdrawal will appear on the Student’s Medical School Performance Record (“MSPR”) (also called the “Dean’s Letter”) but not on any Official Transcript issued by the University’s Registrar’s Office.

2.2. Curriculum Management System – the software application that enables the Max Rady College of Medicine and University of Manitoba to manage UGME student data.

2.3. Leave of Absence or LOA – a period of leave, established, administered and approved by the Program that enables a student to take a temporary leave from the Program, in accordance with the UGME Leaves of Absences (LOA) Policy. Any Leaves of Absence during an academic year are addressed in the UGME Leaves of Absences (LOA) Policy and not under this policy.

2.4. Program – the four-year Doctor of Medicine program at the Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba.

2.5. Program Withdrawal– a withdrawal by a student from the Program in its entirety, who no longer wishes to participate in the Program, and who does not meet the criteria for an Authorized Withdrawal. A Program Withdrawal under this Policy is distinguishable from a Voluntary Withdrawal under the University’s Voluntary Withdrawal Policy, which contemplates withdrawal from a particular course in accordance with certain timelines, without academic penalty. Such parameters do not apply in the Program, as each academic year of the Program, i.e., Med I, Med II, Med III and Med IV constitute a “Term” and course under the University’s Academic Calendar, and each Program Term must be successfully completed in order to move on to the next Program Term, in accordance with the UGME Policy on Promotion and Failure. A Program Withdrawal granted under this Policy will appear on the Student’s MSPR (also called the Dean’s Letter) and on any Official Transcript issued by the University’s Registrar’s Office.

2.6. UGME – Undergraduate Medical Education.

2.7. Voluntary Withdrawal – a registration option that enables students in some programs to withdraw from a course of courses after the registration revision period without academic penalty. This option is not available to students in the Program.


3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1. Any student considering withdrawal or temporary leave from the Program should first meet with the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME, to discuss the options available to the student, and consider all possible implications (e.g., academic progression, financial aid eligibility, student visa requirements) prior to making a decision. The student may also wish to consult with the Office of Student Advocacy (including discussing the matter of possible fee appeals to the Registrar’s Office).

3.2. Ceasing to attend classes, rotations or other course requirements, regardless of reason, will not constitute an Authorized Withdrawal, Program Withdrawal or Leave of Absence. Students who do not complete a Program Withdrawal, receive an Authorized Withdrawal, or receive an approved Leave of Absence remain enrolled in the Program and will receive a final grade.

3.3. The Max Rady College of Medicine must provide an annual report on Authorized Withdrawal and Program Withdrawal applications and approvals to the Provost and Vice-President (Academic), University of Manitoba.

Program Withdrawal

3.4. If a student wishes a Program Withdrawal, the student shall provide a request in writing to the Associate Dean, UGME.

3.5. The Associate Dean, UGME shall provide written confirmation of the student’s decision of Program Withdrawal to:

(a) the student;

(b) the Administrator, Enrolment, Max Rady College of Medicine; and

(c) the Administrators, Clerkship, Pre-Clerkship, Clerkship Evaluations and Pre-Clerkship Evaluations (as applicable).

3.6. Upon Program Withdrawal, the student is considered to have withdrawn from the Program with no anticipated date of return.

3.7. If, at a later date, a student with a Program Withdrawal wishes to return to the Program, the student must re-apply for Program admission as if he or she were a new applicant and in accordance with the Program admission and eligibility requirements as they then exist and are set out in the Program Applicant Information Bulletin.

Authorized Withdrawal

3.8. An Authorized Withdrawal may be approved under the following circumstances:

(a) Medical Grounds. When a serious event, including but not limited to illness, accident or injury affects a student’s ability to attend classes and/or complete course requirements; and/or

(b) Compassionate Grounds. When an extraordinary personal circumstance, including but not limited to a serious illness or death of a significant person in a student’s life affects a student’s ability to attend classes and/or complete course requirements.

3.9. If a student wishes an Authorized Withdrawal, the student shall provide the request for Authorized Withdrawal in writing to the Associate Dean, UGME. The request shall be made prior to the end of the Term to which the Authorized Withdrawal applies. The Authorized Withdrawal request shall include:

(a) A letter from the student requesting an Authorized Withdrawal with an explanation detailing how the circumstances or symptoms affected his/her ability to attend classes and/or complete course requirements;

(b) Supporting documentation including but not limited to:

a. Letters or documents from objective, credible and verifiable health care professionals.

Students are encouraged to consult the Guidelines for Health Care Professionals that are available through the University’s Office of Student Advocacy;

b. A funeral program and/or obituary;

c. A police report or auto accident report and/or

d. Travel receipts (e.g. airline, rail, bus).

3.10. The Associate Dean, UGME shall determine whether an Authorized Withdrawal is approved, taking into consideration the Medical Grounds and/or Compassionate Grounds affecting the student as well as the student’s current academic record and if so approved, the conditions for re- enrolment.

3.11. An Authorized Withdrawal shall have conditions for re-enrolment, as determined by the Associate Dean, UGME. The conditions for re-enrolment shall include:

(a) At the time of the request for re-enrolment, the student has met the academic criteria and technical standards requirements or will satisfactorily complete any such requirements prior to re-enrolment.

(b) The year of re-entry (e.g., Med I, Med II, Med III or Med IV) will be based on the educational level of the student at the time of the request for re-enrolment, based on the review of the Associate Dean, UGME, considering curriculum requirements as they then exist compared to when the AW was granted.

(c) The student must comply with all other regular Program requirements, including providing evidence of student registration with the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba, providing updated clearance checks for criminal records, adult abuse registry and child abuse registry, compliance with applicable immunization requirements and CPR requirements, and ensuring payment of all University tuition fees and expenses.

(d) If a student has been on Authorized Withdrawal for three (3) years or longer, the student shall be required to re-apply for admission through the regular first-year admissions process as if she/he were a new applicant and meet the Program admission and eligibility requirements as they then exist and are set out in the Program Applicant Information Bulletin.

3.12. Additional conditions for re-enrolment may include, without limitation: (a) Meeting with an academic advisor;

(b) Producing a certificate of fitness to return to studies; (c) Making use of support services on campus;

(d) Re-enrolment subject to availability of space given that the Program is a limited enrolment program.

3.13. If the student receives an Authorized Withdrawal, the Associate Dean, UGME shall provide written confirmation of the Authorized Withdrawal with the conditions for re-enrollment to:

(a) the student;

(b) the Administrator, Enrolment, Max Rady College of Medicine; and

(c) the Administrators, Clerkship, Pre-Clerkship, Clerkship Evaluations and Pre-Clerkship Evaluations (as applicable).

3.14. If a student is unsuccessful in receiving an Authorized Withdrawal, the student may appeal the decision to the UGME Student Appeals Committee, within ten (10) working days of the decision, in accordance with the process set out in the Undergraduate Medical Education Student Appeals (UGME SAC) Policy.

3.15. If, at a later date, a student with an Authorized Withdrawal wishes to return to the Program, the student should discuss their potential re-enrolment and actions that must be taken to facilitate a re-enrolment with the Associate Dean, UGME, and/or Associate Dean, Student Affairs, UGME. Should the student wish to re-enrol, the student shall provide a written request with appropriate documentation showing compliance with the conditions of re-enrolment to the Associate Dean, UGME.

3.16. Within thirty (30) working days of receipt of the student’s re-enrolment request, the Associate Dean, UGME will review the request, meet with the student if required, and determine the student’s eligibility for re-enrolment based upon the conditions for re-enrolment.

3.17. The Associate Dean, UGME, will communicate, in writing, the decision regarding re-enrolment (which may include a request for further documentation to corroborate documentation already received) and appropriate date for return, if applicable, to:

(a) the student;

(b) the Administrator, Enrolment, Max Rady College of Medicine;

(c) the Administrators, Clerkship, Pre-Clerkship, Clerkship Evaluations and Pre-Clerkship Evaluations (as applicable); and

(d) the University’s Registrar’s Office.

3.18. If re-enrolment is denied, and/or the student is otherwise not accepting of the decision of the Associate Dean, UGME, the student may appeal the decision to the UGME Student Appeals Committee, within ten (10) working days of the decision, in accordance with the process set out in the Undergraduate Medical Education Student Appeals (UGME SAC) Policy.


4. PROCEDURES

Responsibilities of the Administrator, Enrolment

Upon receipt of the letter confirming Authorized Withdrawal or Program Withdrawal from the Associate Dean, UGME, the Administrator, Enrolment:

4.1. Contacts the Registrar’s Office to provide student’s full name, student number, type of withdrawal and date of withdrawal. Liaises with Registrar’s Office personnel to update the student’s Aurora file and place student file on permanent hold;

4.2. Ensures that the student’s contact information is up to date in AURORA Student;

4.3. Liaises with Financial Services to ensure that all financial obligations to the University for the student are completed;

4.4. Contacts the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba to inform them of student’s withdrawal and date of withdrawal;

4.5. Creates permanent file for student and forwards to off-site storage;

4.6. Removes the student from any existing Curriculum Management System class lists and changes student status;

4.7. Collects lock, locker keys and mailbox keys from the student and updates lists as required. Responsibilities of the Administrator, Clerkship:

Upon receipt of the letter confirming Authorized Withdrawal or Program Withdrawal from the Associate Dean, UGME, the Administrator, Clerkship:

4.8. Collects the student’s pager and return for deactivation to the Manitoba e-Health Telecommunications Office;

4.9. Collects the student’s hospital access card and arrange for deactivation with hospital Security Services;

4.10. Arranges for deactivation of hospital computer privileges with Manitoba e-Health;

4.11. Arranges for deactivation of clerkship stipend payment with WRHA-HRSS Office;

4.12. Removes student from all clerkship groups and notifies department administrators. Responsibilities of the Administrator, Pre-Clerkship:

Upon receipt of the letter confirming Authorized Withdrawal or Program Withdrawal from the Associate Dean, UGME, the Administrator, Pre-Clerkship:

4.13. Removes the student from any Pre-Clerkship student listings/groups in the Curriculum Management System;

4.14. Removes the student from external records outside of the Curriculum Management System such as attendance sheets or student listings sent to departments.


5. REFERENCES

5.1. University of Manitoba Authorized Withdrawal Policy

5.2. University of Manitoba Authorized Withdrawal Procedure

5.3. University of Manitoba Voluntary Withdrawal Policy

5.4. Undergraduate Medical Education Leaves of Absence (LOA) Policy 

5.5. Undergraduate Medical Education Student Appeals (UGME SAC) Policy


6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact the Associate Dean, UGME, Max Rady College of Medicine with questions respecting this policy.

Travel - Max Rady College of Medicine

International travel - UGME

Policy Name:

International Travel

Application/ Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students

Approved (Date):

 

Review Date:

August 2023

Revised (Date):

August 2018

Approved By:

Curriculum Executive Committee

1. PURPOSE

Increasingly, Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) students are requesting Exposures and Selectives in international settings. The medical and cultural benefits of these experiences are recognized by the Max Rady College of Medicine. International Exposures and Selectives pose potential risks for the trainee and the receiving community/institution, therefore specific preparation, supervision and follow-ups are required. For International Exposures and Selectives, students may be required to carry out special preparation, particularly important for those planning to work in low resource settings and developing countries.

This policy will outline the requirements for application and successful completion of International Exposures and Selectives to receive faculty support and recognition for these activities.

2. DEFINITION

2.1 Pre-Clerkship – Year I and Year II of the UGME program.

2.2 Clerkship – Year III and IV of the UGME program.

2.3 Selective – Three (3) week block in February and March during Module Seven (7) of the curriculum.

2.4 Exposure – An experience in a clinical setting taking place during the summer months of

Pre-Clerkship of the MD Program.

2.5 Final In-Training Evaluation Report (FITER) – A comprehensive summary of student performance as a necessary component of their Clerkship training which demonstrates the full range of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) required of a physician. Electronically distributed at the start of each rotation, FITERs must be completed and submitted electronically at the end of the rotation. This should include a narrative description of medical student performance.

2.6 Pre-Departure Training – Didactic presentations and small-group sessions covering the following pertinent topics: personal and patient safety, availability of emergency care (i.e. resources in case of natural disasters, political instability, exposure to disease), preparation for medical placements, common clinical diseases, intercultural communication, how to incorporate global health into your training, cultural sensitivity, potential challenges to the code of medical ethics adopted by the home school and past Exposure/Selective experience presentations given by medical students.

2.7   Clinical supervision – Intervention that is provided by a senior member of a profession to a junior member of that same profession with the purpose of enhancing the students’ skills, competence and confidence.

  • Such intervention monitors that the quality of professional services offered to the patients is deemed to be safe, ethical and competent and ensures compliance with professional and organizational treatment standards and practice.

3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 International Travel must take place at the designated time in the summer months for Pre- Clerkship students and during Module Seven, Transition to Residency.

3.2 Students are only allowed one (1) International Exposure/Selective during Module Seven.

3.3 Student’s international supervisor must be a practicing physician able to ensure good quality clinical supervision that matches the student’s level of training. Student must not be supervised by an immediate, extended, or in-law family member.

3.4 Students are strongly encouraged to attend a travel clinic prior to departure.

3.5 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.

4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.1 Request for International Exposures/Selectives must be submitted to the Director, Electives via email a minimum of three (3) months prior to their International Exposure/Selective start date. This will allow the student to properly prepare for the International Selective and allow enough time for required immunizations, visas, passports, and pre-departure training.

4.2 The student must include the following information with their request:

  • Provide as much information on where you are planning to do your International Exposure/Selective (Country, Title of Exposure/Selective, Supervisor’s Name, Name & Address of Hospital, Dates of International Exposure/Selective, etc.)
  • Student is required to investigate the intended location and provide your analysis of the risk factors that will be posed by the requested placement by attaching a document with the application.
    • Students can get access to the latest medical and travel security advice through the U of M online service: INTERNATIONAL SOS at: https://www.internationalsos.com/medical-and-security-services login with membership password: 27AYCA524935 or Visit the link below to get information about country's risk factors- i.e. political instability, infectious diseases, crime, etc.
    • The website address is that of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), which provides travel updates regarding health and safety around the world. The website address is: https://travel.gc.ca/travelling/advisories.
  • Identify the purpose of the International Exposure/Selective educational experience.

4.3 Individual students are responsible for applying for and covering the cost of any passport, visa, comprehensive insurance (such as health, evacuation and repatriation), and any other requirements.

4.4 Once the student receives approval from the Director, Electives, the student must complete the following:

  • Travel Forms (Emergency Contact/Liability Waiver) – submit to ElectivesUGME@umanitoba.ca.
  • Mandatory Pre-Departure Training session through UM Learn, organized by the Administrator, Electives. This training is required for all those undertaking International Exposures/Selectives in low and middle resource settings, for areas designated medium to high risk by the Foreign Affairs and International Trade Travel Reports & Warnings website, and for culturally diverse destinations.
    • Students are exempt from pre-departure training (but are still encouraged to attend) if their International Exposure/Selective takes place in developed countries approved by the Director, Electives.
  • Students may be required to take part in Post-Exposure/Selective debriefing sessions, as appropriate. For all students, the Office of Student Services, along with the Student Affairs, are available, at any time, to students wishing to debrief about their experience.

4.5 Upon completion of the International Exposure/Selective, all students are required to provide a Post-Exposure/Selective summary reflecting on their overall educational experience. The summary will include an overall assessment of their learning experience and the adequacy of the instructional site.

4.6 Upon completion of the International Exposure/Selective, all students are responsible for ensuring that both a student evaluation and preceptor evaluation are completed, and emailed to the Administrator, Electives, UGME. International Selective students will complete the Student Evaluation and ensure that their preceptor completes the Preceptor Evaluation, which are distributed through the Curriculum Management System.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTOR, ELECTIVES

4.7 A student’s International Exposure/Selective will be pre-approved by the Director, Electives if the following requirements are met:

  • The destination region for the International Exposure/Selective does not carry a warning of “Avoid Non-Essential Travel” or “Avoid All Travel” on the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada Travel Reports & Warnings webpage.
  • Student has identified the purpose of the International Exposure/Selective educational experience and what they hope to accomplish while participating in their international placement.
  • Student has provided complete addresses of the place they will be working as well as the place they will be staying, for emergency response purposes and supervisors name and title.
  • Student has completed Pre-Departure Training.

4.8 NOTE: Once the International Exposure/Selective has been approved by the Director, Electives, it is possible to revoke this decision and the International Exposure/Selective can be cancelled due to a change in conditions in the country to where the student is going, loss of in-country supervisor, OR arising academic or professional concerns on the part of the student.

4.9 The Director, Electives will review all submitted Post-Exposure/Selective summaries and evaluations from completed International Exposures/Selectives to assess the quality of the teaching and of the site so as to inform future decisions regarding approval of other requests for the same International Exposure/Selective experience from other medical students.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADMINISTRATOR, ELECTIVES

4.10 Once the student is approved for the International Exposure/Selective by the Director, Electives; the Administrator, Electives will request that the student complete and return the Travel Forms.

4.11 The Administrator, Electives will enroll students in UMLearn for the Pre-Departure Training course and communicate to the students that they have been enrolled and are required to complete the training. The Administrator, Electives will keep track on each student’s progress.

5. REFERENCES

5.1 Summer Early Exposure website: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/health_sciences/medicine/education/undergraduate/summer earlyexposure.html

5.2 Electives website:

http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/health_sciences/medicine/education/undergraduate/electives.html

5.3 Summer Early Exposure Application Form: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/health_sciences/medicine/education/undergraduate/media/A pplication_-_Early_Exposure_-_Internal_Students_Mar_2018.pdf

5.4 Summer Early Exposure Travel Forms: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/health_sciences/medicine/education/undergraduate/media/T ravel_Forms(1).pdf

5.5 Summer Early Exposure Student Form: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/health_sciences/medicine/education/undergraduate/media/S tudent_Evaluation_-_Rev_Feb_2016.pdf

5.6 Summer Early Exposure Preceptor Form: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/health_sciences/medicine/education/undergraduate/media/P receptor_Evaluation_-_Rev_Feb_2016.pdf

6. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Director, Electives with questions respecting this policy.

 

Student travel - UGME

Policy Name:

Student Travel

Application/ Scope:

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Students

Approved (Date):

June 2018

Review Date:

June 2023

Revised (Date):

June 2018

Approved By:

UGME Management Committee [June 2018]

1. PURPOSE

Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) will provide funding and support to medical students to attend identified national/international conferences/meetings related to their required participation as student representatives of the University of Manitoba.

This policy does not apply to financial support for conferences and/or meetings that are generally funded through UGME Awards, Max Rady College of Medicine. 

2. DEFINITIONS

2.1 Academic year – runs from August of one year, to August of the next year.

2.2 CCME – Canadian Conference on Medical Education

2.3 CFMS – Canadian Federation of Medical Students

2.4 MMSA – Manitoba Medical Students Association

3. POLICY STATEMENTS

3.1 A student seeking support under this policy must be in good academic standing and currently registered with the University of Manitoba and the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba.

3.2 UGME will fund student participation, within available financial resources upon completion of required application (see Appendix 1) and upon recommendation of MMSA.

3.3 A student seeking to attend a conference dealing with leadership in student government or leadership in global health may be supported dependent on available financial resources and upon completion of required application.

3.4 Student participation in national/international leadership events will be at the sole discretion of the Associate Dean, UGME, upon the completion of required application.

3.5 International student travel that is identified from specific trust funding and allocated through UGME will be administered by UGME.

3.6 The allocation of funding will be determined on an annual basis and communicated when the budgeting process is complete.

3.7 Each student must comply with the Max Rady College of Medicine Guidelines for Student Travel (Appendix 2) which is an adaptation of the University of Manitoba Travel Services guidelines.

3.8 This policy will be reviewed on the first anniversary of its original passage and every five years thereafter.

4. PROCEDURES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

4.1 The student seeking funding must complete The University of Manitoba Max Rady College of Medicine Student Travel Application for UGME Funded National and International Conferences/Meetings Form (see Appendix 1) and submit to the Assistant to the Associate Dean, UGME and Business Manager.

4.2 Submissions must be returned no later than two months prior to conference/meeting via fax to 789-3929 or in person to 260 Brodie Centre.

4.3 The student will pay for all remaining costs and submit all original receipts and invoices for reimbursement to the Assistant to the Associate Dean, UGME and Business Manager (see Appendix 2).

4.4 The student must submit all original documentation no later than two months after travel is complete. The student will receive three reminders prior to final deadline date. Reimbursement of receipts/invoices received after the stated deadline date will not be provided.

RESPONSIBILITY OF UGME FACULTY AND STAFF

4.5 Accept students to receive funding, as per the recommendation of MMSA (as per Policy Statement 3.2).

  • CFMS Fall AGM will accept 2 students – Max $2500 (combined total)
  • CFMS Spring AGM/CCME will accept 2 students – Max $2500 (combined total)
  • Western Dean’s will accept 1 student – Max $1250

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE ASSISTANT TO THE ASSOCIATE DEAN, UGME AND BUSINESS MANAGER

4.6 The Assistant to the Associate Dean, UGME and Business Manager will contact the student to confirm flight information and will make the flight arrangements.

5. POLICY CONTACT

Please contact Business Manager, UGME with questions respecting this policy.

GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT TRAVEL

FLIGHTS:

1) The Assistant to the Associate Dean, UGME and Business Manager will contact the student to obtain personal information and arrange their flight.

2) The student must book the following using their personal funds and apply for reimbursement after the trip:

  • Hotel
  • Conference registration
  • Transportation (ex. taxi, bus, car rental, parking)
  • Meals (not including alcohol)

Entertainment will not be reimbursed (ex. movies, pay-per-TV, etc.)

REIMBURSEMENT:

Upon returning from a trip, the student must submit the following to the Assistant to the Associate Dean, UGME and Business Manager:

a) All original receipts and invoices (Note: All meal receipts should include both the itemized receipt and the payment receipt.)

b) For international travel, a credit card statement will also be required. All information, other than name and the specific items to be reimbursed, may be blacked out.

Only original boarding passes and receipts/invoices will be accepted. In special cases, Travel Services may accept computer receipts/invoice but this is not guaranteed. Handwritten receipts (apart from the ones taxis give you) will not be accepted.

IMPORTANT TO NOTE:

All original receipts and invoices must be handed no later than two months after returning from trip. The student will receive three emailed and written reminders to submit their receipts and a final deadline date. Reimbursement of receipts/invoices received after the stated deadline date will not be provided.

If there are any questions, please contact the Assistant to the Associate Dean, UGME and Business Manager.

UGME Student Travel Application Form

School of Dental Hygiene

Accommodation for Undergraduate Dental Hygiene Students with Disabilities

Preamble

The term "disability" is used to summarize a great number of different functional limitations and activity restrictions.

It is identified that people may be disabled by physical, intellectual or sensory impairment, medical conditions or mental illness, and that these may be permanent or transitory in nature.

The Manitoba Human Rights Code identifies that all individuals be accorded equality of opportunity, and that reasonable accommodation be made for those with special needs.

The University of Manitoba is committed to facilitating the integration of students with disabilities into the University community through to reasonable accommodation of the needs of persons with documented disabilities by making efforts to create a barrier-free campus and provide other supports and services within the limits of available resources.

The University will endeavor to meet the identified needs of each student by adapting services, courses, and programs as feasible, and as resources allow, while maintaining appropriate academic standards.

The University expects that the responsibility for making reasonable accommodations will be shared by the students, instructors and support staff.

Within the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene, each student with a disability is entitled to reasonable accommodation that will assist her or him to meet academic as well as technical standards; the technical standards are identified in a policy entitled Essential Skills and Abilities for Admission, Promotion and Graduation in the Dip. (Dent. Hyg.) Program.

Accommodation for Students with Disabilities

Dissemination of this Policy: This policy and the document entitled Essential Skills and Abilities for Admission, Promotion and Graduation in the Dental Hygiene Program are posted on the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene website: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/dentistry/dentalhygiene/future/index.html.

Both documents are consistent with the University of Manitoba policy entitled Accessibility for Students with Disabilities.

Students are informed of the procedures to request accommodation for disabilities via orientation sessions organized just prior to classes for in-coming students and through an e-mail sent to all students at the beginning of each academic year.

Pre-application Information: The admissions information posted on the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene website: http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/dentistry/dentalhygiene/future/index.html will contain the statement:

“Students concerned about the extent to which they meet the technical standards as outlined in the policy entitled Essential Skills and Abilities for Admission, Promotion and Graduation in the Dip.

(Dent. Hyg.) Program, with or without accommodation, are advised to contact the Director for the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene.”

Pre-application advice that is given to students will be confidential and independent of the admissions process, any records generated in this regard shall be retained independently from a student’s application file, and if applicable, the student’s academic record of the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene.

Accommodation Committee: An Accommodation Committee of the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry will be established to oversee the process of integrating students with disabilities who meet the technical standards as identified in the document entitled Essential Skills and Abilities (Technical Standards) for Admission, Promotion and Graduation in the Dental Hygiene Program.

The Accommodation Committee will be chaired by the Director, School of Dental Hygiene or designate, and membership will include the Coordinator of the University of Manitoba Student Accessibility ServicesStudent Accessibility Services or designate, and two full-time Faculty members drawn from the School of Dental Hygiene or from a clinical Department in Dentistry.

The Accommodation Committee may elect to consult with other individuals who may include: other members of Faculty who may be directly involved with specific components of the program and/or student; legal counsel; the Registrar of the College of Dental Hygienists of Manitoba, or designate; and others as deemed appropriate by the Committee.

The Accommodation Committee shall correspond with the Chair, Committee for Selection in Dental Hygiene, and/or the Associate Dean (Academic) as dictated by the circumstances of individual students.

The Accommodation Committee shall submit an annual report of the Committee’s work to Dental Faculty Council Executive.

Student Responsibilities: It is the student’s responsibility to self-identify to the Chair of the Accommodation Committee in a timely proactive fashion.

Where possible, students are requested to declare their needs to Student Accessibility Services at the time of application, or upon admission, or as soon as possible before registration.

Accommodations cannot be made retroactive to an examination or clinical evaluation.

Use of an Intermediary: There are a few circumstances in which an intermediary may be appropriate.

However, no disability can be accommodated if the intermediary has to provide cognitive support, substitute for cognitive skills, perform a physical examination and/or in any way supplement clinical and ethical judgment.

The appropriateness of an intermediary will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Confidentiality

Confidential records of all information regarding accommodation will be placed in the student's file and kept secured in Student Accessibility Services Office.

The nature of the disability, the nature of the accommodation, the dates of implementation, as well as any subsequent modification to the original accommodation will be kept on file.

This information will not be placed in, nor form any part of the student's academic file.

Students will be informed that in order for a requested accommodation to be implemented it may be necessary to share relevant information on a need to know, confidential basis with individuals involved in providing the accommodation (e.g., faculty, clinical supervisors, physical plant, etc.) The specific logistical requests for accommodation will be forwarded to those responsible for facilitating them; disclosure of the nature of the disability may be required.

Students must consent in writing to this degree of communication in order to permit the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene to meet their needs.

Procedures

Preadmission: No inquiries regarding an applicant student’s disability shall be made by individuals involved in the admissions process.

Students who meet the technical standards but may require accommodation for the admissions process or degree program can direct requests for information about reasonable accommodation to the Director for the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene, or Student Accessibility Services.

Such requests are kept independent from a student’s admission file.

Application process: An applicant with a disability may request accommodation for the application process.

The request shall be directed to the Chair of the Accommodation Committee, or Student Accessibility Services.

Newly registered students: A student who gains acceptance to the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene may direct a request for reasonable accommodation for disability to the Chair of the Accommodation Committee, or Student Accessibility Services.

The student requesting the accommodation is responsible for providing Student Accessibility Services with medical documentation to establish that the student has a disability, such that recommendations for accommodation may be determined to be appropriate for the student’s condition.

If the disability is not documented or if the medical or other relevant documentation is not current or complete, the student may be directed to Student Accessibility Services of the University of Manitoba for a preliminary assessment.

The student will then be directed by the Student Accessibility Services office to the appropriate professional for an assessment and for accommodation recommendations.

If there is a delay in acquiring a comprehensive assessment, the Accommodation Committee will meet to develop an interim plan.

The Accommodation Committee will meet with the student to discuss the accommodation plan.

The Accommodation Committee will contact the appropriate persons to facilitate the recommendations.

The Committee will ensure that appropriate individualized accommodation is implemented proactively as the student moves through the Dip. (Dent. Hyg.) Program.

The individual plan will be reviewed as frequently as required as the student progresses through the curriculum, and upon request by the student.

Plans will be reviewed by the Committee to determine whether further accommodation is reasonable in the case of a student who does not progress as expected.

Students in their course of study: Should a student become aware of a disability, or acquire an impairment, condition, or illness during their undergraduate dental education program, the student may direct a request for accommodation for disability to the Chair of the Accommodation Committee, or Student Accessibility Services.

Processes will be invoked as identified above.

Accommodation for disability if required and approved shall be prospective, not retroactive.

Should reasonable accommodation for disability be unsuccessful in assisting the student in attaining the requisite skills and abilities, the student may be requested to withdraw from the dental hygiene program.

Students seeking readmission: Policies and processes regarding students seeking readmission shall be the same as identified above.

Appeals

A student who disagrees with the recommendations of the Accommodation Committee should in the first instance address his/her concerns with the Accommodation Committee.

A student has the right to appeal through the standard appeal process within the Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, School of Dental Hygiene.

The student may appeal a judgment to the relevant appeal committee of the University of Manitoba.

Students are encouraged to consult with the Student Advocacy office for information and assistance about the appeal processes.

For information about Respectful Work and Learning Environment policy, students are encouraged to contact Equity Services.

Document Review

The Accommodation Committee will review this policy biannually.

This policy document is adapted from the Max Rady College of Medicine policy document entitled Accommodation for Undergraduate Medical Students with Disabilities.

That document was adapted with permission from the policy document entitled Implementation Policy: Students with Disabilities in the MD Program, approved in 2007 by the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, and is influenced by the AAMC document entitled Medical Students with Disabilities: A Generation of Practice, published June, 2005.

Reference may be made to the University of Manitoba Policy entitled Accessibility for Students with Disabilities.