ACE | Arts, Community, and Education

The Master of Education in Arts, Community, and Education follows a social and environmental justice agenda, where students will explore contemporary theories and practices in arts education, such as critical and aesthetic philosophies, arts-based research, community arts and the role of cultural institutions in shaping society. Students will consider art education as a social, cultural and historical process as individual and community transformation, whether the student chooses to work in formal or informal art education settings.

Thesis-based Route

18 credit hours, plus thesis 

Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. For the thesis, students will engage with one or more research questions, generate/gather and interpret data, and share the outcomes of their investigations, explorations and understandings in any format agreed amongst committee members and supported by a final oral presentation (thesis defense).  

Core Courses (6 credit hours) 

  • EDUB 7000 Contemporary Perspectives and Practices in Arts Education 
  • EDUB 7030 The Arts in Education 

Research Courses (3 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education 

plus 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000 level in Education

Concentration Courses (6 credit hours) 

Student selects a total of 6 credit hours of coursework at the 7000 level in the concentration in consultation with their advisor. 

Thesis 

Course Level Restrictions 

  • 12 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; 
  • the remaining 6 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties. 

Course-based Route

30 credit hours + comprehensive exam 

The student and program advisor will select courses that lead to mastery within arts education. As the course component is completed, the student, with the program advisor's support, prepares a project of a suitable form or an examination that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. This project or exam culminates in a final oral presentation. 

Core Courses (6 credit hours) 

  • EDUB 7000 Contemporary Perspectives and Practices in Arts Education 
  • EDUB 7030 The Arts in Education

Research Courses (3 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education 

Concentration (21 credit hours) 

  • Students select a total of 21 credit hours of course work at the 5000 or 7000 level in consultation with the advisor. 

Comprehensive Exam 

Course Level Restrictions 

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; 
  • the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties. 

Graduate Program Advisors

Joanna Black 
ACE Arts, Community and Education 
Research Interests: Digital technologies; Human Rights issues; Learning for social Change; Visual research creation; Environmental issues in the Anthropocene. 
Contact: (204) 474-9028
Joanna.Black@umanitoba.ca

Bruno de Oliveira Jayme 
ACE Arts, Community and Education 
Contact: (204) 474-6886
Bruno.Jayme@umanitoba.ca

Graham Lea
ACE Arts, Community and Education 
Research Interests: Research-based theatre; Narrative in mathematics education; Theatre/drama in health and teacher education. 
Contact: (204) 474-6786
Graham.Lea@umanitoba.ca

Beryl Peters 
ACE Arts, Community and Education 
Research Interests: Arts education; Multiliteracies; Teacher education; Critical pedagogy. 
Contact: (204) 474-9043
Beryl.Peters@umanitoba.ca

Adult and Post-Secondary Education

The Master of Education in Adult and Post-Secondary Education program is designed to develop leadership in adult education in a wide variety of settings, including universities, community colleges, technical and vocational education, adult learning centres, business and industry and health and social services agencies.

Please note that we are not accepting applications for the M.Ed. program specialization in Adult and Post-Secondary Education for 2024. 

The Master of Education in Adult and Post-Secondary Education balances research, theory, policy and practice and is based on four primary components: a foundational knowledge base, a professional knowledge base, methodological knowledge base and experiential learning.

We embrace the trend to use information and communication technologies for removing distance as a barrier to education, and making learning more accessible. We currently offer several of our courses online and in distributed modalities. Our course, EDUA 7420 Program Planning in Adult Education, won the Web CT 2001 International Exemplary Award for the exemplary use of technology to deliver a distance education course while maintaining strong academic rigor and content robustness.

Thesis-based Route

18 credit hours, plus thesis

Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. For the thesis, students will select a research question, gather and interpret data, present the investigation and its results as a written document with the program advisor’s support. An oral defense of the thesis culminates the program.
Coursework and Thesis

Core Courses (6 credit hours)
  • EDUA 7402 Development of Adult Education and Post-Secondary Education (3)
  • EDUA 7404 Lifelong Learning in Educational Settings (3)

Research Courses (6 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023 ) 
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (for students admitted fall 2023 and onward) 
  • plus 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000-level in Education or 3000 level or above in other faculties

Plus an additional 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000-level in the Faculty of Education or at the 3000-level or above in other Faculties.

Concentration (6 credit hours)

The thesis is the focus of the concentration. In addition, students will select six credit hours at the 7000-level coursework from the courses listed below.

  • EDUA 7406 Topics in Adult Education and Post-Secondary Education (3)
  • EDUA 7420 Program Planning in Adult Education (3)
  • EDUA 7412 Governance of Post-Secondary Education (3)
  • EDUA 7810 Evaluating Educational Programs (3)
  • EDUA 7414 Seminar in the Administration of Post-Secondary Education (3)
  • EDUB 7416 Teaching and Learning in Post-Secondary Education (3)
  • EDUB 7420 The Study of Teaching (3)
  • EDUB 7450 Seminar in Educational Technology (3)
  • EDUB 7460 Information Technology & Education (3)
  • EDUB 7560 Theory & Practice of Curriculum Design and Development (3)

or other courses approved by the advisor and department head.

Thesis
Course Level Restrictions
  • 12 credit hours must be at the 7000 level, the remaining 6 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

Course-based Route

Course-Based Route

30 credit hours plus comprehensive examination

The student and program advisor select courses that lead to mastery within Adult and Post-Secondary Education and the concentration. As the course component is completed, the student, with the program advisor’s support, prepares a document that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. The document can be a final examination or a project, which may culminate with an oral defense of the document.
Coursework and Comprehensive Option

Core Courses (9 credit hours)
  • EDUA 7402 Development of Adult Education and Post-Secondary Education (3)
  • EDUA 7404 Lifelong Learning in Educational Settings (3)
  • EDUA 7408 Seminar in Adult Education and Post-Secondary Education (3)

Research Courses (3 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023) 
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (3) (for students admitted fall 2023 onward) 
Concentration (9 credit hours)

Students will select 9 credit hours from the courses listed below:

  • EDUA 7406 Topics in Adult Education and Post-Secondary Education (3)
  • EDUA 7420 Program Planning in Adult Education (3)
  • EDUA 7412 Governance of Post-Secondary Education (3)
  • EDUA 7810 Evaluating Educational Programs (3)
  • EDUA 7414 Seminar in the Administration of Post-Secondary Education (3)
  • EDUB 7416 Teaching and Learning in Post-Secondary Education (3)
  • EDUB 7420 The Study of Teaching (3)
  • EDUB 7450 Seminar in Educational Technology (3)
  • EDUB 7460 Information Technology & Education (3)
  • EDUB 7560 Theory & Practice of Curriculum Design and Development (3)

or equivalent courses from other faculties or universities approved by the advisor and department head.

Electives (9 credit hours)

The intent of these electives is to allow students to pursue their specific interests such as Second Language Education, Nursing Education, Medical Education etc.

Comprehensive Exam
Course Level Restrictions

18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level, the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

Graduate Program Advisors

Joe Curnow
Research Interests: Politicization, anti-racism and anti-colonialism, youth-led social movements. 
Contact: (204) 474-7111
Joe.Curnow@umanitoba.ca

Robert Mizzi
Research interests: Educational policy and politics; Teacher professionalism; Equity and diversity studies (with a focus on LGBTQ topics); Leading adult learning organizations; Educator work and welfare; Workplace learning. 
Contact: (204) 474-9042
Robert.Mizzi@umanitoba.ca

Robert Renaud
Research Interests: Post-Secondary Education; Measurement & Evaluation. 
Contact: (204) 474-9017
Robert.Renaud@umanitoba.ca

Merli Tamtik
Research interests: Policy coordination in multi-level governance, science and research policy, innovation and ways of knowing, international and multicultural education, transatlantic cooperation, international educational partnerships, research methods in social sciences. 
Contact: (204) 474-9606
Merli.Tamtik@umanitoba.ca

Counselling Psychology

The Master’s Program in Counselling Psychology prepares graduates to integrate critical knowledge and understanding of the theoretical bases of counselling, and develops counselling skills. The model of training is that of a scientist-practitioner with an emphasis on reflective practice.

Specifically, the graduate program is designed to help students with:

  • Developing individual and group counselling skills;
  • Conducting and interpreting current research;
  • Increasing their knowledge of the latest developments in counselling and literature;
  • Training in communication skills;
  • Providing career development, career information and job search skills;
  • The principles, processes and methods of interviewing children, adolescents and adults; and
  • The skills of measurement and evaluation.

The program provides an array of supervised practicum placements that can support more specialized experience to meet individual needs and interests. Our graduates have found employment in a wide range of settings including schools, community agencies, clinics, hospitals, business and industry, rehabilitation centres, government services and private practice.

Frequently Asked Questions

Thank you for your expressed interest in the graduate Master’s program in Counselling Psychology. This document was created to help applicants for applying to either the comprehensive course-based or thesis-based program. This document is based on the most common student inquiries received over the past 3 years. Various questions may emerge depending on what stage you are in your planning process.We encourage you to read and review this document carefully. We recognize that common questions emerge based on the stage that a person may be with the application process. The three stages that this document explores are a) Exploration of interest in Counselling Psychology, b) Planning and Decision-making regarding Application, and c) Working on an Application. 

Stage 1. Exploration of interest in Counselling Psychology:

1. What is Counselling Psychology and why are Counselling Psychology programs housed within the Faculty of Education?

Counselling Psychology training programs in Canada are located in departments within Faculties of Education rather than being connected with clinical psychology, experimental psychology, or undergraduate psychology programs in faculties of arts, health, social sciences, or sciences. Faculties of Education are perceived as a better fit for Counselling Psychology as it relates to life span development and lifelong learning in school and community based settings. It also provides a holistic orientation that focusses on client strengths, diversity and context, and utilizes a client-centred approach. 

2. What type of work or volunteer experience is required to be eligible to apply for the program?

Applying to either of the comprehensive course-based route or the thesis-based route requires that you have some work or volunteer experience where you have experienced strengthening your helping skills. Examples of this type of experience include: practicum experience through taking EDUA 5490 Field Placement in Counselling, volunteering through distress lines/centres, shelters, street-level services for vulnerable people, mentoring programs, school counselling, teaching, facilitating youth or adult group programming, or being a team leader.
There is no set-baseline for having enough experience. As a minimum, you should have at least one or two different volunteer or work roles that helped you build your interpersonal and helping skills.

3. Can I become a certified counsellor after the completion of my M.Ed Counselling Psychology degree?

Graduates may be eligible for certification as a Canadian Certified Counsellor under the guidelines of the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA). CCPA certification attests to the level of professional counselling competence and is considered the minimum professional standard in Canada. Upon graduation, students use the title “Professional Counsellor” or “Professional Therapist” as their designation.
Students are responsible for ensuring that they meet the requirements for certification as established by CCPA and work closely with their academic advisor to take courses and have practicum experiences that align with CCPA. As our program is not accredited with CCPA, it becomes the student’s responsibility to ensure that all requirements for certification are met prior to graduating from the program.

4. Do applicants require a teaching background?

No, applicants do not require a teaching background to apply for the Counselling Psychology program. We welcome and accept both applicants with an educational background as well as from a wide variety of undergraduate baccalaureate educational backgrounds (social work, nursing, sciences, family studies, humanities/faculty of arts, fine arts, psychology, and business).  Applicants are encouraged to review information pertaining to the graduate application process available at
https://umanitoba.ca/graduate-studies/graduate-student-admissions/requirements

5. Can I apply to the Counselling Psychology Master’s program if I am an International Student?

Yes, we welcome applications from international students. Students still need to meet all the program requirements (volunteer/work experience as well as completion of pre-requisite courses) as other applicants do. You also have to meet the Faculty of Graduate Studies English Language Proficiency Requirements, listed at http://umanitoba.ca/graduate-studies/graduate-student-admissions/requirements/international-graduate-student-requirements.

6. Would I be eligible to work as a school counsellor in Manitoba with a Master’s degree in Counselling Psychology?

You would be eligible to work as a school counsellor with a Master’s degree in Counselling Psychology if you also held a Bachelor of Education degree. Working in schools as a counsellor in Manitoba is restricted to students who have a Bachelor of Education degree (provincial rule).

7. Would I be eligible to work in community- based settings with a Master’s degree in Counselling Psychology?

Yes, an array of students (with diverse undergraduate degrees) who have graduated with a Master’s degree in Counselling Psychology have gained employment in community-based settings (working with adults, children, youth, and/ or families). Please note that for these students, becoming certified with the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA), was needed to be gainfully employed in community-based settings. In some instances, graduates from our program have also entered private practice.

Stage 2. Planning and Decision-Making regarding Application:

8. What is the difference between the comprehensive course-based and thesis-based Counselling Psychology Master’s program?

The comprehensive course-based as well as the thesis-based program include courses in counselling theories, ethics, research, various electives in counselling, and practicum. The thesis-based program involves a minimum of 27 credits of course work and conducting a supervised research study that would involve direct data collection. The comprehensive course-based program involves 33 credits of course work and culminates with completing two comprehensive papers with an oral exam that explores case conceptualization based on practical engagement through practicum experiences as well as aspects related to personal and professional development of becoming a counsellor.

9. What is a thesis and how long will it take to complete?

A thesis is an independent research project of significant involvement requiring a supervisory committee. To complete a thesis-based program, a minimum of 18 credits of course work is required and includes writing a thesis proposal, an oral proposal defense, the final thesis incorporating results, and final thesis oral defense. On average, it typically takes full-time students 2-3 years and part-time students about 2.5 -4.5 years to complete. This process would commence during completing course work, over the duration of the practicum year, and possibly after completion of the practicum year. 

10. If I complete a thesis-based route will I be eligible to pursue a doctorate in Counselling Psychology?

Students wishing to pursue a doctoral degree in Counselling Psychology need to be aware that the option does not currently exist in Manitoba. A doctoral degree in Counselling Psychology requires having access to internship sites (to support a one-year full-  time internship for a student) which is not possible at this time. As such, students will need to apply outside of Manitoba to pursue further studies. Additionally, eligibility for most academic programs that offer doctoral studies in Counselling Psychology may require subject specific courses to be completed at the Master’s level. In the event of pursuing the thesis-based route, please ensure that you look into academic requirements at other institutions to ensure that during your Master’s degree you take sufficient number of courses to be eligible to apply for other PhD programs.

11. I currently live in Winnipeg and I am looking into the prospect of volunteering to gain more experience in counselling. What would you suggest would be a good starting point?

If you reside in Winnipeg, you may consider volunteering through the organization "Klinic" (spelled with a K).

Stage 3. Working on the Application:

12. What makes for a strong application?

The Counselling Psychology faculty members independently rate applications based on: (1) academic ability (e.g., GPA); (2) depth and breadth of the cover letter (also called letter of letter of intent); (3) amount and quality of related work or volunteer experience; (4) for thesis students the amount and quality of research experience; (5) quality of letters of recommendation; and (6) overall “fit” with the program (match with your interests and career goals). 
To strengthen an application, it is suggested that for comprehensive course-based applicants as well as thesis-based applicants, to gain as much related work or volunteer experience as possible before applying. Additionally, recognize that your statement of intent is the only direct sample of writing we have to consider in the adjudication process and recommend that you spend time working on it. Additionally, for thesis-based students please include at least one referee that comments explicitly on research potential and abilities. For comprehensive-based applicants, having two professional referees that can attest to your counselling skills and relationship-building skills is most beneficial.

13. What should I include in my cover letter (letter of intent)?

Your cover letter should address: (a) why you are interested in counselling psychology, (b) why you think this program would be a good fit for you, (c) key learnings taken away from your volunteer/work experiences as a counsellor and (d) how this program would contribute to your professional development and goals (short and long term career objectives). If you are pursuing a thesis-based route you would also need to include (e) your research topic of interest, significance to the field, what previous research skills you will draw from to inform your work, and who you are interested in being supervised by on your thesis work.The maximum pages for your letter of intent is 3 pages, single spaced, 12-point font.

14. How are Master’s applications evaluated, and can they be re-assessed if it is not accepted? 

The competitiveness of an application can vary each year, depending on the applicant pool. Some years are more competitive than others and it is important to understand that while applications may have met all of the eligibility requirements, it may still be assessed as less competitive in relation to other applications.  Therefore, knowing how close an application was to being accepted, or its rank, will not predict how competitive that same application might be if it is submitted again in the following year. If you receive a Notification of Refusal and you want to be re-considered, you must re-apply for admission to a future year.

15. I have applied to graduate program in counselling and would like to use the wait time for notification to take courses that could possibly serve as electives and transferred into my graduate program. Would it be possible to gain course advice prior to acceptance into a graduate program in Counselling Psychology?

The Faculty in Counselling Psychology are not in the position to provide this type of guidance to any prospective applicant prior to official acceptance. Please also note that if you decide (on your own accord) to take additional courses and find out that you attain a spot in our program, it is still at the discretion of the advisor that you are appointed to decide whether they transfer these courses into a graduate level program plan and whether they are suitable electives.Faculty advisors assigned to the student will discuss aspects related to course selection only after a student is officially accepted into the graduate program in counselling psychology.

16. If I obtain admission into the program will the university help me find a practicum site?

A practicum in counselling (EDUA 7520) is a required component of the Master of Counselling Psychology program at the University of Manitoba. Practicum placement opportunities are typically in community-based settings and in some cases a school setting. Although the practicum comes near the end of one’s program, we recommend that students think about where they plan to complete their counselling practicum and consider connecting with people in the field that you may like to learn from. It is in your best interest to explore ahead of time whether they may be able to serve as an on-site supervisor that will make your practicum possible and a meaningful experience. In addition, it is important to note that while the instructor of EDUA 7520 will search for practicum sites for students to apply for, the number of sites available vary year to year and offers of acceptance are subject to an interview and are also made at the discretion of the site supervisor. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that you start connecting with people in the field and explore ahead of time whether they may be able to serve as an on-site practicum supervisor when you take EDUA 7520.

Thesis-Based Route

27 credit hours plus thesis

Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. For the thesis, students will select a research question, gather and interpret data, present the investigation and its results as a written document with the program advisor’s support. An oral defense of the thesis culminates the program.

Coursework and Thesis

Core Courses (9 credit hours)

  • EDUA 7550 Theories of Counselling (3)
  • EDUA 7520* Practicum Seminar in Counselling (6)

*EDUA 7520 is a 3-hour weekly seminar offered over fall and winter terms taken concurrently with a minimum of 180 hours of supervised practicum experienced in a selected placement. Students are required to be available September to April during the day for a minimum of one to one-and-a-half days per week for the practicum component.

Research Courses (6 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023)
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (for students admitted fall 2023 and onward) 
  • plus 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000 level in Education or 3000 level or above in other faculties. 

Concentration Courses (3 credit hours)

The thesis is a focus of the concentration.
Students will select a minimum of 3 credit hours from:

  • EDUA 5480 Counselling Skills (3) 
  • EDUA 5520 Ethics in Counselling (3)
  • EDUA 7510 Seminar in Current Issues in Counselling (3)
  • EDUA 7530 Group Counselling: Theory and Practice (6)
  • EDUA 7540 Programs in Career Development (3)
  • EDUA 7710 Development in Learning Environments (3)
  • EDUA 7750 Topics in Educational Psychology 2 (3) (requires Advisor approval)
  • EDUA 7760 Interview Techniques with Children and Adolescents (3)
  • or other courses approved by program advisor and department head

Electives (None)

Thesis

Course Level Restrictions

  • 12 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; the remaining 6 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

Course-Based Route

33 credit hours, plus comprehensive examination

The student and program advisor select courses that lead to mastery within Counselling Psychology and the specialization. As the course component is completed, the student, with the program advisor’s support, prepares a document that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. The document can be a final examination or a project, which may culminate with an oral defense of the document.

Coursework and Comprehensive Option

Core Courses (9 credit hours)

  • EDUA 7550 Theories of Counselling (3)
  • EDUA 7520* Practicum Seminar in Counselling (6)

*EDUA 7520 is a 3-hour weekly seminar offered over fall and winter terms taken concurrently with a minimum of 180 hours of supervised practicum experienced in a selected placement. Students are required to be available September to April during the day for a minimum of one to one-and-a-half days per week for the practicum component.

Research Courses (3 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023) 
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (3) (for students admitted fall 2023 onward) 

Concentration Courses (18 credit hours)
Students will select a minimum of 18 credit hours from:

  • EDUA 5480 Counselling Skills (3)
  • EDUA 5520 Ethics in Counselling (3) 
  • EDUA 7510 Seminar in Current Issues in Counselling (3)
  • EDUA 7530 Group Counselling: Theory and Practice (6)
  • EDUA 7540 Programs in Career Development (3)
  • EDUA 7710 Development in Learning Environments (3) 
  • EDUA 7750 Topics in Educational Psychology 2 (3) (requires Advisor approval)
  • EDUA 7760 Interview Techniques with Children and Adolescents (3)
  • plus additional electives at the 5000 level or equivalent or other courses approved by program advisor and department head

Electives (None)

Comprehensive Exam

Course Level Restrictions

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

Graduate Program Advisors

Priya Mani
Research interests: Cultural diversity and career development. 
Contact: (204) 474-6979
Priya.Mani@umanitoba.ca

Virginia Tze
Research interests: Social-emotional competencies and development, psychological well-being, cultural diversity, quantitative research. 
Contact: (204) 474-7085
Virginia.Tze@umanitoba.ca

Grace Ukasoanya
Research interests: Psychosocial disability research and issues of inclusion, participation and empowerment among diverse populations. 
Contact: (204) 474-9010
Grace.Ukasoanya@umanitoba.ca

Critical Perspectives in Curriculum, Teaching and Pedagogy

Critical Perspectives in Curriculum, Teaching and Pedagogy focuses on these core questions: What is the purpose of education? What do we mean by curriculum, teaching and pedagogy and who decides? Moreover, we consider how ideological and political discourses influence our understanding of curriculum, teaching and pedagogy. Understandings of curriculum expand beyond provincial curriculum documents and instructional resources, to include the ways in which curriculum is imagined, intellectualized, and enacted. This concentration will explore scholarship and research in curriculum theory, curriculum and pedagogical discourses, teaching and pedagogy, teacher identity, teacher education, and educational leadership. While grounded in curriculum theory, students can explore specific disciplines (e.g. social studies) and contexts (e.g. teachers, administrators, and specialists).

Thesis-based Route

18 credit hours, plus thesis 

The thesis-based route consists of the core, research, and concentration courses and a thesis. Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. For the thesis, students will select a research question, gather, and interpret data, and present the investigation and its results as a written document with the program advisor's support. An oral defense of the thesis culminates the program. 

Core Courses (6 credit hours) 

  • EDUB 7542 Contemporary Approaches to Curriculum Theorizing 
  • EDUB 7550 Curriculum: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Implications

Research Courses (6 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education 
  • plus an additional 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000 level in Education or 3000 or above in other faculties.

Concentration Courses (6 credit hours) 

In consultation with the advisor, students select: 

  • 6 credit hours of 7000 level coursework in the concentration. 

Elective Courses 

  • Up to 6 more credit hours coursework from any Faculty of Education courses at the 5000 or 7000 level.  

Course Level Restrictions 

  • 18 credit hours at the 7000 level. 

Course-based Route

30 credit hours + comprehensive exam 

The student and program advisor select courses that lead to mastery within Critical Perspectives in Curriculum, Teaching and Pedagogy. As the course component is completed, the student, with the program advisor's support, prepares a document that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. The document can be a final examination or a project, which may culminate with an oral defense of the document. 

Core courses (6 credit hours) 

  • EDUB 7542 Contemporary Approaches to Curriculum Theorizing 
  • EDUB 7550 Curriculum: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Implications 

Research Course (3 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education 

Concentration Courses (21 credit hours) 

In consultation with the advisor, students select:

  • at least 6 credit hours of 7000 level coursework in the concentration. 
  • 12 credit hours of coursework from the Faculty of Education at the 5000 level or above. 
  • 3 credit hours from the Faculty of Education or other faculties at the 5000 level or above. 

Comprehensive Exam 

Course Level Restrictions 

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; 
  • the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties. 

Graduate Program Advisors

Bruno de Oliveira Jayme 
Critical Perspectives of Curriculum, Teaching, and Pedagogy 
Contact: (204) 474-6886
Bruno.Jayme@umanitoba.ca

Melanie Janzen 
Critical Perspectives of Curriculum, Teaching, and Pedagogy
Contact: (204) 474-9009
Melanie.Janzen@umanitoba.ca

Shannon Moore 
Critical Perspectives of Curriculum, Teaching, and Pedagogy 
Research Interests: The incorporation of Media Education in the social studies context; The incorporation of theories of social justice in the social studies context; The role of The Teacher in the use of creative/playful pedagogies; The impact of neo-liberal discourses and policies on public schools/schooling. 
Contact: (204) 474-7158 
Shannon.Moore@umanitoba.ca

Cross-Cultural, Sociological, and Philosophical Foundations in Education

The MEd Program in Cross-cultural, Sociological, and Philosophical Foundations in Education focuses on the philosophical and social factors that influence teaching and learning in schools. Faculty members have studied in a number of countries, including Australia, Canada, France, New Zealand, the Philippines, the United States and the United Kingdom. The program focuses on understanding both the assumptions and the evidence that supports the great variety of educational programs in these and other countries. The research by faculty members has been directed at understanding and contributing to the on-going debates about educational policies and practices.

The courses in the program are based on the disciplines of anthropology, philosophy, and sociology. As such, graduate students may focus on:

  • Aboriginal Education
  • Educational Philosophy
  • Educational Sociology
  • Intercultural and International
  • Education Policies and Practices in Education

Thesis-Based Route

18 credit hours plus thesis

Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. For the thesis, students will select a research question, gather and interpret data, present the investigation and its results as a written document with the program advisor’s support. An oral defense of the thesis culminates the program.


Coursework and Thesis

Core Courses (6 credit hours)

  • EDUA 7200 Philosophy of Education (3)
  • EDUA 7210 Educational Sociology (3)
  • EDUA 7270 Seminar in Cross Cultural Education 1 (3)

Research Courses (6 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023) 
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (3) (for students admitted fall 2023 and onward) 
  • plus an additional 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000 level in the Faculty of Education or at the 3000 level or above in other Faculties.

Concentration (6 credit hours)
The thesis is the focus of the concentration. In addition, students will select 6 credit hours at the 7000 level from:

  • EDUA 7230 Social Criticism in Education
  • EDUA 7240 Values in Education
  • EDUA 7250 Comparative Education
  • EDUA 7270 Seminar in Cross-Cultural Education 1
  • EDUA 7280 Seminar in Cross-Cultural Education 2
  • EDUA 7300 History of Canadian Education from 1867
  • EDUA 7340 Seminar in Educational Thought
  • or other courses selected from the Department of CTL, U of M Faculty of Arts, or other universities--and approved by the program advisor and department head.

Thesis

Course Level Restrictions

  • 12 credit hours must be at the 7000 level, the remaining 6 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

 

Course-Based Route

30 credit hours plus comprehensive examination

The students and the program advisor select courses that lead to mastery within Social Foundations and the concentration. As the course component is completed, the student, with the program advisor’s support, prepares a document that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. The document can be a final examination or project, which may culminate with an oral defense of the document.

Coursework and Comprehensive Option

Core Courses (9 credit hours)

  • EDUA 7200 Philosophy of Education (3)
  • EDUA 7210 Educational Sociology (3)
  • EDUA 7270 Seminar in Cross Cultural Education 1 (3)

Research Courses (3 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023) 
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (3) (for students admitted fall 2023 onward)

Concentration (18 credit hours)
Students will select 18 credit hours, with a minimum of 9 credit hours at the 7000 level from:

  • EDUA 7230 Social Criticism in Education
  • EDUA 7240 Values in Education
  • EDUA 7250 Comparative Education
  • EDUA 7280 Seminar in Cross-Cultural Education 2
  • EDUA 7300 History of Canadian Education from 1867
  • EDUA 7340 Seminar in Educational Thought

Comprehensive Exam

Course Level Restrictions
18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level, the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in others faculties.

Graduate Program Advisors

Lucy Fowler 
Cross-Cultural, Sociological, and Philosophical Foundations
Research Interests: Métis research methodologies; Indigenous hip hop; Queer Métis identities; Youth-led community-based research. 
Contact: (204) 474-9144
Lucy.Fowler@umanitoba.ca 

Joe Curnow 
Cross-Cultural, Sociological, and Philosophical Foundations
Research Interests: Politicization, anti-racism, and anti-colonialism, youth-led social movements. 
Contact: (204) 474-7111
Joe.Curnow@umanitoba.ca

Nathalie Piquemal
Cross-cultural, Sociological, and Philosophical Foundations
Research Interests: Aboriginal and Intercultural Education; International Education; Research Ethics
Contact: (204) 474-7032
Nathalie.Piquemal@umanitoba.ca

Educational Administration

The Educational Administration Area Group at the University of Manitoba is unique in Canada. Our faculty are highly interdisciplinary in their studies of educational administration. Interdisciplinary approaches are designed for educational leaders to develop multi-layered understandings of their practice, and as a result, make decisions that improve work and learning experiences and outcomes. The faculty has strong connections to Indigenous perspectives, social justice and equity studies, primary, secondary, adult, and higher education, community organizations, sociology, psychology, and cross-cultural and international perspectives. The faculty infuse interdisciplinary lenses into the traditional foundations of educational administration, breaking new ground and generating greater impact in their teaching and research.

The Master of Education in Educational Administration program is designed to develop leadership for educational systems, and to provide students with an in-depth and theoretical understanding of educational administration as both a moral and a technical endeavour. Students in this program will benefit from their prior experiences as teachers or administrators in an educational organization.

In addition to courses during the regular academic session, the Master of Education in Educational Administration program frequently offers Summer Institutes in Educational Administration, which have included Equity and Diversity, International Perspectives on School Improvement, School and Community, and Law and Ethics in Educational Administration.

Thesis-based route

18 credit hours plus thesis

Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. For the thesis, students will select a research question, gather and interpret data, present the investigation and its results as a written document with the program advisor’s support. An oral defense of the thesis culminates the program.

Coursework and thesis description

Core courses (6 credit hours)

  • EDUA 7010 Educational Administration as a Field of Study & Practice (3)
  • EDUA 7050 Theoretical Perspectives in Educational Administration (3)

Research courses (6 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023) 
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Education Research (3) (for students admitted fall 2023 and onward) 
  • plus an additional 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000 level in Education or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties

Concentration (6 credit hours)
The thesis is a focus of the concentration.

Students will select 6 credit hours from:

  • EDUA 5040 Personnel Administration in Education (3)
  • EDUA 5100 Issues in the Administration of Education (3)
  • EDUA 7020 Politics of Education (3)
  • EDUA 7030 Educational Finance (3)
  • EDUA 7040 Legal Aspects of Education (3)
  • EDUA 7060 Organizational Planning & Development in Education (3)
  • EDUA 7070 The Analysis of Educational Organizations (3)
  • EDUA 7082 Indigenous Instructional Leadership

or others approved by the program advisor and department head.

Electives (None)

Thesis

Course-level restrictions

  • 12 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; the remaining 6 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

Course-based route

30 credit hours plus comprehensive examination

The student and program advisor will select courses that lead to mastery within Educational Administration and the concentration. As the course component is completed, the student, with the program advisor’s support, prepares a document that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. The document can be a final examination or a project, which may culminate in an oral defense of the document.
Coursework and comprehensive option

Core courses (9 credit hours)

  • EDUA 7010 Educational Administration as a Field of Study & Practice (3)
  • EDUA 7050 Theoretical Perspectives in Educational Administration (3)

and 3 credit hours from:

  • EDUA 7200 Philosophy of Education (3)
  • EDUA 7210 Educational Sociology (3)
  • EDUA 7270 Seminar in Cross Cultural Education 1 (3)

Research courses (3 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023) 
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (3) (for students admitted fall 2023 onward) 

Concentration (12 credit hours)
Students will select 12 credit hours from:

  • EDUA 5040 Personnel Administration in Education (3)
  • EDUA 5100 Issues in the Administration of Education (3)
  • EDUA 7020 Politics of Education (3)
  • EDUA 7030 Educational Finance (3)
  • EDUA 7040 Legal Aspects of Education (3)
  • EDUA 7060 Organizational Planning & Development in Education (3)
  • EDUA 7070 The Analysis of Educational Organizations (3)
  • EDUA 7082 Indigenous Instructional Leadership

or others approved by the program advisor and department head.

Electives (6 credit hours)

Comprehensive exam

Course-level restrictions

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

 

Graduate Program Advisors

Frank Deer
Research Interests: Indigenous Education; Indigenous Language Programming; Philosophy of Education; Identity Studies. 
Contact: (204) 474-9072
frank.deer@umanitoba.ca

Marti Ford 
Educational Administration
Research Interests: Indigenous Youth Success; Indigenous Men's Wellness; Leadership in Indigenous Education; Indigenous Community Development.  
Contact: (204) 474-7845
Marti.Ford@umanitoba.ca

Cameron Hauseman
Educational Administration
Research Interests: The emotional aspects of school leadership; Principals' work; Leadership practices. 
Contact: (204) 474-6176
Cameron.Hauseman@umanitoba.ca

Peng Liu
Educational Administration
Research interests: Indigenous leadership; effective leadership; comparative education leadership; educational policy in cross-cultural contexts; educational change in cross-cultural contexts; teacher professional development
Contact: (204) 474-7809
Peng.Liu@umanitoba.ca

Robert Mizzi
Educational Administration
Research interests: Educational policy and politics; teacher professionalism; equity and diversity studies (with a focus on LGBTQ topics); leading adult learning organizations; educator work and welfare; workplace learning. 
Contact: (204) 474-9042
Robert.Mizzi@umanitoba.ca

Merli Tamtik
Educational Administration
Research interests: Policy coordination in multi-level governance, science and research policy, innovation and ways of knowing, international and multicultural education, transatlantic cooperation, international educational partnerships, research methods in social sciences. 
Contact: (204) 474-9606
Merli.Tamtik@umanitoba.ca

Ee-Seul Yoon
Educational Administration
Research interests: Educational inequality & inequity; School choice; Critical studies of education marketization/privatization; School funding/fundraising; Critical geography of educational policy; Policy sociology
Contact: (204) 474-6109
Ee-Seul.Yoon@umanitoba.ca

Inclusive Education

The Master of Education in Inclusive Education program provides individuals with the skills, knowledge, and experiences they need to promote inclusive educational opportunities for students with diverse needs. The program focuses on inclusion from the lens of persons with disabilities and learning differences, however, perspectives from various marginalized groups may also be considered. Students in the program will develop a multi-layered understanding of inclusive education that balances current and relevant research, important theoretical frameworks, and practical implications. Graduate courses enable students to conduct research from a variety of methodological perspectives, lead the professional development of their colleagues, foster program development at their workplaces, and provide clinical or consultant services to classroom teachers. Our graduates work as inclusive education administrators, clinicians, consultants, program leaders, resource/learning support teachers, and other professionals in the area of inclusion.

Pre-requisite Coursework

A minimum of six (6) credit hours of university level coursework at the 5000 level or equivalent with a GPA of 3.0 (B) or better, consisting of: 

  • EDUA 5602 Introduction to Inclusive Education (6)
  • Similar coursework from a related Degree program, such as Special Education, Psychology, Disability Studies, Social Work, or Counselling. 

Thesis-Based Route

18 credit hours, plus thesis

Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. For the thesis, students will select a research question, gather and interpret data, present the investigation and its results as a written document with the program advisor’s support. An oral defense of the thesis culminates the program.


Coursework and Thesis

Core Courses (6 credit hours)

  • EDUA 7602 Seminar in Inclusive Education (6)

Research Courses (6 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023) 
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Education Research (3) (for students admitted fall 2023 and onward)
  • plus an additional 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000 level in Education or 3000 or above in other faculties

Concentration (6 credit hours)
The thesis is a focus of the concentration. Students will select 6 credit hours with a minimum of 3 credit hours at the 7000 level from:

  • EDUA 7610 Behavioural Issues in Educational Settings (3)
  • EDUA 7630 Advanced Assessment and Instruction in Inclusive Special Education (3)
  • EDUA 7652 Field Experience in Inclusive Education (6)
  • EDUA 7740 Topics in Educational Psychology 1 (3) (requires advisor approval)
  • EDUA 7750 Topics in Educational Psychology 2 (3) (requires advisor approval)
  • EDUA 5612 Field Experience in Inclusive Education (6)
  • EDUA 5620 Teaching Through Alternative and Augmented Communication (3)
  • EDUA 5642 Transition from School to Adult Life (3)
  • EDUA 5660 Organization and Delivery of Resource Program and Support Services
  • EDUA 5670 Strategies for Organizing Inclusive Classrooms & Schools (3)
  • EDUA 5680 Promoting Responsible Behaviour in Educational Settings (3)
  • or other courses approved by the advisor and department head

Electives (None)

Thesis

Course Level Restrictions

  • 12 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; the remaining 6 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

 

Course-Based Route

30 credit hours plus comprehensive examination

The student and program advisor will select courses that lead to mastery within Inclusive Education and the concentration. As the course component is completed, the student with the program advisor’s support, prepares a document that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. The document can be a final examination or a project, which may culminate with an oral defense of the document.
Coursework and Comprehensive Option

    Core Courses (6 credit hours)

  • EDUA 7602 Seminar in Inclusive Education (6)

    Research Courses (3 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3)

    Concentration (21 credit hours)

Students will select 21 credit hours with a minimum of 12 credit hours from the following 7000 level courses:

  • EDUA 7610 Behavioural Issues in Educational Settings (3)
  • EDUA 7630 Advanced Assessment and Instruction in Inclusive Education (3)
  • EDUA 7652 Field Experience in Inclusive Education (6)
  • EDUA 7740 Topics in Educational Psychology 1 (3) (requires advisor approval)
  • EDUA 7750 Topics in Educational Psychology 2 (3) (requires advisor approval)
  • EDUA 5612 Field Experience in Inclusive Education (6)
  • EDUA 5620 Teaching Through Alternative & Augmented Communication (3)
  • EDUA 5642 Transition from School to Adult Life (3)
  • EDUA 5662 Delivering Supports for Inclusive Education (3)
  • EDUA 5680 Promoting Responsible Behaviour in Educational Settings (3)

    or other courses approved by the program advisor and department head

    Electives (None)

    Comprehensive Exam

    Course Level Restrictions

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level;
  • the remaining 12 credit hours may at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

Graduate Program Advisors

Nadine Bartlett
Inclusive Education
Research Interests: The Wraparound Approach; Community schools; Interdisciplinary collaboration. 
Contact: (204) 474-9446
Nadine.Bartlett@umanitoba.ca

Charlotte Enns
Inclusive Education
Research Interests: Inclusive special education; Deaf education; Language & literacy learning, alternative & augmented communication. 
Contact: (204) 474-9017
Charlotte.Enns@umanitoba.ca

Rick Freeze
Inclusive Education
Research Interests: Consultative-collaborative resource programs; Transition from school to work & adult life; Inclusion; Precision reading; Promoting responsible classroom behaviour; Disability & diversity. 
Contact: (204) 474-6904
Rick.Freeze@umanitoba.ca

Lauren Goegan 
Inclusive Education 
Research Interests: Equity, diversity and inclusion; Students' transitioning from High School to Postsecondary Education; Academic success and cheating. 
Contact: (204) 474-9926 
Lauren.Goegan@umanitoba.ca

Indigenous (First Nations/Métis/Inuit) Perspectives in Curriculum, Teaching and Learning

Students in this concentration will study Indigenous (First Nations, Métis, and Inuit) ways of knowing and knowledge across curricular areas/disciplines. This specialization will offer students opportunities to explore Indigenous (First Nations,Métis, and Inuit) education as a field of study and practice, including decolonizing curriculum theory, curricula, and methodologies.

Thesis-based Route

18 credit hours, plus thesis 

The thesis-based route consists of the core, research, and concentration courses and a thesis. Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. The student and program advisor will select courses that lead to mastery within Indigenous (First Nations, Métis, Inuit) perspectives in CTL. As the course component is completed, work on the thesis may begin. Students will, in consultation with their advisor, develop a thesis proposal and, once approved by the students' committees, will commence their thesis research. Once a defendable thesis has been developed, an oral defense of the thesis culminates the program. 

Core Courses (6 credit hours) 

  • EDUB 7900 Critical Examination of (Re-)conciliation in and through Education
  • EDUB 7930 Indigenous (First Nations/Métis/Inuit) Ways of Knowing in/for Curriculum, Teaching and Learning

Research Courses (6 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education 
  • plus 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000 level in Education preferably with a focus in Indigenous Research Methodology 

Concentration Courses (6 credit hours) 

In consultation with the advisor, students will select 6 credit hours at the 7000 level from: 

  • EDUB 7910 Seminar in Indigenous (First Nations/Métis/Inuit) Education (3) 
  • EDUB 7950 Indigenous Storytelling, Narrative and Storywork as Pedagogy (3) 
  • any 7000-level course offered in the CTL Department. 

Course Level Restrictions 

  • 12 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; 
  • the remaining 6 credit hours may be at the 5000 level of above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties. 

Course-based Route

30 credit hours + comprehensive exam 

The student and program advisor will select courses that lead to mastery within Indigenous (First Nations, Métis, Inuit) perspectives in CTL. As the course component is completed, the student, with the program advisor's support, prepares a document that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. The document can be a final examination or a project, which may culminate in an oral defense of the document. 

Core Courses (9 credit hours) 

From the list below, students select a total of nine credit hours of 7000 level coursework in consultation with their advisor: 

  • EDUB 7900 Critical Examination of (Re-)conciliation in and through Education
  • EDUB 7930 Indigenous (First Nations/Métis/Inuit) Ways of Knowing in/for Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
  • Any other 7000-level course in consultation with their advisor. 

Research Course (3 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education

Concentration Courses (18 credit hours) 

In consultation with the advisor, students will select 18 credit hours from: 

  • EDUB 7910 Seminar in Indigenous (First Nations/Métis/Inuit) Education 
  • EDUB 7950 Indigenous Storytelling, Narrative and Storywork as Pedagogy 
  • Up to 6 credit hours of 7000-level courses offered in the CTL Department.
  • Up to 6 credit hours of 5000-level or above courses offered in the Faculty of Education.

Comprehensive Exam 

Course Level Restrictions 

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; 
  • the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties. 

Graduate Program Advisors

Frank Deer 
Indigenous (First Nations/Métis/Inuit) Perspectives in Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning
Research Interests: Indigenous education; Citizenship education; Identity in education
Contact: (204) 474-9072
Frank.Deer@umanitoba.ca

Amy Farrell 
Indigenous (First Nations/Métis/Inuit) Perspectives in Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning 
Research Interests: Indigenous sacred story, storytelling, and narrative within Indigenous creative writing; Indigenizing Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) education. 
Contact: (204) 474-9036
Amy.Farrell@umanitoba.ca

Lucy Delgado
Indigenous (First Nations/Métis/Inuit) Perspectives in Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning 
Research Interests: Métis research methodology; Indigenous hip hop; Queer Métis identities; Youth-led Community-Based research. 
Contact: (204) 474-9144
Lucy.Delgado@umanitoba.ca

Language and Literacy

The Master of Education in Language and Literacy program is a broad specialty encompassing pre-school to post-secondary levels. The purpose of the program is to develop a theoretical background and promote skills that will enable students to conduct independent research. Language investigation may also include social, political and cultural issues.

Literacy educators are also interested in early language development, reading diagnosis and remediation, and the use of language to learn at all levels and in all content areas. Programs can be designed so that graduates can qualify for certification as Reading Clinicians.

Note: Reading Clinician requirements are determined by Manitoba Education and Advanced Learning.

Thesis-Based Route

18 credit hours, plus thesis

Language & Literacy courses prepare students to design and implement a research project that leads to a thesis. For the thesis, students will select a research question, gather and interpret data, present the investigation and its results as a written document with the program advisor’s support. An oral defense of the thesis culminates the program.

Coursework & Thesis

In consultation with their advisor, students select 12 credit hours of concentration courses in Language and Literacy (at the 7000-level). These courses are normally selected from:

  • EDUB 7060 Seminar & Practicum in Clinical Diagnosis & Remediation (6) 
  • EDUB 7070 Classical Research in Reading (3) 
  • EDUB 7090 Seminar in Reading Process (3) 
  • EDUB 7100 Language and Literacy Curriculum Inquiry in the Early Years (3) 
  • EDUB 7110 Research in Language and Literacy Development (3) 
  • EDUB 7120 Curricular Issues in English Language Arts Education (3)
  • EDUB 7130 Becoming Writers: Power, Place, and Pedagogy in Teaching Writing (6) 
  •  EDUB 7142 Topic in Curriculum, Teaching and Learning (in Language and Literacy) (3) 
  • EDUB 7150 Seminar in Reading and Response to Literature (3) 
  • EDUB 7160 Language Teacher as a Researcher (3) 
  • EDUB 7180 research in Written Composition (3)
  • EDUB 7190 research in Language for Learning (3)
  • EDUB7290 Curriculum Research in the Early Years: Young Children and Social Semiotics (3)
  • EDUB 7530 Curriculum Development and Implementation in Language and Literacy (3) 
  • or other 7000-level courses in Language and Literacy approved by the advisor and department head. 

Research Courses (6 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023) 
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (3) (for students admitted fall 2023 and onward)  
  • plus additional 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000- level in Education or 3000 or above in other faculties

Thesis

Course Level Restrictions

  • 12 credit hours must be at the 7000-level; the remaining 6 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

Coursework & Comprehensive Option

In consultation with their advisor, students select 15 credit hours of concentration courses in Language and Literacy (12 of which must be at the 7000-level). These courses are normally selected from: 

  • EDUB 7060 Seminar & Practicum in Clinical Diagnosis & Remediation (6) 
  • EDUB 7070 Classical Research in Reading (3) 
  • EDUB 7090 Seminar in reading Processes (3) 
  • EDUB 7100 language and Literacy Curriculum Inquiry in the Early Years (3)
  • EDUB 7110 research in Language and Literacy Development (3)
  • EDUB 7120 Curricular Issues in English Language Arts Education (3)
  • EDUB 7130 becoming Writers: Power, Place, and Pedagogy in Teaching Writing (6) 
  •  EDUB 7142 Topics in Curriculum, Teaching and Learning (in Language and Literacy) (3) 
  • EDUB 7150 Seminar in Reading and Response to Literature (3) 
  • EDUB 7160 Language Teacher as Researcher (3) 
  • EDUB 7180 research in Written Composition (3) 
  • EDUB 7190 Research in Language for Learning (3) 
  • EDUB 7290 Curriculum research in the Early Years: Young Children and Social Semiotics (3) 
  • EDUB 7530 Curriculum Development and Implementation in Language and Literacy (3) 
  • or other courses in Language and Literacy approved by the advisor and department head. 

In addition, students select 12 credit hours of electives in consultation with their advisor. 

Research Courses (3 credit hours)    

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023)
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (3) (for students admitted fall 2023 onward)

    Comprehensive Exam

    Course Level Restrictions

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties

Graduate Program Advisors

Gregory Bryan
Language & Literacy, Studies in CTL
Research Interests: Children's Literature, Author and Illustrator Biographies, Literary Travel. 
Contact: (204) 474-6431
Gregory.Bryan@umanitoba.ca

Xiaoxiao Du 
Language & Literacy, Studies in CTL 
Research Interests: Literacy events and literacy practices in the early years; Multimodal meaning making; Identity construction among learners and teachers; School literacies, home literacies, and community literacies. 
Contact: (204) 474-8714
Xiaoxiao.Du@umanitoba.ca

Michelle Honeyford
Language & Literacy, Studies in CTL
Research Interests: ELA Curriculum & Teaching; Critical Literacies & Social Justice; Writing & Identity; Transcultural Literacies; Practitioner Inquiry. 
Contact: (204) 474-7243
Michelle.Honeyford@umanitoba.ca

Jennifer Watt
Language & Literacy, Studies in CTL
Research Interests: Literacies for/as well-being; Life writing; Student voice, agency, and erasure; Multimodalities.
Contact: (204) 474-7210
Jennifer.Watt@umanitoba.ca

Second Language Education

The Master of Education in Second Language Education (SLE) concentration addresses research, language learning, and pedagogical issues in teaching English as a second language and teaching English as a foreign language, in pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12 through adult teaching contexts. The MEd in SLE also offers students the opportunity to explore the theoretical foundations of curriculum in education in a cohort of approximately 30 graduate students. Our students have taught in a wide variety of international, national, and local contexts, and the MEd in SLE program is designed to provide challenging and stimulating frames of reference for SLE practice.

With the support of a program advisor (faculty member), graduate students in SLE will plan and complete a program of coursework in SLE, research methodologies, and curriculum, capped by a thesis or comprehensive examination option. The thesis or comprehensive option is intended to address the unique goals and interests of each graduate student.

Thesis-Based Route

18 credit hours plus thesis

Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. For the thesis, students will select a research question, gather and interpret data, present the investigation and its results as a written document with the program advisor’s support. An oral defense of the thesis culminates the program.
Coursework and Thesis

Core Courses (9 credit hours)

  • EDUB 7210 Seminar in ESL Theory and Practice (3)
  • EDUB 7220 Research Issues and Application in TESL (3)
  • EDUB 7580 Social, Cultural, and Political Theories in Second Language Acquisition (3)
  • EDUB 7212 Critical Applied Linguistics in a Global Context (3) 

Research Courses (6 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023)
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (3) (for students admitted fall 2023 and onward)
  • plus 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000 level in Education or 3000 level or above in other faculties

Concentration (3 credit hours)

The thesis is the focus of concentration. Students will select an additional 3 credit hours at the 7000 level, related to their research and approved by the Advisor.

Thesis

Course Level Restrictions

  • 12 credit hours must be at the 7000 level;
  • the remaining 6 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

Course-Based Route

30 credit hours plus comprehensive option

The student and program advisor select courses that lead to mastery within Second Language Education. As the course component is completed, the student, with the program advisor’s support, prepares a document that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. The document can be a final examination or a project, which may culminate with a public presentation of the document.
Coursework and Comprehensive Option

Core Courses (9 credit hours)

  • EDUB 7210 Seminar in ESL Theory & Practice (3)
  • EDUB 7220 Research Issues and Application in TESL (3)
  • EDUB 7580 Social, Cultural, and Political Theories in Second Language Acquisition (3)
  • EDUB 7212 Critical Applied Linguistics in a Global Context (3)

Research Courses (3 credit hours)

  • EDUA 5800 Introduction to Educational Research (3) (for students admitted prior to fall 2023) 
  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education (for students admitted fall 2023 and onward)

Concentration (18 credit hours)

18 credit hours, with a minimum of 9 credit hours at the 7000 level, from a pre-selected list of courses and approved by the faculty advisor and department head. 

Comprehensive Exam

Course Level Restrictions

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level;
  • the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.

Graduate Program Advisors

Sreemali Herath 
Second Language Education 
Research Interests: Arts based approaches to identity research; Post conflict reconciliation; Critical action research and teacher development; Teacher preparation for diversity. 
Contact: (204) 480-1451
Sreemali.Herath@umanitoba.ca

Sandra Kouritzin
Second Language Education
Research Interests: Immigrant & Aboriginal Language Loss; Multi-lingual Development; Economics of Bilingualism; Literacy Studies & Language Education; "Best Practices" in T.E.S.L.; Life History Narrative; Feminist & PostStructural Research Approaches; English & Other Imperialist Languages; Issues in Second Language Education; Heritage Language Retention. 
Contact: (204) 474-9079
Sandra.Kouritzin@umanitoba.ca

Clea Schmidt
Second Language Education
Research Interests: Cultural & Linguistic Diversity; Critical Ethnography; Intercultural Approaches to Language; E.S.L. Teacher Development; Non-native English Speakers in T.E.S.L.; Critical Teacher Education Policies and Practices. 
Contact: (204) 474-9314
Clea.Schmidt@umanitoba.ca

Studies in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education

Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education takes its starting point in a view of humans that considers and integrates all aspects of what it means to be human, including but not limited to the physical, emotional, cognitive, social, ecological, ethical, creative, spiritual, and contemplative aspects. Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education draws on the wisdoms of different cultural traditions, multidisciplinary perspectives, and integrative practices from different times and places to educate for living in current times; and, second, Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education integrates studies of the whole person, curriculum, teaching, and learning by collaboratively exploring holistic, experiential, and transformative educational approaches for a flourishing life in a flourishing society.

Thesis-based Route

18 credit hours + thesis 

The thesis-based route consists of the core, research, and concentration courses and a thesis. Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. For the thesis, students will select a research question, gather and interpret data, and present the investigation and its results as a written document with the program advisor's support. An oral defense of the thesis culminates the program. 

Core Course (12 credit hours) 

From the list below, students select a total of 12 credit hours of 7000 level coursework in consultation with their advisor: 

  • EDUB 7700 Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education: The Self 
  • EDUB 7710 Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education: The Social, Cultural, and Ecological
  • EDUB 7720 Approaches to Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Curriculum and Pedagogy 
  • EDUB 7730 Being an Educator in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education 
  • EDUB 7740 Recent Topics in Research in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education 

Research Courses (6 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education
  • plus 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000 level in Education or 3000 or above in other faculties

Course Level Restrictions 

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level 

Course-based Route

30 credit hours + comprehensive exam 

The student and program advisor select courses that lead to mastery within contemplative, holistic and integrative studies in education. As the course component is completed, the student, with the program advisor's support, prepares a document that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. The document can be a final examination or a project, which may culminate with an oral defense of the document. 

Core Courses (12 credit hours) 

From the list below, students select a total of 12 credit hours of 7000 level coursework in consultation with their advisor: 

  • EDUB 7700 Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education: The Self 
  • EDUB 7710 Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education: The Social, Cultural, and Ecological
  • EDUB 7720 Approaches to Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Curriculum and Pedagogy. 
  • EDUB 7730 Being and Educator in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education
  • EDUB 7740 Recent Topics in Research in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education

Research Course (3 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education 

Concentration Courses (6 credit hours) 

From the list below, students select 6 credit hours of coursework in consultation with their advisor. 

  • EDUB 7740 Recent Topics in Research in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education
  • EDUB 7750 Seminar in Studies on Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education
  • any other 7000 level course deemed suitable by the advisor to the concentration focus. 

Elective Courses (9 credit hours) 

  • 9 more credit hours of coursework from any Faculty of Education 5000 or 7000 level courses. 

Comprehensive Exam 

Course Level Restrictions 

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; 
  • the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties. 

Graduate Program Advisors

Thomas Falkenberg
Studies in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education
Contact: (204) 480-1486
Thomas.Falkenberg@umanitoba.ca

Yi Li 
Studies in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education 
Research Interests: International education; Multilingual development in the Early Years; Hope studies in educational settings. 
Contact: (204) 474-8299
Yi.Li@umanitoba.ca

Beryl Peters 
Studies in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education
Research Interests: Arts education; Multiliteracies; Teacher education; Critical pedagogy 
Contact: (204)474-9043
Beryl.Peters@umanitoba.ca

Kathryn Riley 
Studies in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education
Research Interests: Anticolonial praxis for social and ecological justice; Pedagogies for wholistic wellness; Sense of belonging with Land/Country/Place; Teacher and learner identities; Transdisciplinary approaches to curriculum. 
Contact: (204) 474-9481 
Kathryn.Riley@umanitoba.ca

Wayne Serebrin 
Studies in Contemplative, Holistic, and Integrative Education 
Research Interests: Teaching for Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social - and Eco-Justice; Contemplative Embodied Practices and Pedagogies in Relation to Trauma, Healing, Resilience, and Grappling with "Cure"
Contact: (204) 474-9024
Wayne.Serebrin@umanitoba.ca

Studies in Mathematics Education and Science Education (Studies in MESE)

Students will explore theories, research, policies and practices in mathematics education and science education as well as various intersections between the two disciplines. Mathematics education and/or science education will be examined in K-12 and post-secondary settings as well as in settings beyond schools. Throughout the program, students will consider the social, cultural, ethical, human rights and sustainability dimensions of mathematics education and/or science education.

Thesis-based Route

18 credit hours, plus thesis 

The thesis-based route consists of the core, research, and concentration courses and a thesis. Courses prepare the student to design and implement a research project that leads to the thesis. For the thesis, students will select a research question, gather and interpret data, and present the investigation and its results as a written document with the program advisor's support. An oral defense of the thesis culminates the program. 

Core Course (3 credit hours) 

  • EDUB 7492 Recent Advances in Mathematics Education and Science Education.

Research Courses (6 credit hours) 

  • EDUA 7830 Engaging with Research in Education.
  • plus an additional 3 credit hours of research methodology at the 7000-level in Education or 3000-level or above in other faculties. 

Concentration Courses (6 credit hours) 

In consultation with their advisor, students select: 

  • 3 credit-hour course at 7000-level in the concentration.  
  • 3 credit-hour course at the 5000-level or above in the concentration.

Elective Courses (3 credit hours) 

  • 3 credit hours of coursework at the 5000-level or above from the Faculty of Education. 
  • In addition, up to 6 credit hours of coursework at the 5000-level or above from the Faculty of Education. 

Thesis Course Level Restrictions 

  • 12 credit hours must be at the 7000-level; 
  • the remaining 6 credit hours may be at the 5000-level or above in the Faculty of Education. 

Course-based Route

30 credit hours + comprehensive exam 

The student and program advisor select courses that lead to mastery within Studies in Mathematics Education and Science Education. As the course component is completed, the student, with the program advisor support, prepares a document that demonstrates comprehensive mastery. The document can be a final examination or a project, which may culminate with an oral defence of the document. 

Core Course (3 credit hours) 

  • EDUB 7492 Recent Advances in Mathematics Education and Science Education 

Concentration Courses (12 credit hours)

In consultation with their advisor, student select 12 credit hours of coursework in the concentration: 

  • 6 credit hours at the 7000 level 
  • 6 credit hours at the 5000 level or above 

Elective Courses (12 credit hours) 

In consultation with advisor, students select 12-credit hours of coursework: 

  • 6 credit hours must be from CTL Department (one at 7000 level and the other at 5000 level or above) 
  • 3 credit hours must be from the Faculty of Education at the 7000 level 
  • the remaining 3 credit hours at the 5000 level or above from the Faculty of Education or 3000 level or above from another faculty. 

Comprehensive Exam 

Course Level Restriction 

  • 18 credit hours must be at the 7000 level; 
  • the remaining 12 credit hours may be at the 5000 level or above in the Faculty of Education and/or at the 3000 level or above in other faculties.  

Graduate Program Advisors

Christopher Charles 
Studies in Mathematics Education and Science Education 
Research Interests: Inquiry-based teaching strategies; Learners generating examples as a teaching strategy; Teachers' lived experiences with inquiry-based teaching strategies; Students' lived experiences with inquiry-based teaching strategies. 
Contact: (204) 474-9086 
Christopher.Charles@umanitoba.ca

Martha Koch 
Studies in Mathematics Education and Science Education 
Research Interests: Mathematics assessment; Mathematics curriculum revision; Teacher professional judgment. 
Contact: (204) 474-9015 
Martha.Koch@umanitoba.ca

Lilian Pozzer 
Studies in Mathematics Education and Science Education 
Research Interests: Sociocultural Studies in Science Education; Classroom Communication & Interaction; Graphical Literacy; Gender Inclusive Science Education & STEM Education; Science Education for Eco-social Justice; Discourse Analysis and Critical Content Analysis; Multimodal Video Analysis and Interaction Analysis.
Contact: (204) 474-9054
Lilian. Pozzer@umanitoba.ca 

Dawn Sutherland 
Studies in Mathematics Education and Science Education 
Research Interests: Engineering Design Education-Elementary and Middle Years; Cultural contexts in science education; Educational Enquiry for Youth and Children in Care. 
Contact: (204) 474-9887 
Dawn.Sutherland@umanitoba.ca