Registration is required to directly participate in the Zoom question and answer session. The questions session will be simultaneously streamed on YouTube.

Download the presentation schedule of the 38th Spring Research Symposium as a PDF.

38th Spring Research Symposium program (PDF)

Session information sheet

Download the Spring Research Symposium information sheet (PDF)

Day 1 presentations May 3 sessions

Presentations will take place from 9 am–12 pm. Poster sessions from 1–4 pm.
*All times listed are Central time

Join the Centre on Aging for virtual presentations for this year’s 38th Annual Spring Research Symposium. This year's theme is Looking forward to aging in a post-pandemic world. Our first day will feature speaker presentations by Centre Research Affiliates and our Advisory Board member. 

Beginning Monday at 9 am, pre-recorded presentations will be shown. For those interested, a moderated question and answer session will be hosted on Zoom and registration will be required via EventBrite to participate in the question and answer session via modified chat. The audience questions and answer session will be simultaneously streamed live on YouTube, but viewers will not be able to pose questions to the presenters.

Be sure to stay tuned for the afternoon at 1 pm where virtual attendees can view pre-recorded poster presentations on the Centre on Aging’s Web site. Find out about current aging related research from UM students, post-doctoral fellows, and Research Affiliates. These pre-recorded sessions will all have an audio component so you are able to hear about the research directly from the poster presenters, along with viewing their poster or slides.

Day 1 Presentations Opening remarks

Welcome and University greetings
9–9:15 am

Michelle Porter, PhD, Director Centre on Aging 

Honourable Heather Stefanson, Minister of Health and Seniors Care, Province of Manitoba

Dr. Digvir Jayas, O.C., Ph.D., D.Sc., P.Eng., P.Ag., FRSC, Vice-President (Research and International) and Distinguished Professor

Day 1 Presentations Mental health in later life: Is it the best of times or the worst of times?

9:15–10 am

Corey S. Mackenzie, Ph.D., C. Psych.
Professor, Departments of Psychology & Psychiatry; Clinical Associate, Centre on Aging

This presentation will review two hypotheses about how mental health changes with age. The first is that aging is a difficult, sad process associated with many negative outcomes. The second is that aging is associated with positive changes that result in numerous mental health benefits. This presentation will review what a large and growing body of scientific evidence has to say about which of these hypotheses appears to be most accurate, and we will review several theoretical models that help us understand why mental health changes as we age. Finally, we will discuss how the information covered in this talk applies to ways in which people of different ages have been coping during the global pandemic.

Question and answer session

Immediately following Dr. Mackenzie's presentation is a question and answer session in Zoom. Registration in Eventbrite is required to ask questions during this session.

Health break Exercise break

10–10:15 am

Symposium attendees can use this time to take their own health break, or take part in the short exercise session led by UM Recreation Services staff. 

At home attendees should use a stable chair (no wheels) when doing the exercises.

Day 1 Presentations Lessons from the pandemic—Older adults, their health and their health care

10:15–11 am

Cornelia (Kristel) van Ineveld, MD, MSc, FRCP(C)
Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

The COVID-19 pandemic has not only directly impacted the health of those older adults infected with the virus, but also led to social isolation, loneliness, functional decline and the destabilization of chronic comorbidities for many.   The heavy toll of the pandemic in long term care highlights the need to plan across the continuum of care.  Lessons learned tell us that we must advocate for: the improved availability of technology; the vital role of essential caregivers and family; public health adapting their outreach to target at-risk populations; consistent rapid access to ambulatory care that is more tightly integrated with primary care.

Question and answer session

Immediately following Dr. van Ineveld's presentation is a question and answer session in Zoom. Registration in Eventbrite is required to ask questions during this session.

Health break Exercise break

11–11:15 am

Symposium attendees can use this time to take their own health break, or take part in the short exercise session led by UM Recreation Services staff. 

At home attendees should use a stable chair (no wheels) when doing the exercises.

Day 1 Presentations The Mindful Elder: The healing power of Indigenous contemplative and mindfulness practices

11:15–11:55 am

Michael Yellow Bird, MSW, PhD
Dean and Professor, Faculty of Social Work

This presentation discusses the healing power of traditional Indigenous contemplative and mindfulness practices and the implications for building a community of Mindful, healthy, and resilient Indigenous Elders. Contemplative research and traditional knowledge have found that contemplative practices help to build cognitive resilience, cultivate compassion and tolerance, heal emotions, improve the brain, slow aging, and alleviate trauma. The talk will include a discussion of the effects that trauma has on the brain and body and how contemplative practices can restore health and well-being even down to the genetic and molecular levels.   

Day 1 Presentations In memoriam

11:55 am–12 pm

On behalf of the Centre on Aging, Director Dr. Michelle Porter will pay a short tribute to Ms. Norma Drosdowech, long time supporter and friend of the Centre on Aging.

Day 1 Presentations Poster sessions

1–4 pm

Visit us online to virtually support our students, post-docs, and researchers during the poster sessions.

Academic poster presentations are audio narrated, allowing attendees to learn about current aging related research at the University of Manitoba. 

Day 2 presentations May 4 sessions

Poster sessions will take place from 9 am–12 pm. Presentation sessions will be streamed from 1–4 pm.
*All times listed are Central time

Tuesday morning starting at 9 am, virtual attendees can view pre-recorded poster presentations on the Centre on Aging’s Web site. Find out about current aging related research from UM students, post-doctoral fellows, and Research Affiliates. These pre-recorded sessions will all have an audio component so you are able to hear about the research directly from the poster presenters, along with viewing their poster or slides.

Join the Centre on Aging for virtual presentations for this year’s 38th Spring Research Symposium. Our second day will feature speaker presentations by Centre Research Affiliates. 

Beginning Tuesday at 1 pm, a pre-recorded presentation will be shown. For interested virtual attendees, immediately following the presentations, attendees can take part in a live moderated online question and answer session via Zoom. Registration is required for the online sessions via EventBrite.

Day 2 Presentations Poster sessions

9 am–12 pm

If you missed the poster session on Monday, Symposium attendees have a second opportunity to virtually support our students, post-docs, and researchers during the poster sessions.

Academic poster presentations are audio narrated, allowing attendees to learn about current aging related research at the University of Manitoba. 

Day 2 Presentations Opening remarks

Welcome and University greetings
1–1:15 pm

Michelle Porter, PhD, Director Centre on Aging 

Honourable Heather Stefanson, Minister of Health and Seniors Care, Province of Manitoba

Dr. Digvir Jayas, O.C., Ph.D., D.Sc., P.Eng., P.Ag., FRSC, Vice-President (Research and International) and Distinguished Professor

Day 2 Presentations Life after COVID: Opportunities and challenges for home care

1:15–2 pm

Christine Kelly, PhD
Associate Professor, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Community Health Sciences

During the pandemic, media coverage focuses on residential care facilities because of the alarmingly high rates of severe and deadly cases of COVID-19 and the social isolation that residents are experiencing. Yet, the vast majority of older people who need care receive it at home, and this group is also often at higher risk of contracting severe cases of the disease. This commentary draws on material found in the public domain to present some of the impacts of COVID-19 on home and community care services considering the perspectives of clients, unpaid caregivers, and paid care workers. The presentation considers the potential of carrying forward lessons learned as we enter the late stages of the pandemic. 

Question and answer session

Immediately following Dr. Kelly's presentation is a question and answer session in Zoom. Registration in Eventbrite is required to ask questions during this session.

Health break Exercise break

2–2:15 pm

Symposium attendees can use this time to take their own health break, or take part in the short exercise session led by UM Recreation Services staff. 

At home attendees should use a stable chair (no wheels) when doing the exercises.

Day 2 Presentations Social isolation and loneliness: Can lessons learned during the pandemic help in the future? 

2:15–3 pm

Verena Menec, PhD
Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine

Decades’ worth of research shows that social isolation and loneliness increase older adults’ risk of physical and mental health problems. With the social distancing required during the COVID-19 pandemic, more people are experiencing social isolation and loneliness. This presentation will focus on how people and organizations have been affected by, and have adapted to the pandemic, and how the lessons learned might help in the future in reducing social isolation and loneliness, and associated health risks.

Question and answer session

Immediately following Dr. Menec's presentation is a question and answer session in Zoom. Registration in Eventbrite is required to ask questions during this session.

Health break Exercise break

3–3:15 pm

Symposium attendees can use this time to take their own health break, or take part in the short exercise session led by UM Recreation Services staff. 

At home attendees should use a stable chair (no wheels) when doing the exercises.

Day 2 Presentations Lessons from the pandemic—Health policy

3:15–4 pm

Phil St. John, MD, MPH, FRCPC
Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted many policy issues relevant to the delivery of care to ageing populations. It has reinforced the importance of social connections, social engagement, and social supports. It has also put a spotlight on social determinants of health, and on longterm care. Ongoing attention to improve social situations and health care delivery will be needed to improve health and reduce health inequalities amongst older populations. 

Question and answer session

Immediately following Dr. St. John's presentation is a question and answer session in Zoom. Registration in Eventbrite is required to ask questions during this session.

Previous Spring Research Symposium programs

View the Spring Research Symposium programs from previous years.