The 39th Annual Spring Research Symposium will take place May 2–3, 2022.

To assist Symposium attendees with planning their sessions, listed below is this year's presentation schedule, presenters and presentation abstracts.

About the Symposium sessions

Get your own copy of the Symposium session abstracts, program at a glance, presenter bios, and poster session presenters for the 39th Annual Spring Research Symposium.

Download the Symposium program (PDF)

Download the Symposium information sheet (PDF)

Day 1 presentations May 2 sessions

Join the Centre on Aging for virtual presentations for this year’s 39th Annual Spring Research Symposium. This year's theme is Dialogue on Aging. Our first day will feature speaker presentations by Centre Research Affiliates and the Age-Friendly University Initiative project recipients. 

Beginning Monday at 9 a.m., pre-recorded presentations will be shown. For those interested, a moderated question and answer session will be hosted on Zoom and registration will be required to participate in the question and answer session via modified chat. The audience questions and answer session will be simultaneously streamed live on YouTube, but viewers will not be able to pose questions to the presenters.

Be sure to stay tuned for the afternoon at 1 p.m. where virtual attendees can view pre-recorded poster presentations on the Centre on Aging’s Web site. Find out about current aging related research from UM students, post-doctoral fellows, and Research Affiliates. These pre-recorded sessions will all have an audio component so you are able to hear about the research directly from the poster presenters, along with viewing their poster or slides.

Day 1 Presentations Opening remarks

Welcome and University greetings
9–9:15 a.m.

Michelle Porter, PhD, Director Centre on Aging 
Honourable Scott Johnston, Minister of Seniors and Long-Term Care, Province of Manitoba
Digvir Jayas, O.C., Ph.D., D.Sc., P.Eng., P.Ag., FRSC, Vice-President (Research and International) and Distinguished Professor

Day 1 Presentations Can science help us stay on our feet? A research update on fall risk and prevention

9:15–10 a.m.

Veronica Silva, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management

This presentation discusses the problem of falls in older adults. Although researchers have been studying falls for decades, falls are still the leading cause of injury and disability in older adults. This presentation will discuss the recent research on the mechanisms of falls and associated risk factors, and we will review what the recent scientific evidence has to say about the effectiveness of fall prevention strategies.

Question and answer session

Immediately following Dr. Silva’s presentation is a question and answer session in Zoom. Registration is required to ask questions during this session.

Health break Exercise break

10–10:15 a.m.

Symposium attendees can use this time to take their own health break, or take part in the short exercise session led by UM Recreation Services staff. 
At home attendees should use a stable chair (no wheels) when doing the exercises.

Day 1 Presentations Myokines and their involvement in health and disease

10:15–11 a.m.

Stephen Cornish, Ph.D.
Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education; Associate Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management

Myokines, which are peptides, proteins, or cytokines released from skeletal muscle, are thought to influence several physiological processes in the human body. One key process they are known to influence is the inflammatory process. Regularly participating in exercise seems to exert an anti-inflammatory effect via the release of a certain myokine from muscle called interleukin-6 (IL-6). As we age, there seems to be a chronic low-grade inflammation that develops which may precipitate many types of diseases (cardiovascular disease, cancer, type II diabetes, and neurological disease). Completing an exercise training program is thought to reduce the amount of chronic low-grade inflammation and, hopefully, reduce the risk of disease development as we age. My lab is committed to finding out differences in myokine responses to exercise between younger and older adults and whether exercise training can positively influence the myokine response to exercise.

Question and answer session

Immediately following Dr. Cornish's presentation is a question and answer session in Zoom. Registration is required to ask questions during this session.

Health break Exercise break

11–11:15 a.m.

Symposium attendees can use this time to take their own health break, or take part in the short exercise session led by UM Recreation Services staff. 
At home attendees should use a stable chair (no wheels) when doing the exercises.

Day 1 Presentations Age-Friendly University Initiative panel

11:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

  • “Micro-certificate in facilitating older adult learning”
    Bill Kops, EdD, Extended Education
  • “Kaffeeklatsch Klatsch: Intergenerational friendship and knowledge sharing” 
    Jean Borbridge, Education Coordinator, School of Art Gallery
    Blair Fornwald, BFA, MFA, Director/Curator, School of Art Gallery
  • “Accessible tunnel wayfinding at UM” 
    Akash Singh, Laurel Cowley, Master of Landscape architecture students; Vanessa Jukes Strutt, MALA, CSLA, PMP, Project Manager AES; Kale
    Kostick, Projects Coordinator OOS
  • “Bridging digital gaps: an age-friendly introduction” 
    Wilfred Sam-King, Alumni Outreach and Engagement Officer

Day 1 Presentations Poster sessions

1–4 p.m.

Visit us online to virtually support our students, post-docs, and researchers during the poster sessions.
Academic poster presentations are audio narrated, allowing attendees to learn about current aging related research at the University of Manitoba. 

Day 1 Presentations Poster session Q&A

3–4 p.m.

New this year, Symposium attendees will have an opportunity to ask participating poster presenters about their research in a Q&A session via Zoom. Pre-registration is required to receive the participation link.

Day 2 presentations May 3 sessions

Tuesday morning starting at 9 a.m., virtual attendees will be able to view pre-recorded poster presentations on the Centre on Aging’s Web site. Find out about current aging related research from UM students, post-doctoral fellows, and Research Affiliates. These pre-recorded sessions will all have an audio component so you are able to hear about the research directly from the poster presenters, along with viewing their poster or slides.

Join the Centre on Aging for virtual presentations for this year’s 39th Spring Research Symposium. Our second day will feature speaker presentations by Centre Research Affiliates. 

Beginning Tuesday at 1 p.m., a pre-recorded presentation will be shown. For interested virtual attendees, immediately following the presentations, attendees can take part in a live moderated online question and answer session via Zoom. Registration will be required to ask questions for the online sessions.

Day 2 Presentations Poster sessions

9 a.m.–12 p.m.

A second opportunity for Symposium attendees to virtually support our students, post-docs, and researchers during the poster sessions.

Academic poster presentations will be audio narrated, allowing attendees to learn about current aging related research at the University of Manitoba. 

Day 2 Presentations Opening remarks

Welcome and presentations
1–1:05 p.m.

Michelle Porter, PhD, Director Centre on Aging 

Day 2 Presentations Developing the ‘Winter-Walk’ team: research priorities

1:05–1:50 p.m.

Ruth Barclay, PhD, MHSc, BMR (PT)
Associate professor, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Department of Physical Therapy

Walking outdoors can lead to physical and mental health benefits for older adults. Walking outdoors in the winter, however, has many challenges. The Winter-Walk team was funded by the Centre on Aging Research Team Small Grant. The team consists of community members, student trainees and researchers from three universities across multiple disciplines. Research priorities related to winter outdoor walking and older adults were developed during two days of meetings. Two projects have been completed: identifying barriers and facilitators associated with outdoor winter walking and older adults, and identifying resources related to safe outdoor winter walking. This presentation will describe the research priorities of the Winter-Walk team and results of the first two completed projects.

Question and answer session

Immediately following Dr. Barclay’s presentation is a question and answer session in Zoom. Registration is required to ask questions during this session.

Health break Exercise break

1:50 to 2:05 p.m.

Symposium attendees can use this time to take their own health break, or take part in the short exercise session led by UM Recreation Services staff. 
At home attendees should use a stable chair (no wheels) when doing the exercises.

Day 2 presentations Studying polypharmacy and deprescribing

2:05 to 2:50 p.m.

Christine Leong, BSc(Gen), BSc(Pharm), PharmD
Assistant Professor, College of Pharmacy; Max Rady College of Medicine, Psychiatry

Approximately two-thirds of Canadians 65 years of age and older are receiving five or more different prescription drugs. While medications have an important role in the treatment of disease, taking too many can sometimes lead to negative effects that outweigh the benefits. Dr. Leong will present on the creation of a multidisciplinary team to identify priority areas of research with respect to polypharmacy and deprescribing. She will also present on research related to describing patient values and preferences towards polypharmacy and deprescribing, tools to identify and deprescribe polypharmacy in primary care practice, and future research directions. 

Question and answer session

Immediately following Dr. Leong’s presentation is a question and answer session in Zoom. Registration is required to ask questions during this session.

Health break Exercise break

2:50 to 3:00 p.m.

Symposium attendees can use this time to take their own health break, or take part in the short exercise session led by UM Recreation Services staff. 
At home attendees should use a stable chair (no wheels) when doing the exercises.

Day 2 presentations Alzheimer Centre of Excellence Research Team panel

3–4 p.m.

  • Barbara Borges, PhD, Coordinator, Undergraduate Medical Education in Family Social Sciences Undergraduate Program, Max Rady College of Medicine
  • Kerstin Roger, PhD, Professor, Max Rady College of Medicine, Community Health Sciences
  • Shauna Mallory-Hill, PhD, M.Arch., B.E.S., Associate Professor, Faculty of Architecture, Interior Design
  • Laura Funk, PhD, Professor, Faculty of Arts, Sociology and Criminology 

Question and answer session

Immediately following the panel’s presentation is a question and answer session in Zoom. Registration is required to ask questions during this session.

Previous Spring Research Symposium programs

View the Spring Research Symposium programs from previous years.