Undergraduate funding and awards

Scholarships, prizes, awards

  • Scholarships

Direct Entry Admission Scholarships - Award Value: $ 1,000.00

Awarded to the five highest ranking students who have been admitted to the Faculty directly from high school with good academic standing and who are now enrolled full-time in his/her first year of study in any baccalaureate degree program offered by the Riddell Faculty.

Indigenous Direct Entry Admission Scholarship Award Value: $ 1,000.00

Awarded to the highest ranking indigenous student who has been admitted to the Faculty directly from high school with good academic standing and who are now enrolled full-time in his/her first year of study in any baccalaureate degree program offered by the Riddell Faculty.

Undergraduate Admission Scholarships Award Value: $ 1,000.00

Awarded to the five highest ranking students who have completed a minimum of 24 credit hours and a maximum of 60 credit hours of university level courses with good academic standing and who is now enrolled full-time in his/her second year of study in any baccalaureate degree program offered by the Riddell Faculty.

Indigenous Undergraduate Admission Scholarship Award Value: $ 1,000.00

Awarded to the highest ranking indigenous student who has completed a minimum of 24 credit hours and a maximum of 60 credit hours of university level courses with good academic standing and who is now enrolled full-time in his/her second year of study in any baccalaureate degree program offered by the Riddell Faculty.

Prizes

Undergraduate Initiative Prize Award Value: $1,000.00

For a student who has completed at least one year of full-time study in the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources, with good academic standing who has by her/his efforts and accomplishments developed, built upon and/or contributed to a local, regional, national, or international initiative that serves the greater good.

Each year, one prize valued at $1000.00 will be offered to an undergraduate student who:

  1. was enrolled full-time (minimum 80% course load) in the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources, in any General, Advanced, Major, or Honours degree program in the year in which the award is tenable;
  2. has achieved a minimum degree grade point average of 3.00;
  3. has by his/her significant voluntary service efforts and accomplishments developed, built upon and/or contributed to a local, regional, national, or international initiative that serves the greater good. Such initiatives may target specific populations (e.g. students, youth, the elderly), specific issues (e.g. global warming, poverty, resource exploration, environmental pollution), and/or specific outcomes (e.g. policy development).

Nominations will be invited from faculty and students of the University of Manitoba and members of the community. Nominations must be accompanied by:

  1. a cover letter which identifies the award for which they wish to nominate the candidate and provides a description and explanation of the initiative, the candidate’s specific roles and responsibilities, and the resulting outcomes with reference to the selection criterion (maximum 500 words);
  2. the candidate’s resume or curriculum vitae;
  3. two letters of recommendation (maximum 500 words each); one from a faculty member and one from a representative of the broader community most impacted by the initiative. The letters should describe how the candidate has met the requirements set out in the criterion (3) above.

Undergraduate Thesis Prize Award Value: $1,000.00

For a full-time student in the Riddell Faculty, in any Honours degree program, with good academic standing, who has submitted the best undergraduate thesis.

Each year, one prize valued at $1000.00 will be offered to an undergraduate student who:

  1. was enrolled full-time (minimum 80% course load) in the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources, in any Honours degree program in the year in which the award is tenable;
     
  2. has achieved a minimum degree grade point average of 3.50

Nominations will be invited from faculty of the University of Manitoba and members of the community. Nominations must be accompanied by:

  1. a copy of the final version of the undergraduate thesis;
     
  2. a letter of support from the candidate’s thesis advisor

Awards

NSERC Undergraduate Summer Research Awards (USRA)

Each summer, students have the opportunity to work alongside professors in their research labs. These awards are intended to stimulate the interest of undergraduate students by providing them with a valuable experiential learning opportunity in a scientific research environment. Students holding one of these awards will participate in research activities during their work period.

Eligibility
Visa students are not eligible for NSERC awards. You must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada.

  • NSERC applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher.
  • NSERC Indigenous applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • Supervisors for NSERC awards must be NSERC holders.
  • Students from other universities are eligible for the NSERC awards.
  • Students must have been registered as full-time students, except in their final term prior to graduation.
  • Students may apply to graduate studies but must not have started their graduate program.
  • Students in their first year are not eligible for this award.
  • Students must be registered, as of the deadline date for applications at the university, in a bachelor’s degree program at an eligible university.
  • Students must be registered in at least one of the two terms immediately before holding the award in a bachelor's degree program at an eligible university.
  • Students already in possession of a Bachelor’s degree who are studying towards a second Bachelor’s degree are eligible to hold this award, provided they do not hold a higher degree in the natural sciences.
  • Students may hold a maximum of THREE of these awards throughout their university career.
  • Co-op students are eligible to hold the NSERC award simultaneously with a co-op placement.

Value of NSERC USRA Awards
These awards have a minimum value of $7,500. Of this amount, $6,000 will be provided by NSERC and the remainder (at least $1,500) will be provided by the supervisor. 

Researchers can increase their contribution beyond the minimum, especially when supporting senior, experienced trainees.

Duration of Support
The duration of the NSERC USRA is 16 consecutive weeks.

Application Procedures - DO NOT APPLY DIRECTLY TO NSERC USRA
Application forms are available online. The letter of recommendation must be completed by a knowledgeable instructor, and it should be emailed directly to ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca. An official transcript is not required at this point in time, but the completed form must also be accompanied by the student’s academic web transcript.  Incomplete forms may result in a negative award decision.

Deadline for Applications: JANUARY 28, 2022.
Applications due to Ilka Cudmore, ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca
 
If you have any questions or concerns, please contact:
Ilka Cudmore
204-590-6128
ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca

NSERC Undergraduate Summer Research Awards (USRA) - Projects

Freshwater Environmental Science 

Name: David Barber
Contact Information: David.Barber@umanitoba.ca

Job Description:

  • Assist Manitoba Great Lakes Project Masters student in collection and analysis of a variety of environmental parameters, including whole water samples
  • Under the supervision of the CanWIN coordinator and the Senior Research Manager work with environmental datasets to standardize datasets for ingestion into the CanWIN data repository.
  • Datasets may include arctic and freshwater datasets, e.g.: ice mass balance, ice meteorological tower and ice beacon data, Lake Winnipeg water quality data
  • Perform quality control/quality assurance procedures on datasets
  • Analyze an assigned subset of Manitoba Great Lakes data and present as a report (including figures)
  • Load data into the Canadian Watershed Information Network series of databases -including spatial data
  • Produce GIS base map layers for public consumption
  • Produce map data for specific datasets
  • Use a GIS system to produce bathymetric maps of Lake Manitoba and Lake Winnipegosis from non-spatial digital files

Job Qualifications:

  • Enrolled in Post-secondary program in environmental sciences or related discipline
  • Knowledge of arctic or freshwater research
  • Experience working with Microsoft office software – MS Word and MS Excel or equivalent software packages
  • Strong verbal communication skills and ability to work in a team project environment
  • Effective written communication skills
  • Ability to work independently and take initiative

Asset Qualification:

  • Experience with data collection and recording
  • Knowledge of Matlab, R or other statistical analysis software
  • Experience working with GIS software

Arctic Marine Science 

Name: David Barber
Contact InformationDavid.Barber@umanitoba.ca

Job Description:

  • Assist with marine sample analysis from various Arctic field program
  • Datasets may include arctic and freshwater datasets, e.g.: ice mass balance, ice meteorological tower and ice beacon data, Nelson estuary data.
  • Perform quality control/quality assurance procedures on datasets
  • Analyze an assigned subset of the Arctic marine system science data and present as a report (including figures)
  • Load data into the Canadian Watershed Information Network series of databases -including spatial data
  • Produce GIS base map layers for public consumption
  • Produce map data for specific datasets
  • Use a GIS and or remote sensing analysis system to produce sea ice, ocean surface temperature and sediment maps.

Job Qualifications:

  • Enrolled in Post-secondary program in environmental sciences or related discipline
  • Knowledge of Arctic and/or freshwater research
  • Experience working with Microsoft office software – MS Word and MS Excel or equivalent software packages
  • Strong verbal communication skills and ability to work in a team project environment
  • Effective written communication skills
  • Ability to work independently and take initiative

Asset Qualification:

  • Experience with data collection and recording
  • Knowledge of Matlab, R or other statistical analysis software
  • Experience working with remote sensing and GIS datasets and software tools

Stress Ecology Laboratory

Name: Mark Hanson
Contact InformationMark.Hanson@umanitoba.ca

Description of ResearchInterested in helping us to better understand the fate and effects of contaminants in order to protect the environment?  We are looking to work with a motivated individual who has a strong science background in biology, ecology, chemistry, or toxicology to join our team in 2022.  There are a number of research projects you could be involved with, including regional salinity monitoring efforts, wetland mesocosm studies, water quality assessment in Arctic communities, new methods of laboratory aquatic toxicity testing, industrial site remediation, and work at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) on whole lake impacts of antimicrobials.  You will be part of a science-focused team and all the skills that go with being a competent, ethical, and engaged researcher.   We will find a research question that appeals to you from amongst our various initiatives.  Past undergraduates in our lab have characterized the health risks associated with metals in community garden soils, determined the effects on neonicotinoids on zooplankton and insects under field conditions, examined the role of invertebrates as vectors of antimicrobial resistance, quantified the extent of microplastic contamination on Lake Winnipeg, characterized the impacts of dilbit on insects at the ELA, and global exposure assessments for pesticides.  What interests you?


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE - CHEMISTRY

Name: Feiye Wang
Contact InformationFeiyue.Wang@umanitoba.ca

 

Description of Research: Our research deals with environmental chemistry and biogeochemistry of legacy (e.g., mercury) and emerging (e.g., oil spills, microplastics) contaminants especially in the Arctic. Current research projects focus on cold-temperature chemical and biogeochemical processes in the Arctic sea ice and marine environment, marine oil spill response, and the interplay between chemical contamination and climate change. Our research is supported by the Ultra-Clean Trace Elements Laboratory (UCTEL), Sea-ice Environmental Research Facility (SERF), Churchill Marine Observatory (CMO), and research vessels and stations in the Canadian and Greenlandic Arctic.

Qualifications:

  •  Academic training in environmental chemistry, analytical chemistry, geochemistry, and/or chemical oceanography;
  •  Demonstrated experience with chemical analysis;
  •  Ability to work independently and as a team;
  •  Fieldwork experience is an asset.

NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE - 
CONSERVATION AND ECOLOGY OF GRASSLAND SONGBIRDS


Name: Nicola Koper
Contact InformationNicola.Koper@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: Field work on grassland bird conservation in southern Alberta (based in Brooks), and would work closely with graduate students who are studying the impacts of oil and gas development on grassland birds. The student would learn to do one or more of the following: large and small mammal surveys, snake surveys, bird surveys, sampling vegetation, finding and monitoring grassland songbird nests, putting nest cameras out to observe parent’s behaviour near nests, other behavioural observations, and monitoring and maintaining video cameras. Students must be willing to work long hours, in all sorts of weather, and be passionate about conservation. Students will gain outstanding experience in applied ecology, conservation, management, field work, data collection and study design, and natural history research.


Name: Andrew Frederiksen
Contact InformationAndrew.Frederiksen@umanitoba.ca

Characterizing the seismic noise spectrum in Winnipeg for MASW analysis

Description of Research: Seismic ambient noise in the Winnipeg area: this project would involve recording ambient seismic noise in the Winnipeg area, using a 24-channel instrument, low-frequency geophones, and different seismic-array geometries, in order to determine whether it is possible to measure the depth to bedrock in this manner.


Name: Mostafa Fayek

Contact information: Mostafa.Fayek@umanitoba.ca

Environmental Isotope Geochemistry and Ore Deposits

Description of Research: Are you interested in helping us better understand the source and fate of microplastics in the environment?  Current global plastic production is estimated to be 311 million metric tons annually and is increasing by 10% each year.  Plastic production will certainly increase in the very near future because of the increased use of plastics for protection against the current SARS Covid-2 virus (e.g., PPE, Plexiglas shields, food containers).  We are looking for a motivated individual who has a strong background in geology, physical geography or chemistry.  Experience with stable isotopes or stable isotopic data is an asset.  In 2021, the research in which you will be involved will include a field and lab component.  You will learn to be part of a science-focused research team, and gain the skills that go with being a knowledgeable, ethical and engaged researcher. We also have projects in ore deposits and environmental isotope geochemistry.  What are your interests?


Name: Paul Durkin
Contact InformationPaul.Durkin@umanitoba.ca

Sedimentology and Stratigraphy

Description of Research
: The student will conduct field work in Dinosaur Provincial Park in eastern Alberta for several weeks during the summer. The student will work closely with graduate students in the research group. Field work will include measuring stratigraphic sections, collecting paleoflow data, and mapping stratigraphic surfaces. This data will be integrated with a 3D digital outcrop model previously constructed using Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems. Applicants must be willing to conduct field work in rough terrain for long periods of time. Time not spent in the field will involve data compilation and analysis in the lab. Please contact Dr. Durkin for more information.


Name: Eric Collins
Contact Information: Eric.Collins@umanitoba.ca

Project Description: Microorganisms (including bacteria, archaea, algae, protists, fungi, and viruses) drive the ecosystem in the ocean, and provide benefits to humans in the form of Ecosystem Services. This project will utilize metagenomic sequence analysis to explore the role of Arctic microbes in providing Ecosystem Services, and to understand how those services might change in a warmer future.


Northern estuaries and coasts

 Name: Zou Zou Kuzyk

Contact Information: zouzou.kuzyk@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: The research involves field work in the Arctic or subarctic using the landfast sea ice as a platform and small boats or ships. The student would work with a team of other researchers to study the physics, chemistry, or biology/biogeochemistry of river plumes where they enter into the coastal ocean. The student would gain experience in sampling waters and sediments, using various sensors and field instruments to measure properties of freshwaters and seawaters, and various types of lab work when not in the field. A background in environmental science, earth science, aquatic ecology or biogeochemistry, a drivers license, and a team attitude are desirable. A keen interest in conducting northern field science in cooperation with Inuit and Cree community members is essential.


Name: Juliana M. Marson

Contact information: Juliana.MariniMarson@umanitoba.ca
 
Description of Research: My research focus lies on the polar oceans, their interactions with the cryosphere and climate. In particular, I use numerical models to understand how warming and increasing freshwater input to the polar and subpolar oceans (especially from melting land ice) can change their physical and biogeochemical characteristics. I am also fascinated by icebergs, their role in ocean dynamics and primary productivity, their patterns of drift, and how they can affect marine transportation and other offshore activities.

Name: Karen Alley

Contact information: Karen.Alley@umanitoba.ca
 
Description of Research: Research in glacier-ocean interaction: This work will focus on assessing changes in glaciers in the Canadian Arctic, Greenland, or Antarctica that are driven by ocean temperature and circulation changes. Data will be derived from optical or radar satellites, and analysis will be carried out using a GIS program (such as QGIS or ArcMap) and/or in a coding language (such as Matlab or Python). 

Vertebrate Paleontology

Name: Dr. Kirstin Brink

Contact information: kirstin.brink@umanitoba.ca

The Vertebrate Paleontology Lab at the UofM (kirstinbrink.weebly.com) studies the evolution, development, and ecology of bones and teeth using the fossil record and studies of living reptiles.

Potential Duties (will align with students interests and career goals):

  • Learn how to analyse and segment CT scans of lizard heads using Amira software to make 3D models
  • Learn histological and paleohistological techniques
  • Assist with animal care (green anoles) when needed
  • Assist with fossil collection at field sites around Manitoba
  • Prepare vertebrate fossils in the lab using pneumatic tools, sort microvertebrate fossils using a microscope
  • Perform SEM analyses on fossil amphibian teeth 

Qualifications:

  • Patience and attention to detail
  • Background or interest in biology, geology, environmental science, health sciences/dentistry, or paleontology

Greenhouse Gas and Carbon Cycle Research on Lake Winnipeg

Tim Papakyriakou

Contact InformationTim.Papakyriakou@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: Research aims to shore up our understanding of the carbon cycle in Lake Winnipeg, and along the aquatic corridor from the lake to Hudson Bay. Specifically the goal is to characterize the greenhouse gas footprint of the lake, and the downstream river system to the Bay. The research is team oriented. The students should have an interest in carbon cycle research. The student will assist with the deployment and maintenance of aquatic sensors, sampling of water for analysis in the laboratory, assist with the preparation of sampling gear, and help maintain the project data base. Duties will require the student to occasionally work in Manitoba’s near north for short periods of time as part of a small dedicated research team, and participate on ship and/or boat-based sampling on Lake Winnipeg and/or the Nelson River.

Qualifications:

  • A strong background in hydrology, aquatic chemistry and/or aquatic ecology;
  • Valid drivers license;
  • No aversion to fieldwork in remote areas, including from a ship or boat.

NSERC Undergraduate Summer Research Awards (USRA) - Research Interests

Ryan Galley - research is focused on the evolution of brine in sea ice both temporally and spatially in the context of the physical controls on its presence and movement

Alfredo Camacho - Current research interests include origins and characteristics of fluids, phase transformations, durations of thermal pulses associated with the advection of heat, and exhumation historie

Julienne Stroeve - study of “sea ice-climate coupling” will provide a key bridge to understanding how the Arctic affects the climate and hydrology of southern Canada. 

Michael Schindler -  research interests include all kinds of nano-scale processes in the environment such as the transport of metals and metal(loid)s as nanoparticles and colloids, their retention by mineral surface coatings and their release during dissolution of minerals.

Søren Rysgaard - research infesters include marine microbiology and biogeochemistry, pertaining to the structure and function of Arctic marine ecosystems. This includes benthic-pelagic coupling, carbon and nutrient cycling in Arctic waters, sea ice processes, glacier-fjord-ocean interactions, and global change. 

Anton Chakhmouradian - Current research interests include detailed studies of carbonatites from Canada, Mongolia, Morocco, China, USA, and Russia

CJ Mundy - seeks to understand variability and change in the Arctic marine ecosystem due to climate change and the resulting loss of sea ice. In particular, he studies physical and biological processes controlling the timing, location, magnitude, and fate of primary producers in the ice-covered environment.

Dorthe Dahl-Jensen - developing an understanding of the physics controlling glacial ice stream flow processes; the role of the ocean in the ice discharge at the fronts of ice streams. Use of ice core proxies to recreate past sea ice conditions in marine areas adjacent to the Greenland Ice sheet and use these to understand sea ice variability and change over longer time scales. The research will lead to better estimates of the sea level and to how the changing fresh water will influence the marine resources, sea ice, ocean circulation and atmospheric weather patterns at lower levels of our planet.

Jens Ehn - Research interests include the use of field observations, remote sensing and modeling to understand: Light propagation and light-matter interactions in Arctic estuarine, marine and sea ice environments; processes and feedbacks controlling air-ice-ocean interactions, sea ice formation and melting; seasonal evolution, trends and variability of sea ice covered environments; freshwater-marine interactions in Arctic and subArctic coastal and shelf waters

Stefanie Brueckner - Research focuses on (metamorphosed) hydrothermal mineral deposits that were formed from relatively hot, metal-bearing fluids circulating through Earth’s crust. We focus in particular on precious metals gold and silver and various critical metals (e.g., Bi, Co, Sb, Se, Te, V) since they play an essential role in various green, medical and communication technologies and have an increasing global demand in our ever-changing society. Our goal is to understand the transport conditions, deposition mechanisms, ore and alteration assemblage, and source region of the investigated metals for different hydrothermal deposit types (e.g., VMS, epithermal, orogenic gold). We also investigate the role of metamorphism on metal enrichment in hydrothermal mineral deposits, since many mineral deposits are metamorphosed. We use a multi-faceted approach that includes field methods (e.g., core logging, mapping), microscopy and micro-analytical tools to better understand ore-forming processes and the role of metamorphism. I closely work with industry partners, other academic units nationally and internationally, and the government (e.g., Geological Survey).

Undergraduate Research Awards (URAs)

The Undergraduate Research Award is open to undergraduate students in all fields and ranges of research, scholarly works or creative activities.

The awards are competitive. Students apply to be mentored for 16 weeks (full-time from May through August) by a professor of their choice. There are:

  • 172 awards available across all disciplines
  • 10% of awards are available for self-declared Indigenous students
  • 2 awards for community-based projects
  • $7,000 monetary award
  • Is a recognized UM Co-Curricular Record activity
 
For more information including on how to apply, go to: https://umanitoba.ca/research/opportunities-support/undergraduate-research-awards

Research opportunities


Environmental Chemistry and Biogeochemistry

Feiyue Wang

Contact Info: feiyue.wang@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: Our research deals with environmental chemistry and biogeochemistry of legacy (e.g., mercury) and emerging (e.g., oil spills, microplastics) contaminants especially in the Arctic. Current research projects focus on cold-temperature chemical and biogeochemical processes in the Arctic sea ice and marine environment, marine oil spill response, and the interplay between chemical contamination and climate change. Our research is supported by the Ultra-Clean Trace Elements Laboratory (UCTEL), Sea-ice Environmental Research Facility (SERF), Churchill Marine Observatory (CMO), and research vessels and stations in the Canadian and Greenlandic Arctic.

Qualifications:

  • Academic training in environmental chemistry, analytical chemistry, geochemistry, and/or chemical oceanography;
  • Demonstrated experience with chemical analysis;
  • Ability to work independently and as a team;
  • Fieldwork experience is an asset.

Juliana M. Marson

Contact informationJuliana.MariniMarson@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: My research focus lies on the polar oceans, their interactions with the cryosphere and climate. In particular, I use numerical models to understand how warming and increasing freshwater input to the polar and subpolar oceans (especially from melting land ice) can change their physical and biogeochemical characteristics. I am also fascinated by icebergs, their role in ocean dynamics and primary productivity, their patterns of drift, and how they can affect marine transportation and other offshore activities.


David Walker

Contact InformationDavid.Walker@UManitoba.ca

 
Description of Research: Landscapes are dynamic with constantly changing spatial patterns driven by natural processes and human activities. Understanding how processes affect pattern and conversely how pattern informs us about process, is critical in managing landscapes and mitigating impacts of large-scale natural disturbances (e.g. fire) and changes in the environment (e.g. climate change and urbanization). Furthermore, how species of plants and animals respond to these changes is also driven by, and a driver of, spatial pattern. How do species adapt to the urbanization and development of landscapes? How do large scale fires, similar to those of the summer of 2021, impact plant community spatial patterns over the long term? How do species respond to spatial pattern when selecting resources? How do changes in land management influence landscape species and spatial diversity? My research focuses on landscape spatial dynamics and how knowledge gained from studying pattern can be used in conservation. This research leverages geomatics technologies (Geographic Information Systems, Global Navigation Satellite Systems, & Remote Sensing) in studying landscapes and some previous experience with these platforms is expected although instruction will also be provided. For a full description of each topic contact David.Walker@UManitoba.ca. Topics are listed below:
  1. Plant community changes in former PFRA Community pastures
  2. Habitat mapping and site suitability assessment for caribou using machine learning
  3. Characterizing spatial entropy on post-fire landscapes
  4. Geographic Object Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) of urban wildlife habitat

Research in glacier-ocean interaction

Karen Alley

Contact InformationKaren.Alley@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: This work will focus on assessing changes in glaciers in the Canadian Arctic, Greenland, or Antarctica that are driven by ocean temperature and circulation changes. Data will be derived from optical or radar satellites, and analysis will be carried out using a GIS program (such as QGIS or ArcMap) and/or in a coding language (such as Matlab or Python). 


Northern estuaries and coasts

 Zou Zou Kuzyk

Contact Information: zouzou.kuzyk@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: The research involves field work in the Arctic or subarctic using the landfast sea ice as a platform and small boats or ships. The student would work with a team of other researchers to study the physics, chemistry, or biology/biogeochemistry of river plumes where they enter into the coastal ocean. The student would gain experience in sampling waters and sediments, using various sensors and field instruments to measure properties of freshwaters and seawaters, and various types of lab work when not in the field. A background in environmental science, earth science, aquatic ecology or biogeochemistry, a drivers license, and a team attitude are desirable. A keen interest in conducting northern field science in cooperation with Inuit and Cree community members is essential.


Vertebrate Paleontology

Dr. Kirstin Brink kirstin.brink@umanitoba.ca

Contact Informationkirstin.brink@umanitoba.ca

The Vertebrate Paleontology Lab at the UofM (kirstinbrink.weebly.com) studies the evolution, development, and ecology of bones and teeth using the fossil record and studies of living reptiles. 

Potential Duties (will align with students interests and career goals):

  • Learn how to analyse and segment CT scans of lizard heads using Amira software to make 3D models
  • Learn histological and paleohistological techniques
  • Assist with animal care (green anoles) when needed
  • Assist with fossil collection at field sites around Manitoba 
  • Prepare vertebrate fossils in the lab using pneumatic tools, sort microvertebrate fossils using a microscope
  • Perform SEM analyses on fossil amphibian teeth

Qualifications:

  • Patience and attention to detail
  • Background or interest in biology, geology, environmental science, health sciences/dentistry, or paleontology

Green-Energy, Critical Minerals Research

Mostafa Fayek

Contact informationmostafa.fayek@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: Are you interested in helping us better understand the source of critical minerals required for green-energy generation and technology development?  On March 11, 2021, the government of Canada published its list of critical elements also referred to as critical minerals.  These minerals are essential for the development of green energy and technology, and are considered integral to lowering our carbon footprint. Lowering our carbon footprint has considerable social and economic benefits.  In 2021, the research in which you will be involved will include a field and lab component.  You will learn to be part of a science-focused research team, and gain the skills that go with being a knowledgeable, ethical and engaged researcher. 


Stress Ecology Laboratory

Interested in helping us to better understand the fate and effects of contaminants in order to protect the environment?  We are looking to work with a motivated individual who has a strong science background in biology, ecology, chemistry, or toxicology to join our team in 2022.  There are a number of research projects you could be involved with, including regional salinity monitoring efforts, wetland mesocosm studies, water quality assessment in Arctic communities, new methods of laboratory aquatic toxicity testing, industrial site remediation, and work at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) on whole lake impacts of antimicrobials.  You will be part of a science-focused team and all the skills that go with being a competent, ethical, and engaged researcher.   We will find a research question that appeals to you from amongst our various initiatives.  Past undergraduates in our lab have characterized the health risks associated with metals in community garden soils, determined the effects on neonicotinoids on zooplankton and insects under field conditions, examined the role of invertebrates as vectors of antimicrobial resistance, quantified the extent of microplastic contamination on Lake Winnipeg, characterized the impacts of dilbit on insects at the ELA, and global exposure assessments for pesticides.  What interests you?

If you want to learn more, please contact Mark Hanson (mark.hanson@umanitoba.ca).


Bruce Erickson

Contact Information: Bruce.Erickson@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: My research focuses on the history and politics of tourism. I have two projects that students could join me on. The first is a history of polar bear tourism in Churchill, Manitoba, looking at the relationship between Churchill and Southern Manitoba during the transition to a tourist-focused economy in Churchill. This project might also be able to include the production of a podcast on Tourism in Churchill. The second project would look at the history of tourism in the context of European expansion. Both of these projects would involve working with archival and historical documents.


Jonathan Peyton

Contact Information: Jonathan.Peyton@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: My research is focused on the early years of oil and gas extraction in Arctic. Students could work on a host of research projects in one of three geographic regions where dreams of Arctic oil and gas first emerged: the Beaufort Sea, the Arctic Archipelago or the Eastern Arctic (Lancaster Sound/Baffin Bay/Davis Strait).

This work will be focused on the social, economic and ecological effects of the early attempts to locate and develop Arctic hydrocarbon resources through the 1970s and 1980s. Students could work on a range of topics including but not limited to: oil spill research and the BIOS project, the relationship between seismic testing and marine life, oil and gas exploration and the management of conservation spaces, energy geographies and the politics of scientific knowledge, energy development and community relationships, moving Arctic research and the development of “sci-fi” technologies, or relations of extractive economies to the lives of Arctic animals (caribou, Muskox, bowhead whales, belugas, etc.). Most of the research will be with archival and community documents, though there may be an opportunity to engage in interview techniques.


Dr. Iain Davidson-Hunt

Contact Information: Iain.Davidson-Hunt@umanitoba.ca

Project Description: Over the past few years I have led a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council research project on innovation in small-scale food systems. This work has considered the supply chains of craft breweries in Manitoba, the role of commercial community kitchens as a space of innovation for small-scale food processors along with wild rice harvest camps and recipe development in northwestern Ontario with Anishinaabe communities. In this project, I would like a student to work with Phil Veldhuis of DirectFarm Manitoba and myself to better understand the participation of Indigenous Peoples (Métis / First Nation) in small-scale food enterprises in Manitoba. The student will undertake a review of literature, websites and farmer markets in Manitoba to identify Indigenous smallscale food enterprises. Ideally, the student will be studying in the fields of agriculture, business, cultural anthropology or cultural geography but we are also open to students with other backgrounds who share our interest in, and passion for, small-scale food enterprises.


John Hanesiak

Contact Information: john.hanesiak@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: The successful candidate will be part of the Northern Tornadoes Project (NTP) that aims to improve our current tornado climatology (occurrence and strength) as well as better understanding severe storm processes and prediction capabilities in Canada. The student will participate in tornado event and damage surveys across the Prairies, deploy atmospheric remote sensing equipment on the UM campus for data analysis following local storm events, and launch local weather balloons prior to and during severe convective storm events.

Requirements:

  • valid drivers license
  • enrolled in the Environment and Geography B.Sc. atmospheric science stream (should be a second year student or beyond)
  • Willing to travel, drive to various Prairie locations and work outdoors
  • proficient with MS word/excel
  • works well in a team environment

CONSERVATION AND ECOLOGY OF GRASSLAND SONGBIRDS

Nicola Koper

Contact Information: nicola.koper@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: Field work on grassland bird conservation in southern Alberta (based in Brooks), and would work closely with graduate students who are studying the impacts of oil and gas development on grassland birds. The student would learn to do one or more of the following: large and small mammal surveys, snake surveys, bird surveys, sampling vegetation, finding and monitoring grassland songbird nests, putting nest cameras out to observe parent’s behaviour near nests, other behavioural observations, and monitoring and maintaining video cameras.
Students must be willing to work long hours, in all sorts of weather, and be passionate about conservation. Students will gain outstanding experience in applied ecology, conservation, management, field work, data collection and study design, and natural history research.


Characterizing the seismic noise spectrum in Winnipeg for MASW analysis

Andrew Frederiksen

Contact Information: Andrew.Frederiksen@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: Seismic ambient noise in the Winnipeg area: this project would involve recording ambient seismic noise in the Winnipeg area, using a 24-channel instrument, low-frequency geophones, and different seismic-array geometries, in order to determine whether it is possible to measure the depth to bedrock in this manner.


Clastic Sedimentology and Stratigraphy

Paul Durkin

Contact Information: Paul.Durkin@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: Please contact Paul contact directly to discuss project opportunities.


Greenhouse Gas and Carbon Cycle Research on Lake Winnipeg

Tim Papakyriakou

Contact Information: Tim.Papakyriakou@umanitoba.ca

Description of Research: Research aims to shore up our understanding of the carbon cycle in Lake Winnipeg, and along the aquatic corridor from the lake to Hudson Bay. Specifically the goal is to characterize the greenhouse
gas footprint of the lake, and the downstream river system to the Bay. The research is team oriented. The students should have an interest in carbon cycle research. The student will assist with the deployment and maintenance of aquatic sensors, sampling of water for analysis in the laboratory, assist with the preparation of sampling gear, and help maintain the project data base. Duties will require the student to occasionally work in Manitoba’s near north for short periods of time as part of a small dedicated research team, and participate on ship and/or boat-based sampling
on Lake Winnipeg and/or the Nelson River.

Qualifications:

  • A strong background in hydrology, aquatic chemistry and/or aquatic ecology;
  • Valid drivers license;
  • No aversion to fieldwork in remote areas, including from a ship or boat.

Freshwater Environmental Science

David Barber

Contact Information: David.Barber@umanitoba.ca

Job Description:

  • Assist Manitoba Great Lakes Project Masters student in collection and analysis of a variety of environmental parameters, including whole water samples
  • Under the supervision of the CanWIN coordinator and the Senior Research Manager work with environmental datasets to standardize datasets for ingestion into the CanWIN data repository.
  • Datasets may include arctic and freshwater datasets, e.g.: ice mass balance, ice meteorological tower and ice beacon data, Lake Winnipeg water quality data
  • Perform quality control/quality assurance procedures on datasets
  • Analyze an assigned subset of Manitoba Great Lakes data and present as a report (including figures)
  • Load data into the Canadian Watershed Information Network series of databases -including spatial data
  • Produce GIS base map layers for public consumption
  • Produce map data for specific datasets
  • Use a GIS system to produce bathymetric maps of Lake Manitoba and Lake Winnipegosis from non-spatial digital files

Job Qualifications:

  • Enrolled in Post-secondary program in environmental sciences or related discipline
  • Knowledge of arctic or freshwater research
  • Experience working with Microsoft office software – MS Word and MS Excel or equivalent software packages
  • Strong verbal communication skills and ability to work in a team project environment
  • Effective written communication skills
  • Ability to work independently and take initiative

Asset Qualification:

  • Experience with data collection and recording
  • Knowledge of Matlab, R or other statistical analysis software
  • Experience working with GIS software

Arctic Marine Science

David Barber

Contact Information: David.Barber@umanitoba.ca

Job Description:

  • Assist with marine sample analysis from various Arctic field program
  • Datasets may include arctic and freshwater datasets, e.g.: ice mass balance, ice meteorological tower and ice
  • beacon data, Nelson estuary data.
  • Perform quality control/quality assurance procedures on datasets
  • Analyze an assigned subset of the Arctic marine system science data and present as a report (including
  • figures)
  • Load data into the Canadian Watershed Information Network series of databases -including spatial data
  • Produce GIS base map layers for public consumption
  • Produce map data for specific datasets
  • Use a GIS and or remote sensing analysis system to produce sea ice, ocean surface temperature and sediment maps.

Job Qualifications:

  • Enrolled in Post-secondary program in environmental sciences or related discipline
  • Knowledge of Arctic and/or freshwater research
  • Experience working with Microsoft office software – MS Word and MS Excel or equivalent software packages
  • Strong verbal communication skills and ability to work in a team project environment
  • Effective written communication skills

Ability to work independently and take initiative
Asset Qualification:

  • Experience with data collection and recording
  • Knowledge of Matlab, R or other statistical analysis software
  • Experience working with remote sensing and GIS datasets and software tools.

Arctic Marine Microbial Ecosystem Services

Eric Collins

Contact Information: eric.collins@umanitoba.ca

Project Description: Microorganisms (including bacteria, archaea, algae, protists, fungi, and viruses) drive the ecosystem in the ocean, and provide benefits to humans in the form of Ecosystem Services. This project will utilize metagenomic sequence analysis to explore the role of Arctic microbes in providing Ecosystem Services, and to understand how those services might change in a warmer future. Applicants should have some programming experience.
 


Stephane McLachlan

Contact Information: Steph.McLachlan@umanitoba.ca

Project 1 Description: This student project will explore the relationship between hydropower and climate change and their combined implications for Indigenous fisheries in northern Manitoba. This work will focus on impacts on both environment and community and explore possible solutions to these impacts moving forward. It will ideally involve travelling to a subset of these communities and video-record interviews with fishers in these communities. Thes recordings would be mapped uploaded on the project website for widespread dissemination. The project would be coordinated through our Wa Ni Ska Tan Alliance of Hydro-Impacted Communities. The student would work closely with the larger research team working in this Indigenous-led Alliance while also collaborating closely with participating communities. Our project website is at: https://hydroimpacted.ca 

Project 2 Description: This student project will explore document many of the community-scale, alternative-energy projects initiated by Indigenous communities across Manitoba and in other parts of Canada as well as the US. These would likely include solar, wind, micro-hydro, and geothermal initiatives amongst others. A literature review will contextualize a series of interviews conducted with project representatives from each community. A subset of communities will be visited in person, and these visits will be video-recorded and made available on the project website for widespread dissemination. The project would be coordinated through our Wa Ni Ska Tan Alliance of Hydro-Impacted Communities. The student would work closely with the larger research team working for this Indigenous-led Alliance while also collaborating closely with participating communities.
Our project website is at: https://hydroimpacted.ca 

Project 3 Description: This student project will document some of the many proactive responses to COVID-19 initiated by Indigenous communities across Canada since February 2020. Interviews will be conducted with project representatives and a number of these communities will be visited in person.  Such initiatives have played a critical role in helping communities caretake their own health and wellbeing in the face of the pandemic. They relate to food, culture, ceremony, the use of medicines, land-based education, and youth sports and recreation amongst others. The project would be coordinated through kitatipithitamak mithwayawin, an Indigenous-led project that has helped support Indigenous communities through the pandemic. The student would work closely with the larger research team working on this project while also collaborating closely with participating communities. Our project website is at: https://covid19indigenous.ca 

 

Graduate awards

Graduate Entrance Scholarships Award Value: $ 5,000.00

For a full-time student in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, in the first year of a Masters or Doctoral program delivered by a unit in the Riddell faculty, with high academic standing. Ten awards are offered annually and recipients are determined by a selection comittee.

Graduate Initiative Prize Award Value: $1,000.00

For a student who is enrolled full-time in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, in any Master’s or Doctoral program delivered by a unit in the Riddell Faculty, who has demonstrated a commitment to voluntary service that has developed, built upon and/or contributed to a local, regional, national, or international initiative that serves the greater good.

Each year, one prize valued at $1000.00 will be offered to a graduate student who:

  1. was enrolled full-time in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, in any Master’s or doctoral program delivered by a unit in the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources, in the year in which the award was tenable;
  2. has achieved a minimum degree grade point average of 3.00 (or equivalent) over the last 60 credit hours of study;
  3. has by his/her significant voluntary service efforts and accomplishments developed, built upon and/or contributed to a local, regional, national, or international initiative that serves the greater good. Such initiatives may target specific populations (e.g. students, youth, the elderly), specific issues (e.g. global warming, poverty, resource exploration, environmental pollution), and/or specific outcomes (e.g. policy development).

Nominations will be invited from faculty and students of the University of Manitoba and members of the community. Nominations must be accompanied by:

  1. a cover letter which provides a description and explanation of the initiative, the candidate’s specific roles and responsibilities, and the resulting outcomes with reference to the selection criterion (maximum 500 words);
  2. the candidate’s resume or curriculum vitae;
  3. a letter of recommendation (maximum 500 words) from a representative of the broader community most impacted by the initiative. The letter should describe how the candidate has met the requirements stout in the criterion (3) above.

Berkes Graduate Scholarship in Community-Based Research Award Value: $3,000.00

Professor Fikret Berkes, Tier I Canada Research Chair in Community-Based Resource Management, has established the Berkes Graduate Scholarship in Community-based Research. This annually funded scholarship will provide support towards degree-related field research and related expenses (including travel, food, housing, and to return research findings to the research host community); an opportunity to train in methods for community-based research, including community-based resource and environmental management, conservation and planning; and an opportunity to engage in outreach training, and to translate results into communication to communities, public audiences, and policy-makers through written, visual, oral and/or multimedia means.

Number of Awards and Value:    one at $3,000

Deadline: February 5, 2021

Eligibility Criteria:

  1. is enrolled full-time in the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of Manitoba, either in a Master’s or a Ph.D. program;
  2. is pursuing studies in community-based research methods including, but not limited to, community-based resource and environmental management, conservation and planning;
  3. has achieved a minimum degree grade point average of 3.5 (or equivalent) on the last 60 credit hours of courses (graduate and undergraduate); and,
  4. does not already hold a UMGF, SSHRC or other major award greater than $10,000.

Applicants are required to submit the following in order to be considered for this award:

  1. A copy of the research proposal (maximum of 2 pages) 

  2. A current academic transcript(s) - web transcripts accepted for UManitoba programs only. Transcripts from external institutions need be official transcripts 

  3. Two letters of reference. One of the letters must be from the graduate advisor, indicating that the applicant does not already hold a major award, and that this scholarship will make a major difference in the applicant’s ability to carry out the proposed research. 

  4. A list of all scholarships and awards received since admission to your graduate program (start with the most recent and include name of award(s), period held and monetary value). 

  5.  A curriculum vitae

Completed application packages should be emailed in one single PDF document to ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca.

Henley Graduate Scholarship in Natural Resources Development and Stewardship in Manitoba Award Value: $2,100.00

For a student who is enrolled full-time in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, in any Master’s or Doctoral program delivered by a unit in the Riddell Faculty, with good academic standing who is pursuing studies in natural resources management in Manitoba.

Eligibility Criteria:

  1. is enrolled full-time in the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of Manitoba, either in a Master’s or a Ph.D. program delivered by the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources;
  2. has achieved a minimum degree grade point average of 3.5 (or equivalent) on the previous 30 credit hours (or equivalent) of study;
  3. is pursuing studies in natural resources management in Manitoba;
  4. has submitted the highest quality research proposal, in the opinion of the selection committee; and,
  5. currently holds, or has been offered, an award valued at $5,000 or more.

Nomination packages including the award application should be submitted in PDF format via email to: Ilka Cudmore, Awards Secretary, ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca

North American Caribou Workshop Graduate Fellowship in Wildlife Management Award Value: $1,600.00

The North American Caribou Workshop Graduate Fellowship in Wildlife Management is geared towards graduate students with a demonstrated interest in aspects of caribou research, monitoring or management and who considers different disciplines or subdisciplines such as ecology, economy, governance, resource management and land use planning.
 

One fellowship will be offered to a graduate student who:

  1. was enrolled full-time in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, in any Master’s or doctoral program delivered by a unit in the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources, in the year in which the award was tenable;
  2. has achieved a minimum degree grade point average of 3.50 (or equivalent) over the last 60 credit hours of study;
  3. demonstrates an interest in aspects of caribou research, monitoring or management and who considers different disciplines or subdisciplines such as ecology, economy, governance, resource management and land use planning.

Applications must be accompanied by:

  1. a short essay (500 words maximum) explaining how different disciplines contribute to caribou research, monitoring as well as management as well as listing any relevant project(s) and /or experience in wildlife management in Manitoba and Canada;            
  2. an official transcript and curriculum vitae;
  3. two letters of recommendation


Completed applications must be submitted electronically to Ilka Cudmore, Awards Secretary, ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca

Stantec Graduate Fellowship in Environment, Earth, and Resources Award Value: TBA

For a student whom is enrolled full-time in the Faculty of Graduate Studies in the second year of a Masters’s program delivered by the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources at the University of Manitoba and is working on an approved Master’s thesis focused on one or more areas of interest to Stantec, including: environmental assessment, energy and resources, water, mining, and/or infrastructure. - AWARD IS ON HOLD FOR THE 2020-2021 ACADEMIC YEAR.

V.E. Barber Memorial Fellowship in Arctic Research Award Value: Variable

Dr. David Barber and Mr. Doug Barber have established an endowment fund in honour of their father, V.E. Barber, a strong supporter of science and an amateur historian and naturalist. The fund will be used to support graduate students conducting thesis research pertaining to the Arctic.

Eligibility Criteria:

  1. applicants must be enrolled full-time in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, in a Master’s or doctoral program and are supervised (or co-supervised) by a faculty member of the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources; OR
  2. applicants have recently completed their Master's or Doctoral program and were supervised (or co-supervised) by a faculty member of the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources; 
  3. have achieved a minimum degree grade point average (DGPA) of 3.5 (or equivalent) based on the last 60 credit hours of study;
  4. are undertaking thesis research pertaining to the Arctic;
  5. have demonstrated outstanding leadership and/or excellence in Arctic research.

Candidates will be required to submit an application that will consist of:

  1. a description of the candidate’s research and their achievements in Arctic research (maximum 500 words);
  2. a curriculum vitae;
  3. a current academic transcript(s) - web transcripts accepted for UManitoba programs only, transcripts from external institutions need be official transcripts;
  4. two (2) academic letters of reference from professors at a post-secondary institution(s).

Completed application should be submitted electronically to Ilka Cudmore, Awards Secretary, ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca

Masters Thesis Prize Award Value: $1,000.00

The Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources offers an annual prize to the student who has successfully completed all the requirements for a Masters degree program delivered by any unit, including the NRI, with high academic standing and who has completed the best Masters thesis.

Eligibility Criteria:

  1. Has successfully completed all of the requirements for a Masters degree program delivered by any unit in the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources;
  2. has achieved a minimum degree grade point average of 3.5 (or equivalent) based on the last 60 credit hours of study;
  3. has received approval of their thesis, and has submitted the final version to the Faculty of Graduate Studies between September 1 and August 31 of the previous academic year.

Applications must be accompanied by two letters of support, one from the candidate’s thesis advisor and one from a member of the candidate’s examining committee. The letters should describe and explain the strengths, merits, and innovative nature of the thesis and the candidate’s research.  

Completed applications must be submitted electronically to Ilka Cudmore, Awards Secretary, ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca

Ph.D. Thesis Prize Award Value: $1,000.00

For a student who has successfully completed all the requirements for a Doctoral degree program delivered by any unit in the Riddell faculty, including NRI, with high academic standing and who has completed the best Doctoral thesis.

Eligibility Criteria:

  1. Has successfully completed all of the requirements for a Doctoral degree program delivered by any unit in the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources
  2. has achieved a minimum degree grade point average of 3.5 (or equivalent) based on the last 60 credit hours of study;
  3. has received approval of their thesis, and has submitted the final version to the Faculty of Graduate Studies between September 1 and August 31 of the previous academic year.

 Applications must be accompanied by the external examiner's report, two letters of support, one from the candidate’s thesis advisor and one from a member of the candidate’s examining committee. The letters should describe and explain the strengths, merits, and innovative nature of the thesis and the candidate’s research.

Completed applications must be submitted electronically to Ilka Cudmore, Awards Secretary, ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca

 

Aboriginal Issues Press Scholarship Award Value: $500.00 to $1,500.00

Number of Awards and Value:   variable
 

Deadline: February 28, 2021

Applicants are required to submit the following in order to be considered for this award:

  1. Evidence of enrollment in Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of Manitoba at either the Masters or Doctoral level
  2. Evidence of registration in or completed a graduate-level course covering Aboriginal Issues
  3. Have a research focus on Aboriginal issues
  4. Proof of having achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 (A current academic transcript(s) - web transcripts accepted for UManitoba programs only. Transcripts from external institutions need be official transcripts. (scanned copies are acceptable)
  5. Have demonstrated a commitment to disseminate the results of research
  6. Submit a one page statement explaining how research relates to Aboriginal issues and how this research will be disseminated in order to be considered for this award

Normally this scholarship is not awarded to a student entering his/her first year of a graduate program. Recipients may receive this award only once.

Completed application packages should be emailed in one single PDF document to ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca.

Oakes-Riewe Environmental Studies Research Award

Number of Awards and Value:   variable

Deadline: February 28, 2021

Applicants are required to submit the following in order to be considered for this award:

Applicants are required to submit the following in order to be considered for this award:

  1. evidence stating whether or not all required course work for the particular degree has been completed and why (this confirmation is to come in writing from the Graduate Program Chair of the student’s home department).
  2. a two-page (single-spaced) research proposal including the purpose, objectives, and methods of the project.
  3. a statement signed by the student’s thesis advisor which states that the research proposal has been approved by the Thesis Advisory Committee.
  4. a signed (by the Chair of the Research Ethics Board of the University of Manitoba) statement that the research is approved by the Research Ethics Board (and Animal Care Committee if applicable) of the University of Manitoba.
  5. letters of approval and/or copies of research licenses signed by the appropriate authority from the Aboriginal Community or Research Authority which will participate in, be influenced by, or benefit from the research.
  6. a statement from the applicant indicating how she/he plans to familiarize her/himself with the protocols practiced by the Aboriginal community in which the research will be conducted.
  7. a budget detailing how the outlined costs relate to particular aspects of the project, list funds received and/or requested from other sources.
  8. award amount requested
  9. a statement that the applicant, if successful, will present his/her research findings at an interdisciplinary seminar with an environmental focus such as the Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources Seminar at the University of Manitoba upon completion of the project and will submit the findings for publication in the Aboriginal Issues Press (or in an equivalent refereed publication).
  10. expected date of Graduation

Recipients may hold this award only once.

Completed application packages should be emailed in one single PDF document to ilka.cudmore@umanitoba.ca.

Teaching awards

These annual awards recognize teaching excellence among professors who are members of the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources.

Award of Excellence for First Year Undergraduate Teaching

Eligibility
Any faculty member who has taught a 1000-level course in the academic year immediately preceding the deadline for nominations.
Criteria 
• Excellence in teaching 
• Innovation and effectiveness in pedagogical practice 
• Commitment to the support and advising of students 
• Establishment of a solid foundation for their students in the discipline to support future study 
• Effective coverage of the breadth inherent in introductory courses

Award of Excellence for Undergraduate Teaching

Eligibility
Any faculty member who has taught an undergraduate course (2000, 3000, and/or 4000-level) in the academic year immediately preceding the deadline for nominations.
Criteria
• Excellence in teaching 
• Innovation and effectiveness in pedagogical practice 
• Commitment to the support and advising of students 
• Presentation, discussion, and demonstration of level-appropriate content 
• Assessment of student learning through challenging, innovative, and supportive means 
• Effective coverage of the depth inherent in higher level undergraduate courses

Award of Excellence for Graduate Teaching

Eligibility
Any faculty member who has taught a graduate course or has advised a graduate student in the academic year immediately preceding the deadline for nominations.
Criteria 
• Innovation and effectiveness in pedagogical practice 
• Commitment to the support of student scholarly and research excellence 
• Excellence in research guidance 
• General assistance and availability to graduate students (in program advising, advocacy, and technical/procedural issues)  
• Thesis or dissertation direction  
• Assistance in developing conference presentations and/or publishable works 
• Impact on students individually or collectively by providing opportunities and/or support 
• Outstanding contribution to the structure, organization, and delivery of graduate programming and the graduate student experience

Graduate Student Teaching Award

Eligibility
Any graduate student who has taught a course in the academic year immediately preceding the deadline for nominations and whilst enrolled in a graduate program in the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources.
Criteria 
• Innovation and effectiveness in pedagogical practice 
• Commitment to personal development of professional skills and expertise (e.g. attendance at workshops) 
• Commitment to the support and advising of students 
• Effective assessment of student learning

Contact us

Contact Us

Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources
Room 440 Wallace Building, 125 Dysart Road
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3T 2N2
 

204-474-7252
204-275-3147