Animal Care Committees (ACC) and submission deadlines

The use of animals in research, teaching or testing is a privilege that is extended when a justifiable need is established. All animal care and use must be reviewed and approved by the Animal Care Committees (ACC) prior to commencement. See applicable forms below.

ACC meeting and submission deadlines

2023-24 Bannatyne campus - Protocol submission deadline dates and meeting schedule

Pre-review of “C” and “D” category of invasiveness protocols will occur following submission. The veterinarian conducting the pre-review will be in contact with you.

 

Protocol Submission Deadline Date

 

Meeting Date

July 17

August 14 2023

 

August 14

September 11 2023

 

September 18

October 16 2023

 

October 16

November 20 2023

 

November 13

December 11 2023

 

December 11

January 8 2024

 

January 15

February 12 2024

 

February 12

March 11 2024

 

March 11

April 8 2024

 

April 15

May 13 2024

 

May 13

June 10 2024

 

 

No meeting in July

 

July 15

August 12 2024

 

2024-25 Bannatyne campus - Protocol submission deadline dates and meeting schedule

Pre-review of “C” and “D” category of invasiveness protocols will occur following submission. The veterinarian conducting the pre-review will be in contact with you.

 

Protocol Submission Deadline Date

 

Meeting Date

July 15

August 12 2024

 

August 12

September 9 2024

 

September 23

October 21 2024

 

October 21

November 18 2024

 

November 8

December 9 2024

 

December 6

January 13 2025

 

January 13

February 10 2025

 

February 10

March 10 2025

 

March 17

April 14 2025

 

April 14

May 12 2025

 

May 12

June 9 2025

 

 

No meeting in July

 

July 14

August 11 2025

2023-24 Fort Garry campus - Protocol submission deadline dates and meeting schedule

Pre-review of “C” and “D” category of invasiveness protocols will occur following submission. The veterinarian conducting the pre-review will be in contact with you. 

Protocol Submission Deadline Date

Meeting Date

July 27

August 24 2023

August 31

September 28 2023

September 28

October 26 2023

October 26

November 23 2023

November 23

December 21 2023

December 14

January 25 2024

January 25

February 22 2024

February 29

March 28 2024

March 28

April 25 2024

April 25

May 23 2024

May 30

June 27 2024

 

No meeting in July

July 25

August 22 2024

2024-25 Fort Garry campus - Protocol submission deadline dates and meeting schedule

Pre-review of “C” and “D” category of invasiveness protocols will occur following submission. The veterinarian conducting the pre-review will be in contact with you. 

Protocol Submission Deadline Date

Meeting Date

July 25

August 22 2024

August 29

September 26 2024

September 26

October 24 2024

October 31

November 28 2024

November 21

December 19 2024

December 12

January 23 2025

January 30

February 27 2025

February 27

March 27 2025

March 27

April 24 2025

April 24

May 22 2025

May 29

June 26 2025

 

No meeting in July

July 31

August 28 2025

Animal care forms

All Animal Care forms are available in alternate formats upon request.

Note: If presented with a "Please wait..." screen on a form, save the electronic file to your computer and complete the form on your device by adding any necessary information. Once the form is complete, re-save the document to your computer and submit it according to the instructions on the form.

Approval timelines

All protocols need to be reviewed by the Animal Care Committee (ACC). Please allow six to 8 weeks for the review process.

Pre-Review of protocols

Any protocols involving anesthesia/sedation/chemical restraint (Schedule 2), surgery (Schedule 3) or humane endpoints (Schedule 4) require pre-review by the applicable veterinarian. The protocol submission deadlines allow for sufficient time for the pre-review of the submitted protocol to take place.

All protocols

Please provide an electronic copy of the entire protocol (including schedules, etc.) to charlene.hennessey@umanitoba.ca. Your submission will be routed to the assigned veterinarian who will contact you upon receipt and regarding any concerns or recommended changes to the protocol.

Pre-review of Schedule 10

Please ensure that an electronic copy of the protocol and the Schedule 10 is submitted to the Animal Care Occupational Health Specialist (OHS) for pre-review as per the Protocol Submission Deadlines (see links above).

Fort Garry and Bannatyne OHS
Mr. Steven Cole
steven.cole@umanitoba.ca

St. Boniface Research Centre OHS
Mr. Devon Liscum
dliscum@sbgh.mb.ca

Signatures on Schedule 10 are not required at the pre-review stage.

Renewal – short form and application for amendment

Animal protocol renewal – short form

The short form for annual renewal of approved protocols can be used for three years (three renewals). In the fourth year, the full protocol application form must be used. Renewals should be submitted five weeks prior to the protocol expiry date.

For example, if the protocol expires June 15, 2022, the renewal should be submitted no later than May 11, 2022. It normally takes three to five weeks to process a short form renewal.

Application for amendment to animal use protocol

Complete an Application for Amendment for review and approval if you:

  • have a change in personnel associated with a protocol
  • require a change in numbers of animals (or species) used, anesthetics, analgesics or other drugs or agents administered to animals
  • make minor changes in procedures from those given in the original protocol

Substantial changes or additions to procedures not reviewed in the existing protocol, or large changes in numbers or species of animals being used may require submission of a new protocol. You are free to consult the applicable ACC Chair or clinical veterinarians if you have questions as to whether an amendment or new submission is necessary. It normally takes two to four weeks to process an amendment.

You may not implement the changes until approval of the amendment is obtained.

For Bannatyne campus renewals and amendments

Please submit one signed copy of the renewal or amendment to:
Central Animal Care Services
cacs@umanitoba.ca

For St. Boniface Research Centre renewals and amendments

Please submit one signed copy of the renewal or amendment to:
R.O. Burrell Lab
roburrell@sbrc.ca

For Fort Garry campus renewals and amendments

Please submit one signed copy of the renewal or amendment to:
Animal Care
Belinda.Homer@umanitoba.ca

Compliance guidelines

Implementing and adhering to policies and guidelines on the proper care and use of animals in research, teaching or testing is an institutional responsibility shared by:

  • the administration (including central, faculty and departmental)
  • specially appointed committees
  • the director of animal care and use and veterinary services
  • animal facilities directors
  • faculty members, staff and students

UM policy and procedure on animal care and use

Visit Governance documents for animal care and use

Animal user training

The primary goal of the Education Program is to ensure that all personnel involved in the care and use of animals in research, teaching and testing at the University of Manitoba are adequately trained in the principles of laboratory animal science and the ethical use of animals, and that they have the necessary practical skills required to conduct sound, humane research using animals.

New animal users are encouraged to attend the Animal Care and Use, New Faculty Orientation offered every September. This workshop is beneficial to recently hired, senior animal research personnel such as faculty members, post-docs, research associates and senior technical personnel who will be applying for funding, holding or writing animal care protocols or managing research projects utilizing animals. Watch for dates posted on the University of Manitoba’s event calendar.

Students - Steps to follow BEFORE starting your Animal Research (PDF)

The Animal User Training Program is divided into two components: the didactic and the hands-on wet lab training.

Didactic component

All personnel associated with any research program utilizing live or intact animals must complete the Animal User Training Course (often referred to as ethics training) online and be approved on an Animal Use Protocol before initiating any work involving animals. This includes summer students and other short-term workers.

Ethics training received from any Canadian institution assessed by the CCAC and holding a Good Animal Practice (GAP) certificate is considered equivalent to the UM training course on UM Learn. Individuals with this type of previous training can proceed to the Animal User Training Form for further direction.

Register for the Animal User Training Course

Students and personnel who do not have a UMNetID must submit a request for a sponsored account to autp@umanitoba.ca before registering for the course.  Please allow one week for the request to be processed.

Students and individuals with a UMnetID can self-register for the online course as follows:

1. Access UM Learn and select:

  • Support
  • Self-registration
  • Animal User Training Course 

2. Follow the steps to register.

3. Select and join the appropriate stream using the Group Tool.

4. Read the introduction.

5. A badge is earned immediately upon completion.  Within 24 hours of completing the course an email will be received from UM Learn requesting the Animal User Training Form to be submitted to autp@umanitoba.ca.

6. A certificate of completion and further direction with regards to additional training will be provided once the form is received.

Wet lab training sessions

Training programs provide participants with the necessary knowledge base and technical skills to carry out required procedures, and to promote quality science based on appropriate use of animals by skilled individuals.

Just-in-time training is standard practice to ensure the skills taught are not lost or deteriorated before the project begins.  Please register close to the anticipated start date of your project. 

Refresher training is available to anyone at any time should they need to refresh their skills.

To register personnel for applicable training sessions:

Please register at least one week in advance. A cancellation fee may be charged if notice is not received within 24 hours of the session. 

Training available upon request

  • Please submit the Wet lab registration form to request training for:
    • Swine
    • Bovine (dairy cattle)
    • Poultry
    • Fish
    • Guinea pig
    • Advanced Surgical Technique Wet Lab: Cannulations
  • Someone will be in contact with you once the form is received.

Course descriptions

Wet lab attendance is dependent upon the work being conducted. Sessions are assigned on an individual basis. Please review each description below for course details.

Mouse wet lab introduction

Instructor: Animal Health Technician

Session dates: Three times per month; see online training schedule

Session length: 3 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who need to work with mice

Prerequisite: Animal User Training Course or equivalent

Training session objectives:

  1. Confidently and safely handle and restrain the species.
  2. Determine the sex of the species.
  3. To become familiar with the appearance of a normal, healthy animal and be able to recognize common signs of pain, distress, injury or illness.
  4. Understand how to apply individual methods of identification.
  5. Learn how to weigh the animal.
  6. Understand how to humanely euthanize a rodent and provide assurance of death.

Wet lab size: one to two people

Additional technical procedures taught as required.

Rat wet lab introduction

Instructor: Animal Health Technician

Session dates: Three times per month; see online training schedule

Session length: 3 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who need to work with rats

Prerequisite: Animal User Training Course or equivalent

Training session objectives:

  1. Confidently and safely handle and restrain the species.
  2. Determine the sex of the species.
  3. To become familiar with the appearance of a normal, healthy animal and be able to recognize common signs of pain, distress, injury or illness.
  4. Understand how to apply individual methods of identification.
  5. Learn how to weigh the animal.
  6. Understand how to humanely euthanize a rodent and provide assurance of death.

Wet lab size: one to two people

Additional technical procedures taught as required.

Poultry wet lab

Instructor: Animal health technician

Session dates: As needed upon request

Session length: 2 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who need to work with chickens for their research project

Prerequisite: Animal User Training Course or equivalent

Training session objectives:

  1. Orientation to facility
  2. Learn how to safely pick up, handle and restrain chickens
  3. Understand different methods of identification
  4. Learn how to recognize common signs of pain, distress, injury or illness
  5. Learn how to weigh a chicken
  6. Learn how to obtain a blood sample (if required)
  7. Learn how to safely handle needles and syringes
  8. Learn how to perform an IM injection (if required)
  9. Learn how to properly transport chickens short distances
  10. Understand acceptable methods of euthanasia

Wet lab size: one to three people

Additional procedures will be taught as required.

Bovine wet lab

Instructor: Clinical veterinarian, agricultural attendant and/or animal health technician

Session dates: As needed upon request

Session length: 3 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who need to work with bovine for their research project.

Prerequisite: Animal User Training Course or equivalent

Training session objectives:

  • Be familiar with ways to safely handle and move dairy cattle.
  • Demonstrate the proper approach to cow in a stall.
  • Demonstrate proper rope halter placement.
  • Be familiar with squeeze chutes, their purpose, and animal user safety.
  • Be aware of potential zoonotic diseases and proper use of personal protective equipment.
  • Be familiar with identification methods used with cattle.
  • Understand how to recognize signs of pain and distress, injury or illness, and the proper reporting.
  • Learn how to safely handle needles and syringes.
  • Learn how to obtain a blood sample (if required).
  • Learn how to perform injections (if required).
  • Learn how to collect a fecal or urine sample (if required).
  • Learn how to collect a milk sample (if required).

Location: Glenlea Dairy Barn

Wet lab size: one to four people

Additional procedures may be taught as required.

Swine wet lab

Instructor: Animal Health Technician and Agricultural Attendant

Session dates: As needed upon request

Session length: 3 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who need to work with swine for their research project

Prerequisite: Animal User Training Course or equivalent

Training session objectives:

  1. Orientation to facility
  2. Learn how to safely handle, move and restrain swine
  3. Understand different methods of identification
  4. Learn how to recognize common signs of pain, distress, injury or illness
  5. Learn how to weigh a pig
  6. Learn how to obtain a blood sample (if required)
  7. Learn how to safely handle needles and syringes
  8. Learn how to perform an IM injection (if required)
  9. Understand issues to consider when transporting pigs

Location: T.K. Cheung Centre, Fort Garry Campus

Wet lab size: one to four people

Additional procedures may be taught as required.

Fish in research

Instructor: Clinical Veterinarian or Animal Health Technician

Session dates: As needed upon request

Session length: 3 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who need to work with fish for their research project

Prerequisite: Animal User Training Course: Fish or equivalent

Training session objectives:

  1. To introduce fish users to the aquatic holding facility.
  2. To provide users with information regarding proper fish acquisition and housing.
  3. To be able to recognize a sick fish.
  4. To understand the basic concepts for anesthetizing fish.
  5. To understand proper methods for tagging (if required).
  6. To understand correct methods for injections in fish (if required).
  7. To understand correct methods for blood collection in fish (if required).
  8. To understand proper methods of euthanasia.

Location: Z100 Duff Roblin Building

Wet lab size: one to four people

Anesthesia and Analgesia Wet Lab: Rodents

Instructor: Animal Health Technician

Session dates: Once a month, see online training schedule.

Session length: 4 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who will be responsible for anesthetizing and monitoring rodents for invasive procedures.

Prerequisite: Animal User Training Course or equivalent, Introduction Wet Lab for the species being used, and the Anesthesia and Analgesia Modules (online module).

Training session objectives:

  1. Become familiar with some of the common anesthetic agents and the primary concerns associated with anesthesia.
  2. Become familiar with rodent anesthetic machines, their parts, proper connections and settings.
  3. Learn how to operate a rodent anesthetic machine and deliver an inhalant anesthetic to an animal.
  4. Learn how to do a drug dose calculation and administer an injectable anesthetic.
  5. Recognize the four planes of anesthesia.
  6. Understand and be able to apply proper anesthetic monitoring.
  7. Understand the advantages and disadvantages associated with the more commonly used anesthetics.
  8. Understand the importance of pain management and how to recognize signs of pain and distress.
  9. Understand proper anesthetic recovery procedures.
  10. Be able to perform SQ injection to deliver an analgesic.

Web lab size: 1-2 people

Gas Anesthesia Wet Lab: Rodents

Instructor: Animal Health Technician

Session dates: Once a month, see online training schedule.

Session length: 3 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who will be responsible for anesthetizing rodents for short non-invasive procedures.

Prerequisite: Animal User Training Course or equivalent and the Introduction Wet Lab for the species being used.

Training session objectives:

  1. Become familiar with rodent anesthetic machines, their parts, proper connections and settings.
  2. Learn how to operate a rodent anesthetic machine and deliver an inhalant anesthetic to an animal.
  3. Recognize the four stages or planes of anesthesia.
  4. Understand how to properly assess depth of anesthesia and apply basic anesthetic monitoring methods for short non-invasive procedures.
  5. Understand proper gas anesthetic recovery procedures.

Web lab size: 1-2 people

Introduction to Surgery and Post-op Care (Part 1: Inanimate)

Instructor: Animal Health Technician

Session dates: Once a month, see online training schedule.

Session length: 6 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who will be responsible for or participating in survival surgeries on rodents.

Prerequisites: Animal User Training Course or equivalent, Introduction Wet Lab for the species being used, the Anesthesia and Analgesia Wet Lab: Rodents, and Procedures with Care: Aseptic Technique in Rodent Surgery Video (online module).

Training session objectives                                                                            

At the end of this session the trainee must be able to:

  • Demonstrate correct preparation of packs for the autoclave.
  • Demonstrate correct surgeon preparation.
  • Demonstrate proper instrumentation and suturing techniques on inanimate training tools.
  • Demonstrate proper patient preparation.
  • Demonstrate proper conduct as non-sterile assistant.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of proper operating room conduct.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how to maintain a sterile field.

At the end of this session, the trainee should be familiar with:

  • The importance of pre-surgical planning.
  • The importance of SOP development and checklists.
  • The importance of proper instrument care and use.
  • The different types of suture material and their use.
  • How to correctly perform multiple surgeries on the same day.
  • Basic Post-op Care

Web lab size: 1-2 people

Introduction to Surgery and Post-op Care (Part 2: Animate)

Instructor: Animal Health Technician

Session dates: As needed upon request

Session length: 3 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who will be responsible for conducting survival surgeries on rodents.

Prerequisites: Animal User Training Course or equivalent, an Introduction Wet Lab for the species being used, Anesthesia and Analgesia Wet Lab: Rodents, and Introduction to Surgery and Post-op Care Part 1.

Training Session Objectives

At the end of this session, the trainee must be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to perform a rat nephrectomy applying basic surgical skills.
  • Demonstrate the ability to maintain a sterile field while performing the surgery.
  • Demonstrate acceptable operating room conduct as a surgeon.
  • Demonstrate the ability to complete a post-op care monitoring record.

At the end of this training session, the trainee must be familiar with the concepts of:

  • Acute Post-op Care
  • Long Term Post-op Care

Wet lab size: 1-2 people

Physical Methods of Euthanasia Wet Lab: Rodents

Instructor: Animal Health Technician

Session dates: Once a month

Session length: 2 hours with follow up as required

Who should attend: Students and researchers who need to learn how to perform a physical method of euthanasia on a rodent for their research project.

Prerequisite: Animal User Training Course or equivalent and Rat or Mouse Wet Lab: Introduction

Training session objectives:

  1. Learn how to identify the emotional impact that physical methods of euthanasia may have on personnel.
  2. Learn how to indicate the need for justification for use at the time of protocol submission.
  3. Learn how to perform the physical method of euthanasia as required in the approved Animal Use Protocol.

Wet lab size: 1 person

Advanced Surgical Technique Wet Lab: Cannulations

Instructor: Animal Health Technician

Session dates: Available upon request

Session length: 5 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who need to learn how to perform a jugular or carotid artery cannulation for their research project.

Prerequisite: Animal User Training Course or equivalent and Introduction to Surgery and Post-operative Care Wet Lab.

Training session objectives:

  1. Learn how to correctly place a catheter in the jugular vein and/or the carotid artery
  2. Identify the importance for using aseptic technique
  3. Demonstrate how to exteriorize an indwelling catheter (if required)
  4. Learn concepts relating to catheter maintenance and catheter obstruction
  5. Correctly perform a cannulation on a rat

Web lab size: 1 person

Aseptic Stereotactic Surgery in Rodents Wet Lab

Instructor: Animal Health Technician

Session dates: Once a month, see online training schedule.

Session length: 5 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who will be responsible for conducting stereotactic surgery.

Prerequisites: Animal User Training Course or equivalent, an Introduction Wet Lab for the species being used, Anesthesia and Analgesia Wet Lab: Rodents, and Introduction to Surgery and Post-op Care Part 1.

Training Session Objectives

At the end of this training session, the trainee must be able to:

  • Position the animal in the stereotactic apparatus correctly.
  • Perform correct patient preparation.
  • Demonstrate how to prepare the sterile field using the sterile tip approach.
  • Demonstrate proper instrumentation and suturing techniques.
  • Identify the two landmarks: Bregma and Lambda

At the end of this training session, the trainee should be familiar with:

  • The spatial relationship expressed using 3 coordinates: Anterior-Posterior (AP), Medial-Lateral (ML), and Dorsal-Ventral (DV).
  • The concepts of acute post-op care
  • The concepts of long-term post-op care

Wet lab size: 1-2 people

Endpoints, Monitoring and Record Keeping

Instructor: Animal Health Technician

Session dates: Once a month, see online training schedule.

Session length: 2 hours

Who should attend: Students and researchers who will be responsible for performing endpoint monitoring.

Training Session Objectives:

  • To understand the significance and purpose for setting humane endpoints.
  • To learn how to assess an animal's well-being.
  • To understand whose responsibility it is to monitor the animals.
  • To learn how to complete an endpoint monitoring record.

Class size: 1-4 people

Training for wildlife users

Investigators conducting wildlife research work with so many different species and employ such a diverse array of techniques, that a singular course presenting aspects of animal ethics and care pertinent to all such investigations cannot be developed.

Principal Investigators (PIs) are responsible, however, for ensuring that all personnel involved in such work are aware of potential health risks to themselves, and are intimately familiar with both the general principles surrounding the ethical use of animals in research (outlined in the Canadian Council on Animal Care – Guide to the Care and Use of Experimental Animals, and presented via mandatory completion online of the UM Animal User Training Course in the ethical use of animals in research), and also those sundry matters that arise in the context of conducting research on their particular study species or study system.

Process overview

A synopsis should be developed and given a name by the Principal Investigator to address all pertinent training issues as outlined in the Animal Care and Use Guidelines for Investigations Involving Field Research on Wildlife. 

The synopsis is to be submitted to the appropriate ACC to represent the PI-Directed component of the UM Short Course on the Care and Use of Experimental Animals for approval. The corresponding Animal Use Protocol (AUP) will not receive approval until the PI-directed Training Synopsis is approved.

As an indication of their understanding, the certification of delivery page of the document will be signed and dated by all personnel involved in the study and the Principal Investigator once the training in the field is complete. Copies of the signed Certification of Delivery page are forwarded to the Laboratory Animal Training Coordinator so that participation in these training exercises can be recorded in the LATC training database.

Review the PI-directed wildlife training document for full details. It includes:

Also provided is an example of a PI-Directed wildlife training synopsis.  

  • Synopsis of PI-directed wildlife training for electroshock fishing, department of biological sciences

Note: When filling out an electronic form, first save it to your computer and then complete the form by adding the necessary information. Once the information is complete, re-save the document to your computer.