Future Undergraduate Students

Department Overview

Our department is responsible for two fully accredited undergraduate programs in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering, with over 200 students in each program. The department is very active in graduate teaching and research with approximately 80 Ph.D. candidates and 90 students pursuing M.Sc. degrees. The department presently comprises 27 academic staff, 16 support staff, and over 30 post-doctoral fellows, visiting scholars, and adjunct professors.

All engineering programs in Canada are subject to regular review by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) to ensure the highest quality of engineering education. The last review of engineering programs offered by the University of Manitoba was conducted in 2007. The result was continued accreditation of all undergraduate programs in the Faculty of Engineering. The next accreditation assessment will occur in 2012.

The Department has come a long way since the start of the B.Sc. degree program in Electrical Engineering in 1907. It was formally structured as the Department of Electrical Engineering in 1921. Now it is included among the best in Canada for both the quality of electrical and computer engineering education, and for its research contributions.

Historically, major changes in undergraduate studies activities occurred in 1951 when Engineering Physics was added to the B.Sc. (EE) program but later in 1967 was discontinued. In 1982, a new degree program in Computer Engineering (TE) was added. A post-graduate degree program existed on the books virtually from the very beginning, but while M.Sc. degrees were awarded in 1916 and 1934, the full-time M.Sc. Program started in 1953. The Department experienced major expansion during 1955 to 1965. With the hiring of a number of faculty members with doctoral qualifications, a thrust in research was added to its teaching activities. Approval to run a Ph.D. program was granted in 1967.

Electrical Engineering Program Overview

The program in Electrical Engineering has a core-plus-elective structure. The core develops the necessary base in mathematics, the physical sciences, dynamics, thermodynamics, electric fields and circuits, and fundamental professional courses focused on energy conversion and transmission, electronics, materials and devices, communications, and control systems. The final year includes a graduation thesis, control systems, and communication systems as core requirements, with the remaining program based on electives. A certain level of specialization is possible through the selection of elective courses offered in the final year.

The student's program must include a three credit hour complementary studies elective. Courses in engineering economics, technical writing, and engineering law, the environment and society are compulsory.

Students are encouraged to consult with the department for model four- and five-year programs. Students are strongly encouraged to follow the model programs when possible, as timetabling and course offerings are based on these.

Computer Engineering Program Overview

The program in Computer Engineering has a core-plus-elective structure. The core develops the necessary base in mathematics, physical sciences, computer science, circuits and systems, fundamental professional courses such as digital logic, discrete mathematics, electronics, microprocessors, operating systems, software engineering, and compiler design. The final year core includes the graduation thesis.

Some specialization is possible in either the software or the hardware area through the selection of technical electives in the final year.

The student's program must include a specified number of complementary studies electives. Courses in engineering economics, technical writing, and engineering law, the environment and society, are compulsory.

Students are encouraged to consult with the department for model four- and five-year programs. Students are strongly encouraged to follow the model programs when possible, as timetabling and course offerings are based on these.