Four Cafe Scientifique panelists sit side by side on stage talking to a crowd of attendees.

Check back for the 2020-2021 season, coming August 2020.

Café Scientifique video library

Archives

2019 - 2020 Café season

 

Your Data and Health Research

Sep. 23, 2019

Are our health services available in the areas with the greatest needs? Is the population getting healthier over time? How does healthcare in one region compare to another? How does healthcare use in Manitoba compare to other parts of Canada? What is the relationship between education, housing and other social services and health? The answers to these questions and more are in the data. Each doctors visit, every prescription filled and school program creates data. These data can tell us a lot about how we use services and what keeps us healthy. Join our expert panel to learn what this research can tell us about the health and well-being of Manitobans.

Resourceful and Resilient: Supporting today’s caregivers

Oct. 10, 2019

More than 8 million Canadians are informal (unpaid) caregivers for a family member or friend with a long-term health condition, disability or aging needs. A sense of purpose (or for some, a renewed sense of relationship) can exist even alongside considerable challenge. Caregiving can impact caregivers’ physical and mental health, paid employment, personal finances, and available time for other activities. Some caregivers are affected more than others, and caregiver supports are crucial. Researchers on this panel will summarize and discuss existing research into the experience and/or effects of caregiving as well as promising interventions and policy changes.

150 years of nature’s elements

Nov. 28, 2019

2019 marks the 150th anniversary of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements. Chemists have elegantly organized the 118 known elements into this table. Chemists and physicists have explained much of the underlying physics behind this grouping, while astronomers probed the astronomical origins of the synthesis of these elements.

2017 shook the world when, for the first time, the gravitational waves facility, LIGO, detected gravity waves from a spectacular event following the collision of two neutron stars. Tracked by some 70 ground- and space-based observatories, this fascinating event suggested that much of the heavy elements like gold and platinum in the Universe can originate from such explosive collisions. However, interpretation and future progress require input from other fields and further astronomical discoveries.

Join us to learn about how the studies in multiple fields will help us answer the long-standing, fundamental question: how did the elements in Nature come to be? And experience first-hand, the excitement that lies ahead.

Solving the Math Problem: Transitioning from High School to University

Jan. 13, 2020

Manitoba students are struggling in their mathematical journey from high school to university mathematics. Mathematics is a required strength in our new knowledge economy. Join our expert panel who will discuss what some of the reasons may be for this difficult transition, what the success rates of students in first year mathematics courses are compared to success rates in high school mathematics, and how can we help students persist and succeed in first year university mathematics in our province.

Got (Breast) Milk? Breakthroughs and barriers in breastfeeding research

Feb. 5, 2020

The World Bank recently declared that “if breastfeeding did not already exist, someone who invented it today would deserve a dual Nobel Prize in medicine and economics.” Breastfeeding promotes health and prevents disease in mothers and children, and saves money for families and the healthcare system. Yet, fewer than 25% of babies born in Manitoba achieve international breastfeeding recommendations. Our panel of experts will debate the latest breakthroughs and hot topics in breastfeeding research, from marijuana to the microbiome! They will also discuss the challenges faced by women who breastfeed (and those who cannot), and the role of public policy in shaping a breastfeeding-friendly society.

(Re)Thinking Sustainable Energy Amid a Global Pandemic

Watch video

Jun. 10, 2020

In this special online edition of Café Scientifique, our panel will discuss the merits of sustainable energy development and use in Canada in light of the present pandemic, including the social, economic and environmental cases for renewable energy as a global priority, what a transition to a ‘carbon-neutral’ energy economy might actually look like and the current state-of-the-art thinking on how to power our planet in a sustainable way.

Moderator:
  • Dr. David Herbert, Associate Professor, Chemistry, Faculty of Science, UM
Panelists:
  • Dr. Michael McDonald, Sustainable Transportation Specialist, Motor Coach Industries
  • Dr. Derek Oliver, Director, Manitoba Institute for Materials; Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Price Faculty of Engineering, UM
  • Dr. Shirley Thompson, Associate Professor, Natural Resources Institute, Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources, UM

 

2018 - 2019 Café season

Choosing Wisely: Why more medical tests are not always better

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September 13, 2018

While medical testing is often a useful tool for diagnosis, it is sometimes harmful and can expose patients to invasive further testing, unnecessary treatment and unwarranted stress. Research efforts are being made in collaboration with Choosing Wisely Manitoba to ensure that testing provides consistent benefit to patients. Join our experts to learn about the issues related to unnecessary treatment while they discuss their roles in examining this problem to encourage optimal, personalized medical care for the public.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Eric Bohm, Professor, Surgery, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Director, Health Systems Performance, George & Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation; Hip & Knee Reconstruction Surgeon, Concordia Joint Replacement Group, Concordia Hospital and Co-Sponsor, Choosing Wisely Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Dr. Roger Süss, Assistant Professor, Family Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Family Physician, Northern Connection Medical Centre.
  • Dr. Alex Singer, Associate Professor, Family Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Family Physician, Family Medical Centre, Inpatient Family Medicine, St. Boniface Hospital and Director, Manitoba Primary Care Research Network
  • Dr. Michelle Driedger, Professor, Community Health Sciences, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; former Canada Research Chair in Environment and Health Risk Communication

 

Polypharmacy: Are we overmedicating older Canadians?

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October 29

Medication plays an important role in managing disease. But what happens when it’s being overused? Nearly two-thirds of Canadians 65 years of age and older are receiving five or more different prescription drugs, which can increase the risk of side effects and interactions, leading to patient burden, morbidity and hospitalizations. Join us to learn about the latest research on the use of medication and potential harm, while we discuss how research can drive advancement of clinical knowledge and improve patient care of older adults.

Moderator:
  • Dr. I fan Kuo, Assistant Professor, College of Pharmacy, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Dr. Silvia Alessi-Severini, Associate Professor, College of Pharmacy, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Jamie Falk, Assistant Professor, College of Pharmacy; Family Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Christine Leong, Assistant Professor, College of Pharmacy; Psychiatry, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Clinical Pharmacist, Family Medical Centre

Is Canada a Safe Haven? Experiences in resettling refugees in Canada

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November 27

More people are on the move than ever before. With the growing amounts of migration, there are differing opinions on whether Canada is doing too much or too little with regard to refugee resettlement. Our panel of experts will focus on current debates, issues and research on the topic. They will discuss several aspects, including our duty to protect others, the true economic costs of resettlement and misconceptions that shape false attitudes and beliefs, while providing insight from professional fields to improve public knowledge.

Moderator:
  • Carol Sanders, Reporter, Winnipeg Free Press
Panelists:
  • Abdikheir Ahmed, Director, Immigrant Partnerships of Winnipeg
  • Dr. Shauna Labman, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Lori Wilkinson, Professor, Sociology and Criminology, Faculty of Arts, University of Manitoba

Addiction and the Brain: Why is it so Hard to Quit?

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March 13, 2019

Addiction comes in many forms—alcohol, gambling and drugs—and can have devastating effects on individuals, families and communities as a whole. While many people are treated successfully, others struggle to overcome the cycle of abstinence and relapse. Why is it so hard to overcome an addiction? Part of the answer lies in what happens within the brain. Join our expert panel of scientists to learn how the brain is altered by addiction, and how this information can be used to improve treatment.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Jun-Feng Wang, Associate Professor, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences; Neuroscientist, Kleysen Institute for Advanced Medicine
Panelists:
  • Dr. Erin Knight, Assistant Professor, Psychiatry, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Medical Director, Addictions Unit, Health Sciences Centre
  • Dr. Matthew Keough, Assistant Professor, Psychology, Faculty of Arts
  • Dr. Gordon Glazner, Professor, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences; Principal Investigator, Division of Neurodegenerative Disorders, St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre

 

2017 - 2018 Café season

High-Tech Humans: Exploring the Limitless Potential of Technology

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September 28, 2017

Technology has permeated almost all aspects of our lives – from the way we socialize, to how we entertain, learn, and express ourselves. It is also being used by an increasingly wide range of individuals, with diverse abilities, interests and tasks. This panel will share their insight into this interplay between technology and the individual. They will discuss several aspects, including the impact of technology on flow, how technology can meet the needs of its users and how augmented and virtual reality technologies facilitate creative expression while also considering the dangers of such experiences.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Zana Lutfiyya, Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Kelley Main, Associate Professor of Marketing, Department Head, Marketing Department, Asper School of Business
  • Andrea Bunt, Associate Professor of Computer Science, Co-director of the Human Computer Interaction (HCI) lab
  • Corey King, Owner, ZenFri Inc.

In The Pink: 50 Years of Breast Cancer Research

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October 25, 2017

In the last half-decade, research has made significant advancements in breast cancer treatment. Although it remains the most common cancer diagnosis for Canadian women, the five-year survival rate for breast cancer patients is nearly 87 per cent. But not everything is so rosy. In nearly 30 per cent of patients, breast cancer tumours return after five years, significantly decreasing survival. Join our expert panel as they discuss the past 50 years of biological research and current efforts at the University of Manitoba to develop new ways of detecting breast cancer and new treatments for fighting recurrent breast cancer tumours and improving patient quality of life.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Afshin Raouf, Team Leader, Manitoba Breast Cancer Research Group, Associate Professor, Immunology Department/Regenerative Medicine Program
Panelists:
  • Dr. Marshall Pitz, Medical Oncologist, Director of Clinical Research, Research Institute of Hematology and Oncology, a joint institute of the University of Manitoba and CancerCare Manitoba
  • Dr. Sabine Hombach-Klonisch, Associate Professor, Section Head Gross Anatomy, Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, Member of the Manitoba Breast Cancer Research Group, Member of the Brain Tumor Research Alliance of Manitoba (BTRAM)
  • Dr. Stephen Pistorius, Research Scientist, CancerCare Manitoba & Research Institute of Hematology and Oncology, Professor (Physics & Astronomy), Associate Professor (Radiology), Director: Medical Physics Graduate Program, Vice Director: Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Manitoba

The Fallout: Research & Practical Tips for Preventing Falls

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November 6, 2017

In older adults, falls are a leading cause of injuries, depression, and death. Yet there are many ways to reduce the risk. In this panel, experts from the Centre on Aging’s Falls Prevention Research Group will discuss what causes people to fall and strategies you can use in your daily life to prevent falls.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Michelle Porter, Director, Centre on Aging, Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology & Recreation Management
Panelists:
  • Dr. Kathryn Sibley, Assistant Professor, Canada Research Chair in Integrated Knowledge Translation in Rehabilitation Sciences, Department of Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Dr. Jon Singer, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology & Recreation Management
  • Dr. Sandra Webber, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

Not a One Hit Wonder: Statins Benefit Beyond Cholesterol

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Tuesday, January 23, 2018

As patent protection on statins draw to a close, researchers at the University of Manitoba are studying new applications for this popular cholesterol-lowering drug. Join us as we learn about the potential benefits of statins in cancer, heart disease, and chronic lung diseases.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Andrew Halayko, Professor, Physiology & Pathophysiology/Pediatrics & Child Health/Internal Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences and Canada Research Chair in Airway Cell and Molecular Biology; Scientist, Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Dr. Saeid Ghavami, Assistant Professor, Human Anatomy & Cell Science, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Dr. Christopher Pascoe, Post-doctoral Fellow, Physiology & Pathophysiology, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Dr. Amir Ravandi, Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine/Cardiology and Physiology, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences; and Bergen Cardiac Care Centre, St Boniface Hospital.

Analyzing The Spectrum: The Neuroscience of Autism

Co-sponsored with the Manitoba Neurosciences Network

Watch Video

March 12, 2018

Autism spectrum disorder, better known as autism, is one of the most common neurological conditions affecting children today. It is also one of the most complex. For some individuals, the effects are mild, but for others, their ability to learn and communicate is severely affected. Join University of Manitoba scientists to learn how autism affects the brain and leads to these behavioural changes in children and adults. Our panelists will also discuss how their research is helping to develop new methods for diagnosing and treating autism.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Toby Martin, Director, St Amant Research Centre and Assistant Professor, Psychology, Faculty of Arts, University of Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Dr. Tabrez Siddiqui, Assistant Professor, Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Principal Investigator, Neuroscience Research Program, Kleysen Institute for Advanced Medicine
  • Dr. Janine Montgomery, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts
  • Dr. Cheryl Glazebrook, Associate Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management

 

2016 - 2017 Café season

Older Adults Living the Prairie Life

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September 29, 2016

Living in small urban centres and rural communities has its benefits and challenges for older adults. This Café Scientifique will address a few of the common challenges faced by older adults such as accessing health services for older couples, social isolation, and the experience of caregivers of people in late stages of dementia in different settings. We will discuss these challenges and how we can support older adults by making changes to public education, health care provision, programming, and policy development.

Come join the discussion!

Moderator:
  • Dr. Michelle Porter, Director, Centre on Aging and Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management, University of Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Dr. Fran Racher, Professor, Department of Psychiatric Nursing, Faculty of Health Studies, Brandon University
  • Dr. Rachel Herron, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Faculty of Science, Brandon University
  • Dr. Nancy Newall, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science, Brandon University

Family caregiving: How can we improve the experience?

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October 3, 2016

In 2012, eight million Canadians provided care to family members or friends with a long-term health condition, disability or challenges associated with aging. Statistics show that caregivers of these family members overwhelmingly would like more help than they are currently receiving.

Join us to learn from our graduate students—the researchers of tomorrow—about the research they are undertaking with family caregivers and their experiences caring for those with an acquired brain injury, dementia, or frailty and how those experiences can be improved.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Todd Duhamel, Associate Dean (Research and Graduate Studies), Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management; Director of the Health Leisure and Human Performance Research Institute; and Principal Investigator, Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, St-Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre
Panelists:

(PhD Candidates, Applied Health Sciences):

  • Jane Karpa , PhD Candidate, Applied Health Sciences program
  • Scott Kehler, PhD Candidate, Applied Health Sciences program
  • Barbara Tallman, PhD Candidate, Applied Health Sciences program

Baby Boomers Are All Grown Up: Implications for an Aging Manitoba

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February 6, 2017

The Baby Boomer generation dramatically shaped the landscape of Canadian society over the late 20th and early 21st century. Now, the first wave of Baby Boomers are entering their 70s, and – for the first time in Canadian history – the largest segment of the nation’s population is over 65. So what does this mean for Canada? Join our expert panel as they explore the ways in which Baby Boomers’ golden years will impact our health care system, work environment and retirement.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Michelle Porter, Director, Centre on Aging; Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology & Recreation Management
Panelists:
  • Dr. Malcolm Doupe*, Associate Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Dr. Arran Caza*, Associate Professor, Department of Business Administration, I. H. Asper School of Business, University of Manitoba
  • Ms. Connie Newman, Executive Director, Manitoba Association of Senior’s Centres

* Research Affiliate, Centre on Aging, University of Manitoba

The Battle Against Brain Tumours: Developing New Treatments Through Innovative Research

Co-sponsored with the Manitoba Neuroscience Network

Watch Video

March 15, 2017

A brain tumour is one of the most frightening diagnoses a person can receive. These cancers are some of the deadliest known, and many of them, such as glioblastoma and medulloblastoma, are most common in children and young adults. What can be done in the face of such an aggressive and often incurable disease? University of Manitoba scientists are using stem cells and molecular biology to develop new tools and treatments to fight these tumours and bring hope to patients and their families. Please join us to hear about their ground-breaking research.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Thomas Klonisch, Professor and Head, Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Dr. Sachin Katyal, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences; Senior Scientist, Research Institute of Oncology and Hematology, a joint institute of CancerCare Manitoba and the University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Marshall Pitz, Internal Medicine (Medical Oncology), Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences; Chair, Brain Tumour Disease Site Group, CancerCare Manitoba
  • Dr. Tamra Werbowetski-Ogilvie, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, and Principal Investigator, Regenerative Medicine Program, Canada Research Chair in Neuro-Oncology and Human Stem Cells, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

Precision Medicine: One Size Doesn't Fit All

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April 26, 2017

There are 7.4 billion people in the world and each one is unique. To account for that uniqueness, heath care is moving towards precision medicine: an approach that takes into consideration each individual’s environmental, genetic and lifestyle factors. Similar to the way blood typing reduces the risk of complications in blood transfusions, precision medicine holds the potential for more effective disease prevention and treatment. Join us as we discuss the emerging field of precision medicine and what it could mean for the future of health care.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Louise Simard, Professor and Head, Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Dr. Shantanu Banerji, Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences; Research Scientist, Research Institute of Oncology and Hematology, a joint institute of CancerCare Manitoba and the University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Peter Eck, Associate Professor, Human Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Geoff Hicks, Professor and Director, Regenerative Medicine Program, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

 

2015 - 2016 Café season

Approaching Cancer Research from Many angles

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September 21, 2015

About 2 in 5 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetimes. There are an estimated 196,900 new cases of cancer each year in Canada. With numbers on the rise, cancer research is underway in Manitoba to better understand the causes and develop new treatments to improve cancer survival rates. Join our graduate student panelists to learn about their research into blood, brain and colorectal cancers and what they are finding.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Afshin Raouf, Assistant Professor, Cell Biology & Immunology, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences; Investigator, Research Institute of Oncology & Hematology, a joint institute of the University of Manitoba and CancerCare Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Mrs. Rebecca (DeLong) Dielschneider, PhD student, Department of Immunology, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Ms. Lisa Liang, PhD student, Department of Biochemistry & Medical Genetics, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences
  • Ms. Erin McAndrew, MSc student, Department of Biochemistry & Medical Genetics, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences

DIY DNA: Science and Consequences

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October 13, 2015

The mapping of the human genome in 2003 has led to scientific discoveries of all kinds. The identification of the genes causing genetic disorders continues to grow in the 21st century. Pet owners can now obtain a kit to send off and find out the genetic makeup of their dogs. People can do the same, through such businesses as Ancestry and 23andMe. What are the implications of access to this detailed health information? How accurate is it? How do you interpret the findings?

Moderator:
  • Dr. Louise Simard, Head and Professor, Department of Biochemistry & Medical Genetics, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences
Panelists:
  • Claudia Carriles, Certified Genetic Counsellor, Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory, Diagnostic Services Manitoba
  • Vivian Rachlis, Partner, Thompson Dorfman Sweatman LLP
  • Dr. Cheryl Rockman-Greenberg, Professor, Pediatrics & Child Health and Biochemistry & Medical Genetics, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Research Affiliate, Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba

Alzheimer’s Disease: Can you avoid it?

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November 16, 2015

There are approx. 19,000 Manitobans over the age of 65 who have Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia: this is expected to grow to over 34,000 by 2038. What is the latest research on Alzheimer’s disease telling us about the disease? Can it be avoided? If so, how? Join our expert panel for an informative discussion.

Moderator:
  • Wendy Schettler, CEO, Alzheimer’s Society of Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Dr. Benedict Albensi, Associate Professor, Pharmacology & Therapeutics, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba and Manitoba Dementia Research Chair; Principal Investigator, Division of Neurodegenerative Disorders, St-Boniface Hospital Research; Everett Endowment Fund Chair
  • Dr. Colleen Millikin, Geriatric Clinical Psychologist, Deer Lodge Centre; Director, Early Cognitive Change Clinic for Older Adults, St. Boniface Hospital; Clinical Health Psychology Program, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority; Assistant Professor, Clinical Health Psychology, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Zahra Moussavi, Canada Research Chair in Biomedical Engineering, Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering; Professor, Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences; Director, Biomedical Engineering Program, University of Manitoba; Research Affiliate, Riverview Health Centre and Centre on Aging.

Gut Instinct: the science between the brain-gut connection

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January 20, 2016

Did you know your intestines and brain are having a constant conversation? Not only does your brain affect how you feel physically, but your gut can affect how you feel mentally. When you consider that Canada has the world’s highest reported prevalence of a gut condition called Inflammatory Bowel Disease (which includes Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis), it is important to better understand this link and what it means for those with gut diseases such as IBD. The financial costs of IBD to the healthcare system are close to $3 billion per year, but what are the personal mental health costs? And what can researchers do with this knowledge to improve the lives of Canadians?

Join our panel of doctors, scientists, and patients who will share their knowledge, and their hopes for the future.

Moderator:
  • Dr. Charles Bernstein, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Bingham Chair in Gastroenterology Research; Head - Section of Gastroenterology, and Director, Inflammatory Bowl Disease Clinical and Research Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
Panelists:
  • Dr. Jean-Eric Ghia, Assistant Professor, Immunology and Internal Medicine Section of Gastroenterology, College Of Medicine, Faculty if Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Director, Basic Biology Research, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Clinical and Research Centre; research scientist, Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba.
  • Dr. Lesley Graff, Professor and Head, Clinical Health Psychology, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Medical Director, WRHA Clinical Health Psychology Program, Health Sciences Centre
  • Paula Sturrey, Patient

Multiple Sclerosis: Questions and Answers from Manitoba Researchers

Co-sponsored with the Manitoba Neuroscience Network

Watch Video

March 7, 2016

Manitoba has some of the highest rates of MS in the entire world and there are many questions surrounding this disease. What are the risk factors? What does it do to the brain and spinal cord? Why do some MS patients experience severe symptoms while others experience mild symptoms? Join our panel of expert physicians and scientists who will share what they know, what the latest research is telling them, and the hope that exists for the future.

Moderator:
  • Darell Hominuk, Director, Programs and Services, Government Relations, MS Society of Canada
Panelists:
  • Dr. Chase Figley, Assistant Professor, Radiology, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Principal Investigator, Neuroscience Research Program, Health Sciences Centre
  • Dr. Ruth Ann Marrie, Professor of Medicine & Community Health Sciences, Don Paty Career Scientist, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Director, Multiple Sclerosis Clinic, Health Sciences Centre
  • Dr. James Marriott, Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine, Section of Neurology, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences; Clinician, MS Clinic, Health Sciences Centre

 

2014 - 2015 Café season

Why Kids Get Injured: Accidents or Predictable Events?

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September 15, 2014

Keeping children safe is a never-ending job for most parents. Injuries happen often but perhaps there are ways of predicting and preventing some of the common injuries that befall our kids. There are common risk and preventive actors across both unintentional and intentional injuries. Join our panel of experts as they explore how our kids get injured and strategies to reduce their risk.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Caroline Piotrowski, Head and Associate Professor, Family Social Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Scientist, Manitoba Institute for Child Health
  • Dr. Carolyn Snider, Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Scientist, Manitoba Institute for Child Health; Emergency Physician, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority
  • Dr. Lynn Warda, Associate Professor, Pediatrics & Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Medical Director of IMPACT (injury prevention program), Winnipeg Regional Health Authority
Moderator:
  • Dr. Michael Moffatt, Professor, Community Health Sciences and Pediatrics & Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba

Kidney Disease: The Silent Killer

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October 27, 2014

One in ten Canadians has kidney disease. Are you at risk? What are the risk factors? How can you prevent or delay chronic kidney disease? Join our expert panel to learn about why the kidney, our body’s filtration system, should be cared for and learn about the latest research on prevention and treatment of chronic kidney disease, including kidney transplantation.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Harold Aukema, Professor, Human Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Allison Dart, Assistant Professor, Pediatrics & Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Julie Ho, Associate Professor, Internal Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Navdeep Tangri, Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; attending nephrologist, St-Boniface Hospital and Seven Oaks Hospital
Moderator:
  • Dr. Claudio Rigatto, Associate Professor, Internal Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; attending nephrologist, St-Boniface Hospital and Seven Oaks Hospital

Endocrine Disorders: Overeating, Obesity And Diabetes

A Perspective From Our Medical Researchers Of The Future, Our “students”

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November 24, 2014

Obesity and diabetes is increasing, with Canada now ranking number three among European and North American countries. We are seeing unprecedented numbers in our youth population. What research is needed to prevent, treat and/or manage the obesity epidemic, diabetes and its complications? How are research findings used by the general public, scientists and in clinical practice to help the patient? What is required to see more effective translation of research findings? Enter the discussion and hear the perspective of our students, the next generation of biomedical and clinician scientists.

Panelists:
  • Jennifer Enns, PhD student, Physiology & Pathophysiology, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Janice Ho, MD, Endocrine Resident, Post-Graduate Medical Education, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Martin Sénéchal, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Child Health; Pediatrics & Child Health, University of Manitoba
  • Hana Vakili, PhD student, Physiology & Pathophysiology, University of Manitoba
Moderator:
  • Dr. Jon McGavock, Robert Wallace Cameron Chair in Evidence Based Child Health, and an Associate Professor, Pediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, and Research Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Child Health

Sitting is the New Smoking

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January 14, 2015

We all know smoking is harmful to our health, but how harmful is sitting? The research is convincing. Sedentary behaviour, such as sitting, has been linked to premature death and chronic conditions regardless of smoking or exercise habits. Join our expert panel to learn about how sitting affects your health and what we can do to reduce our time spent sitting—for children, in our community, or at work—and how our health care system can help. Get off your butt and come learn how sitting is the new smoking!

Panelists:
  • Ms. Sue Boreskie, Chief Executive Officer, Reh-Fit Centre
  • Dr. Danielle Bouchard, Assistant Professor, Kinesiology & Recreation Management, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Todd Duhamel, Associate Professor, Kinesiology & Recreation Management, University of Manitoba; Principal Investigator, Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, St-Boniface Hospital Research
  • Dr. Jon McGavock, Associate Professor, Pediatrics & Child Health, University of Manitoba; Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Child Health
Moderator:
  • Dr. Phillip Gardiner, Canada Research Chair in Physical Activity and Health Studies; Director, Health, Leisure & Human Performance Research Institute, University of Manitoba

Keeping Your Head in the Game: How Concussions Affect the Brain

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March 18, 2015

The management and long-term consequences of concussions has become a major issue in professional sports. The number of concussions in amateur sports is also on the rise, particularly among children. This raises serious concerns for players, coaches, and parents. Join our expert panel to learn how concussions affect the brain, the risks posed by these injuries, and the latest research aimed at preventing and treating them.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Michael Ellis, Medical Director, Pan Am Concussion Program; Depts. of Surgery & Pediatrics, Division of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Co-Director, Canada North Concussion Network; Scientist, Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba
  • Dr. Tammy Ivanco, Associate Professor, Psychology, Faculty of Arts
  • Dr. Jeffrey Leiter, Assistant Professor Depts. of Human Anatomy & Cell Science, Surgery, and Family Medicine, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Albrechtsen Research Chair, Pan Am Clinic Foundation
  • Dr. Kelly Russell, Assistant Professor, Pediatrics & Child Health, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Scientist, Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba
Moderator:
  • Dr. Benedict Albensi, Associate Professor, Pharmacology & Therapeutics, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences; Principal Investigator, Division of Neurodegenerative Disorders, St-Boniface Hospital Research

 

2013 - 2014 Café season

Helping Parents Understand & Help Their Anxious Child Or Teenager

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September 17, 2013

Roughly one in 10 kids and teenagers experience a problem with anxiety, causing significant distress and interfering with school, and activities with friends and family. These young people are also more likely to have anxiety and mood problems as adults. Learn about the latest in anxiety management: new technological tools and ‘listening’ strategies designed to help all who are affected, from children to their parents.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Leanne Mak, Clinical Health Psychology, University of Manitoba & Manitoba Adolescent Treatment Centre
  • Dr. John Walker, Clinical Health Psychology, University of Manitoba & St-Boniface Hospital
  • Dr. Roberta Woodgate, CIHR Applied Chair in Reproductive, Child & Youth Health Services & Policy Research, University of Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Child Health & St-Boniface Hospital Research
Moderator:
  • Dr. Carolyn Peters, Director of Alternative Solutions, Therapy Services, Agency Training and Evaluation, New Directions

The Battle Against The Flu Virus

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October 24, 2013

Every year thousands of Canadians catch seasonal influenza , resulting in a substantial number of hospitalizations and deaths (anywhere from 2-8, 000 depending on the severity of the flu season).

Join our experts for the latest on the fight against the ever-evolving virus: from diagnosis to prevention and the development of a better vaccine.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Fred Aoki, Professor, Internal Medicine, Medical Microbiology, Pharmacology & Therapeutics, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Kevin Coombs, Professor, Medical Microbiology; Assistant Dean (Research), Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Joanne Embree, Board Member of Canadian Paediatric Society; Professor, Medical Microbiology, Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba; Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Child Health
  • Dr. Trina Racine, Research Scientist, Public Health Agency of Canada
Moderator:
  • Dr. Greg Hammond, Board Member, Pan Provincial Vaccine Enterprise (PREVENT); Professor, Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba

Practical Solutions For Developmental Disabilities

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November 19, 2013

What we learn through research can make a real difference in the lives of those who have developmental disabilities. The exchange of knowledge that happens when parents, caregivers and teachers are involved in the research process sheds light on better ways to handle issues like difficult behavior in the classroom or teacher training.

Join our expert panelists to learn about their findings and research partnerships.

Panelists:
  • Joyce Douglas, Acting Principal, St-Amant School
  • Dr. Janine Montgomery, Associate Professor, Psychology, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Javier Virués-Ortega, Assistant Professor, Psychology, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. CT (Dickie) Yu, Psychology, University of Manitoba; Director, St-Amant Research Centre
Moderator:
  • Dr. Angela Cornick, Director of Autism & Outreach Programs, St-Amant

Heart Failure: Prevention, Treatment & Transplantation

A Perspective From Our Graduate Students, The Medical Researchers Of The Future

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January 13, 2014

They are startling statistics: roughly one in 500 Canadians will have a heart attack this year and only half will be alive one decade from now; one in five Canadians has high blood pressure (some of them don’t even know it); and only a third of available donor hearts are transplanted, resulting in a critical shortage of organs for people with heart failure.

Come meet five University of Manitoba physiology graduate students who are exploring these important research areas. From Canada’s next generation of medical researchers learn about: functional foods that help lower blood pressure, recent advances that can improve heart attack survival rates, and better ways to preserve donor hearts.

Panelists:
  • Rushita Bagchi, (PhD candidate, holder of a CIHR/MHRC Student Fellowship)
  • Stephanie Caligiuri, (PhD candidate, holder of a CIHR Student Fellowship)
  • Jie Wang, (PhD candidate, holder of a MHRC Studentship)
  • Dr. Chris White, (PhD candidate, holder of a CIHR Fellowship), Member of the Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons
  • Matt Zeglinski, (PhD candidate, holder of a MHRC Studentship)
Moderator:
  • Dr. Ian M.C. Dixon, Physiology, University of Manitoba; Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, St-Boniface Hospital and St-Boniface Hospital Research Centre

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and a Need for a 21st Century Human Rights Response

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February 10, 2014

Worldwide, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the only disability of its type that is considered 100 per cent preventable. While promising prevention practices have been developed and implemented, the condition still occurs and cases are often diagnosed late. Efforts are now underway to diagnose this disorder earlier and more easily. In this Café we explore—through the lens of research—clinical care and advocacy; and why we need to address this lifelong disability medically and socially in a way that protects the rights of the women, men, children, families and communities affected.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Albert Chudley, Pediatrics & Child Health, University of Manitoba; Health Sciences Centre
  • Dr. Brenda Elias, Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Program Coordinator, Fetal Alcohol Prevention Program
Moderator:
  • Professor Karen Busby, Faculty of Law; Academic Director of Centre for Human Rights Research, University of Manitoba

 

2012-2013 Café season

Chronic Lymphocytid Leukemia - New Discoveries and Options for Patients

October 3, 2012

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells. It is the mostly widely diagnosed type of leukemia in the Western world, mostly affecting older men and has a poor survival rate. As the Baby Boomer generation grows older, the incidence of CLL will increase.

In the new era of personalized medicine, what new diagnostic tests will improve detection at the earliest stages? What research discoveries will pave the way to new treatments and improve survivorship? What clinical trials are being conducted in Manitoba? Join us in a lively and open discussion on CLL with Canada’s leading scientists, clinicians, patient advocates and nurses on this important disease.

Panelists:
  • Dr. James B Johnston, Clinical Director of Manitoba CLL Tumour Bank; Hematologist/Oncologist CancerCare Manitoba; Senior Scientist and Associate Director, Clinical Affairs, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology; Professor of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Versha Banerji, Senior Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology; Hematologist/Oncologist, CancerCare Manitoba; Associate Professor, Biochemistry & Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Aaron Marshall, Professor, Immunology, Biochemistry & Medical Genetics, Canada Research Chair in Molecular Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Cynthia Toze, Member, Leukemia/BMT Program of British Columbia, Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine, BC Cancer Agency Gordon & Leslie Diamond Health Care Center, Hematology Administration
  • Dan Skwarchuk, Executive Director, Health Services Integration, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority
Moderator:
  • Dr. Spencer Gibson, Director, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Professor and Manitoba Chair; Biochemistry, Medical Genetics, Immunology, University of Manitoba

Tuberculosis: The Hidden Epidemic

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October 23, 2012

Most Canadians think that tuberculosis (TB) is a disease of the past. In reality, while general rates of TB in Canada are slowly decreasing, in some regions such as Nunavut and Manitoba, they have risen over the past decade. In this Café Scientifique, we explore, through the lens of research, clinical care, public health, human rights, advocacy and personal experience, the story behind the numbers —how socioeconomic, environmental, biological and cultural factors are affecting the incidence of TB in Canadian communities, and how our experience fits within the context of global TB and the pursuit of TB control/ eradication.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Anne Fanning, Chair, Stop TB Canada; Member of the Order of Canada; Professor Emeritus, University of Alberta
  • Dr. Pamela Orr, President-Elect, North American Region of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Professor, Internal Medicine and CIHR Researcher, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • An individual who has experienced TB personally will join our panel for the discussion.
Moderator:
  • Dr. Brenda Elias, Assistant Professor, Community Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba

HIV/AIDS in Manitoba: Global Strategies for a local problem

November 29, 2012

Every year in Manitoba over 100 new cases of HIV are diagnosed. Some would be surprised to learn that the majority of cases are in the over 40 age group, with over 63 per cent contracted through heterosexual partners. For decades, the University of Manitoba has led the fight against the spread of HIV/AIDS around the globe. Come join the discussion with our experts to learn about the latest prevention strategies being used to address Manitoba’s growing HIV/AIDS cases and the status of the development of a vaccine to prevent the disease.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Keith Fowke, Professor, Departments of Medical Microbiology and Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Marissa Becker, Assistant Professor, Centre for Global Public Health; Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Associate Director, Manitoba HIV Program
  • Blain Butyniec, Health Educator, Nine Circles Community Health Centre
Moderator:
  • Dr. Stephen Moses, Professor and Head, Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba

Nature and Nurture (Not Versus): the New Science of Epigenetics

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January 28, 2013

Epigenetics steps in where mapping the human genome left off. Nature says we inherit our genetic make-up or DNA code from our parents. Many believe this code and the genes it represents set the ‘program’ for who we are and what health risks we might possess. Nurture (or epigenetics) says that this program can be ‘hacked’ by life experience, either increasing or decreasing health risks already in our DNA code. Join our experts in a discussion about whether we can control our health destinies by controlling what we eat, drink, breathe, and where we live.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Jim Davie, Professor, Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Canada Research Chair in Chromatin Dynamics
  • Dr. Kirk McManus, Assistant Professor, Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba
  • Dr. Mojgan Rastegar, Assistant Professor, Immunology, Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
Moderator:
  • Dr. Peter Cattini, Professor and Head, Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba

Drug Discovery: The 21st Century Petri Dish

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February 25, 2013

The many life-saving drugs that appear on our drug store shelves and that are prescribed by physicians every day to treat diseases and infections all had their start in a research laboratory. In the 21st century, the demand for new antibiotics and anticancer drugs is an urgent focus, given antibiotic resistance and the need to tailor our fight against diseases. Come join our experts as they share the challenges and rewards of their current drug discovery research and the implications for health care these drugs hold.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Donald Miller, Associate Professor, Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Frank Schweizer, Assistant Professor, Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. John Sorensen, Associate Professor, Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. George Zhanel, Professor, Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
Moderator:
  • Dr. Albert Friesen, President, Medicure; Co-Chair, Manitoba Innovation Council

Understanding Our Immune System: A Graduate Student Perspective

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April 29, 2013

In recognition of the International Day of Immunology April 29, 2013 graduate students from the University of Manitoba’s Department of Immunology will discuss their research on the inner workings of the immune system. Providing a unique student perspective on he research endeavor, the session will touch on a number of areas in which the immune system impacts health. The discussion will highlight both the research trainee experience and our need to understand both the beneficial and harmful sides of the immune system.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Christopher Wiebe, M.Sc. Candidate, University of Manitoba. Researching factors affecting rejection of kidney transplants.
  • Samantha Pauls, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Manitoba. Researches signaling networks controlling activation of B lymphocytes.
  • Natascha Fitch, M.Sc. Candidate, University of Manitoba. Researches the measurable effects of vitamin D on immune cell function.
  • Hesam Movassagh, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Manitoba. Researches mechanisms controlling recruitment of immune cells to inflamed airways in allergic asthma.
  • Rebecca Dielschneider, M.Sc. Candidate, University of Manitoba. Examines disruptions in signaling networks in leukemia cells and new treatment strategies based on targeting the abnormal networks.
Moderator:
  • Dr. Aaron Marshall, Professor, Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba. Canada Research Chair in Molecular Immunology Studies the signaling networks that control the activities of B lymphocytes and other immune cells. Dr. Marshall teaches and mentors young scientists in several biomedical science programs at the University of Manitoba.

 

2011-2012 Café season

Breast Cancer Research: What Does the Future Hold?

Monday, October 3, 2011

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. One out of every sevenManitoba women will experience breast cancer, often after age 50.But scientists and doctors have been developing better ways to identify those at risk. A better understanding of genes and how our bodies areaffected has paved the way to new and improved methods of treatment.But what about women who have already been diagnosed with cancer?How can we improve the care, communication, and coping mechanisms available to them? Will this improve how well they respond to treatment? Come join in the discussion and learn more about the latest developments in the care and treatment of breast cancer.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Leigh Murphy, Professor, Faculty of Medicine, and Chair, Breast Cancer Research Group, University of Manitoba; Senior Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, CancerCare Manitoba
  • Dr. Tom Hack, Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba; Director, Psychosocial Oncology and Cancer Nursing Research, I.H. Asper Clinical Research Institute, St. Boniface General Hospital
  • Ms. Lois Harrison, Director, Health Promotion, Canadian Breast Cancer FoundationPrairies/NWT
Moderator:
  • Dr. Yvonne Myal, Professor, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Director, Diagnostic Services of Manitoba; Senior Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, CancerCare Manitoba

Oral Health: More than Bad Breath!

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

How healthy is your smile? When you brush and floss, you’re protecting more than just your teeth and gums. If you lose your teeth, you may have to change your eating patterns, resulting in nutritional deficiencies and involuntary weight loss. And cavities and gum disease have been linked to serious chronic illnesses such as diabetes and respiratory disease. Adopting good dental hygiene practices at an early age could have a lasting impact on a person’s health.As we learn more about the importance of a healthy smile, new questions arise. Why is poor oral health connected to other illnesses? What can we do to improve dental care for kids? And how can we let people know that taking care of your teeth is about more than fresh breath? Join us to share your thoughts and hear the latest research evidence from experts in oral health.

Panelists:
  • Tony Lacopino, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba
  • Michael Glogauer, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto
  • Hani el-Gabalawy, Faculty of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Manitoba
  • Robert Schroth, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba
Moderator:
  • Jeff Dixon, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Western Ontario

Telling it like it is: Communicating health research to the public (YOU!)

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

As a society we rely heavily on scientific facts as they relate to our health. But when the “facts” are presented to us in technical jargon they likely go over our heads. Health related issues are interpreted for us by an array of media outlets, but what is science really saying about health? How accurately are policy makers interpreting the message? Is the media disseminating reliable information to the general public? Is there a way to ensure academics, researchers, journalists and YOU, the public, are on the same page? Join us as we discuss the challenges of communicating health research to the masses.

Panelists:
  • Réal Cloutier, Chief Operating Officer, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority
  • Dr. Michelle Driedger, Canada Research Chair in Environment and Health Risk Communication; Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Helen Fallding, Manager, Centre for Human Rights Research Initiative, University of Manitoba; Recipient, Canadian Institutes of Health Research Journalism Award
Moderator:
  • Dr. Malcolm Smith, Professor and Head, Department of Marketing, I. H. Asper School of Business, University of Manitoba

Renewing Hope for Spinal Cord Injury

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Most of us take walking for granted. It’s the primary way of getting from point A to point B. But suppose you suffered an injury and lost that ability. How then could cells and tissues be encouraged to repair themselves? Could we limit or reverse the damage caused by spinal cord injury? To what extent? And do we even know enough about the mechanics of walking to recover this function? Join us for an interactive discussion about the human body’s ability to repair itself. We’ll explore promising research strategies aimed at restoring function and limiting secondary consequences after spinal cord injury.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Soheila Karimi, Assistant Professor, Physiology; Principal Investigator, Regenerative Medicine Program; Principal Investigator, Spinal Cord Research Centre; Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Child Health; University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Kristine Cowley, Research Associate, Spinal Cord Research Centre; University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Larry Jordan, Professor, Physiology; Founding Director & Principal Investigator, Spinal Cord Research Centre; University of Manitoba
Moderator:
  • Dr. Geoff Hicks, Associate Professor, Biochemistry & Medical Genetics and Physiology; Director, Regenerative Medicine Program; Senior Investigator, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, CancerCare Manitoba; University of Manitoba

Diabetes: Is Resistance Futile?

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Diabetes is on the rise. Scientists predict there will be 300 million sufferers worldwide within the next 15 years. Consequences include more than just insulin shots. Diabetes can also lead to high blood pressure, blindness, kidney disease, and even limb loss.But why do certain groups of us seem more susceptible than others? What roles do environment, stress, heredity and diet play, and are these factors that can really be controlled? Come and join the discussion on these factors and what role you can play in resisting diabetes.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Sharon Bruce, Associate Professor, Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Paul Fernyhough, Professor, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Director, Division of Neurodegenerative Disorders, St-Boniface Hospital Research Centre
  • Dr. Sora Ludwig, Associate Professor, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba and St-Boniface Hospital
Moderator:
  • Andrea Kwasnicki, Regional Director, Canadian Diabetes Association

 

2010-2011 Café season

Arthritis: Are you at risk? What can you do about it?

Monday, September 20, 2010

The word ‘arthritis’—which comes from the Greek ‘arthro’ (joint) and ‘it is’ (inflammation)—is used to describe more than 100 conditions involving joints, the tissue that surrounds them, and other connective tissue. Arthritis affects an estimated 4.2 million Canadians. Three in five people under the age of 65 are diagnosed, including children and those in the prime of life. Researchers at the University of Manitoba and the Health Sciences Centre are gaining insight about the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and those who are most at risk. The Arthritis Society, Manitoba Division, has strategies in place for managing the disease both at home and in the workplace. Come hear about arthritis research in Manitoba and join the discussion.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Hani El-Gabalawy, Professor, Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Christine Peschken, Assistant Professor, Community Health Sciences/Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Ms. Cheryl Machula, Education Programs & Services Coordinator, The Arthritis Society, Manitoba/Nunavut Division
Moderator:
  • Dr. John Wilkins, Professor, Internal Medicine/Biochemistry & Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba

The New Wonder Vitamin: D

Monday, October 25, 2010

Studies abound regarding the wonders of vitamin D. It is estimated that more than 1.1 million Canadians—roughly four percent—are vitamin D deficient, which can cause rickets in children and osteoporosis in adults. Higher levels of vitamin D have been associated with a lower risk of breast cancer, colon cancer, and some immune system disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Type 1 diabetes.Researchers at the University of Manitoba are studying the impact of vitamin D in a variety of areas: for example, children’s dental health, our immune resistance to tuberculosis, and diabetes. Come join the discussion, hear their findings and learn how this vitamin can have a positive effect on your health.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Linda Larcombe, Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Bob Schroth, Assistant Professor, Dentistry, Pediatrics & Child Health, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Shayne Taback, Associate Professor, Pediatrics & Child Health, Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
Moderator:
  • Dr. Michael Moffatt, Professor, Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba; Executive Director, Research and Applied Learning, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority

Keeping Your Skeleton Healthy

Monday, November 29, 2010

One in four women and many men over the age of 50 have osteoporosis, a painful and debilitating disease caused by the gradual loss of bone density. Some of the factors that may lead to its development are: the use of common medications like proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and anti-depressants, having a family history, and ethnicity.Our panelists will discuss their research about the increased risk of devel-oping osteoporosis from PPIs and other health-related factors that further increase those odds. They’ll also share strategies for reducing your risk and ways to prevent fractures. Please come and join the discussion.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Laura Targownik, Associate Professor, Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. William Leslie, Professor, Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Ms. Marg MacDonell, Chair, Osteoporosis Canada, Manitoba Chapter
Moderator:
  • Dr. Hugo T. Bergen, Associate Professor, Human Anatomy & Cell Science, University of Manitoba

Men's Health: Separating Fact from Fiction

Monday, January 24, 2011

Men aren’t living as long as women, even in the 21st century. What factors affect the health of men? We know things like smoking, physical activity, whether they are single or married, mental health, access to care and prostate health are some of them. From a disease-specific perspective, population-based cancer research provides further insight into men’s health. What roles do these factors play and what can we do to lengthen and improve men’s lives? Researchers are developing better treatment and education strategies to help reduce these risk factors. They have also been studying a group of Canadian men for some 60 years – The Manitoba Follow-Up Study – and are finding out what things are making men live longer despite chronic and life threatening illnesses. Come out and hear what we know and what we’re still trying to find out and join the discussion.

Panelists:
  • Mr. Curt Sparkes, Counsellor, Klinic Community Health Centre
  • Dr. Robert Tate, Associate Professor, Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Donna Turner, Provincial Director, Population Oncology, CancerCare Manitoba
Moderator:
  • Dr. Janice Dodd, Professor & Head, Physiology, Faculty of Medicine; Professor, Women’s & Gender Studies, Faculty of Arts, University of Manitoba

Schizophrenia: Beyond the Social Stigma

Monday, February 28, 2011

Mental illnesses are diagnosed in one third of the population in Manitoba. Schizophrenia affects 1% of the world’s population and takes a toll on the individual and their family and caregivers. Treatment strategies have improved over the past 50 years, resulting in individuals with schizophrenia being able to live long and healthy lives. Researchers are studying the improved screening methods, treatments, drug development, and increasing the understanding of the causes of schizophrenia and how it impacts the individual’s health.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Diana Clarke, Assoc Dean (Research), Nursing University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Xin-Min Li, Professor, Psychiatry, University of Manitoba
  • Mr. Chris Summerville, CEO, Manitoba Schizophrenia Society
Moderator:
  • Dr. Michael Eleff, Associate Professor, Psychiatry, University of Manitoba; Medical Director, Schizophrenia Treatment & Education Program (STEP), Health Sciences Centre

Use it or Lose it: Mobility in Older Adults

Monday, March 21, 2011

Regular physical activity is important whether we are young or old. Factors that can slow us down include osteoarthritis, vision changes, and stroke. With the ever-aging baby boomer population finding solutions to these challenges and keeping mobile at any age is crucial to the quality of life we are able to live. Researchers are developing unique ways to keep us moving. Things like tele-gaming and tele-monitoring, increasing long-term rehabilitation services through tele-rehab are being explored. As well, research into aging and driving and what you can do to keep mobile will be discussed at this interactive café.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Phillip Gardiner, Canada Research Chair in Physical Activity and Health Studies; Professor & Director, Health, Leisure & Human Performance Research Institute, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Michelle Porter, Professor, Health, Leisure & Human Performance Research Institute, Faculty of Kinesiology & Recreation Management, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Tony Szturm, Associate Professor, Physical Therapy, School of Medical Rehabilitation, University of Manitoba
Moderator:
  • Mr. Jim Evanchuk, Executive Director, Active Living Coalition for Older Adults (ALCOA) Manitoba

Antibiotics: How the Bugs are Fighting Back

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Have you ever taken antibiotics? For an ear infection, a sinus infection, or maybe a bladder infection? At the time, it probably seemed like a minor treatment for a minor illness. But not that long ago, physicians didn’t have antibiotics in their arsenal, and “minor” illnesses claimed many lives. Antibiotics represented a major advance in medicine and public health.But they have become a victim of their own success. Overused and abused, antibiotics are no longer as effective against the bacteria they are supposed to defeat. The bacteria have adapted to the antibiotics’ tricks. What are we doing wrong? How can we put antibiotics back on top?

Panelists:
  • Mr. Brian Mark, Medical Microbiology & Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Michael Mulvey, Microbiology, University of Manitoba, and Chief, Antimicrobial Resistance & Nosocomial Infections, National Microbiology Lab
  • Dr. George Zhanel, Medical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, University of Manitoba
Moderator:
  • Dr. Eric Brown, Professor and Chair, Biochemistry & Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University

 

2009-2010 Café season

Autism: Solving the Mysteries

Wednesday, November 4, 2009

Interested in talking and learning more about different health topics and related research? CIHR Café Scientifiques bring together experts with non-researchers (you, me, neighbours, friends, etc.) in a relaxed atmosphere to talk about their work and the questions it raises. Come and join the discussion!Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)are increasing worldwide. Approximately 190,000 Canadians are affected. This means that one in 165 children are diagnosed with an ASD. Why the increase? What causes ASDs in the first place? How close are we to finding the answers? What do we know?Come join in a discussion with a panel of autism researchers from the University of Manitoba. Learn what the National Autism in Canada population-health study is finding; hear what we are learning from genetics and basic science research.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Albert Chudley, Professor, Pediatrics & Child Health, Biochemistry & Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine; Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Child Health
  • Dr. Tammy Ivanco, Associate Professor, Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Medicine
  • Dr. C.T. (Dickie) Yu, Associate Professor, Psychology, Faculty of Arts; Director, St. Amant Research Centre
Facilitator:
  • Dr. Shahin Shooshtari, Assistant Professor, Family Social Sciences & Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Human Ecology and Faculty of Medicine

Alzheimer's Disease: Looking for Answers

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Interested in talking and learning more about different health topics and related research? Café Scientifiques bring together experts with non-researchers (you, me, neighbours, friends, etc.) in a relaxed atmosphere to talk about their work and the questions it raises. Come and join the discussion!An estimated 450,000 Canadians are currently living with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or some other form of dementia. This number will grow with the increasing number of us growing older every year. Researchers at the University of Manitoba are looking at AD from many angles - from microscopic examination of compounds within our blood to imaging of our brains. They are investigating how memory works and the ways that AD impairs it, and the best ways to diagnose and treat people with AD. Join our research experts in a discussion of their current work about a disease that may one day affect you or a loved one.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Marc Del Bigio, Professor, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Canada Research Chair in Developmental Neuropathology
  • Dr. Gordon Glazner, Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Principal Investigator, Division of Neurodegenerative Disorders, St. Boniface Hospital Research
  • Dr. Melanie Martin, Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Assistant Professor, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Manitoba and University Winnipeg
Facilitator:
  • Dr. Kathy Gough, Professor, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Manitoba

Keeping Your Ticker Happy: Strategies for Heart Health

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Interested in talking and learning more about different health topics and related research? Café Scientifiques bring together experts with non-researchers (you, me, neighbours, friends, etc.) in a relaxed atmosphere to talk about their work and the questions it raises. Come and join the discussion!More people die of heart attacks every year in Canada than from any other cause. Researchers around the world continue to work on learning what makes our tickers keep on ticking and what factors play a role in our hearts' health. Things like what we eat, how often we move, and lifestyle choices like smoking, play a major role. Come hear what our heart health researchers at the University of Manitoba are up to and how you can keep your heart happy.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Todd Duhamel, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology & Recreation Management, University of Manitoba; Principal Investigator, Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, St. Boniface Hospital Research
  • Dr. Davinder Jassal, Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Principal Investigator, Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, St. Boniface Hospital Research
  • Lisa Scharf, Physical Activity/Heart Health Manager, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Manitoba
  • Dr. Carla Taylor, Professor, Human Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Human Ecology, University of Manitoba
Facilitator:
  • Dr. Grant Pierce, Professor, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Executive Director of Research, St. Boniface Hospital Research

Back to Basics: Helping Kids Be More Active

Monday, March 29, 2010

Interested in talking and learning more about different health topics and related research? Café Scientifiques bring together experts with non-researchers (you, me, neighbours, friends, etc.) in a relaxed atmosphere to talk about their work and the questions it raises. Come and join the discussion!There are a lot of signs that our kids need to change their habits or risk dying at a much younger age than the generation before them. Children are now being diagnosed with high cholesterol, an early warning sign of heart disease; and childhood obesity rates continue to climb, resulting in children with high blood pressure and kidney disease. The number of young people developing Type 2 diabetes due to poor lifestyle choices is also on the rise. The benefits of minor increases in physical activity to both physical and psychological—and the need for children to continue those activity habits into adulthood—is crucial. A fact now recognized by the Province of Manitoba who have made physical education in schools mandatory through to graduation. Researchers at the University of Manitoba are finding solutions to these problems by studying Type 2 diabetes in Manitoba children, gauging the true impact of small and big changes to their activity levels, exploring how school-aged children really feel about taking part in sports programs and the benefit that adolescents gain from sport participation, as well as evaluation of the Grade 11 and 12 Physical Education/Health Education curriculum.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Jonathan McGavock, Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management, University of Manitoba; Research Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Child Health
  • Rob Pryce, PhD Candidate, Applied Health Sciences Program, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Leisha Strachan,Assistant Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management, University of Manitoba
Facilitator:
  • Dr. Heather Dean, Professor, Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Research Scientist, Manitoba Institute of Child Health

What Affects Women's Health: It's Complicated!

Monday, April 26, 2010

Interested in talking and learning more about different health topics and related research? Café Scientifiques bring together experts with non-researchers (you, me, neighbours, friends, etc.) in a relaxed atmosphere to talk about their work and the questions it raises. Come and join the discussion!Research has shown that there is not one thing that holds the key to good health. For women especially, there are many factors that play an important role. Environmental factors such as family violence, how we care for ourselves, our sexual health, and use of prenatal care, all play an important role in our overall health and well-being. Researchers at the University of Manitoba are engaged in many of these questions. Join in a discussion of the issues that play a role in women's health and hear what our researchers are investigating and what they have learned.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Maureen Heaman, Professor and CIHR Chair in Gender and Health, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Diane Hiebert-Murphy, Associate Professor, Faculty of Social Work, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Anne Katz, Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba; Clinical Nurse Specialist and Sexuality Counsellor, CancerCare Manitoba; Editor, Nursing for Women's Health journal.
Facilitator:
  • Dr. Janice Ristock, Associate Vice-President (Research); Professor, Women's and Gender Studies,Faculty of Arts, University of Manitoba

Anxiety and Depression in "Gen Y": Engaging Youth and Finding Solutions

Monday, May 17, 2010

One in five Canadians will experience serious problems with anxiety or depression. For most, this happens by age 25. Young adults are at greater risk since this is the time they face important life tasks, like complet-ing their education and making a living on their own. To complicate matters, they’re often balancing school, a part-time job, and a social life that might include drugs and alcohol. Join our panel of experts to learn about strategies to engage young adults early on and improve their lifelong mental health. These U of M researchers are figuring out what social connections young adults need to flour-ish, and how to better equip them with the skills to deal with stress, anxiety, and depression when problems first arise.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Laurence Katz, Associate Professor, Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Tracey Peter, Assistant Professor, Sociology, Faculty of Arts, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. John Walker, Professor, Clinical Health Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; Head, Anxiety Disorders Program, St. Boniface General Hospital
Facilitator:
  • Nicole Chammartin, Executive Director, Canadian Mental Health Association - Winnipeg Region

Mind the Gap: Does Gender Make a Difference for Health Policy and Practice?

Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Women in Manitoba go to the doctor more often than men, but does that mean they’re healthier? Research tells us men have higher rates of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, while women are more likely to develop hypertension, arthritis, and hip fracture. Why do these differences exist? How do gender (society’s ideas about men and women) and sex (the biology of our bodies) affect our health? And how can we better design health care and health policy to meet the unique needs of Manitoba’s women and men? Come and learn about how local researchers are gaining knowledge about gender and sex to improve the health of Manitobans. Café Scientifiques bring together experts with non-researchers (you, me, neighbours, friends,) in a relaxed atmosphere to talk about important health questions. Please join us for lively discussion, debate, and refreshments. This free event is presented by the CIHR Institute of Gender and Health and the Office of the VP (Research), University of Manitoba.

Speakers:
  • Dr. Randy Fransoo, Assistant Professor, Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, and Research Scientist, Manitoba Centre for Health Policy
  • Ms. Margaret Haworth-Brockman, Executive Director, Prairie Women’s Health Centre of Excellence
  • Dr. Maureen Heaman, Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, and CIHR Chair in Gender and Health
Moderator:
  • Dr. Joy Johnson, Scientific Director, Institute of Gender and Health, Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

2008-2009 Café season

What is Age-Friendly?

Monday, October 27, 2008

The media is full of stories on our aging baby boomer population and the impact on society that this will have. How do we plan for and manage the changes that may need to take place to meet the needs of this increasingly older population? What things need to be made age-friendly in order to ensure a quality and standard of life for an aging population? More importantly, what is age-friendly? Our panelists will talk about the Age-Friendly Communities research project, an older population behind the wheel, and bring the seniors’ perspective to the discussion.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Verena Menec, Canada Research Chair in Healthy Aging; Director, Centre on Aging; and Associate Professor, Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Michelle Porter, Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management
  • Ms. Vivian Stunden, Manitoba rep to the Federal Superannuates National Association and participant in the Age-Friendly Communities project
Facilitator:
  • Dr. Juliette Cooper, Professor Emerita, School of Medical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba

Could keeping kids too clean make them sick? Asthma, allergies & chronic disease

Wednesday, March 4, 2009

Interested in talking and learning more about different health topics and related research? CIHR Café Scientifiques bring together experts with non-researchers (you, me, neighbours, friends, etc.) in a relaxed atmosphere to talk about their work and the questions it raises. Come and join the discussion!  Western culture seems to be obsessed with cleanliness evidenced by the girth of cleaning products, antibacterial wipes and hand sanitizers that have hit the market over the past several years. The impact of this may well be related to the increase in asthma and allergies in children and linked to the development of chronic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and lupus to name a few. What is the role of genetics, environment and nutrition in all of these diseases? Our panelists represent a wealth of knowledge in the areas of childhood asthma, inflammatory bowel disease and human nutrition.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Allan Becker, Professor, Pediatrics & Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Charles Bernstein, Professor, Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Harold Aukema, Professor, Human Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Human Ecology, University of Manitoba
Facilitator:
  • Dr. Kent HayGlass, Canada Research Chair in Immune Regulation, and Professor, Immunology and Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba

What affects your mental health?

Monday, April 20, 2009

Interested in talking and learning more about different health topics and related research? CIHR Café Scientifiques bring together experts with non-researchers (you, me, neighbours, friends, etc.) in a relaxed atmosphere to talk about their work and the questions it raises. Come and join the discussion!  Mental illness affects a large portion of our population, from young to old. These individuals are generally high users of health care services. What strategies might work best to address these issues? Certain populations are more at risk for mental illnesses. What preventive measures can be taken to assist these people? The heavy psychological burden to individuals facing life threatening and life limiting illnesses can be extensive. Ways for people to approach these psychosocial issues within this context need to be identified. Our panelists will provide insights into their research in the areas of mental health services, suicide prevention, and the psychological aspects of life threatening and life limiting illnesses.

Panelists:
  • Dr. Harvey Max Chochinov, Canada Research Chair in Palliative Care; Distinguished Professor, Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba; and Director, Manitoba Palliative Care Research Unit, CancerCare Manitoba
  • Dr. Patricia Martens, CIHR/PHAC Applied Public Health Chair; Director, Manitoba Centre for Health Policy; and  Associate Professor, Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
  • Dr. Jitender Sareen, Associate Professor, Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba
Facilitator:
  • Dr. John Arnett, Professor, Clinical Health Psychology, Faculty of Medicine

Contact us

Office of the Vice-President (Research and International)
Room 202 Administration Building
66 Chancellor's Circle
University of Manitoba (Fort Garry campus)
Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 Canada

204-474-6915
204-261-1317