Graduate Degree Programs

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Are you thinking of applying for graduate school in anthropology? The Department of Anthropology at the University of Manitoba has a large and vibrant graduate program, offering degrees at both the MA and PhD levels in Anthropology.

Our current graduate program has over 40 students at various levels of their program.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION



The Department of Anthropology offers graduate programs at both the MA and PhD levels in sociocultural anthropology, biological anthropology and archaeology. We maintain a strong focus on research training and attempt to tailor programs to the interests and strengths of individual students in close cooperation with faculty advisors. The experience of the Department's staff ranges over much of the world, from the far North to the tropics, and around the globe from Asia to the Americas. This research serves to increase our understanding of family life and community structure; gender relations; cultural groups and their varied responses to health and illness; industrialization and migration for work; the political economy and culture of globalization; the universal concern for food and shelter, beliefs and values, art and symbols, language and folklore; human evolution and ecological adaptations.

Research is currently being carried out in Canada, China, Europe, Israel, Latin America, and Africa. Abundant research opportunities within the Province of Manitoba are supported by the presence of a wide variety of cultural and ethnic groups and a rich record of ancient human settlement. Local projects have included the adaptation and cultures of aboriginal peoples in the North; multi-ethnic urban anthropology in Winnipeg; paleo-environments and early human settlements in the Lake Agassiz region; the fur trade of the region; ethnohistory and late prehistoric archaeology of southwestern Manitoba; and population biology and pathology of native and immigrant groups.

Our graduates have been highly successful in a variety of fields. They have taken up positions in universities and colleges as professors or specialists, in the Foreign Service, in health related institutions, in museums, in education, in government heritage positions, for the International Development Research Centre, and in counselling for Native municipal boards. Others have chosen to be free lance anthropologists; some have incorporated their own successful companies.

 

DEGREE PROGRAMS


 Degrees Offered  Expected Duration
 M.A.            2 years          
Ph.D.

4 years


For information about Individual Interdisciplinary Studies (IIS), please click here.

 
FIELDS OF RESEARCH

The department’s research focus, and consequent graduate training and undergraduate teaching emphasis, lies in the following:

 

Sociocultural Anthropology: Culture and political economy, cultural production, ecology, migration, global political economy, gender and development, symbolic anthropology, media, tourism, kinship, nationalism, education, youth culture, conflict, sexuality, and applied anthropology. Aboriginal Canada, Canada, India, South America, West Africa, China, Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Archaeology: Theory, analytic methods, environmental archaeology, zooarchaeology, lithics, ceramics, settlement patterns, domestication, hunter/fisher/gatherers, ethnoarchaeology,historic and fur trade archaeology. Western and Northern Canada, Eastern Europe, Southern Africa, Near East.

Biological Anthropology: Skeletal biology, medical anthropology, demography, palaeodemography, historical epidemiology, palaeopathology, growth and development, infectious disease, reproductive behaviour, 3D imaging, gender and health, colonialism and health.

Please visit the faculty profiles page for more information on faculty research interests.

RESEARCH FACILITIES


 

 

 

 

The Department of Anthropology's administrative and faculty offices are located in the Fletcher Argue Building within the Arts Faculty Complex, while the Laboratory facilities are located in the Duff Roblin Building. The laboratories include comparative collections of lithics, ceramics, flora and fauna (primarily from Manitoba), a pollen and phytolith extraction lab, a thin-section facility, the Biological Anthropology Digital Imaging Laboratory (BDIAL), a microfilm reading facility, and an Ethnographic Resources Lab, all of which permit advanced study and research. Click here for more information on the laboratories, and check out our photo gallery to get a closer look at the research facilities on campus. Computer facilities are housed in the Department’s Fletcher Argue and Duff Roblin areas. The University Library system has a collection of anthropological material, including the Human Relations Area Files. Faculty and students also have access to the Provincial Archives, the Hudson's Bay Company Archives, the Manitoba Museum and the University of Winnipeg Library.


PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS


 

 

 

M.A. Program Requirements

In addition to the minimum course requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies found in the Graduate Studies Regulations Section of this Calendar, students must complete a minimum number of 12 credit hours of coursework at the 7000 level, including at least 9 credit hours of Anthropology courses. In addition a mandatory pass/fail ANTH 7000 Professional Development in Anthropology Course must be taken. Finally students must submit an acceptable thesis and pass a thesis oral examination.

Second Language Reading Requirement: None

Expected Time to Graduate: 2 Years


Ph.D. Program Requirements

In addition to the minimum course requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies found in the Graduate Studies Regulations Section of this calendar, students must complete 9 credit hours of coursework at the 7000 level, including at least 6 credit hours of Anthropology courses. In addition a mandatory pass/fail ANTH 7000 Professional Development in Anthropology Course must be taken. Finally students must submit an acceptable thesis and pass a thesis oral examination.

Second language requirement: Yes. Student must demonstrate a reading proficiency in one language with a scholarly discourse other than English. The language requirement must be met prior to the defence of the dissertation.

Expected time to graduation: 4 years


Pre-Master's Program Requirements

The Pre-Master’s program normally consists of up to 18 credit hours of coursework from the undergraduate, and especially the Advanced/Honours undergraduate, curriculum. Pre-Master’s study programs are individually worked out by the advisor assigned by the Graduate Programs Committee to Pre-Master’s students, normally the Department Head.


Please Note: In the event of any discrepancies between the information provided here and in the University's most current Calendar, the Calendar entry shall prevail. Click here to view the Graduate Academic Calendar

ADMISSION INFORMATION


 

 

 

If you are interested in applying please review our detailed information on admission requirements and application process.     
    

FUNDING AND AWARDS


 

Student study and research work are supported by Student Research Assistantships, University of Manitoba Graduate Fellowships, SSHRC and NSERC, as well as by faculty grants. Please visit the funding and awards page for more information.

 

 

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Application Information

Supplemental Regulations

Faculty of Graduate Studies

Graduate Awards and Funding

Anthropology Graduate Student Handbook