HOME    ABOUT     FABRICATIONS       CALLS       COMPETITIONS      KEYNOTES     PRESENTERS     INSTALLATIONS     SCHEDULE      QUOTES     REGISTER      PRACTICALITIES

 

 

 

PRESENTERS

FABRICATING TRUTH

 

 

 

PALLAVI SWARANJALI, Carleton University

 

Forging Architecture: The Contronymic Nature of Architectural Creation in the work of

 

Indian Ar. B.V.Doshi

 

 

 

 

STEVEN BEITES, Laurentian University

 

Context Through Awareness

 

 

 

 

KATIE GRAHAM, Carleton University

 

Architectural Storytelling in Virtual Reality: How VR Can Expand on Architectural Perception

 

 

 

 

TED LANDRUM, University of Manitoba

 

Poetry as Research: Fabricating Architectural Truth

 

 

FABRICATING IN SITU

 

 

 

SCOTT GERALD SHALL, Lawrence Technological University

 

Borrowed Intelligence: Leveraging Industrial Fabrication To Evolve Building Production

 

 

 

 

NAHID AHMADI, Carleton University

 

Asphalt Deserts: Rethinking the Architecture of Surface Parking Lots

 

 

 

 

DIETMAR STRAUB, University of Manitoba

 

A Beautiful Waste of Time: Operating a Snow Academy

 

 

 

 

JENNIFER SMITH, Auburn University

 

INCREMENTAL: Resilience through Disaster-Relief Housing

 

 

 

 

BRYAN HE, University of Manitoba

 

Making of the Hakka Vernacular

 

 

 

SOCIAL FABRICS

 

 

 

VALENTINA DAVILA, McGill University

 

Down the Back Stairs: Servants’ Spaces in Montreal’s Square Mile

 

 

 

 

LAWRENCE BIRD, Winnipeg

 

Dominion

 

 

 

 

ELLEN GRIMES, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

 

History's Future Fabrics: New Models for Historic Ecologies

 

 

 

 

NIKOLE BOUCHARD, University of Wisconsin

 

(H)our House

 

 

 

 

RYAN STEC, Carleton University

 

Making Public Space: Examining Walter Lippmann & John Dewey’s pragmatism as a

 

constructive expansion to the spatial theory of public space

 

MEDIATING FABRICS

 

 

LANCELOT COAR, University of Manitoba

 

Lignes d’erre: Tracing the History and Future of Force Flow in Structures

 

 

Things themselves are lying and so are their images – Robert Le Ricolais

 

 

The search for meaning in architectural form can be traced back as far as humans have endeavoured to shape material. And while there have been innumerable

 

efforts to elicit connections between building form and the conceptual ideals of our cultures, there has also been a parallel pursuit for a closer link between the

 

shape of structures and the invisible forces that move through them. These forces, though unseen, are largely responsible for a building’s structural performance,

 

material efficiency, and the construction methods required to realize them.

 

 

Our understanding of these hidden energy fields has, like our cultural impulses in design, evolved throughout time, and yet remained a constant link to our primal

 

bond with the material world and the mysterious laws that govern its behaviour and performance in our structures. As design traditions and construction methods

 

have advanced, so too have the ways in which our designs relate to these forces both aesthetically and structurally.

 

 

This talk will centre on both historical examples and emerging trajectories of projects that have connected material behaviour, design intent, and invisible force flow

 

to achieve highly efficient and often surprising results. Originating from some of the methodological revelations of Robert Hooke, to the physical computations

 

offered by the modeling techniques of Frei Otto and Heinz Isler, the presentation will follow a thread of physical and computational research endeavours that have

 

used modeling not as a mode of representation, but rather as a dynamic tool to map force-flow in structures and to predict the sequential efficiencies of full-scale

 

construction. Distinct from industrial modern traditions of forcibly shaping material through bruit force to submit to “ideal” shapes, this approach has offered a

 

consistent counterpoint to ideological trends that have often resulted in inefficient design and construction methods speaking principally to conceptual momenta.

 

 

To illustrate some of the opportunities of this approach, research by the author will be presented in which recently discovered techniques in the mapping of forces

 

has helped lead to new methods of constructing flexible framed structures that utilize material behaviour, gravity, and structural form, to create highly efficient

 

fabric formed ice shells.

 

 

 

 

 

FEDERICO GARCIA LAMMERS & JESSICA GARCIA FRITZ, South Dakota State University

 

Master Building Complex Forms in the Absence of Graphics

 

 

 

 

JOE KALTURNYK, Winnipeg

 

The Temporary and the Intermediate: Strategies for a Better Dinner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo: Landon Lucyk [M2 Architecture]

The 2018 Atmosphere Symposium is co-chaired by: Lisa Landrum and Liane Veness with the support of the Faculty's Cultural Events Committee and the Centre for Architectural Structure and Technology (C.A.S.T.); web design and graphics support by Tali Budman (ED4 Architecture student), and administrative support from Brandy O’Reilly (Faculty of Architecture, Partners Program).

 

Questions? Please contact info@atmos.ca