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[NOTE: The following texts appear below more or less as they would have been printed out from the 8-29 March 1996 I.O.D. catalogue, which was an electronic disk with print-outs slipped into a brown file folder screen printed with an heart image by Winnipeg artist Patti Johnson. - Cliff Eyland]

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
CORNISH LIBRARY 1996. ORGANIZED BY PLUG IN INC., WINNIPEG
Print out .... see also files on the enclosed disk saved as Microsoft Word for the MACINTOSH 4.00A + Text Only files. File folder cover credit: heart image by Patti Johnson.
__________

Plug In Inc. at the Cornish Library

"The poet makes himself a visionary through an [immense and ordered derangement] of all the senses." - Arthur Rimbaud quoted in The Discovery of the Art of the Insane by John M. MacGregor [Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1989, 80]

Critical inquiry is as natural as a painting or a shelf of books in art galleries and libraries. Like art galleries, libraries are places where people stop for a moment, or for hours, to think. The library and the art gallery are two institutions which should find common cause in contemporary life.

Canadian artist-run institutions like Plug In Inc. have been staging exhibitions in venues outside traditional art gallery spaces for a long time. This trend creates new audiences for art, but this is not the most important reason for showing this exhibition in a library. The works in this show have been chosen because they tend to look across the chaotic landscape of contemporary life with a steady eye. A library is a response to the immense, ordered and deranged condition of contemporary life, and these works, like the library and its ordering systems, embody reasons not to panic at this condition.

The works in this exhibition have their own histories and reasons for existence outside of their appearance here. They have been brought together because of how they will be seen in the ambience of a library, amidst the works of art that are on the walls on a more permanent basis, amidst the hubbub of library business, and against a backdrop of a public place in which contemplation is encouraged.

A library is often imagined to be a vast collection of neat little cells fitted together to make an infinitely complicated, but perfectly visible body, like those anatomical toys called "The Visible Man," but in a real library things are always a bit more chaotic than that--ask anybody who works in a library. Materials of all sorts are constantly ingested into libraries (depending on budgets!) and useless materials are constantly being discarded. Occasionally a book disappears into a wrong stack or altogether. At the scale of a single letter, and also at the scale of its broadest organizational principles, the library exhibits the order we associate with complex living organisms, as if they were a form of life.

Works of art have an uncertain relation to the library's trade in reproductions and multiple editions of things. Many artists are interested in what cannot be assimilated into the library's ordering systems. Some artists treasure what is magically independent of all classifications except the classification "art." For them, libraries put every experience at a remove from itself. But what is the remove from reality that artists imagine library materials to possess which works of art do not possess? Are not books, floppy disks, videotapes, and microfiche as ontologically unique as art? Doesn't every informational medium have its own physical vehicle-- its own corporeality?

Flaubert conjures up a beautiful vision of the library--a sort of reconciliation of the library with art--in his novel Bouvard et Pecuchet (quoted by Michel Foucault in "Fantasia of the Library" from Language, Counter-memory, Practice, 87-109):

The imaginary now resides between the book and the lamp [and] a true image is now a product of learning: it derives from words spoken in the past, exact retentions, the amassing of minute facts, monuments reduced to infinitesimal fragments, and reproductions of reproductions. In the modern experience, these elements contain the power of the impossible. Only the assiduous clamour created by repetition can transmit to us what only happened once. The imaginary is not formed in opposition to reality as its denial or compensation; it grows among signs, from book to book, in the interstice of repetitions and commentaries; it is born and takes shape in the interval between books. It is a phenomenon of the library. [Flaubert, Bouvard et Pecuchet, Ed. by D.F. Bouchard. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1977, 90-91]

This exhibition asks the reader to raise herself from the imaginary space between the book and the lamp every so often to look at a work of contemporary art. While stretching and walking around the library, perhaps one can catch an edifying glimpse of something which has been strategically positioned next to a book stack or around a hidden corner. The contemplative state which a library engenders in its patrons is perfect for this show.

The Work

Works of art which are already in the Cornish Library have not been removed from the library's walls for this exhibition except if necessary. If there is confusion about which art works in the library are part of this exhibition (despite the labels) so much the better. Whenever possible, the works in IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED have been placed on existing wall hooks and shelves so that after the exhibition the library can be easily returned to its previous state.

Putting a work of art in proximity to related books is one way of integrating art into libraries, and of testing an idea about the library as an art institution, but there are many other ways of discovering what happens when library materials and contemporary art cohabit the same space.

The artists in this exhibition, except for Shaun Gough who lives in Halifax, are active in the "parallel" gallery scene in Winnipeg, and most were educated in Winnipeg at the University of Manitoba School of Art. "Parallel galleries" are artist-run centres which often attract art school trained artists as staff, members, and exhibitors. Parallel galleries in Canada make up a network of exhibition spaces. Like municipal and university galleries, parallel galleries such as Plug In Inc. are public institutions, and anyone is able to join, participate in and view exhibitions and activities. Except for special events, parallel galleries usually do not charge admission to see exhibitions. (Parallel galleries in Winnipeg include Plug In Inc., Ace Art, Main/Access Gallery, Video Pool, and Floating Gallery.) The parallel gallery system nurtures artists by providing a context for critical response to their work. Both emerging and mature artists get experience in the parallel art gallery system from showing and getting feedback from shows of their work.

Artists of various levels of experience have been included in this exhibition. Some works have been designed specifically for viewing in a library, while others touch on library issues only because they are exhibited in this context. A variety of material and conceptual approaches are used in this show which are common to contemporary art. Viewers are encouraged to see how the works fit into in a library context without forcing the issue.

Jo-Anne Balcaen's first solo exhibition happened recently at Ace Art in Winnipeg. She showed large fabric works about cliches of love, romance and partnership. (As IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED opens, one of her images is currently on the Plug In billboard at River and Osborne in Winnipeg.) Balcaen is a recent Manitoba art school graduate. Her contribution to IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED is a small collage onto which is attached a candy with the words "Want You" embossed on it. The literalism and irony of this work addresses mass culture in a straightforward legible presentation.

Richard Brown, shown recently in a Winnipeg Art Gallery exhibition, paints enigmatic puzzle paintings which--especially in a library setting--foster thinking about the organization of knowledge. There are no solutions to the visual puzzles which Brown makes. Comparisons between the internal logic of Brown's paintings and the placement of things such as books on a shelf are inevitable in the context of his exhibition; both the library cataloguing system and a Brown painting are organized in similarly "arbitrary" but precise ways.

Susan Chafe's small glass works with texts from hymns are designed to be attached to windows. The back-lit transparency of these works is reminiscent of computer screens and video monitors. One also tends to read Chafe's texts with the same reverence one might bring to a stained glass window--the work seems to ask for quiet attention. Four pages from a glass book are also included in this show.

Sarah Crawley's "light leak" photograph of a child was taken this year in Vimy Ridge Park in Winnipeg with a cheap Holga camera. This photograph is part of a series made in the same technical way. Light leaks--what most non-artists would call "mistakes"--suffuse this print with an otherworldly feeling. The shadow of someone in mid-swing looms in front of a child in this picture. How are we to regard a photograph like Crawley's in a library: as documentation? as information? as decorative art meant to have no particular relation to a library setting?

William Eakin's large collection of kitsch is legendary in Winnipeg. He takes photographs of metal souvenir trays, bullfighter statues, amateur paintings, and all sorts of miscellaneous stuff. Much of this collection has been bought at second-hand stores for pennies. A small part of Eakin's little museum collection is bowling and other trophies. The artist showed large versions of his "Monument " series at the Winnipeg Art Gallery's Fractured Spaces show last year. Other photographs based on his collection were shown recently at the Lethbridge Art Gallery. One small framed "Monument" Polaroid photograph of a golfer has been included in this exhibition.

Shaun Gough's book "Name Dropping (300 Artists' Names)" is a project of The Art Gallery, Mount Saint Vincent University. The artist:

Recalling from memory as many artists' names as I could, unaided, and in one sitting, I arrived at a quantity of three hundred. The process of recollection was ceased when the pause between recalled names became too uncomfortable for me to bear (approx. 3-5 min.)...

These names, correctly spelled and maintaining their original order, were entered into a common word processing program for Macintosh computers, and put through a spell checking utility. The resulting altered names were presented twelve at a time, in a column, centred on a standard 8.5x11" laser print....

Patrick Hartnett's "Coach" is a photographic print in which the artist, by means of computer software, has fused his face seamlessly onto one of the bodies in a photograph of the British Royal Family. Like Shaun Gough's deliberate spelling mistakes, John Maclean's photocopy distortions of a reproduction of a painting (see below), and Crawley's light leak photographs, Hartnett turns information into artistic disinformation.

Patti Johnson has screen printed one of her trademark heart images onto the letter-size file folders which we are using, along with a computer disk and print-outs, as the catalogue for this exhibition. She culled the heart image, which she has used in her work in various ways in past works, from a nineteenth-century medical text.

Jean Klimack makes, among other things, braids out of green moss. One of these braids has been hung on a picture hook against the Cornish library's wood panelled walls. Klimack's braids are rich in possible associations--everything from the work of Italian arte povera artists such as Penone to Anne of Green Gables.

Doug Lewis - Sculpture presents unique problems in the organization of an exhibition in a public library. In negotiations with various libraries in Winnipeg about the possible installation of this show, sculpture, because of the risk it presents as an impediment to traffic and an interference to normal library business, has been a sticky point. The average library has abundant wall space but precious little floor space. Lewis has installed one half of the negative cast of a light bulb on a piece of blonde plywood in a Plexiglass box under the Cornish Library's newspaper rack. Lewis is also a ceramic artist, and he has worked with vessels of various kinds in the past. This work will remind some viewers of the yonis of Hindu art; others will be reminded of Jasper Johns' light bulb works, and still others of Bruce Nauman's early work (Lewis often refers to Nauman in conversation). For most, however, the form of an outsized light bulb will encourage more metaphorical thinking.

John Maclean has made photocopies of an art reproduction of Rembrandt's "Night Watch." The original image was taken from a reproduction and successively blown up (using a photocopier like the one across the room from Maclean's work in the Cornish Library) so that the accumulated mechanical changes in the images, minute at first, become greatly exaggerated as the image is enlarged: grey areas turn either white or black, and figures become abstract and barely recognizable. Maclean takes the famous play of light and shadow in Rembrandt's painting toward one logical extreme of mechanical possibility.

Erika MacPherson's videotape is called "All of Me," and was produced as a television spot. She calls the tape a "comedy" and has used conventions familiar to viewers from silent film and music videos (the tape is black and white): mime and exaggerated gestures serve to conjure a dream-like scene in which food surrealistically becomes books which are literally consumed. The work has been installed in the Cornish Library's loft space, from which it seems to survey the entire library.

Claire Marchand makes small photo/sculpture works with tiny vessels and small photographs. The work conjures up images of archives, museums and libraries, as if Marchand had discovered the elements of her art in some musty attic. They look as much like period artifacts as they do recently-made works.

Karri Moffatt's small paintings are made on the surfaces of reproductions that she buys from second-hand stores. Like William Eakin and many other Winnipeg artists, Moffatt revels in this city's thriving thrift shop culture. A painting of a mosquito-bitten arm from her "Body Parts" series has been included in this show. It has been installed over the library's drinking fountain. Moffatt has painted varnish, conté, and oil on the framed reproduction in order to transform a rather banal landscape into a mosquito-infested vista. As such, Moffatt's work may be read as a small corrective to the promotional literature of Canadian tourism, among other things.

Debra Mosher makes stunning, quickly executed drawings. The expressionistic work on paper in this exhibition is based on a drawing a child did on the artist's studio wall. Mosher has transformed the image to better match her responses to the evocative text on the original child's drawing --"Love Can Be In The Rain." The child's original studio wall drawing is a conventional picture of a cat, but in Mosher's reworking, the cat is given a human female body. The colour and drawing in this work is exquisitely applied in fast dashes.

Kim Ouellette's small abstract work is composed of two panels. The artist has leaned the work on a library shelf against one of the Cornish Library's walls. In an art gallery these paintings are screwed directly to walls with their edges slightly battered, as if to make a rough counterpoint with their beautifully painted swaths of colour.

Angela Somerset (with Therese Mastroiacovo) puts text-on-paper inserts loosely into appropriate library books. The work we include in this show is from a body of work called "Wanderlust." Amusingly, the artist calls the medium for this work "correspondence."

Harry Symons is in the middle of a huge project which artistically transforms and interprets Canada's constitutional debates in mixed media installations. A small section of this work has been included in this show. Composed of many paintings and materials, the title is "Excerpts from Stepping Stones, Roadblocks, and other Tangential Studies." Like a game of chess, Symons' work has infinite possibilities for expansion and elaboration.

Evan Tapper has contributed a small mixed media wall hanging work to this exhibition which is made of a nineteenth-century book, pieces of glass, a wood box, a Polaroid transfer photograph, and rope. The work is called "Post Prophecy, " and resembles a satchel or a small homemade suitcase in which valuable, old, tattered things are being hastily transported. I think of the contents of a turn-of-the-century immigrant's suitcase as I look at this work.

-- Cliff Eyland, Winnipeg 1996

(Cliff Eyland is a painter, writer and curator who lives in Winnipeg .)

IDENTIFICATION/HAND LIST for IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
Cornish Library 8-29 March 1996

Please check labels and the exhibition catalogue for more information:

1. Jo-Anne Balcaen- A small photographic collage work with a candy. The text on the candy reads "Want You."
2. Richard Brown- A gridded oil on canvas painting with silhouette images entitled "Our Knowledge and Our Ignorance ."
3. Susan Chafe- Glass works with text based on hymns attached to library windows, and four pages from a glass book placed on a shelf.
4. Sarah Crawley- A light leak photograph taken with a Holga camera in Vimy Ridge Park, Winnipeg. This colour photographic print depicts a boy and a shadow .
5. William Eakin- A framed Polaroid pin-hole photograph of a golfing trophy from the "Monument" series.
6. Cliff Eyland- A file card sized mixed media painting with the text "The Library of the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University" on it.
7. Shaun Gough- A limited edition book "300 Artists' Names" placed on a table in the library.
8. Patrick Hartnett- A framed computer enhanced photograph in which the artist has substituted his face for that of the uniformed man sitting across from the Queen of England.
9. Patti Johnson- An image of a heart taken from a nineteenth-century medical text screen printed onto the legal file folders. With a computer disk and other inserts, this is exhibition's catalogue.
10. Jean Klimack- A braid made of green moss hung on a wall.
11. Doug Lewis- A white plaster cast negative of a light bulb in a Plexiglass box placed under the Cornish Library's newspaper rack.
12. John Maclean- Two configurations of several black and white photocopy enlargements taken from an art reproduction of Rembrandt's "Night Watch."
13. Erika MacPherson- A videotape called "All of Me." (Thanks to Video Pool for assistance.) The video is installed in the Cornish Library's loft space. The tape is short, about three minutes.
14. Claire Marchand- Three mixed media works made of sculptural elements with photographs placed on Cornish Library shelves.
15. Karri Moffatt- A small painting using a framed reproduction of a landscape as a base. A mosquito-bitten arm, from Moffatt's "Body Parts" series, has been painted on this reproduction with varnish, conté and oil.
16. Debra Mosher- A framed acrylic and pastel on paper painting of a cat head on a human body with this text on it: "Love Can Be In The Rain."
17. Kim Ouellette- An abstract work composed of two paintings leaned against a wall side by side on a shelf.
18. Angela Somerset (with Therese Mastroiacovo)- Pieces of paper with text inserted into selected library books. The work is from "Wanderlust."
19. Harry Symons- An excerpt from a mixed media wall work composed of many small paintings and materials. The work is based on Canadian constitutional debates.
20. Evan Tapper - A small mixed media wall work with book, glass, wood, rope, and Polaroid transfer print on paper.

Artist: Jo-Anne Balcaen
Title: Want You

Framed photographic collage with candy.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Richard Brown
Title: Our Knowledge and Our Ignorance

Oil on canvas painting.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Susan Chafe
Title: Four Pages from a Glass Book

Mixed media with glass.
(See also Chafe's works on selected windows.)

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Sarah Crawley
Title: Untitled

Photographic print in Plexiglass box frame.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: William Eakin
Title: Untitled from "Monument" Series

Polaroid print in frame.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Cliff Eyland
Title: Untitled

File card sized painting.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Shaun Gough
Title: Name Dropping (300 Artists' Names)

Limited edition book. Laser prints.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE!

Artist: Patrick Hartnett
Title: Coach

Framed computer generated photograph.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Patti Johnson
Title: Untitled

File folder cover art.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Jean Klimack
Title: Untitled

Braid made of green moss.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Doug Lewis
Title: XORIS IPOGRAFI (without signature)

Plaster cast with cover.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: John Maclean
Title: My Night Watch

Photocopy enlargements of a reproduction
of Rembrandt's painting.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Erika MacPherson
Title: All of Me

Video tape about 3 minutes long.

Instructions for viewing:

1) TV/Monitor should already be on Channel 4.
(There should be no reason to touch the TV/Monitor controls.)
2) Please use headphones.
3) Press PLAY on video deck (to the right of the TV/Monitor).
4) Press STOP on video deck after tape is seen (3 minutes).
5) "All of Me" is repeated on the tape, so there is no need to rewind until the tape finishes.

"All of Me" stars Sharon Bajer, Noam Gonick, Lori Freedman,
Lorri Millan, Deb Patterson.
"All of Me" is sung by Sharon Bajer. Bass Clarinet: Lori Freedman.
Camera: John Gurdebeke. Lighting: Laurence Mardon.
Sound: T.R. Elliot.
Thanks: Neil Campbell, J. Hajel,
Murdoch at Food Fare, Dr. Rick Rosenberg,
Jennifer Turner, Christine Kirouac.
Made with assistance from: Video Pool Inc.,
the Manitoba Arts Council, Videon.

©1996 by Hairy Eyeball Productions.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Claire Marchand
Title: Colony

Black and white photographs and clay objects.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Claire Marchand
Title: Medicine

Black and white photographs and clay objects.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Claire Marchand
Title: Navigation (Counting)

Clay objects.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Karri Moffatt
Title: Untitled from Body Parts Series

Painting on framed thrift store reproduction.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Debra Mosher
Title: Love Can Be In The Rain

Acrylic and pastel on paper.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Kim Ouellette
Title: Untitled

Painting on two Masonite panels.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Angela Somerset
(with Therese Mastroiacovo)
Title: Correspondence Inserts from
"Wanderlust"

Inserts in selected Cornish Library books.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

Artist: Harry Symons
Title: Excerpts from Stepping Stones,
Roadblocks, and other Tangential Studies

Mixed media on wood.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library, Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!

Artist: Evan Tapper
Title: Post Prophecy

Mixed media assemblage with book, glass, etc.

IMMENSE/ORDERED/DERANGED
An exhibition at the Cornish Library , Winnipeg
and the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax

Organized by Plug In Inc., Winnipeg, Canada
Sponsors: The Cornish Library, The Manitoba Arts Council
and the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH!



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