Brown Bag Lecture Series

2021 Brown Bag Lecture Series

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Brown Bag Series is focused on welcoming PACS Alumni/ae and current PhD Candidates to offer lectures. In the absence of in-person contact, it is hoped this lecture series will bring together the current PACS students, faculty, and PACS alumni, along with members of the wider community to facilitate relationships within the Mauro Institute, PACS, UManitoba and wider community. The lectures are free and broadcast to the public. Lectures are approximately 30 minutes in length, followed by a discussion period.

The Brown Bag Lecture Series is held on designated Fridays during the regular sessions from 11:30 am - 12:30 pm CDT. This year, the lecture series will be held via Zoom and broadcast to the public via Facebook live and Youtube.

Brown Bag Lecture Series Posters 2014-2020 (45 lectures)


UPCOMING BROWN BAG LECTURES for WINTER 2021

Friday February 19, 2021 | 11:30 am    
The Predicaments of ‘Belonging’ in Kaduna State, Nigeria
A lecture with Dr. Benjamin Maiangwa, Peace and Conflict Studies (University of Manitoba, 2020)

Dr. Benjamin Maiangwa book coverThis book uses the power of storytelling to explore the contested notions of belonging among the Fulani and other ethnic groups in Kaduna state, Nigeria. The book argues that these controversies center around Indigenous, nomadic, and autochthonous claims of belonging.

Dr. Maiangwa identifies these differing notions of belonging as a major condition of violent conflicts in Kaduna and across various postcolonial societies. The analysis in the book demonstrates how dynamic ideological impetuses for these conflicts underscore broader issues of citizenship rights, nationhood, and local peacebuilding in Nigeria.

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February 19 | 11:30 am | via Zoom and live on Facebook and archived on Youtube

To join the Zoom webinar, please contact the Mauro Institute at Mauro.Institute@umanitoba.ca for registration details.


PREVIOUS BROWN BAG LECTURES for FALL 2020 and WINTER 2021

Friday February 5, 2021 | 11:30 am    
Perceptions of Ethnicity, Religion, and Radicalization among Second-Generation Pakistani-Canadians: Unity in Diversity?
A lecture with Dr. Saad Ahmad Khan, Peace and Conflict Studies (University of Manitoba, 2020)

Dr. Saad Khan book cover“Why do they hate us?” The answer to a seemingly simple question made famous by U.S. President George W. Bush in the wake of 9/11 has become more complex with the entrance of homegrown terrorists into many armed conflicts. Why do they hate us so much that some of them try to kill us en masse, even though they are born and raised with us, go to school with us, and work with us. This book offers an in-depth analysis to the phenomenon of radicalization of second-generation Pakistani-Canadians.

Based on interviews with second-generation Pakistani-Canadians from various backgrounds, Saad Ahmad Khan argues that radicalization is a complex and layered process stemming from multiple sources ranging from childhood experiences to the role of Saudi Arabia in exporting its brand of Islam. Individual, social, national, and international factors need to be addressed holistically, if radicalization of second-generation individuals is to be pre-empted and subsequent generations saved from the scourge of violence and terrorism.

February 5 | 11:30 am | via Zoom and live on Facebook and archived on Youtube

Order your copy of Dr. Khan's new book:
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To join the Zoom webinar, please contact the Mauro Institute at Mauro.Institute@umanitoba.ca for registration details.


Friday November 20, 2020 | 11:30 am    
Sex Industry Slavery in Present-Day Canada: Protecting Canada’s Youth
A Brown Bag Lecture and Book Launch with Dr. Robert Chrismas (PACS, University of Manitoba

Brown Bag Lecture: Dr. Robert ChrismasSexual exploitation and human sex trafficking is a multi-billion-dollar international industry that preys on youth. Written and presented in this lecture by PACS Alumnus and veteran police officer, Robert (Bob) Chrismas, Sex Industry Slavery is an impactful read for anyone who wants to know more about this serious Canadian problem.

Many young women are coerced into oppressive relationships in the sex industry, often starting in childhood. There are numerous barriers and challenges for children who are vulnerable to exploitation as well as for survivors striving to leave the sex industry; however, there are also many opportunities to help them. Based on Chrismas’s award-winning research at the University of Manitoba, this book includes gut-wrenching stories from survivors, social workers, police officers, lawmakers, and activists.

Representing decades of collective knowledge, Sex Industry Slavery presents first-hand perspectives on the problem as well as proposes practical solutions.

Click here to order a copy of Sex Industry Slavery in Present-Day Canada: Protecting Canada’s Youth

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November 20 | 11:30 am | via Zoom and live on Facebook and archived on Youtube

To join the Zoom webinar, please contact the Mauro Institute at Mauro.Institute@umanitoba.ca for registration details.


Friday November 13, 2020 | 11:30 am    
‘Unwanted’ Peoples their Citizenship Struggles: Rohingya and Banyamulenge
A lecture with Dr. Kawser Ahmed, Peace and Conflict Studies (University of Manitoba, 2017), Conflict and Resilience Research Institute, Canada (CRRIC)

Brown Bag Lecture: Dr. Kawser AhmedTwo contested and violently displaced minority groups, the Rohingya of Myanmar/Bangladesh and the Banyamulenge of the Eastern DRC/Great Lakes region, suffered almost similar consequence by their states. They live in complex settings where violence is associated with patterns of local development and resource extraction. In the years following the Rwanda genocide, Eastern Congo was plagued by recurrent violent conflicts involving local and regional actors in alliances that attacked civilians of all communities. Building on the colonial legacy, a special hostility emerged for Banyamulenge.

It was similar in Myanmar/Burma, where Rohingya had long been labelled as ‘intruders’ from Bangladesh, and attacked. The armed groups that emerged among both the Banyamulenge and the Rohingya were then blamed for attacks that led to massive reprisals on the civilian Rohingya and Banyamulenge.

In this backdrop, the presentation will cover some of the key similarities between these two groups and what role the international community can have to transform the conflict. The lecture is based on the findings of a joint collaboration between the Institute of Social Studies (ISS)-Erasmus, Netherlands and CRRIC that resulted into a 4-part e-seminar in September-October 2020. CRRIC wishes to acknowledge PhD Candidate Delphine Ntanyoma and Dr. Helen Hintjens of ISS for their support of the e-seminar.

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November 13 | 11:30 am | via Zoom and live on Facebook and archived on Youtube

To join the Zoom webinar, please contact the Mauro Institute at Mauro.Institute@umanitoba.ca for registration details.


Friday November 6, 2020 | 11:30 am    
Searching for the Disappeared: Vulnerability and Resistance on the Migrant Route
A lecture with Dr. Lisa McLean (PACS Alumna), Visiting Research Fellow, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, Keough School of Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame

Dr. Lisa McLeanIn the early months of 2019, the Mexican government declared that the country had become ‘an enormous clandestine grave,’ with an estimated 40,000 persons registered as ‘disappeared.’ While these statistics point to the enormity of the problem of violence and disappearance in Mexico, activists argue that official statistics offer an incomplete accounting of the true scale of the problem. This is especially true for the thousands of Central American migrants who have disappeared while crossing the increasingly militarized borders of the region.

In response to the lack of political will to protect migrants and search for the missing, Central American women have organized local advocacy groups and a transnational protest movement to search for the disappeared along the migrant route and demand justice for their relatives. Drawing from ethnographic research with Central American families of disappeared migrants, Dr. McLean argues that the women’s strategies for searching for the disappeared represent a form of grassroots peacebuilding that challenges the structural relations of power that lead to displacement and disappearance.

Watch on YouTube

November 6 | 11:30 am | via Zoom and live on Facebook and archived on Youtube

To join the Zoom webinar, please contact the Mauro Institute at Mauro.Institute@umanitoba.ca for registration details.

Brown Bag Lecture Series Posters 2014-2020 (45 lectures)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur V. Mauro Institute for Peace & Justice at St. Paul's College
 

UPCOMING BROWN BAG LECTURES:

Brown Bag Lecture: Dr. Benjamin Maiangwa

For more information about these and future Brown Bag lectures, please contact the Mauro Institute at Mauro.Institute@umanitoba.ca.