Evolution and Biodiversity

Biodiversity refers to the variety of life on Earth. It includes species diversity (i.e., the variety of different types of organisms), genetic diversity within each species, and ecosystem diversity. The Evolution and Biodiversity theme deals primarily with the evolutionary processes that generate and maintain (or limit) organismal and genetic diversity, patterns of species biodiversity in time and space, and the biology and evolutionary relationships within specific organismal groups.

Evolution and Biodiversity theme members conduct research on various aspects of biodiversity from both evolutionary and conservation-related perspectives. Current research on adaptation includes the evolution of flower shape in response to animal pollinators, the genetic basis of adaptation, and the evolution and maintenance of sociality and mating systems. Research on species and genetic diversity includes the systematics and conservation biology of a wide range of organisms (e.g., lichens, vascular plants, fish and other vertebrates) and the study of biological diversity as it relates to human well-being and sustainability.

Registering for the theme

Important Dates

December 11 – December 21: Fall Term Exam Period (includes tests and midterm exams for Fall/Winter Term classes)

December 22 – January 1: Winter Holiday (University Closed)

Upcoming Seminars

General seminar: Karen Dunmall PhD Oral Defense: “Pacific salmon in the Canadian Arctic Indicators of Change” — Tuesday, December 19 at 10 a.m., 304 Biological Sciences.

General seminar: Matthew Doering, PhD Proposal: “Adding spice to fungicides: Discovery of novel genes operating in specialised metabolite biosynthesis in Piper spp. (Piperaceae)” — Wednesday, December 20 at 11 a.m., 304 Biological Sciences.

General seminar: Jared Field, MSc Defense: “Alternative splicing of Bnip3 modulates calcium signals to prevent mitochondrail-dependent cell death and regulate gene expression” — Wednesday, December 20 at 1 p.m., 201 BSB.