Evolution and Biodiversity

Biodiversity refers to the variety of life on Earth. It includes species diversity (i.e., the variety of different types of organisms), genetic diversity within each species, and ecosystem diversity. The Evolution and Biodiversity theme deals primarily with the evolutionary processes that generate and maintain (or limit) organismal and genetic diversity, patterns of species biodiversity in time and space, and the biology and evolutionary relationships within specific organismal groups.

Evolution and Biodiversity theme members conduct research on various aspects of biodiversity from both evolutionary and conservation-related perspectives. Current research on adaptation includes the evolution of flower shape in response to animal pollinators, the genetic basis of adaptation, and the evolution and maintenance of sociality and mating systems. Research on species and genetic diversity includes the systematics and conservation biology of a wide range of organisms (e.g., lichens, vascular plants, fish and other vertebrates) and the study of biological diversity as it relates to human well-being and sustainability.

Registering for the theme

Upcoming Seminars

General seminar: Francis Zwiers — Friday, October 20 at 3:30 p.m., 527 Buller.

General seminar: Workshop - Image Proficiency — Monday, October 23 at 12:30 p.m., 304 Biological Sciences.

General seminar: Crackerjack Seminar - Christa Burstahler — Friday, October 27 at 3:30 p.m., 527 Buller.

General seminar: Crackerjack Seminar — Friday, October 27 at 3:30 p.m., 527 Buller.