________________ CM . . . . Volume IX Number 19 . . . . May 23, 2003

cover

The Inuit of Canada. (First Peoples).

Danielle Corriveau.
Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Publications (Distributed in Canada by Saunders Book Co.), 2002.
48 pp., cloth, $30.65.
ISBN 0-8225-4850-X.

Subject Heading:
Inuit-Juvenile literature.

Grades 4-7 / Ages 9-12.

Review by Harriet Zaidman.

**** /4

excerpt:

Homes

Like igloos, modern houses often have the northern side set against a slope and the door facing south. These features provide shelter against icy winds that blow from the north. The Inuit build their houses close to beaches and landings, so that supplies do not have to travel long distances. The houses are grouped close together, serving as wind breaks for one another. They are also small, because fuel is scarce in the Arctic and very expensive. A small house is easier and cheaper to keep warm. Unlike igloos, modern Inuit houses usually include plumbing, electrical systems and central heating systems.

 

Because good books about the Inuit are in demand in schools, The Inuit will be a welcome addition to a library or classroom collection. The author, Danielle Corriveau, was raised on the Barrengrounds and now writes about her heritage and former home for the “outside” world. She writes clearly about all the important aspects of northern life, including the changes that the Inuit experienced when Europeans made contact with them, how people lived and how they live now. She also discusses traditional Inuit spirituality and legends, transportation, forms of entertainment, political changes, the climate - most everything young readers want to know about how people live in the northern territories of Canada.

     The book is divided into 2 page chapters, the titles of which are self explanatory. Each chapter has a coloured border; the precise, age appropriate text includes a paragraph to introduce the content and then two or three subtitles and explanations. Bright photographs adorn every page. A glossary at the back defines new and Inuit terms, and readers are directed to more print and electronic resources in the “Finding Out More” section. An index completes the 48 page book.


Highly Recommended.

Harriet Zaidman is a teacher librarian in Winnipeg, MB.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.
Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.

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