________________ CM . . . . Volume IX Number 15 . . . . March 28, 2003

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Franklin’s Trading Cards. (Kids Can Read).

Sharon Jennings. Illustrated by Sean Jeffrey, Alice Sinkner & Shelley Southern.
Toronto, ON: Kids Can Press, 2003.
32 pp., pbk. & cl., $5.95 (pbk.), $14.95 (cl.).
ISBN 1-55337-464-9 (pbk.), ISBN 1-55337-463-0 (cl.).

Preschool-grade 3 / Ages 3-8.

Review by Lisa O'Hara.

***½ /4

   
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Franklin Stays Up. (Kids Can Read).

Sharon Jennings. Illustrated by Sean Jeffrey, Jelena Sisic & Shelley Southern.
Toronto, ON: Kids Can Press, 2003.
32 pp., pbk. & cl., $5.95 (pbk.), $14.95 (cl.).
ISBN 1-55337-372-3 (pbk.), ISBN 1-55337-371-5 (cl.).

Preschool-grade 3 / Ages 3-8.

Review by Lisa O'Hara.

***½ /4

excerpt:

Franklin can tie his shoes.
Franklin can count by twos.
And Franklin can eat lots and lots of cereal.

Part of the “Kids Can Read Series” (Level 2 - Kids Can Read With Help), these books are designed for beginning readers but can also be read aloud to younger children. Because most children are already familiar with Franklin, they may have a bit more confidence in attempting to read the stories and may take pride in being able to read Franklin stories all by themselves. The stories are simpler than the original series by Paulette Bourgeois, but they are still familiar. The books also have the familiar Franklin illustrations and a familiar storyline wherein Franklin resolves a problem that he encounters.

     In Franklin's Trading Cards, Franklin begins to collect the trading cards which come free with Fly Krispy cereal. Soon all of his friends are eating the cereal and collecting the cards too. Everyone has collected most of the cards, except for the elusive Super Cat trading card. Franklin loves Fly Krispy cereal, and so he ups his intake in order to get more cards. He is surprised by finding two Super Cat trading cards. Both Fox and Beaver would like his extra Super Cat card and attempt to outbid each other for it by upping the ante in ice-cream scoops and other treats. Franklin decides to flip a quarter at his mother's suggestion, but then realizes that she expects him to stop eating the Fly Krispy cereal now that he has all the cards. The dilemma is resolved when Franklin gives both cards away so that his mother will continue to buy the cereal.

     In Franklin Stays Up, that is exactly what he does. He decides he wants to stay up all night, and he invites Bear, Rabbit and Snail for a stay-up-over instead of a sleepover. They eat snack food, play games, listen to music, but, one by one, the friends fall asleep. Franklin is the only one to stay up until sunrise, after which he finally falls asleep. When his parents wake the friends up for the promised pancake breakfast, Franklin doesn't want to get up; he only wants to sleep all day.

     These books are easy enough for a beginning reader but have an interesting enough story line to keep children reading. And, the lessons taught are good ones.

Highly Recommended.

Lisa O'Hara is a librarian and mother of three in Winnipeg, MB.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.
Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.

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