________________ CM . . . . Volume IX Number 13 . . . . February 28, 2003

cover

Franklin’s Music Lessons. (Kids Can Read).

Sharon Jennings. Illustrated by Sean Jeffrey, Alice Sinkner and Shelley Southern.
Toronto, ON: Kids Can Press, 2002.
32 pp., pbk. & cl., $5.95 (pbk.), $14.95 (cl.).
ISBN 1-55074-996-X (pbk.), ISBN 1-55074-994-3 (cl.).

Preschool-Grade 3 / Ages 3-8.

Review by Lisa O'Hara.

***½ /4

   
cover

Franklin and the Magic Show. (Kids Can Read).

Sharon Jennings. Illustrated by Sean Jeffrey, Alice Sinkner and Shelley Southern.
Toronto, ON: Kids Can Press, 2002.
32 pp., paper and cloth, $5.95 (pbk.), $14.95 (cl.).

ISBN 1-55074-992-7 (pbk.), ISBN 1-55074-990-0 (cl.).

Preschool-Grade 3 / Ages 3-8.

Review by Lisa O'Hara.

***½ /4

Part of the “Kids Can Read” series (Level 2 - Kids Can Read With Help), these books are designed for beginning readers but can also be read aloud to younger children. Although the sentences are simpler and shorter than in the original series, they begin with the familiar phrasing:

Franklin can tie his shoes.

Franklin can count by twos.

But Franklin cannot play the piano.

     The books also have the familiar Franklin illustrations and a familiar storyline where Franklin experiences a problem and works it out in one way or another. This makes for familiar ground for beginning readers and gives them a good starting place.

     In Franklin's Music Lessons, Franklin wants to learn to play the piano, but he is really more interested in playing baseball than in practicing. In the end, he confesses to Mrs. Panda, the music teacher, that he did not practice and did not learn the song he wanted to play. However, his baseball practice has had an added benefit in that it has strengthened his arm and made him the loudest bell-ringer ever heard in the school.

     In Franklin and the Magic Show, Franklin puts on a magic show for his friends where he promises to make himself disappear, but he has overestimated his talents and can't perform the promised trick. When he tells his parents of his failure, his father helps him learn some easier tricks which he can master. Franklin then puts on a magic show for his friends using the easier tricks with much better results.

     The books are interesting enough to hold a young reader's attention and easy enough to read with help. The pictures are plentiful and give the reader some visual clues which will help the beginning reader along. All in all, I think that these books serve their purpose and won't disappoint.

Highly Recommended.

Lisa O'Hara is a librarian and mother of three in Winnipeg, MB.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.
Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.

NEXT REVIEW |TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THIS ISSUE - February 28, 2003.

AUTHORS | TITLES | MEDIA REVIEWS | PROFILES | BACK ISSUES | SEARCH | CMARCHIVE | HOME