________________ CM . . . . Volume XVI Number 34 . . . . May 7, 2010

cover

Kaleidoscopes and Butterfly Dreams.

Nancy Hundal.
Lantzville, BC: Oolichan Books, 2009.
132 pp., pbk., $12.95.
ISBN 978-0-88982-256-6.

Subject Headings:
Friendship-Juvenile literature.
Body image-Juvenile literature.
Moving, Household-Juvenile literature.

Grades 3-5 / Ages 8-10.

Review by Inderjit Deogun.

*** /4

excerpt:

Slices and panes of coloured glass hung from the ceiling, other pieces were propped in the windows. They snatched at every stray ray of sunshine, casting the garage in warm, dappled colour. Even the dust was rainbow-hued, whirling lazily in the sun.

Dad was at a table, his head bent over several pieces of glass. His goggles were back in place, his hands carefully guiding a tool over a section of glass. When he looked up, a strip of turquoise bisected his face. Jeffrey's hair was stained orange and crimson. It felt like a circus.

 

New town, new house, new kids, it all spells change, and 13-year-old Krista hates it. To make matters worse, she isn’t skinny like nearly every other kid in town. All Krista desperately wants is to return to her old life and, most importantly, her best friend, Steffi.

     With the plan to do just that, Krista gets a job selling Weight Wackers door-to-door. When she panics on her very first sales run, it’s nine-year-old Harrison who comes to her rescue. Krista learns that, like her, Harrison is perceived as an outsider by many of the townspeople, not because he’s new, but because he’s Chinese.

     Both Krista and Harrison struggle with battling the prejudice that confronts them at every turn. The need to speak out against this cruelty becomes paramount when Harrison is lured to the town cemetery and attacked. With Krista’s words of encouragement, Harrison finds the courage not only to tell his parents but also the townspeople what he has endured.

     Kaleidoscopes and Butterfly Dreams discusses the inevitability of change in all aspects of one’s life. Nancy Hundal explores how change affects us and the ones we leave behind. She makes it clear that you can’t let the fear of change be the reason you don’t follow your heart. For “if nothing ever changed, there’d be no butterflies.”

Recommended.

Inderjit Deogun is currently pursuing a career in publishing with a particular interest in children’s literature.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.

Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.
 

NEXT REVIEW |TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THIS ISSUE - May 7, 2010.

AUTHORS | TITLES | MEDIA REVIEWS | PROFILES | BACK ISSUES | SEARCH | CMARCHIVE | HOME