________________ CM . . . . Volume XIV Number 9 . . . .December 21, 2007

cover

Helen Keller. (Kids Can Read).

Elizabeth MacLeod. Illustrated by Andrej Krystoforski.
Toronto, ON: Kids Can Press, 2007.
32 pp., pbk. & hc., $5.95 (pbk.), $14.95 (hc.).
ISBN 978-1-55453-000-7 (pbk.), ISBN 978-1-55337-999-7 (hc.).

Subject Headings:
Keller, Helen, 1880-1968-Juvenile literature.
Sullivan, Annie, 1866-1936-Juvenile literature.
Deafblind women-United States-Biography-Juvenile literature.

Grades 1-2 / Ages 6-7.

Review by Ming Wong.

**** /4

   

excerpt:

One morning in early April, Annie had an idea. She hurried Helen over to a water pump. Annie pumped cold water over Helen's hands. As the water gushed out, Annie spelled "W-A-T-E-R" into Helen's hands.

 

Helen Keller is a biography of a remarkable person who achieved worldwide fame for overcoming her handicap of deafness and blindness to become one of the most influential public figures of her time. Helen Keller was no ordinary child. She was a famous American author, activist, and lecturer.

     Helen was born on June 27, 1880, in Tuscumbia, Alabama. In February, 1882, she became dramatically ill at the age of 19 months. The illness left Helen both blind and deaf. The next few years were very hard on her and her family. By the time, Helen was seven; her parents knew they needed help, and so they hired a tutor named Annie Sullivan.

      Annie Sullivan was introduced to Helen in March, 1887. It was the beginning of a 49-year long relationship. Helen immediately learned to communicate by spelling with her fingers. The big breakthrough was when Helen connected the motions her teacher was making on her palm with Annie's running cool water over her hand. Soon after that, Helen learned to speak, to read Braille, and write with both ordinary and Braille typewriters.

      When Helen was 20, she entered Radcliffe College, and later she became the first deaf-blind person to graduate from the institution. Helen wrote nearly a dozen books. Helen continued to do research, gave speeches, and helped raise money to help people who could not see. She traveled around the world speaking about her experiences and beliefs.

      In 1968, at age 87, Helen died in her sleep.

People still remember the many amazing things Helen did.

     Helen Keller is highly recommended for school age readers and is a great addition to elementary schools and appropriate for all public libraries.

Highly Recommended.

Ming Wong, a transported Canadian, lives in Washington, DC.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.
Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.
 

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