________________ CM . . . . Volume XIV Number 5 . . . . October 26, 2007

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Wild Thing. (Lawrence High Yearbook Series; 1).

David A. Poulsen.
Toronto, ON: Key Porter Books, 2007.
96 pp., pbk., $7.95.
ISBN 978-1-55263-931-3.

Subject Headings:
High schools-Juvenile fiction.
Gangs-Juvenile fiction.

Grades 8-11 / Ages 13-16.

Review by Christina Neigel.

*** /4

   
   
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Blind Date. (Lawrence High Yearbook Series; 2).

David A. Poulsen.
Toronto, ON: Key Porter Books, 2007.
112 pp., pbk., $7.95.
ISBN 978-1-55263-933-7.

Grades 8-11 / Ages 13-16.

Review by Christina Neigel.

*** /4

excerpt:

I’d never had any broken bones before. Weird, huh? Most of my friends had broken an arm or collarbone or something falling out of trees or wrecking their bikes when they were little. But not me. Even though I play hockey and football, I didn’t have a clue what it was like to have something broken.

Until that night, that is.

They got me about two houses from home. I saw them coming but they drove the car up on the sidewalk to stop me.

It all happened so fast. Probably only took a few seconds. My dad told me later that he heard me yelling, but by the time he could get outside, it was over.

This new series caters to teen boys as it focuses on Lawrence High School “jocks.” Each book is written from the perspective of a different, but related, character. In Wild Thing, a new kid, who has dubbed himself “Wild Thing,” stirs up the social dynamics of Lawrence High by challenging the jock stereotype. From the perspective of Marcel Boileau (otherwise known as “French”), Wild Thing is trouble. In Blind Date, Curt Tomlinson discovers that his new girlfriend is somehow involved in the drug scene at school, and he is drawn out of his own comfort zone in order to help her.

     In both books, the protagonists develop a better sense of themselves and a deeper appreciation of their peer relationships. While the books’ plots move in a fairly predictable fashion, they are well paced for the length of these high interest and low vocabulary works.

     These works are a great resource for reluctant male readers.

Recommended.

Christina Neigel is the program head for the Library and Information Technology Program at the University College of the Fraser Valley in Abbotsford, BC.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.
Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.
 

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