________________ CM . . . . Volume XIII Number 4 . . . . October 13, 2006

cover

Canada’s Wetland Animals. (Canada Close Up).

Chelsea Donaldson.
Toronto, ON: Scholastic Canada, 2006.
44 pp., pbk., $6.99.
ISBN 0-439-95675-7.

Subject Heading:
Wetland animals-Canada-Juvenile literature.

Grades 1-3 / Ages 6-8.

Review by Jeannette Timmerman.

**** /4

excerpt:

What animal has no teeth but still has a wicked bite? It's the same animal that lives in the water but hardly swims - the snapping turtle!

 

Chelsea Donaldson is a nonfiction writer and editor who has written several children's books about famous Canadians as well as Canada's Arctic Animals.

     Canada's Wetland Animals provides a map of Canada's wetlands and a page explanation about them. The book has a table of contents but no glossary. There are 11 chapters: Beaver, River Otter, Moose, Great Blue Heron, Common Loon, Mallard Duck, Snapping Turtle, Crayfish, Bullfrog, Dragonfly, and Leech. All chapters are four pages in length except for the dragonfly and leech chapters which are three pages. There is a summation page at the end of the book.

     The writing style is lively, and the facts given are often presented with a tie-in to students' lives. For example, “Did you know that leeches can be very useful? If someone loses a finger or toe, doctors may be able to reattach it. But sometimes too much blood rushes to the wound. Leeches can take away some of the extra blood and help the wound to heal!”

     Information is given about each animal's appearance, habitat, and activities. As well, in many chapters, facts about the young of the animal are included.

     The coloured pictures are vibrant and should capture the attention of young readers. They complement the print information wonderfully. Double spacing and large size print add to the attractiveness of the book for younger students. Built into the information are the definitions for such words as dabbling and rut.

     Canada's Wetland Animals could be used by teachers with the entire class in studying nonfiction, as a book for student research, or as a nonfiction book for students to read for pleasure and information. It also may be useful as an additional resource in science curricula on growth and change in animals.

Highly Recommended.

Jeannette Timmerman is a former teacher and principal with the Winnipeg (MB) School Division.

 

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.
Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.
 

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