Dorothy Livesay:

An Inventory of Her Papers at the University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections

Inventory prepared by the staff of the University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections
University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections
Winnipeg, Manitoba
(1986)

Finding aid encoded by Brett Lougheed and Julianna Trivers (March 2002)
Finding aid written in English.

Revision History

  • July 26, 2005 - MSS 37 converted from EAD 1.0 to 2002 by v1to02.xsl (sy2003-10-15).


Collection Summary

Repository:
University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections
Winnipeg, Manitoba

Creator:
Dorothy Livesay

Title:
Dorothy Livesay fonds

Dates:
1907-1983

Quantity:
16.5 m of textual records

Identification:
MSS 37

Language
English.

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Biography of Dorothy Livesay

Dorothy Livesay was born in Winnipeg in October 1909. In 1920, she moved with her family to Toronto, where she went to school and later to the University of Toronto. Her first collection of poetry, Green Pitcher , was published in 1929 when she was only nineteen. It is a remarkable book the first fully modernist collection of poetry published in Canada, yet it was only the first of a series of remarkable accomplishments by one of the most accomplished and committed writers in our history. Dorothy Livesay has remained at the leading edge of intellectual discovery and literary innovation in Canada.

During the 1930's, after a brief stay in France, Livesay became a social worker and a member of the Young Communist Party. Her experience of working with the poor and her discovery of such left wing writers as C. Day Lewis, Stephen Spender, W.H. Auden and Lewis MacNeice led her to abandon the imagist poetry of her early work and to write such committed social poetry as "Day and Night," and "The Outrider." She also wrote agit-prop drama, contributed to and edited work for New Frontier and Masses magazines and took an active part in the work of the Progressive Arts Club. She married Duncan Macnair, moved to Vancouver and continued to write out of her social conscience.

During the 1940's and 50's Livesay devoted much of her time to raising her children, and her poetry lost some of its fervour, becoming more private and domestic. Nevertheless, she published the startlingly innovative poem for voices "Call My People Home," a long documentary poem about the removal of the Japanese from the West Coast.

After the death of her husband, Livesay spent some time in Zambia, then returned to Canada in the early 1960's to take part in a small Canadian literary renaissance. Her books The Unquiet Bed and Plainsongs looked at human relationships, love, and the problems of aging. In the late 1960's and 70's, Livesay's poetry became important to the women's movement, and Livesay herself became an important part of that movement. At the same time, she started the influential poetry journal CVII and returned to the social commitment of the 1930's, this time focussing on the peace and anti-nuclear movements in such works as The Raw Edges .

The Livesay papers are among the most important records in Canadian literature. They document a remarkable career, but they also tell the story of Canadian literature itself. Dorothy Livesay was always at the centre of Canadian literary life, and her papers are the record of a fine and sensitive artist in touch with her own art and her times.

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Scope and Contents of the Papers

The collection consists of biographical material, correspondence, drafts, and versions of Livesay's writings of all genres. Over half of the Livesay collection consists of papers that are strictly non-literary yet directly related to her life and work. This material is divided into five categories: autobiographical, biographical, bibliographical, business papers regarding her writing and her personal business papers. The remainder of the manuscript collection consists of plays, reviews, poems, short stories, essays, talks and addresses, and memoirs.

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Organization of the Papers

This collection is organized into 17 series.

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Restrictions on Access

Use of the Dorothy Livesay Collection is governed by the same professional standards of access as apply to all other holdings in the Archives & Special Collections and as are listed in the reading room. Users are strongly advised to call or write ahead in advance to ensure all arrangements can be made.

In addition, because the Collection is current and contains some sensitive material, Livesay and others have placed certain restrictions on access and use. The following specific materials, as per the terms of the Deed of Gift, and which are referred to in boxes 41, 42, 77, and 78 of the Container List, are not available for public access "until at least ten years" after the death of the donor:

Correspondence between Livesay and Duncan Macnair and friends;

Correspondence between Livesay and Jim Harris;

Letters of Livesay to Leo Kennedy.

Furthermore, the letters of Leo Kennedy to Livesay (Box 77) are closed to the public for thirty years after Mr. Kennedy's death, save to his official biographer and his daughter-in-law, Patricia Kennedy. Similarly the letters of Seymour Mayne (Box 77) and Steven Buri (Box 77) cannot be examined without their consent. Since other restrictions may yet be imposed by writers whose letters and other writings appear here, researchers are urged to consult with department officials before using the Collection.

Copyright to most of Livesay's letters, poems, writings, and other creative works, if not already published, resides with the University of Manitoba although Livesay has an exclusive right to publish her own works. Although Livesay still owns copyright to some materials in the Collection (a listing is available in the Department), this copyright will automatically reside with the University upon her death. With respect to the writings of people other than Livesay, researchers shall abide by the copyright laws of Canada as amended from time to time.

The Department retains the right to restrict photocopying to less than half of the length of any single document in order to preserve intellectual control of the Collection. Photocopies obtained from the Livesay Collection are not to be deposited in any other repository.

Finally, Archives & Special Collections, as owner of the papers, has the right to establish rules of access and use. Patrons who contravene or infringe upon those regulations risk the loss of user privileges.

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Other Finding Aids

PC 43 , TC 31

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Detailed Description of the Collection

AUTOBIOGRAPHY, 1923-1981

The "Autobiography" files come under the following separate headings: a) interviews with Dorothy Livesay, and her autobiographical statements and essays; b) journals of the writer consisting of entries in note-form on separate sheets of paper; c) Livesay's diaries and calendars, or schedules; and d) notes to herself, which she jotted down and kept for numerous reasons and purposes. To some extent, this is the most intimate and unguarded section of the Livesay Collection, and has to be studied with some care for clues to a deeper understanding of the author. There is great value in the "Autobiography" files for scholars who wish to challenge Dorothy Livesay's public and formal statements about herself and her work, statements which are repeated and left unchallenged in most Livesay interviews to this date.

"Interviews and autobiographical statements and essays" contain three types of material. The first consists of interviews with the author, taken by freelance interviewers, journalists, and radio commentators. The Collection contains both published and unpublished copies of interviews. The researcher can measure the extent to which Dorothy Livesay's statements have been edited by comparing the published copies to their manuscripts, and also the quality of Livesay's answers to interviewers by comparing similar statements in different interviews. A second type of autobiographical material is a selection of autobiographical statements the writer has penned, both published and unpublished. A third kind are essays of an autobiographical nature. These essays are perhaps the most sustained of the comments on herself in the Collection as a whole, and may have been intended for eventual publication. The essays are source material for some of Livesay's work, and provide insights into the development of Dorothy Livesay's work.

Not all of the published interviews with Dorothy Livesay are in this Collection, but there are enough to show the nature of the questions that concern interviewers, and the quality of Livesay's answers. Three kinds of concerns surface in the interviews- -political, literary, and social. Since Livesay was an active socialist and writer in the Thirties, some interviews reflect her political bias, her knowledge of Canadian socialist history, and the function of the writer in relation to politics. Others search out Livesay's comments on the art of writing, the climate for writing in Canada, and on her own work. The social concerns expressed in these interviews have to do with feminism, an issue on which she became more vocal during the Seventies. Livesay makes statements about all these subjects, but repeats herself from interview to interview, without ever probing deeply into any given issue. Publicly, Livesay proposes a set of opinions, but seldom an analysis. Often the interviews will show more of the interviewer's position than the interviewee's personality. (The same problem emerges in the clippings on Livesay and in newspaper articles written by journalists.) A typical example of this common problem is an introductory comment in an interview from The Manitoban, October 28, 1976, entitled "Dorothy Livesay and CVII, The Canadian Poets' Friends." The interviewer states that "before my eyes the sweet little old lady poet had turned into a huckster, albeit a huckster for the muse," because Livesay showed her a copy of Contemporary Verse II. Similarly, in The Fulcrum, March 2, 1977, she is described as having "all the grace and warmth of a communal grandmother."

Among the manuscripts of interviews are several fascinating conversations. Most notable are an interview by Mike Heenan, probably for CBC Radio in 1975, and a 1967 interview by Robert McNutt, also likely for radio, or perhaps from a class situation. The transcriptions of radio interviews read like conversations and show the way Dorothy Livesay interacts with people. The Heenan interview, for example, contains a good deal of humour on the interviewer's part, which Livesay seems to miss or does not respond to in kind. The McNutt interview is also refreshingly lively, but there Livesay appears more in tune with her questioner. The rapport between the two speakers in all the interviews is the central matter of importance, and the manuscripts show when such rapport has been edited into the piece for publication, and when that is not the case.

Among the manuscripts are complete copies of a 1975 interview by Bernice Lever, published in the Canadian Forum, and an interview by Alan Twigg, published in the NeWest Review. There is also a manuscript in this file of a 1947 radio interview by Ellen Harris, on Livesay's observations of Britain when she was a European correspondent for The Star in 1946. The researcher can get a good sense of the young Dorothy Livesay's clear-headedness from this piece, and her level-headed responses show her keen observational skills and facilities as a journalist. Livesay is far more direct and to the point in this early interview than she is in the later ones, where she often wanders off the point under discussion. One characteristic of the later interviews, the scholar will find, is Livesay's ability to sidestep a question, or create a new issue out of a query. She reserves the right, in the later conversations, to provide answers that do not correspond to the questions, leaving the interviewer with the task of circling back to the original point.

The file of published copies of Livesay's autobiographical statements is very small and serves as an example of what remains of her essays and notes once they have been edited for publication. The researcher will find that Dorothy Livesay has been an avid editor of her own writing all her life, and many drafts of any given work exist. This is especially true of her autobiographical pieces, and the bulk of her essays, lectures, poems and stories are autobiographical in nature. It is as if the writer is unable to decide what kind of self-portrait to draw, what emphasis to place on events in her life, and what opinions she should have of what has transpired. In this file there is an early documentary-style piece by Livesay on her parents (mainly her father) who influenced her greatly. She provides examples of the writings of both parents and includes her own poem "Lament." This piece, published in The Canadian Bookman, provides an early example of Livesay's interest in "pot-pourri" essays, where documents are quoted without processing or bridging of the texts. Another statement in this file is "Notes from a Diary," from The Canadian Review, 1977. Here is an example of the kind of prose fragments Dorothy Livesay has been jotting down all her life. This one concerns an encounter with a cab driver and the prejudice older people have to face in society.

The unpublished autobiographical file contains both brief and longer pieces by Livesay on herself, her life, and her work. Some of these notes and reflections could be considered journal entries, but are filed here because apparently they are meant for publication as essays of a kind. For example, there are Livesay's notes on her childhood, and her relationship with her father. Here she quotes from the Diary of Anne Frank Anne's thoughts about her father and her feelings of inadequacy, words which may well echo Dorothy Livesay's feelings about her own father. Another note tells of Dorothy's childhood fears and nervous illnesses. She would lie in bed with imagined terrors, and her father would come and massage her legs to help her relax. "Nowadays this sounds highly suspicious," she writes, "but I am sure that he was careful to play the role of the doctor. He had healing hands and in a few minutes I would fall asleep." Here as elsewhere in the Livesay collection, the researcher will find that Dorothy Livesay has written a great deal about her father and his influence on her life and work, and much of what she reveals is contrary to what she would like her reader, and herself, to believe. The Livesay papers as a whole provide a wealth of material on the father-daughter relationship and its connection to a woman's creativity. The "Autobiography" files, along with the correspondence, offer the best examples of this.

Other statements include a description of the author's home on Galiano Island, some comments on love and marriage, and notes on her relatives in England. Among them is a manuscript headed "Prologue to Ch. I," possibly meant for her autobiography (or Darnel), dealing with Livesay's childhood and adolescence in Toronto and relationship with boys. A prefatory remark in this essay summarizes neatly the writer's autobiographical impulse, which is so evident in all her writing. She claims that ". . . the desire to 'make a story' of one's life is one of our most human characteristics. Human beings are not scientists. Memory plays us false; yet memory reveals more than statistics. The truth is a many-sided prism and all one person can do is flash the daylight on some of the walls he knows best." (p. 1)

Of the autobiographical essays a few are concerned with Dorothy Livesay's childhood and youth. Others relate to her experience in New Jersey, her impressions of France, her time in Africa, and two are essays of a general nature on "being in love," and "entertainment." Those essays that deal with Livesay's childhood are to some extent carried over from her short stories (which culminated in A Winnipeg Childhood) and other autobiographical works. Evidently, Dorothy Livesay rewrote the same material many times over the years, as if she had selected only a few recollections that could serve as samples of a larger truth. An instance of such rewriting occurs in the essay "Winnipeg made me," which is the text for a lecture?reading given at the University of Manitoba in January 1970. Here she retells of her coming into consciousness as a child in Winnipeg, using scenes from her story "A Prairie Sampler," Another interesting example of the development of Livesay's work is to be found in an untitled essay or letter dated July 2, 1972 in which the writer describes a winter journey into rural Manitoba, a recollection which became the basis for the poem "Thumbing a Ride." By comparing the essay and the poem, some insight can be gained into Livesay's poetics.

A fragment of an essay on Dorothy Livesay's experiences in New Jersey shows the same persistence with rewriting that is evident in the childhood pieces. Any given fragment on that episode says more or less the same thing, often in the same words, and finds it culmination in Right Hand Left Hand .

The essays on France, however, provide a different view of Livesays' writing. These pieces are more lyrical than the others, more descriptive, and generally more linguistically passionate than most of the author's prose. There is a hint of Dorothy Livesay the journalist in the French articles, with detailed descriptions of the setting and lengthy interviews. The same journalistic trend may be found in three pieces on Africa, including a short story, "Not on My Verandah," which describes, more fully than a regular essay would, what the writer makes of the African experience. Dorothy Livesay can be seen here, as in her New Jersey fragments, empathizing with the natives and others who suffer discrimination. "Not on My Verandah" is one of Livesay's finer stories, where she is able to display her creative talent and journalistic skills to equal advantage.

The two remaining essays in this file, "On Entertainment" and "On Being in Love," are examples of the writer's reflections on her own life and family, and what she culls from those reflections when seeking to understand herself.

Dorothy Livesay's journals occupy a separate box in the autobiographical section of the collection. The journal entries contained therein range from notes she made at the age of fourteen, in 1923, to those penned in the Eighties. Written on loose sheets of paper, there is no overall coherence to the entries. It is likely that the entries here, noted down over a lifetime of writing, are only scattered fragments of the whole of Livesays' journals, with the exception of the very early entries (1923-1928.) The various notes have therefore been grouped by subject rather than date, especially since dates are not always indicated. Entries fall into four general subject categories: Africa; England and France; her parents; and finally reflective jottings of a general nature.

The journal writing Livesay did on her travels abroad is of a specific nature. She speaks mainly of three separate visits to Britain: one while she was studying at the Sorbonne, to attend a Press Conference with her father; another, when she was European correspondent for The Toronto Star, immediately after World War II; and a third when she took training for a job teaching in Africa on behalf of UNESCO. The bulk of the entries concern Livesay's first journey to Europe, where she describes in detail the voyage itself, people on the ship, her impressions of the wide range of social classes she encounters, and her sense of adventure and excitement. Some of the writing is an apparent attempt at fictionalized autobiography, and the Livesay student may discover that the writer used these journal entries as (hopeful) drafts for prose writing. Included in the travel sketches is a make-shift book fragment titled "Touch and Go," a title that reflects both Livesay's uncertainty with life and experience at that time (1950's perhaps), and her convictions about human sexuality. Curiously enough, in the travel entries Dorothy Livesay is doing exactly what her mother, Florence Randal Livesay, did, whose detailed diary about her travels to Africa is also available in the Livesay collection (see "Biography".)

Two prevalent and somewhat contradictory characteristics pertinent to Dorothy Livesay's writing are evident in her travel-sketch journals. In one sense, the reader can see Livesay in the act of finding a form for her autobiography, and for her prose-impetus in general. She tries to dramatize and colour what she observes, often with an odd lack of conviction. In the other, the author functions as a journalist, attempting to remain faithful to the reality she is confronted with, not willing to add or detract for aesthetic purposes. The conflict between Livesay the journalist and Livesay the creative writer continually surfaces and is particularly evident in the few sheets she has concerning Africa. As a teacher and a journalist, as well as a writer concerned with social(ist) activism, Dorothy Livesay tackles all issues and disciplines at once. She cannot entirely dramatize, for she is concerned with the social injustices evident in Africa, particularly the problem of race relations. Nor can she be entirely journalistic, for the dramatist in her, and the autobiographer, nags at her to colour the situation she describes with her own brand of human interest. To the Livesay scholar, there is much to find here when considering the position and problems of the narrator.

The journal entries under the "General" heading cover a wide variety of subjects, although all of them centre the narrative self within a complex of observations and reflections. In these notes, Livesay describes conversations with people, sometimes a dream, and reflects on ideas and historical matters. A small segment of these entries concerns the Thirties, and many provide a useful index to a study of Right Hand Left Hand, as well as the Thirties poems. A few interesting comments may be found scattered among the notes, such as a recorded conversation with her husband Duncan Macnair, about whom there is relatively little material in the collection as a whole. In this segment, Dorothy admits to her husband that being married is "all right for a while," but she imagines she will want something different when she is fifty. Later she considers, after his death, that she has "failed him many times over." The researcher may find that such direct statements are rare in the Livesay papers. The reason for the absence of such unflinching honesty may be found in another entry from this group of papers, which concerns honesty in autobiography. Here she speculates, "who wants to admit the truth about oneself to others? Who even can bear to admit those truths to himself?"

Those entries concerning the influence of Livesay's parents on her writing contain some noteworthy comments, particularly for the student of the writer's memoirs. One entry expresses very lucidly the impetus behind her autobiographical strain, and especially her apparent obsession with her father. Contrary to her assertions elsewhere, in interviews for example, here she speculates that she had no encounters with literary people when she was growing up, and therefore her memoirs cannot be of interest. It should be noted, however, that elsewhere Dorothy Livesay makes much of meeting her parents' friends, such as Mazo de la Roche and Raymond Knister and of the effect these meetings had on her. Her childhood autograph book attests to her having some encounters with famous literary people through her parents, for there she has letters from Edmund Gosse, Frederick P. Grove, Charles G.D. Roberts, and Mazo de la Roche, among others. (See "diaries and calendars".) However, Livesay reflects that only by emphasizing her father's influence on her own career and outlook can an autobiography of hers become universally interesting. Such a work would probe the depths of female creativity and the father complex. "The problem then," she states, "is to make the inner relationships interesting enough."

Finally, the diary fragments from her early youth (1923-1928) to some degree attest to Livesay's emotional sensitivity as a child, and justify her parents' early interest in their daughter's creative abilities. Often Dorothy Livesay complains of being pushed into writing by her parents, but other times she is grateful, It is this relationship which the author can be seen probing, inverting, and analyzing for herself throughout the Livesay collection, and it was obviously of central importance to her. The key to all of Dorothy Livesay's notes, journals, diaries and autobiographical statements may be her entry for September 13, 1970 in which she resolves "not to write many letters to friends or relative, but to make notes each day on the themes I wish to touch in 'the adventures of a writer.'"

One file in the "Journals" category contains descriptions of dreams. Many of the entries are dated (some as early as the 1940's) and contain a description of circumstances in Livesay's life that might have caused her to dream as shown. It is probable that the author wrote down her dreams so she might use them in her writing sometime later. Whether or not Dorothy Livesay actually did base poems or stories on dreams is an open question, one that provides the scholar with a potentially fascinating study. Dreams were recorded as part of the reality she seeks to transform into art, in the same way that her journalism notes provide her with data for her creative work.

The diaries in the collection are distinguished from the journals in that Dorothy Livesay kept diaries intermittently throughout her life, and wrote in them sometimes every day for a stretch of time. The Collection contains relatively few diary books, but enough to determine several points concerning Livesay's life and work. There are diaries from the Twenties, Thirties, Sixties, and Seventies, and then some daily calendars and schedules that show her activities at certain times. The earliest diaries, dated 1929 and 1930, show the young writer in conflict with her own ambitions. "I am suddenly afraid of ambition," she writes on February 23, 1930; "Success does not bring an understanding of life . . . Art no longer matters: I must not let it matter," On March 22, 1929,she writes "I am afraid of exaggeration- -especially in the practical test of storywriting," and on March 9 of that year she comes to the un-Livesayan conclusion that "the question of woman as an artist: it cannot be. This is a fearful truth to accept, but it ought to knock the conceit out of me. . . . Remarks such as these indicate Livesay's reluctance to express herself totally in her work, and show a certain fear of honesty which runs counter to the autobiographical impulse in her writing.

In the diaries, as elsewhere in her papers, the researcher will find an urge on the writer's part to discover the origins of her own inner conflict in the difference between her mother and father. She often hints at a form of repression coming from her parents, and in September 1930, back in Clarkson from France, she writes, "Now I feel alert, very much awakened. Yet already being home closes me up. Already there's a hand against my mouth." That "hand against my mouth" is variously her mother's or her father's in the autobiographical writings, and in the later diaries it becomes the hand of her husband, Duncan Macnair, as well. The Livesay student will find fertile soil in this conflict for an analysis of all aspects of the author's work. The later diaries, 1977 and 1978, provide much insight into Dorothy Livesay's relationship with Duncan Macnair. In the diary she speaks frankly at times of his attitude to her work, their sexual life, and, on October 24, 1977, she recalls "all the scoldings I endured from my father and then from my husband." All of these entries are an index to her sense of repression, and explain to some extent why she spent so much of her life in an effort to be free, both from social convention and from her own emotions.

Interviews with Dorothy Livesay and her autobiographical statements and essays, 1937-1980
BoxFolder
11 Interviews (Published), 1966-80
2-3 Interviews (Manuscripts), 1947-79
4 Autobiographical statements (Published), 1977
5 Autobiographical statements (Manuscripts), 1937-80
6 Autobiographical essays (Manuscripts), 1957-79
Journal entries in note form, 1923-1979
BoxFolder
21-2 Journal entries, Oct. 11, 1923-April 11, 1979
3 Journal entries: dreams, Jan. 30, 1947-Sept. 13, 1977
Calendars, diaries and schedules, 1925-1981
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24-5 Calendars and appointment books (Some are incomplete), 1966, 1968, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1981
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31 Early travel diaries and addresses, one dated 1946 (Most are undated)
2 Diaries: Autograph book received Christmas, 1925; Diary (pages missing),

Oct. 4. 1927-March 5, 1929

3 Diaries: Early scrapbook; University of Toronto Calendar and Memo Book, Sept. 1930-June 1931; Diary (Also contains blank notebook), March 9, 1929 - Sept. 1930
4 Diaries: UNESCO diary, no exact dates; Africa diary, Nov. 21, 1959 or 60-Dec. 7, 1959 or 60; Diary, Nov. 22, 1960-Dec. 5, 1960; Personal diary, Chalimbana Training College, begins July 11, 1962
5 Diaries: Diary, Aug. 1, 1974-Nov. 11, 1975(?); Diary, Jan. 10, 1977-April 5, 1977; Diary, March 9, 1977-March 21, 1978
Dorothy Livesay's notes to herself, no date
BoxFolder
41-2 Study notes for conferences, workshops, and courses
3-4 Notes on literature and quotations from others
5 Miscellaneous notes

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BIOGRAPHY, 1902-1976

This material will be of interest to those who wish to corroborate or relate events in Dorothy Livesay's life to her work, and also to any potential biographer. The "Biography" category is distinguished from "Autobiography," for in the latter are papers where Livesay speaks of herself; and is differentiated from "Bibliography," which concerns only the comments and writings of others on the author's work, not her life. The "Biography" segment of the Collection contains a wide variety of papers from all aspects of Livesay's life, a third of which are strictly related to her political and social activities. It will be evident to the researcher from these files just how active the writer has been socially, both in the community and in international organizations. A large portion of these papers relates to Amnesty International, the League of Canadian Poets, and the Canadian Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies. Other associations included are the Association of Canadian University Teachers of English, the Canada Council, the Canada-USSR Association, and the Canadian Authors Association. An interesting segment of this category for the biographical scholar are those papers that deal with Livesay's working career, which includes the jobs she has held other than academic posts, such as teaching and social work. Also of interest are miscellaneous family documents, such as report cards and certificates.

There are valuable materials on Florence Randal Livesay, John Frederick Bligh Livesay, and Duncan Cameron Macnair. Of her mother, Florence Randal Livesay, there are translations and clippings, as well as correspondence and genealogical charts. A thesis by Louisa Loeb on Florence Randal Livesay's translations can be found here. Included are some of her father's articles and clippings, a few diary notes and correspondence. The files also contain a very few of Duncan Macnair's poems, reviews and articles. In this same series are Dorothy Livesay's theses written for the Sorbonne and the University of British Columbia. Since both of these theses are about poetry, they have a great deal of bearing on the writer's work.

Profiles, sketches, statements, CV's, and interviews with others about Dorothy Livesay, 1966-1968
BoxFolder
51 Biographical profiles and sketches. (Includes biographical material by Frances Wilcox, Alan Pacey, 1966, and Marcus Von Steen, 1968)
2 Brief biographical statements
3 Copies of Dorothy Livesay's Curriculum Vitae
4 Interviews with others about Dorothy Livesay (Includes David Arnason and Mrs. "Jim" Lawson)
Papers and material of and about her father, John Frederick Bligh Livesay (Jan. 23, 1875-June 15, 1944), 1938-1942, some not dated
BoxFolder
55 Diaries, 1938-42
6 Autobiographical statements
7 Notes re: personal life and business
8 Biographical statements
9 Article on JFBL by J. Norman Smith, "JFB Livesay: A Memory."(Pamphlet, separately published. Photocopy. Quoted from in Darnel )
10 Clippings on JFBL
11 Family background
12 Correspondence concerning his papers, miscellaneous readings, and his daughter Dorothy Livesay
13 Short story by JFBL about Hugh Morton on his deathbed. (Possibly a version of "The High White Bed")
14 Short story by JFBL, "The High White Bed."
15 Article by JFBL, "Henry James and His Criticism," The Dalhousie Review
16 Miscellaneous writings
17 Reviews of his works
Papers and material of and about her mother, Florence Randal Livesay (Nov. 3, 1874-July 28, 1953), 1902-1907, 1976, some not dated
BoxFolder
518 Diaries (Includes Dorothy Livesay's notes), 1902-1907
19 Business re: her personal life
20 Clippings about FRL
21 "Biography of Florence Randal Livesay" Edited by Dorothy Livesay. (Chapter 2)
22 Family genealogy. (Includes Dorothy Livesay correspondence)
23 Correspondence concerning Dorothy Livesay
24 Bibliographic materials
BoxFolder
61 Poetry
2 Magazine and journal essays
3 Newspaper essays and columns
4 Scrapbook of clippings. (Primarily FRL's column, "A Chat With Readers." Some of JFBL's clippings are also included)
5 Translations
6-7 Loeb, Louisa. "The Ukrainian Translations and Interests of Florence Randal Livesay." Ph.D. Dissertation, Free Ukrainian University,Munich, Bavaria (Typed copy in folder 6; carbon copy in folder 7), May 1976
Papers and material of and about her husband, Duncan Cameron Macnair (Jan. 9, 1897?-Feb. 12, 1959)
BoxFolder
68 Poems
9 Published newspaper articles
10 His scattered works
11 Notes on Contemporary Canadian Poetry, probably by D.C. Macnair. (Possibly for a lecture or panel discussion)
12 Reviews: Of Canadian Poetry Magazine , Vols. 1-2
13 Reviews: Early draft of a review of Zilliacus' Between Two Wars and D.N. Pritt's Light on Moscow
14 Reviews: Of Ruth Gruber's I Went to the Soviet Arctic . (Possibly by D.C. Macnair)
15 Business and personal matters: court notices, life insurance policy, income tax forms, references, and social/political activities
Family papers
BoxFolder
71 Family papers
2 Documents: certificates, licences, report cards, etc. (Mostly Dorothy Livesay's)
3 Miscellany: tickets, programs, pamphlets, brochures, etc. (Includes some family matters)
Dorothy Livesay's student notes and essays, 1928-1929, 1965, some not dated
BoxFolder
81 Early essays, 1928-29
2 Term essay, "The Polished Lens: A Comparison of the Poetic Styles of Pratt and Klein." Published in Canadian Literature , Summer, 1965
3 Student notes, University of British Columbia
Dorothy Livesay's theses, 1932, 1965
BoxFolder
84 Bibliography and notes, probably relating to Dorothy Livesay's M.Ed. thesis, University of British Columbia, 1965
BoxFolder
91-2 University of British Columbia M.Ed. thesis, "Rhythm and Sound in Contemporary Canadian Poetry" (Folder I contains copy pages; folder 2 contains a complete copy), 1965
3 Partial handwritten draft of her Sorbonne thesis, "Symbolism and the Metaphysical Tradition in Modern English Poetry," 1932
4 Preface, typed draft, and photocopy of her Sorbonne thesis, 1932
Papers re: work/jobs/career (Other than academic), 1958-1963, some not dated
BoxFolder
95-6 UNESCO and Africa teaching: Correspondence, reports, and documents, 1958-1963
BoxFolder
101-2 UNESCO and Africa teaching: Teaching related material: day books, notes, etc., 1958-1963
3 Jobs/career other than UNESCO-Africa
4 Student essays written for her as a teacher
Political/social activities and organizations
Specific associations
BoxFolder
111-5 Amnesty International
BoxFolder
121-6 Canadian Association for Commonwealth literature and Language Studies(CACLALS)
BoxFolder
131-5 League of Canadian Poets
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141 Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures
2-3 Association of Canadian University Teachers of English (ACUTE)
4 Canada Council
5 Canada-USSR Association Inc.
6 Canadian Authors Association
7 Canadian Council of Teachers of English
8 Committee for an Independent Canada
9 Committee on Socialist Studies
10 International Federation of University Women (IFUW)
11 Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA)
General associations
BoxFolder
151 Community activities
2 Education
3-4 Politics
5 Women
6 Writers
7 Other

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BIBLIOGRAPHY, 1927-1985

The "Bibliography" category contains published reviews of Dorothy Livesay's books and edited works; articles about her work, some academic, as well as commentaries and copies of the poet's bibliography as it appears in various directories; clippings on Livesay from magazines and newspapers, covering the years 1927 to 1985; papers regarding the film "The Woman I Am"; bibliographic lists of various kinds; and student essays on the writer's work. All of this material, excepting the student essays, is in the public domain and may be found in almost any university library, These files are therefore not unique to the University of Manitoba Archives and will not be covered in detail here. It is also probable that these files are incomplete, that is, there are more reviews, clippings and articles in existence than have come to the Department. A further problem is that many of the articles, as well as some of the reviews and clippings, are undated or in some way are lacking full bibliographic information. Without this data, the secondary sources concerning the Livesayana are of less than adequate use.

What the "Bibliography" files here do have to offer however, is a good percentage of clippings and reviews which the researcher may find hard to locate elsewhere, since these types of sources are inadequately indexed in the current Canadian press. A clipping will not appear in an index, for example, if the publication it is drawn from is too obscure. The Livesay student will be able to gain an overview of contemporary attitudes to Dorothy Livesay's work, and see the changes that have occurred in the public understanding of her poetry and prose over the years. Some gleanings into Canadian reviewing practices may be discerned as well, for newspaper and journal items began to appear concerning Dorothy Livesay with the publication of her first book, Green Pitcher, in 1928. Since then, there are clippings and reviews to be found from every year, and these are all arranged chronologically. Most of the articles and reviews are sympathetic and favourable, but few probe far beneath the surface of her work in their analysis. Of note are the following: a review article on Collected Poems: The Two Seasons by Patrick Lane (Blackfish Nos. 4-5, Winter/Spring 1972-73); "Livesay's Two Seasons of Love" by Debbie Foulks (Canadian Literature, date unspecified); "Out of the Silence and Across the Distance: The Poetry of Dorothy Livesay," by Peter Stevens (a paper given at an unidentified event); "Dorothy Livesay: Poet of Nature," by Doris Leland (The Dalhousie Review, date unspecified); "Dorothy Livesay and the Transcendentalist Tradition," by Jean Gibbs (The Humanities Association Bulletin, Vol. 21, No. 2, Spring 1970); the early "Canadian Writer of Today," by W.E. Collin (The Canadian Forum, January 1932); and' "How Silence Sings' in the Poetry of Dorothy Livesay 1926-1973," by Beverly Mitchell (The Dalhousie Review., date unspecified).

As to the clippings contained in these files, the Livesay student will find a far more varied reception to the poet in the mass media than in the literary journals, where the articles and reviews mostly have appeared. It seems that journalists covering a book or a reading for the press are less informed and more inclined to express themselves in clicheed terms than are the writers for the journals. Invariably a newspaper story will qualify Dorothy Livesay the writer as either someone's daughter, someone's wife, a housewife, and later as someone's mother and grandmother. Seldom is the writer spoken of as a writer only. An interesting study in Canadian literary journalism may therefore be made from these files, and the Livesay student could then attempt to ascertain what influence these clippings may have had on the poet's self-image, and on her work as a result, The "Autobiography" files will show, in fact, that Dorothy Livesay has always faced some form of conflict between her insecure self?image and her strongly held convictions, Her press and journal coverage goes a long way in explaining this conflict.

Articles, commentaries, and directories
BoxFolder
161 Articles about Dorothy Livesay's work
2 Commentaries
3 Directories
Newspaper and magazine clippings on Dorothy Livesay (Arranged in chronological order), 1927-85
BoxFolder
171 Clippings, 1927
2 [ 1929 ]
3 [ 1932 ]
4 [ 1933 ]
5 Clippings, 1934-35
6 [ 1936 ]
7 [ 1937 ]
8 [ 1939 ]
9 [ 1941 ]
10 [ 1942 ]
11 [ 1944 ]
12 [ 1945 ]
13 [ 1946 ]
14 [ 1947 ]
15 [ 1948 ]
16 [ 1949 ]
17 [ 1950 ]
18 [ 1951 ]
19 [ 1953 ]
20 [ 1954 ]
21 [ 1956 ]
22 [ 1957 ]
23 [ 1959 ]
24 [ 1966 ]
25 [ 1967 ]
26 [ 1968 ]
27 [ 1969 ]
28 [ 1970 ]
29 [ 1971 ]
30 [ 1972 ]
31 Clippings, 1973
32 [ 1974 ]
33 [ 1975 ]
34 [ 1976 ]
35 [ 1977 ]
36 [ 1978 ]
37 [ 1979 ]
38 [ 1980 ]
39 [ 1981 ]
40 [ 1982 ]
41 [ 1985 ]
42 [ Undated ]
Reviews of Dorothy Livesay's books (Arranged in chronological order), 1928-81
BoxFolder
181Green Pitcher, 1928
2Signpost , 1932
3Day and Night , 1944
4Poems for People , 1947
5The Collected Poems of Raymond Knister , edited and with a memoir by Dorothy Livesay, 1949
6Call My People Home , 1950
7New Poems , 1955
8Selected Poems , 1957
9The Unquiet Bed , 1967
10The Documentaries , 1968
11Plainsongs , 1969
1240 Women Poets of Canada , 1971
13Collected Poems , 1972
14A Winnipeg Childhood , 1973
15Woman's Eye , 1974
16Ice Age , 1975
17Right Hand Left Hand , 1977
18The Woman I Am , 1977
19 Dorothy Livesay Issue of Room of One's Own , Vol. 5, Nos. 1-2, 1979
20The Raw Edges , 1981
21 General reviews
22 Reviews of anthologies in which Dorothy Livesay's work is included
23 Reviews and clippings about Contemporary Verse II
Other bibliographical materials, 1959, 1982, some not dated
BoxFolder
191 Correspondence, clippings, reviews, and publicity regarding the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation film "The Woman I Am," a docu- mentary with drama inserts about Dorothy Livesay, 1982
2 Bibliographies of Dorothy Livesay's work
3 Student essays on her work
4 Ph.D. thesis on her work by Kathleen O'Donnell, University of Montreal, 1959

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BUSINESS PAPERS RE: DOROTHY LIVESAY'S WRITING, 1975-1982, some not dated

Among the so-called business papers of Livesay's personal life and writings are such important items as her last will and testament, Canada Council Grants and other contests and awards, inventories and catalogues of her papers and poems elsewhere, newsclippings which she kept, two boxes of her financial papers, and three boxes of files relating to her being writer-in-residence in six different Canadian universities. Of special interest are the several folders of materials which document her founding role, and continuing involvement in the literary journal Contemporary Verse Two (CV/II). These include subscription lists, manuscript material, copies, and several operating files.

Papers regarding her professional writing career. (Includes correspondence, contracts, schedules, expense accounts, publicity material, etc.)
BoxFolder
201 Radio appearances and permission slips
2 Readings
3 Lectures and talks
4 Special occasions: Earle Birney, Pat Lowther, and Charles G.D. Roberts
5 Productions of her work
6 Her books
BoxFolder
211 Books and anthologies in which her work is included
2 Contests and awards
3 Canada Council grants
4 Canada Council brochures
Papers regarding conferences and symposia
BoxFolder
221-4 Papers regarding conferences and symposia
Papers regarding Dorothy Livesay's Last Will and Testament, and the sales, donations, and catalogues of her papers
BoxFolder
231 Last Will and Testament
Holdings at colleges and universities
BoxFolder
232 University of Manitoba Archives
3 St. John's College Library, Winnipeg
4 Queen's University
5 University of Alberta Archives
6 Simon Fraser University
Holdings at provincial archives
BoxFolder
237 Manitoba Provincial Archives
8 British Columbia Provincial Archives
Inventories and catalogues
BoxFolder
239 Of her papers
10-11 Of her poems
Clippings Dorothy Livesay kept
BoxFolder
241-4 On literature
5-6 On politics
BoxFolder
251-2 On natives
3 On women
4 On Bulgaria
5-7 Miscellaneous clippings
BoxFolder
26-28 Writings by others Dorothy Livesay kept, including poetry, articles, essays, theses, etc. (i.e., poetry by Henry Beissel, Marilyn Bowering, Fred Cogswell, Gwen Hauser, and Stephen Scobie; essays on women in literature by Millie Lamb; a thesis on Alan Crawley and Contemporary Verse by Joan McCullagh)

(12 folders)

Contemporary Verse Two ( CV/II ) files, 1975-1982
BoxFolder
291 Published copies of CV/II
2CV/II subscription lists
3 Manuscript material used in CV/II
4-5CV/II files, 1975
BoxFolder
301-2 [ 1976 ]
3 [ 1975-77 ]
4 [ 1977 ]
5 [ 1980-81 ]
6 [ 1982 ]

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BUSINESS PAPERS RE: DOROTHY LIVESAY'S PERSONAL LIFE

Among the so-called business papers of Livesay's personal life and writings are such important items as her last will and testament, Canada Council Grants and other contests and awards, inventories and catalogues of her papers and poems elsewhere, newsclippings which she kept, two boxes of her financial papers, and three boxes of files relating to her being writer-in-residence in six different Canadian universities. Of special interest are the several folders of materials which document her founding role, and continuing involvement in the literary journal Contemporary Verse Two (CV/II). These include subscription lists, manuscript material, copies, and several operating files.

BoxFolder
31-32 Financial papers

(4 folders)

Papers regarding her academic career
BoxFolder
331-2 Lecture notes
3 Student essays written for her as a professor
4 Honorary degree from the University of Waterloo
University business papers. (Includes correspondence, business forms, teaching material, etc.)
BoxFolder
341 University of Ottawa
2-4 University of Manitoba
5-7 University of Alberta
BoxFolder
351 University of British Columbia
2 Simon Fraser University
3 University of Victoria
BoxFolder
354 Miscellaneous papers regarding her academic career
Trip to Bulgaria (1977)
BoxFolder
355 Correspondence, 1977
6 Notes, 1977
7 Poems, 1977
8 Newspaper articles/conference publications, 1977
9 Miscellany, 1977
Papers regarding others
BoxFolder
361 Requests for recommendations from Dorothy Livesay. (Includes CV's and applications)
2 Events: readings, concerts, etc.
3-4 Publishers, books, journals
5 Miscellaneous papers regarding others

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CORRESPONDENCE, 1907-1983

The correspondence is a very large and very rich component of the Dorothy Livesay Collection. Divided into two major sections- -the Family Correspondence and the Professional Correspondence- -it occupies forty-two archival (5") boxes.

The Family Correspondence is filed by individual correspondent, that is, the letters of Dorothy Livesay to her father will be in folders separate from the letters her father wrote to her. In the Professional Correspondence section, no such division exists. The entire exchange of letters between Livesay and the other party are put together in the same folder. Since letters are filed alphabetically under the surname of the other correspondent, no letter in the Professional Correspondence is filed under Dorothy Livesay's name. Nevertheless, many of her letters are here, most often as duplicates of the original.

Indeed, Livesay has managed over the years to preserve copies of a great many of the letters she sent and received. The Family Correspondence contains a number of the letters she wrote to her father when she was a very young child, as well as much of her parents' correspondence, the correspondence of her husband, Duncan Macnair, great sheaves of letters from both her sister, Sophie, and her daughter, Marcia, and even letters from an assortment of fairly distant relatives. The Professional Correspondence is similarly complete, ranging from a single letter from a onetime correspondent to several file folders of letters covering a correspondence which spans decades. The letters range from strictly business relations through heated exchanges over poetry and poetics to intimate friendships, with many variations in between. Some of the more notable of Livesay's correspondents are Milton Acorn, Alan Crawley, Earle Birney, Patrick Lane, Lon Lawson and others who were involved with the magazine New Frontier in the Thirties, Millie Lamb, Oscar Ryan, Fred Cogswell, and Miriam Waddington. She has been in communication with people in South America, Denmark, England, France, Bulgaria, Russia, and Africa. Livesay has always been an avid correspondent, and it is in her letters that one sees her in all her many roles- -poet, friend, confidante, mother, wife, lover, anthologist, academic, applicant and referee for grant proposals, thesis supervisor, concerned citizen and writer of letters to the editor and more.

Across these many roles, however, one can hear in her letters both a consistency of tone and distinct changes of voice. The letters Livesay wrote as a child are charming. Most of them are addressed to her father, John Frederick Bligh Livesay ("JFBL"), who was sometimes separated from his family by trips related to newspaper business, and are imbued with a desire to please him. In return, JFBL made up rhymes and stories and drew amusing pictures in his letters to his daughters. One letter, dated March 18, 1916, is written as if it were from Sophie's imaginary playmate Main.

The voice in Livesay's letters shifts into a slightly different register in late adolescence. The desire to please her father is still strong, and a note of barely contained excitement becomes predominant. A self-consciously literary style and a tone of shared complicity between father and daughter also appear at this time, about 1928-29. For example, the letter marked July 24, 1928 (and signed "Your Fallen Daughter") is a confession of sexual initiation:

Listen: should I have a pseudonym [re: publication of two stories, "The Quarrel" and "Heat"]? You know so many people will be horrified. Oh Lord, I am Jekyll and Hyde all over again. But you have succeeded in keeping one foremost (I forget which one).

By the time she reaches young adulthood and has transplanted herself to Europe, Livesay's desire to please her father, coupled with his transference onto her of his unfulfilled dreams of being a writer, has blossomed into a playful seduction in which both father and daughter engage. This "seduction" is characterized in their letters by a teasing, flirtatious tone, frank sexual discussions and confessions, the use of affectionate names and diminutives, as well as a tone of unspecified longing. Livesay's letters contain subtle suggestions that she prefers her father over any number of men her own age, while he writes scathing denunciations of his wife. The daughter co-operates in this devaluation of her mother. She and her mother never got along well, and, at this particular stage in her life, as the potential "traps" of marriage and childrearing loom closer, she attempts to dissociate herself from her mother even further.

The crisis in the father-daughter relationship comes during a trip to England. Dorothy accompanies JFBL, in place of his wife, on an extended press tour of the country. A great deal of anticipation and excitement is evident in the letters leading up to the trip, and Dorothy is very conscious of taking her mother's place:

But thank you so much for letting me come. Mother indeed would have been hopeless, being entirely without a sense of proportion. Her simplicity is refreshing in the home but impossible in society. However: a "social" wife would not have understood you [DL to JFBL, February 9, 1929 or 1930].

While on the tour, they have a disagreement- -he wants her to come with him on a trip to his birthplace on the Isle of Wight on the same day that she wishes to attend a lecture by George Bernard Shaw. An argument ensues and Dorothy stalks out of the hotel where they are staying and remains away all day long. Her father overreacts to her absence, imagining her injured or killed or having taken her own life. He even goes so far as to write a long letter to his wife assuming all responsibility for his daughter's "suicide." Following this incident, when Dorothy returns unharmed, the intensity between the two of them diminishes somewhat. JFBL begins very gradually to turn more toward his wife, largely because she cares for him in his illness and infirmities. It is only during his last couple of years that a grudging respect for her begins to reappear in his letters to his daughter.

During his daughter's early working and poetic careers, and during the early years of her marriage, JFBL remains involved in her life, although his influence is primarily related to financial matters. The budget of the Macnair household is frequently strained, and JFBL is always willing and able to provide funds for emergencies and for house purchases.

In addition to his financial backing during this period (roughly 1930-1944), JFBL uses his professional influence to promote his daughter's writing career. When each of her first two books --Green Pitcher and Signpost--is published, he writes letters to all his newspaper contacts requesting that his daughter's book be reviewed. He carefully mentions to each editor that of course he expects the book to stand on its own merits and that a "slate" is as good as a "boost," but as General Manager of the Canadian Press his clout with the newspaper editors across Canada was considerable.

The correspondence between Livesay and her father comes to an end with JFBL's death in 1944, but her relationship with him has had an enormous impact upon her throughout her life. His consistent encouragement of and pride in her talents , his example as a journalist, his talents as a literary critic, his financial backing --all of these factors molded her early career. Her fascination with this primary relationship, and with the relationship between her father and her mother, has helped to fuel her lifelong interest in memoirs, autobiography, and documentary.

Livesay's mother, Florence Randal Livesay ("FRL"), provided support and encouragement as well. One difference, perhaps a crucial one, between her father and mother was that her father was a failed writer, whereas her mother enjoyed considerable success and reputation. The father's failure--his confessed inability to tell the whole truth about his life --caused him to deflect his writerly ambitions onto the daughter most likely to succeed where he had not. His failure created a lack, an absence, a space, into which the young woman could insert herself.

FRL was equally supportive of her daughter's literary endeavours. When Livesay is a pre-school child, her mother has a column in the newspaper in which she prints the amusing things little Dorothy says and does and the stories she makes up. It is the mother who secretly sends out her daughter's first poems for publication. Livesay has claimed in interviews that when the first poem appeared in print, she was furious with her mother for snooping into her dresser drawers where she kept her private papers. Her mother continues to act as her "agent" at least until Dorothy has published her first two books. While her daughter is studying in Europe, for example, FRL oversees the production of Signpost. Letters go back and forth discussing the title and arrangement of the book, as well as the publication of some of the poems in various literary magazines in Canada and the United States. FRL sends DL's poems and stories out, keeps track of submissions and payment, and maintains correspondence with publishers. In 1949 on a trip to London, England, FRL tries to negotiate with the British Broadcasting Corporation for a reading of her daughter's poetry, with FRL to do the actual reading. She also drops in at Faber's to promote her daughter's work.

Unlike the father's campaigns, however, many of FRL's promotional efforts on her daughter's behalf produce discord and rancor between parent and daughter. FRL writes:

Of course I am always interested in all your literary projects --but don't take up valuable time and space in telling me how "mad" you are bout something I did for you! [FRL to DL, February 17, 1930]

About criticism --I haven't time to write detailed stuff and you might know I like things if I speak of minor defects [FRL to DL, January 17, 1930].

For her part, Livesay is sharp, abrupt, and impatient with her mother. Hostility usually lurks below the surface. In an undated letter responding to her mother's criticisms of one of her books (probably Day and Night) DL writes:

I don't mind your reactions to the book. The last ten years have been "somber" and "grey" to anyone living in the times, and as you have never experienced them, you naturally do not respond to a record of them.

No doubt JFBL's consuming interest in his daughters, especially Dorothy, must have embittered FRL and caused some disagreeable tensions. Dorothy's sister Sophie, in her letters, also describes their mother as difficult, although it seems she is somewhat closer to her than Dorothy ever was.

Sophie's letters to her parents are much more even in tone. She is emotionally more distant from them. That is to say, for her they are parents, not titans to be wrestled with. Her letters indicate feelings of personal and intellectual inferiority to her older sister. For example, she remarks that Dorothy's first child is probably brighter and better trained than her own child, Gillian, and she writes of her second child, Brenda: "I think she'll be like her Ma, late to develop, but not necessarily stupid . . . But their Mama I fear does not give them the cultural stimulus which the young McNairs [sic] no doubt get" [Sophie to DL, May Day 1946]. Also: "Anyway it doesn't look as if she [Brenda] is going to be the insignificant littler sister that I was. If she hasn't the brains, she's the guts" [Sophie to DL, December 30, 1944].

The letters between Dorothy and Sophie are fairly straightforward discussions of child-rearing, domestic, financial and medical problems, and political events. Dorothy is the more introspective of the two sisters, periodically probing Sophie's memory, as well as her own, for information about their parents' lives. Occasionally the sisters lash out at one another, sometimes over Sophie's vagueness as to travel plans and Dorothy's tendency to intervene and take over such plans. Dorothy accuses Sophie of being too much like their mother. Sophie accuses Dorothy of being overbearing. Both admit to being difficult. However, neither seems to hold a grudge once she has stated her position and got the matter off her chest by writing it down. There are thirty-eight folders of letters between the sisters, ranging from 1926 to 1982.

The letters between Dorothy Livesay and her husband, Duncan Macnair, begin with their courtship in 1936 and end with his death in 1959. There are ten folders of their correspondence. The earliest dated letter from Dorothy, addressed "Ho there, outrider," is about the conflict between writing and political activity due to physical, financial and time constraints and to the extremely small size of the reading public in Canada: "in this country people do not read --their rawness is closer to action than thought or poetry" [DL to Duncan Macnair, letter dated Sunday evening 1936]. In many of these letters from their courtship days, the rhetoric of politics blends with the rhetoric of love and relationship. Dorothy's letters are addressed to "My comrade lover" and "My Heart's Forward Marcher."

At times these two rhetorics co-exist harmoniously; at other times there is a strain. For example, in one letter Livesay discusses the conflict between her communist view of marriage and her traditional romantic views.

As a communist, marriage is just a legal and social manifestation of an already existing arrangement But I am quite incapable, so far, of seeing it in only that light . . . . The forms and the ceremonies I abhor; but the relationship and the assumptions seem to me almost holy (in a human sense) [letter headed Saturday afternoon, Second Beach].

But the conflict between writing and not writing is the issue upon which these conflicts between writing and politics, communism and capitalist conservatism, and many of the other dichotomies in Livesay's life are based:

I am quite sure I am finished with writing poetry, and unless I get hold of a prose project I won't even do that. But first I have to be alone more than has been possible, and second, I have to have music somehow, someway [DL to Duncan Macnair, letter headed Woodlot, Wednesday, January 8].

She writes this letter to her husband in Vancouver from the sanctuary of her father's house in Ontario.

This dilemma of the creative writer --the struggle to gain sufficient time and financial freedom to devote herself to her writing --pervades much of the Dorothy Livesay correspondence. Naturally, since the letters to her husband deal with immediate familial and domestic matters, this theme appears over and over again in these letters, whether they are written before their marriage or after. Livesay's concern remains the same when she is weighing the demands and responsibilities of a husband and family versus her career as a social worker, and both of these against the demands of her writing; when she travels to Europe after World War 11 as a correspondent for the Toronto Star; and when she is working for UNESCO in Paris.

Duncan's letters to Dorothy are similarly addressed to "My Beloved Comrade" and "My Dear Field Marshal," as well as "My Beloved Geranium" and "My Beloved Fish Lake Platypus." His earliest letters describe his job in a mountain mining camp near Hedley, B.C., and discuss politics and the magazine New Frontier. His letters after their marriage usually record where he goes during the day, what people he sees, where he has dinner. He often mentions their cat. There is less content in these letters about his ideas and feelings, as his wife often remarks. He always complains about being tired but nonetheless seems to maintain a fairly demanding schedule of meetings and political activities.

There is a hearty tone in the early letters of both Dorothy and Duncan of setting out as comrades together to change the world. The conviction is often repeated that, as a pair, they can do much in the world. The tone changes considerably after five or six years of marriage. Duncan adopts the stance of the beleaguered man, put-upon by women: "You sure talk a hell of a lot of nonsense compared with what you did 5 years ago --however the coming of a family accounts for that" [Duncan to DL, 25 February 1942]. Similarly in Dorothy's letters to her husband there is a decline in the amount of political content as accounts of their toddler son's antics occupy more and more lines, and as she feels increasingly alienated from her writing by demands of family life.

The Family Correspondence also contains a large number of letters between Dorothy and her daughter, Marcia, and a much smaller number between her and her son, Peter. The children's correspondence with their father occupies four separate folders, and their correspondence with one another one folder. There are twenty-one slim folders of letters between Dorothy and relatives outside her immediate family, as well as some correspondence between her parents and their friends and relatives. There are also the letters between Dorothy and Anne Campbell. Campbell is a very close friend and confidante and even, during periods when Dorothy is away from her family in Europe, surrogate mother to Dorothy's children. The correspondence between "Annie" and "Dee" is much more personal and familial than professional and for this reason is included with the Family Correspondence.

The Professional Correspondence is an impressive collection of some thirty-three boxes of letters with writers, publishers, artists, editors, educators, students, admirers, and scores of other people individually listed in the Container List. Since Livesay's writing career spans the better part of six decades, one might hope for significant correspondence with other prominent Canadian writers at various stages of their careers --an expectation amply borne out by the thousands of letters in this category.

Included here are twenty-nine letters between her and Margaret Atwood (1971-73), a dozen with Bill Bissett (1973-82), sixty with Fred Cogswell (1953-80), over one hundred with Alan Crawley and family (1939-82), thirteen with Patrick Lane (1967-81), seventy-eight with Elizabeth Varley (1939-80), nineteen with Pat Lowther (1970-75), ten with John Newlove (1971-80), eighty-six with George Woodcock (1970-82), and correspondence with approximately 1,800 others.

In total, the Correspondence forms a very large and significant part of the Dorothy Livesay Collection, offering a comprehensive view of Livesay's life and work from childhood into old age. Researchers will be able to investigate such diverse topics as Livesay's activities as an editor of various books and magazines, the editorial process for her Collected Poems, her fan mail, her fascination with such subjects as the Japanese-Canadians, Louis Riel, and Isabella Valancy Crawford, and literary influences, alliances and feuds. It will be possible to make biographical connections between the work and the life through an examination of the Correspondence. Any number of topics primarily related to the work will be further illuminated by a reading of the Correspondence. The Livesay Correspondence is a major addition to the body of Canadian archival materials.

Family correspondence, 1907-1982
Dorothy Livesay's correspondence with her father, JFBL, 1914-1944
BoxFolder
371 Her letters to JFBL: Early childhood
2 Her letters to JFBL, 1928-29
3 Her letters to JFBL, 1930's
4 Her letters to JFBL, 1941-42
5 Her letters to JFBL, 1943-44
6 JFBL to her, 1914-18
7 JFBL to her, 1920-29
8 JFBL to her, 1930
9 JFBL to her, 1931-39
10 JFBL to her, 1940-44
Dorothy Livesay's correspondence with her mother, FRL. (Some letters are undated but can be placed by context), 1926-1953
BoxFolder
3711 Her letters to FRL, 1926-52
12 FRL to her, 1929-53
Correspondence between her parents, 1907-1940
BoxFolder
381 FRL to JFBL, 1916-17
2 JFBL to FRL, 1907-40
BoxFolder
383 Correspondence between her parents and her sister, Sophie Livesay Stewart, 1926-53

(1 folder)

Correspondence between her parents and their friends, acquaintances, and business associates, 1923-1953
BoxFolder
384 Letters to JFBL, 1923-42
5 Letters from JFBL, 1923-44
6 Letters to and from FRL, 1925-53
BoxFolder
387 Correspondence between her parents and their relations, 1909-53

(1 folder)

Dorothy Livesay's correspondence with her sister, Sophie Livesay Stewart, 1926-1982
BoxFolder
391 Her letters to Sophie, 1926-30, 1938
2 Her letters to Sophie, 1951-53
3 Her letters to Sophie, 1954-55
4 Her letters to Sophie, 1956
5 Her letters to Sophie, 1957
6 Her letters to Sophie, 1958-59
7 Her letters to Sophie, 1960-61
8 Her letters to Sophie, 1964-69
9 Her letters to Sophie, 1970
10 Her letters to Sophie, 1972
11 Her letters to Sophie, 1973
12 Her letters to Sophie, 1974
13 Her letters to Sophie, 1976
14 Her letters to Sophie, 1977
15 Her letters to Sophie, 1978
16 Her letters to Sophie, 1979
17 Her letters to Sophie, 1980
18 Her letters to Sophie, 1981
19 Her letters to Sophie, 1982
20 Her letters to Sophie, Undated
BoxFolder
401 Sophie's letters to her, 1930's
2 Sophie's letters to her, 1940's
3 Sophie's letters to her, 1950's
4 Sophie's letters to her, 1960's
5 Sophie's letters to her, 1970
6 Sophie's letters to her, 1971
7 Sophie's letters to her, 1972
8 Sophie's letters to her, 1973
9 Sophie's letters to her, 1974
10 Sophie's letters to her, 1975
11 Sophie's letters to her, 1976
12 Sophie's letters to her, 1977
13 Sophie's letters to her, 1978
14 Sophie's letters to her, 1979
15 Sophie's letters to her, 1980
16 Sophie's letters to her, 1981
17 Sophie's letters to her, 1982
18 Sophie's letters to her, Undated
Dorothy Livesay's correspondence with her husband Duncan Cameron Macnair, 1936-1959
BoxFolder
411 Her letters to Duncan Macnair, 1936-37
2 Her letters to Duncan Macnair, 1940's
3 Her letters to Duncan Macnair, 1958-59
4 Her letters to Duncan Macnair, Undated
5 Duncan Macnair's letters to her. (Note: "Restrictions and Regulations"), 1936
6 Duncan Macnair's letters to her. (Note: "Restrictions and Regulations"), 1937
7 Duncan Macnair's letters to her. (Note: "Restrictions and Regulations"), 1938-39
8 Duncan Macnair's letters to her. (Note: "Restrictions and Regulations"), 1942, 1944, 1946
9 Duncan Macnair's letters to her. (Note: "Restrictions and Regulations"), 1953, 1958, 1959
10 Duncan Macnair's letters to her. (Note: "Restrictions and Regulations"), Undated

Box 41 Restricted

Duncan Macnair's correspondence with his children, Marcia Macnair Hays and Peter Macnair, 1944-1959
BoxFolder
421 Duncan Macnair to Marcia, 1958-59
2 Marcia to her father, 1952-59
3 Duncan Macnair to Peter, 1944
4 Peter to his father, 1948-ca. 1955

Box 42 Restricted

BoxFolder
425 Duncan Macnair's correspondence with others, 1918-53

(1 folder)

Box 42 Restricted

6 Correspondence between Peter Macnair and Marcia Macnair Hays, 1958-74

(1 folder)

Box 42 Restricted

Dorothy Livesay's correspondence with her children, Peter Macnair and Marcia Macnair Hays. (Also contains correspondence with Peter's wife Diane and Marcia's husband Marvin, as well as with grandchildren), 1946-1982
BoxFolder
427 Her letters to Peter and Diane, 1946-82
8 Peter's letters to her (Also contains one letter from early childhood), 1958-79
9 Diane's letters to her, 1966-78
10 Her letters to Marcia, 1956-82
11 Marcia's letters to her, 1950's
12 Marcia's letters to her (from Belfast), 1960-63
BoxFolder
431 Marcia's letters to her (from 67 Walmer Rd., Toronto), 1965-69
2 Marcia's letters to her (from Apt. 705, 169 St. George, Toronto), 1969-71
3 Marcia's letters to her (from Chambersburg), 1973-74
4 Marcia's letters to her (from 102 Waverley Rd., Toronto; Listowel), probably 1974-82
5 Marcia's letters to her, Undated
6 Marvin's letters to her
7 Her letter to Marvin's brother Bill Hays

Box 42 Restricted

Correspondence between Dorothy Livesay and relatives outside of her immediate family
BoxFolder
441 Her grandmother Livesay
2 Her godmother "Aunt Dorrie"
3 Her grandmother Randal
4 Pem Hall (?), aunt
5 Arthur Randal, uncle
6 Helen Randal, aunt
7 Kathleen Randal, aunt
8 Dalton and Rose Randal
9 Shirley Andrews, cousin
10 John Bishop, cousin
11 Margot Gordon, cousin
12 Mary Mitchell, Randal cousin
13 Marnie Mockbeggars(?), Livesay cousin
14 Alan Randal, cousin
15 Bobbie (Mrs. Harold) Bradley, cousin
16 Percy Gordon, JFBL's cousin
17 Brenda and Jill Stewart, Sophie Livesay Stewart's daughters
18 Helen (Lena) Macnair, Duncan Macnair's sister
19 Peter (Kenny) Macnair, Duncan Macnair's brother
20 Laurence MacKenzie, Duncan Macnair's cousin
21 Dorrie MacKenzie, wife of Duncan Macnair's cousin, Laurence MacKenzie
22 Hector MacKenzie, son of Duncan Macnair's cousin, Laurence MacKenzie
BoxFolder
4423 Correspondence between Sophie Livesay Stewart and her friends and relations

(1 folder)

24 Correspondence between Peter Macnair and Marcia Macnair Hays and their relations and friends

(1 folder)

25 Correspondence between Dorothy Livesay's relations

(1 folder)

Family related correspondence, 1931-1979
BoxFolder
451 Anne Campbell's letters to Dorothy Livesay
2 Dorothy Livesay's letters to Anne Campbell, 1940's
3 Dorothy Livesay's letters to Anne Campbell, 1952
4 Dorothy Livesay's letters to Anne Campbell, 1953
5 Dorothy Livesay's letters to Anne Campbell, 1958
6 Dorothy Livesay's letters to Anne Campbell, 1959
7 Dorothy Livesay's letters to Anne Campbell, 1960
8 Dorothy Livesay's letters to Anne Campbell, 1961
9 Dorothy Livesay's letters to Anne Campbell, 1962-63
10 Dorothy Livesay's letters to Anne Campbell, 1969-79
11 Dorothy Livesay's letters to Anne Campbell, Undated letters and letter fragments
12 Helen E. McIntosh, 1947
13 Ruth Mitchell, 1945-46
14 Dorabel Pomeroy, 1939
15 Grant Smith, 1931(?)-38
16 Mr. Winger
17 Lloyd York, 1935
Professional correspondence, 1928-1983
BoxFolder
461 Abrahams, Cecil, 1971-73

(17)

2 Abrahamson, Freda, 1980

(1)

3 Abrams, Al, 1978

(5)

4 Acorn, Milton, 1965-76

(5)

5 Adams, J., 1970

(2)

6 Adams, Janet, 1974-77

(4)

7 Adamson, Arthur, 1979-80

(14)

8 Adaskin, Murray, 1971-81

(5)

9 Adilman, Mona Elaine, 1979

(2)

10 Adiseshiah, M., 1961

(1)

11 Aggrey, E.D., 1963

(3)

12 Agling(?), Ron, 1969(?)

(1)

13 Ahrens, Pamela, 1974-75

(5)

14 Ahvenus, M., 1970

(1)

15 Aide, William, 1968-81

(11)

16 Alexander, Ella, 1976-79

(30)

17 Alexander, Mary H.T., 1945-46

(8)

18 Alford, Edna, 1970

(2)

19Alive , n.d.

(1)

20 Allen, Elizabeth and Harold B., 1973

(3)

21 Allen, Helen, 1973

(1)

22 Allison, Gay, 1977-79

(14)

23 Altizer, Nell, 1978-79

(3)

24 Alvarez, Manuel, 1980

(1)

25 Amabile, George, 1974

(2)

26 Amaron, Douglas G., 1974

(2)

27 Amprimoz, Alexandre L., 1976

(2)

28 Anderson, Allan, 1973

(1)

29 Anderson, Brig, 1979

(1)

30 Anderson, Donna M., 1973

(1)

31 Anderson, Dorris, 1970-72

(3)

32 Anderson, Irene, 1972

(3)

33 Anderson, Marlowe D., 1974-76

(6)

34 Anderson, Patrick, 1974-76

(4)

35 Anderson, Violet, 1971

(2)

36 Andras, Kathy, 1971

(1)

37 Andrew, G.C., 1969

(1)

38 Andrew, Geoffry and Margaret, 1959-81

(2)

39 Andrews, Shirley, 1975

(2)

(Restricted)

40 Andrus, Guy, 1978

(2)

41 Annand, Duncan M., 1963

(2)

42 Anthony, Geraldine (Sister), 1980

(2)

43Antigonish Review , The Editor, 1971

(1)

44 Arber, Lois, 1981

(2)

45 Archer, Raymond, 1971

(1)

46 Archer, Violet B., 1971-80

(24)

47 Armstrong, Mary, n.d.

(1)

48 Arnason, David, 1974-81

(10)

49 Arnason, Jennifer, 1977(?)

(2)

50 Ashton, Edith (Mrs. A.L.), n.d.

(1)

51 Aspinall, Dawn, 1972

(1)

52 Aster, J., 1978

(1)

53 Atherton, Stan, 1971

(5)

54The Atlantic Monthly , n.d.

(1)

55 Atwood, Margaret, 1971-73

(29)

56 Aubert, Rosemary, 1977-79

(11)

57 Auchinachie, Gerald, n.d.

(1)

58 Aupy, Monique, 1969

(2)

59 Auroi, Sz., 1963

(1)

60 Austin, Waddell, 1977

(2)

61 Avison, Margaret, 1971

(2)

62 Ayce(?), Stasis(?), 1982

(1)

BoxFolder
471 Bachinski, Ute, 1976

(7)

2 Bacon, T.C., 1963

(2)

3 Baglow, John, 1974

(6)

4 Bains,G.S., 1974-75

(9)

5 Baird, Irene, 1943

(1)

6 Bairstow, David, 1967-76

(2)

7 Baker, Ron J., 1964-65

(4)

8 Balderstone, Greg, 1977-79

(2)

9 Baldwin, Neil, 1975-78

(2)

10 Baldwin, R. George, 1968-71

(17)

11 Ball, Eric, 1980

(1)

12 Ball, William Nelson, 1976

(1)

13 Baltazzi, Leni, 1960-64

(4)

14 Bancroft, Eldred (Mrs. H.H.), 1971

(1)

15 Baravalle, Edward D., 1965-68

(3)

16 Barber, Marsha, 1979-82

(18)

17 Barbour, Douglas, 1972-73

(2)

18 Barker, Mr., 1960

(1)

19 Barker, S., 1975

(2)

20 Barnard, Sylvia, 1966-69

(9)

21 Barnes, Elizabeth, 1974

(3)

22 Barnes, W.J., 1972-73

(8)

23 Barr, Elinor, 1975

(2)

24 Barrable, Susan, 1979

(1)

25 Barrett, Herb, n.d.

(1)

26 Barry, Patricia S., 1971

(3)

27 Barry-Williams, David Scott, 1980

(1)

28 Bartels, Dennis, 1979

(3)

29 Bartole, Genevieve, 1971-77

(5)

30 Betes, Ron, 1973

(1)

31 Batey, Alan H., 1972

(2)

32 Batt, Sharon, 1978-80

(11)

33 Battye, John H., 1977-78

(2)

34 Baugh, Eddie, 1980

(1)

35 Baxandall, Lee, 1982

(2)

36 Baxter, Shannon L., 1980

(4)

37 Bayer, Mary Elizabeth, 1975

(2)

38 Beardsley, Douglas, 1977-79

(10)

39 Beardsley, Rosemary Sullivan, 1974

(2)

40 Beavan, A.R., 1968

(1)

41 Beaverbrook, William Maxwell Aitken, 1930

(1)

42 Beckman, Lanny, 1979-81

(18)

43 Beckwith, Susan, 1981

(4)

44 Bedford, A.G., 1971

(2)

45 Beecher, John, 1969

(1)

46 Beissel, Henry, 1973

(1)

47 Bell, Beatrice, 1979-80

(5)

48 Bell, David V.J., 1976

(1)

49 Bell, John, 1978

(3)

50 Bellan, Ruben C., 1974

(2)

51 Bellette, Tony, 1971

(2)

52 Belserene, Paul, 1979-80

(7)

53 Belton, George, 1981

(1)

54 Bemrose, John, 1981

(1)

55 Benston, Margaret, 1978

(1)

56 Bentley, Allen, 1966

(1)

57 Benzekri, Katharine A., 1974-75

(2)

58 Berg, Katherine, 1976-80

(3)

59 Berlijn, Pierrette, 1961

(3)

60 Berlis, N.F.H., 1963

(1)

61 Berndt-Sullivan, Terri, 1976

(2)

62 Berryman, Iris, n.d.

(1)

63 Berton, Pierre, 1950

(1)

64 Bessai, Diane E., 1968-72

(10)

65 Betanzos-Santos, Manuel, 1972-80

(7)

66 Beutler, Bernhard, 1973-79

(9)

67 Beverley, (Sister), 1973-74

(3)

68 Bilsland, J.W., 1971-72

(5)

69 Birney, Earle, 1949-73

(12)

70 Birney, Esther, 1943(?)

(1)

71 Bishop, Mary F., 1982

(1)

72 Bishop, Roger J., 1964-65

(5)

73 Bissett, Bill, 1973-82

(12)

74 Bitney, Kate, 1980

(2)

75 Bjerring, Nancy, 1974-75

(10)

BoxFolder
481 Black, Elsie B., 1953

(1)

2 Blackburn, Robert H., 1969

(4)

3 Blackman, Judith, 1978

(1)

4 Blackstock, C.M., 1969

(2)

5 Blair, Dorothy G., 1978

(1)

6 Bloomfield, John, 1966

(1)

7 Blott, Anne, 1972

(1)

8 Bloxham, Ben and Pamela, 1969-74

(20)

9 Boffa, Johanna C., 1970

(1)

10 Bojilova, Cornelai (Connie), 1977-78

(5)

11 Boldt, Carol, n.d.

(1)

12Books in Canada , 1978-79

(2)

13 Booth, Luella, 1971

(5)

14 Boss, Bill, n.d.

(1)

15 Bostwick, Colleen, 1978-79

(7)

16 Botschew, Dimitar, 1982

(1)

17 Bovey, John A., 1976

(1)

18 Bower, Christine, 1971

(1)

19 Bowering, George, 1979

(1)

20 Bowering, Marilyn, 1972-78

(12)

21 Boyd, Esther, 1966

(1)

22 Boyes, C.T., 1973

(6)

23 Boylan, Charles R., 1969-76

(26)

24 Boylan, Sharon, 1971-72

(5)

25 Boyle, Elizabeth, 1966-74

(7)

(Restricted)

26 Boyle, Harry, 1950

(1)

27 Boyle, Pamela, 1980-81

(2)

28 Boyles, Sadie, 1973

(2)

29 Bradbury, Maureen, 1974-76

(4)

30 Bradshaw, Thecla, 1981-82

(13)

31 Brady, Donald F., 1971

(1)

32 Brass, Robin, 1977

(4)

33 Brent, Robert, 1975

(1)

34 Brenton, Bella, 1974

(2)

35 Brett, Brian, n.d.

(1)

36 Brewster, Elizabeth, 1967-82

(46)

37 Brian, Michael, 1976

(2)

38 Brisbin, Frank, 1970

(1)

39 Britton, James, 1959

(1)

40 Brock, Babs and David, 1955

(1)

41 Brooks, Jack R., 1977

(2)

42 Brown, G.W., 1972

(2)

43 Brown, Gerald R., 1974

(2)

44 Brown, Helen, 1953

(1)

45 Brown, James A., 1975

(3)

46 Brown, James R., 1975-79

(9)

47 Brown, Lyall, 1971

(3)

48 Brown, Malcolm, 1959

(1)

49 Brown, Margaret (Mrs. Edward K.), 1976

(1)

50 Brown, Marion E., 1969

(3)

51 Brown, R.M., 1981

(1)

52 Brown, Russell M., 1973

(2)

53 Browne, Colin Victor Alleyne, 1977

(3)

54 Browne, Rachel, 1975-80

(5)

55 Bruce, Charles, 1935-69

(8)

56 Bruce, Skyros, 1971-73

(5)

57 Brunton, Douglas, 1972(?)

(1)

58 Bryans, Cora, 1952

(1)

59 Buckaway, C.M., 1972-80

(2)

60 Buitenhuis, Elspeth, 1973

(4)

61 Buitenhuis, Peter M., 1978

(3)

62 Bulmer, Helen W., 1974

(1)

63 Burant, Jim, 1977

(1)

64 Burgess, Ian and Joanne, 1976(?)-77

(2)

65 Burgis, Grover C., 1976

(1)

66 Buri, Steve, 1970-75

(5)

67 Burke, Brian, 1982

(1)

68 Burke, Herbert, 1970

(3)

69 Burke, Norma, 1967

(1)

70 Burn, K., 1954

(1)

71 Burns, Barbara H., 1978

(1)

72 Burns, Robert J., 1975

(3)

73 Burrows, Mary, 1971

(1)

74 Burrs, Mick, 1969-76

(7)

75 Burstow, Candace Adamson, 1980-82

(3)

76 Busse, K., 1960

(1)

77 Butler, B.C., 1973

(1)

78 Button, Isabel, 1980

(2)

79 Byam, M. Barbara, 1975-79

(6)

BoxFolder
491 Cadwallader, (Miss), 1967

(1)

2 Calver, Cheryl D., 1981

(3)

3 Calvert-Marty, Calais, 1964-66

(7)

4 Cameron, B.A., 1979

(2)

5 Campbell, Charles H., 1971

(5)

6 Campbell, Sandy, 1978-79

(3)

7 Campbell, Viola, 1945

(1)

8 Canada Council, 1969-80

(6)

9 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 1950-(~82)

(25)

10The Canadian Forum , 1971-75

(4)

11 Candelaria, Frederick, 1975-80

(7)

12 Canning, Elaine, 1942

(1)

13 Cannon, Georgina, 1975

(4)

14 Cappon, Paul, 1975

(5)

15 Carlsen, Jorn, 1977-80

(24)

16 Carlsen, Robin Woodsworth, 1980

(1)

17 Carlson, Chuck, 1971

(9)

18 Carnegie, Gordon R., 1972

(1)

19 Carolan, Katherine, 1978-82

(21)

20 Carolan, Tom, 1978

(1)

21 Carpenter, David C., 1973-74

(6)

22 Carr, Emily, 1941 or 1942

(3)

23 Carroll, Beatrice, S., 1981

(2)

24 Carter, E. Graydon, 1977

(1)

25 Carter, Kathy, 1980

(1)

26 Carter, Margaret, 1969

(2)

27 Carter, William D., 1961

(6)

28 Casaubon, Andre', 1974

(1)

29 Casey, Tom, 1970-75

(3)

30 Cassidy, (Mrs.), 1977

(1)

31 Cassidy, H.W., 1937

(1)

32 Cassidy, Mary L., 193?

(1)

33 Cassidy, Michael A., 1935

(1)

34 Cassidy, P., 1981

(1)

35 Cauthers, Janet, 1975-76

(6)

36 Centre for Research in the New Literature in English (CRNLE), 1980-81

(5)

37 Chakulya, W.M., 1977

(1)

38 Chalimbana Training College, 1961-69

(82)

39 Chambrun, Jacques, 1951

(1)

40 Chamish, Barry, 1975-77

(4)

41 Chapman, Darlene, 1971

(4)

42 Charach, Ron, 1979

(2)

43 Charbonneau, Kay, 1974

(2)

44 Charles, John W., 1975

(2)

45 Chartered Trust Company, 1955

(1)

46 The Chelsea Club Limited, 1976-78

(8)

47 Cheney, Nan (Mrs. Hill H.), 1942-79

(10)

48 Chevalier, Jean, 1960-61

(2)

49 Christiaens, Jean, 1960-61

(5)

50 Christou, Maria, 1972-73

(4)

51 Church Representative Body, Dublin, 1975

(1)

52 Clanfield, Fred, n.d.

(1)

53 Clare, Roberta, 1980

(3)

54 Clark, Don E., n.d.

(1)

55 Clark, Joan, 1970

(1)

56 Clark, Pat, 1971

(1 )

57 Clarke, Carrie, 1969

(1)

58 Classey, Jocelyn, 1979

(1)

59 Cleghorn, Diana, 1982

(2)

60 Clever, Glenn, 1976-80

(16)

61 Cloutier, C4cile, 1977

(1)

BoxFolder
501 Cobb, Myrna, 1978

(1)

2 Cogswell, Frederick, 1953-80

(60)

3 Cohen, Andrew, 1975

(1)

4 Cole, Arthur L., 1974

(3)

5 Cole, Sylvia, 1937

(2)

6 Colegrave, D., 1971

(1)

7 Coleman, Helen, n.d.

(1)

8 Coleman, Helena, 1930-45

(9)

9 Colgate, William, 1945

(1)

10 Collins, R.G., 1970

(2)

11 Colman, Mary Elizabeth, 1950

(1)

12 Colombo, John Robert, 1977

(5)

13 Colson, Theodore, 1976

(3)

14 Colwell, Margaret J., 1966

(1)

15 Community Arts Council of Vancouver, 1956

(1)

16 Compton, Neil, 1965

(2)

17 Congreso Interamericano de Escritoras, 1981

(2)

18 Contemporary Authors, n.d.

(1)

19 Cook, Gregory M., 1968-80

(7)

20 Cooley, Dennis, 1974-76

(3)

21 Cooperman, Stanley, 1970

(1)

22 Copping, Edna N., 1979

(1)

23 Cordingley, (Miss), 1930's

(1)

24 Correa, Jose A., 1961-63

(8)

25 Corrigan, Beatrice, 1930

(1)

26 Cosstick, Ruth, 1977-80

(3)

27 Coste, Agnes, 1930-72

(22)

28 Coste, Alfred, 1977-78

(4)

29 Coste, Mady, 1980

(2)

30 Coucill, Irma, 1973

(1)

31 Couves, Dr., 1968

(1)

32 Cowan, Ann, 1981

(1)

33 Coward, Barbara, 1973

(3)

34 Cox, E.R., 1948

(1)

35 Cox, Mary, 1981

(1)

36 Craig, Robert, n.d.

(1)

37 Crawley, Alan, Jean and Michael, 1939-82

(133)

38 Crosland, M., 1947

(1)

39 Cross, Dave, 1939

(1)

40 Crosthwait, Donalda, 1973

(1)

41 Crouch, Keith, 1969

(1)

42 Crowe, Eleanor, 1971

(2)

43 Crowell, Peter M., 1979

(2)

44 Culhane, Claire, 1978

(3)

45 Cunningham,James S., 1973

(1)

46 Currie, Lisa, 1975

(1)

BoxFolder
511 Dahlie, Hallvard, 1971-73

(10)

2 Dale, June, 1975

(1)

3 Damania, Laura, 1972-81

(101)

4 d'Amboise, Jackie, 1976

(2)

5 Dandolo, 1., 1961

(1)

6 Danica, Elly, 1981

(2)

7 Daniells, Roy, 1950-64

(6)

8 Daprato, Barbara, 1972

(1)

9 Dardick, Si, 1975

(2)

10 Darling, Dale, 1981

(2)

11 Darney, Maeve(?), 1959

(1)

12 Daskalova, Liana, 1980

(2)

13 Dauphinee, Eva, 1953

(1)

14 Dauphinee, John, 1971-72

(10)

15 David, Jack, 1975-79

(8)

16 Davies, Alice, 1981

(2)

17 Davies, Bill, 1980

(1)

18 Davies, Bronwyn, n.d.

(1)

19 Davies, Dai and Dorothy, 1979-81

(7)

20 Davies, Evan, 1967-69

(3)

21 Davies, Robertson, 1973

(2)

22 Davis, Ella, 1973

(2)

23 Davis, Virginia, 1977

(3)

24 Davison, Milt, 1977

(1)

25 Dawes, Harry, 1960-62

(3)

26 Day, C.A., 1952-55

(3)

27 Daycock, R.J., 1972

(1)

28 Daymond, Douglas M., 1972

(3)

29 Deahl, James E., 1980-81

(5)

30 Dean, James W., 1974

(1)

31 de Felice, Jim, 1971

(1)

32 de la Barre, Bernadette, 1979

(4)

33 de la Roche, Mazo, n.d.

(1)

34 de Lombardon, (Madame), n.d.

(1)

35 De Roo, Sharon, 1980

(1)

36 Dempster, Barry, n.d.

(3)

37 Denham, Paul, 1979-81

(6)

38 Derry, Ramsay, 1974

(1)

39 Des Rochers, Yvon, 1976

(1)

40 Dexter, Rona Murray, 1978

(2)

41 Di Cicco, Pier Giorgio, 1976-77

(2)

42 Diamond, Pamela, n.d.

(1)

43 Dillon, Norma, 1975

(1)

44 Dixon, Robin, 1960

(1)

45 Djwa, Sandra, 1972-82

(18)

46 Dobbs, Kildare, 1967

(2)

47 Donnelly, M.S., 1974

(1)

48 Donnelly, Robert, 1974-75

(2)

49 Douglas, Jim, 1979

(2)

50 Downes, Gwladys, 1959-81

(15)

51 Doyle, Mike, 1972-79

(11)

52 Drew, John, 1966-67(?)

(1)

53 du Gardein, (Mr. and Mrs.), 1973

(1)

54 Dube, Madeleine, 1977

(1)

55 Dubois, Margaret, 1970

(2)

56 Duchemin, Carmelita, 1966

(1)

57 Duchemin, Lloyd, (Restricted) 1969-73

(7)

58 Dudek, Louis, 1967

(1)

59 Duff, John, 1980

(1)

60 Duffin, Kathleen (Sister), 1976-77

(3)

61 Dumbeliuk-Czernowicky, Mihall W., 1963-64

(6)

62 Duncan, Chester, 1972

(3)

63 Duncan, Pam, 1972

(3)

64 Dunlop, C.R.B., 1971

(1)

65 Dunn, Elspeth (Betty), 1978-80

(13)

66 Dunn, Margo, 1975-78

(8)

67 Dunn, Tim, 1972-78

(5)

68 Dunsmuir, David H., 1980

(2)

69 Dutchak, Kathy, 1976

(1)

70 Duthie, William, 1978

(1)

71 Dyck, Betty, n.d.

(1)

72 Dzioba, Martha, 1972-78

(9)

BoxFolder
521 Earle, Evelyn Purvis, 1972-73

(3)

2 Earle, Margery, 1977

(1)

3 Eastman, Katie, 1959

(1)

4 Eccleston, Keith, 1975

(1)

5 Eddy, Lawrence, 1982

(1)

6 Edel, Leon, 1939-82

(17)

7 Editura Albatros, 1975

(2)

8 Edmonton Journal, 1971

(1)

9 Edwards, Elaine, 1974

(2)

10 Eeds, Alice, 1959

(1)

11 Eger, F.H., n.d.

(1)

12 Eggleston, Wilfrid, 1949

(1)

13 Egyedi, Bela, 1978(?)

(1)

14 Ehomoto, Randy, 1971

(1)

15 Eichler, Margrit, 1973

(1)

16 Elder, A.T., n.d.

(1)

17 Ellichuk, Jocelyne, 1973

(4)

18 Elliot, Ken, 1971

(3)

19 Elliott, Harry C., 1929

(2)

20 Elliott, Lin (Mrs. H.A.) 1970

(15)

21 Elliott, Marjorie Y., 1970

(1)

22 Elliott, Wendy, n.d.

(1)

23 Ellis, H.G., 1963

(1)

24 Ellis, Kathy, 1981-82

(4)

25 Ellsworth, Elaine, 1972-73

(3)

26 Elmandjra, Mahdi, 1961-62

(2)

27 Elson, Nick, 1968

(1)

28 Emery, C.D., 1970

(1)

29 Emery, Tony, 1956

(1)

30 Endres, Robin, 1973-77

(4)

31 Engel, Howard, 1970-80

(16)

32 Engel, Marian, 1979

(6)

33 English, Betty, n.d.

(1)

34 Ennenberg, Margaret, 1978

(1)

35Essays on Canadian Writing , 1977

(1)

36 Estok, Michael, 1979-80

(10)

37 Ethridge, James M., n.d.

(1)

38 Eustace, C.J., 1953

(1)

39 Evans, Don, 1975

(2)

40 Evans, Dorothy, 1934

(3)

41 Evans, Harry M., 1956

(1)

42 Evans, Jennifer, 1977

(1)

43 Evans, Ron, 1975-76

(5)

44 Everson, Ronald G., 1958-77

(10)

45 Ewan, Gladys, 1974

(1)

46 Ewanchuk, Michael, 1979-80

(4)

47 External Affairs Office, 1965

(1)

BoxFolder
531 Fahrni, Mildred, 1950

(1)

2 Fairbairn, Nadine, 1982

(1)

3 Fairbank, Betty, 1979

(1)

4 Fairley, Barker, 1981

(1)

5 Fairley, T.C. , 1972

(1)

6 Falconer, R., 1971

(1)

7 Fallis, Mary, 1970

(3)

8 Farbman, Robin , 1977

(3)

9 Farmiloe, Dorothy, 1971-80

(13)

10 Farquhar, Hugh E., 1973

(1)

11 Faulkner, Hugh (The Honourable), 1975

(1)

12 Faunt, Jessie, n.d.

(1)

13 Faust, Anna, 1976

(1)

14 Fearing, John, 1979

(1)

15 Fenger, Sonia, 1965-80

(2)

16 Ferguson, Laing, 1976

(4)

17 Ferne, Doris, 1970

(3)

18 Ferry, R., 1972

(3)

19 Fertig, Mona, 1977-80

(26)

20 Fetterley, Joyce, 1982

(2)

21 Fiamengo, Marya , 1974

(2)

22 Filteau, Huguette, 1980

(2)

23 Finch, Jeannette F., 1948-50

(2)

24 Finegold, Hannah, 1950

(1)

25Firewood , 1978

(1)

26 Fischer, Hans, 1979-82

(10)

27 Fish, Jeannette , 1980

(3)

28 Fisher, Esther, 1976-77

(7)

29 Fisher, Neil H., 1973

(1)

30 Fitchen, Allen N., 1973

(5)

31 Flannigan, Suzanne, 1981

(2)

32 Fleck, P.D., 1975

(1)

33 Fleet, Brenda, 1971

(2)

34 Flemington, Frank, 1945-74

(16)

35 Flemington, W.T. Ross, 1964

(1)

36 Floman, Marty, 1979

(1)

37 Foley, James, 1976

(7)

38 Fonda, Carlo, 1978

(2)

39 Foord, Isabella, 1971-74

(3)

40 Ford, Elizabeth, 1974

(1)

41 Ford, 0., 1937

(1)

42 Ford, Theresa, 1978-79

(7)

43 Fordice, Patricia G., 1962

(1)

44 Forester(?), Grace, 1949

(1)

45 Foster, Anne, 1976-80

(73)

46 Foster, J.E., 1972

(1)

47 Foster, Sandra Sorensen, 1975

(1)

48 Fourthier(?), Merci, 1980

(1)

49 Fowles, Irene L., 1971

(1)

50 Fox, Gail, 1971-72

(2)

51 Fox, Michael, 1975-76

(4)

52 Frame, Gary, 1979

(2)

53 Frances, (Miss), 1967

(1)

54 Francis, Peter, n.d.

(1)

55 Francis, Wynne 1967-77

(11)

56 Frank, David 1981-82

(4)

57 Frankfurth, Elizabeth, 1945-47

(2)

58 Fraser, Dorothy, 1973

(1)

59 Fraser, Eleanor, 1978

(3)

60 Fraser, Lorna D., 1967

(2)

61 Frazer, Marion, 1979

(2)

62 Fredeman, Jane C., 1973-76

(24)

63 Frederic, John, 1945

(3)

64 Freeman, Jeff, n.d.

(3)

65 Freeman, Marian, 1979

(4)

66 French, William, 1971-78

(6)

67 Frey, Cecelia, 1980

(2)

68 Friedman, Sylvia, 1982

(1)

69 Friesen, Carol, 1977

(1)

70 Friesen, Eric, 1978

(1)

71 Friesen, John K., 1977

(1)

72 Friesen, Pat, n.d.

(1)

73 Fulford, Robert, 1971-78

(12)

74 Fulford, Robin, n.d.

(2)

75 Fullerton, D.H., 1958

(2)

76 Fulton, E. Margaret, 1932

(1)

BoxFolder
541 Gadd, Maxine, 1971-80

(6)

2 Gadsden, Ingrid, 1973

(7)

3 Gagnin, Henri, 1953(?)

(1)

4 Gagnon, Monique, 1973

(1)

5 Gain, Don, 1975

(1)

6 Gallagher, Clare (Sister), 1977

(1)

7 Gallagher, John, 1975

(5)

8 Galvin, Bette, 1971

(2)

9 Gamm, Niki, 1978

(1)

10 Garbutt, Dorothy, 1913-14

(7)

11 Gardner, Paul, 1929

(1)

12 Garnet, Eldon, 1972-73

(9)

13 Garvie, Sandra, 1971

(3)

14 Garwood, Douglas, 1976

(1)

15 Gaskin, Geraldine, 1977

(2)

16 Gatenby, Greg, 1975-80

(16)

17 Gauthier, Claude, 1966

(1)

18 Geddes, Gary, 1972-82

(22)

19 Gelder, Ken, 1981

(2)

20 Gellatly, Dorothy Hewlett (Mrs. David), 1951

(1)

21 Geller, Vincent, 1978-82

(5)

22 George, Maurice(?), 1961-63

(4)

23 Gerbrecht, Peggy, 1979

(1)

24 Gervais, C.H. (Marty), 1972-77

(20)

25 Geske, Patricia, n.d.

(1)

26 Gibbons, Maurice, 1970

(1)

27 Gibbs, Robert, 1968-78

(16)

28 Gibson, Anne, 1971

(1)

29 Gibson, Claudia, 1974

(1)

30 Gibson, Kenneth, 1972-73

(6)

31 Gibson, Lin, 1980-81

(3)

32 Gibson, Marny, 1980

(1)

33 Gibson, Nora, 1950

(1)

34 Gibson, Rose Mary, 1975

(1)

35 Gibson, Shirley, 1976-77

(7)

36 Gilbert, Gerry, 1979

(4)

37 Gilchrist, Jane, 1982

(4)

38 Giles(?), Robert V., 1980

(1)

39 Gill, John, 1975

(1)

40 Gill, Keith, 1972

(2)

41 Gill, Lakshmi, 1971-81

(3)

42 Gillingwater, Linda, 1973

(2)

43 Gillis, Frank, 1971

(2)

44 Gilmore, Cary, 1977

(1)

45 Gilsig, Clare, 1980

(3)

46 Gilteau, Hugette, 1981

(1)

47 Gingell-Beckmann, Susan, 1981

(3)

48 Giroux, Jean-Guy, 1976

(2)

49 Gittings, Joyce, 1953

(1)

50 Givens, Imogen Knister, 1974

(3)

51 Glass, Marvin, 1974

(1)

52 Glassey, Almeda, 1949-73

(2)

53 Glazier, Lyn, 1974

(1)

54 Glickman, Susan, 1978

(3)

55 The Globe and Mail , 1970-79

(6)

BoxFolder
551 Godbehere, Harvey, 1981

(4)

2 Godden, David, 1970

(1)

3 Godfrey, David and Ellen, 1973-79

(70)

4 Godfrey, W.D., 1978-79

(3)

5 Gokhale, D.V. and Vidya D., 1967-78

(3)

6 Goldberg, H.M., 1970-72

(5)

7 Goldstick, D., 1971

(2)

8 Golland, J., 1953

(1)

9 Gom, Leona, 1972-82

(53)

10 Gonick, Cy, 1973-77

(3)

11 Gonya, Irene C., 1951

(1)

12 Gooch, Bryan N.S., 1974

(3)

13 Goodbody, 0., 1977

(1)

14 Goodchild, Peter, 1979

(1)

15 Goodfellow, John C., 1951

(1)

16 Goodwin, K.L., 1971

(1)

17 Gool, Richard, 1976

(2)

18 Gordon, Diane, 1977

(1)

19 Gordon, Larry, n.d.

(1)

20 Gordon, Percy, 1973

(1)

21 Gorman, W.A.R., 1961

(1)

22 Gorrie, Colin, 1972

(1)

23 Gotlieb, Phyllis, 1971

(1)

24 Gourley, Elizabeth, (Restricted) 1966-82

(10)

25 Govier, Kathy, 1976

(1)

26 Grace, Christy, 1945

(1)

27 Graham, Claude, 1981

(1)

28 Graham, Heather, 1978

(1)

29 Grant, William J., 1977

(2)

30 Grantham, Ronald, 1969

(1)

31 Gray, Marilyn, 1974

(1)

32 Gray, Stephen, 1981

(2)

33 Gray, William, 1975

(1)

34 Grayson, J. Paul, 1977-79

(5)

35 Greater Victoria Savings Credit Union., 1976-77

(3)

36 Greene, E.J.H., 1971

(2)

37 Grieve, Christopher, 1976

(8)

38 Grieve, Dorothy, 1973-74

(3)

39 Grieve, Kenneth E., 1959

(1)

40 Grimley, Frank, 1976

(1)

41 Groben, Doris (Mrs. S.R.), 1973

(4)

42 Grossman, Dick, 1960

(1)

43 Groth von Faulhaber, Helga, 1967-68

(4)

44 Groves, Percilla, 1980

(1)

45 Grygier, Patricia, 1971

(1)

46 Guardian Assurance Co. Ltd., Rhodesia, 1963

(1)

47 Gubbe, Lois, 1975

(3)

48 Guiton, J., 1962

(1)

49 Gundry, Frances, 1980

(1)

50 Gundy, H. Pearson, 1970

(1)

51 Gurney, Alice, 1972

(1)

52 Gustafson, Ralph, 1941-76

(3)

53 Guy, Brenda, 1976

(3)

54 Guy, Grant, 1982

(2)

55 Guy, Ralph M., 1974

(1)

56 Gwilliam, F.H., n.d.

(1)

57 Gwynn, Richard, n.d.

(1)

BoxFolder
561 H., Rick, 1971

(1)

2 Haas, Maara, 1974-75

(2)

3 Hackett, Jo, 1978

(2)

4 Hall, Derryl B., 1974

(1)

5 Hall, W., 1954

(1)

6 Halliday, Brenda, 1974

(3)

7 Halliwell, D.W., 1976

(1)

8 Halpenny, Francess G., 1974-81

(8)

9 Ham, James M., 1982

(1)

10 Hambleton, Elizabeth Josephine, 1929-30

(6)

11 Hambleton, Ronald, 1971-72

(4)

12 Hamilton, Malcolm, 1977

(1)

13 Handicapped Labels, 1981

(1)

14 Hanna, Beatrice, 1981

(1)

15 Hannah, Gregg, n.d.

(1)

16 Hanson, Joan, 1970

(1)

17 Hanstein, Dorothy (Gallagher Lott), 1976

(1)

18 Hansvick, Chris, 1978

(1)

19 Hardcastle, G., 1962

(1)

20 Hardin, L. Elizabeth, 1979

(2)

21 Hardman, Marya E., 1971-74

(6)

22 Hare, F. Kenneth, 1981

(2)

23 Hargrave, T.C., 1948

(1)

24 Harlow, Robert, 1966

(1)

25 Harmon, Catherine, 1947-48

(3)

26 Harrigan, F. Wayne, 1972

(1)

27 Harriott, John E., 1974-75

(6)

28 Harris, Hu (The Honourable), 1970

(3)

29 Harris, Michael, 1977

(1)

30 Harris, Pippa, 1961-74

(12)

31 Harris, Robin, 1966

(1)

32 Harrison, Dick, 1976-78

(11)

33 Harrison, Elaine, 1976-77

(11)

34 Harrow, J., 1970

(3)

35 Hart , Ellen, 1947

(1)

36 Hart, John, n.d.

(1)

37 Hartman, Joyce F., 1950-51

(3)

38 Harvey, Louise, 1956

(1)

39 Harvey, Roderick, 1981

(2)

40 Haskett, Lawrence, 1975

(1)

41 Hatch, Ronald, 1978

(1)

42 Haudeville(?), Madeline, 1977-78

(3)

43 Hauser, Gwenyth, 1973-79

(15)

44 Hausletor, Ron, 1972

(1)

45 Hawkes, Gerald, 1971

(1)

46 Haworth, Peter, 1978-81

(3)

47 Hawthorn, Harry, 1951

(2)

48 Hay, Judy, 1974

(2)

49 Hayden, Howard, 1961-62

(3)

50 Hays, J.H., 1971

(1)

51 Healy, Jack, 1970

(9)

52 Heaney, Seamus, 1970

(2)

53 Hebein, Gloria, 1971

(1)

54 Heenan, Joe, 1977

(2)

55 Heenan, Michael, 1975-78

(5)

56 Heimbecker, Kathy, 1974

(3)

57 Helwig, David, n.d.

(1)

58 Hembroff-Schleicher, Edyth, 1980

(1)

59 Henry, C.E., 1980

(1)

60 Henry, C.J., 1963

(2)

61 Henry, E.M., 1944

(3)

62 Herman, Cleta M., 1955

(1)

63 Hertz, Kenneth, 1971-72

(16)

64 Heuchert, Theresa M., 1976

(2)

65 Hewett, Phillip (Rev.), 1980

(2)

BoxFolder
571 Hicks, Anne, 1980

(3)

2 Hieger, Lois, 1959-81

(29)

3 Higgins, J.F., 1974

(1)

4 Hill, John E., 1968

(1)

5 Hindmarsh, H.C., 1946

(3)

6 Hine, Daryl, 1971

(1)

7 Hinshaw, Robert E., 1957

(1)

8 Hissey, Lynne, 1979

(4)

9 Hodder, H.J., 1964

(1)

10 Hodgeman, M., 1972

(1)

11 Hodgins, Jack, 1974

(3)

12 Hodgson, Helen, 1969

(1)

13 Hoffer, William, 1974-78

(8)

14 Hoffman, Stanton, 1971

(8)

15 Hoffos, Signe, 1976

(1)

16 Hogan, Homer, 1972

(2)

17 Holden, John S., 1958-59

(3)

18 Holford, William D., 1982

(1)

19 Holland, Joan, 1963

(1)

20 Holland, L., 1938

(1)

21 Holland, Patrick, 1978-79

(7)

22 Hollingsworth, Margaret, 1980

(1)

23 Holt Rinehart and Winston of Canada, 1973

(1)

24 Holzman, A.W., 1978

(1)

25 Hopkins, Anthony, 1977-78

(3)

26 Horswill, Eleanor Crowe, 1971

(3)

27 Hotson, J. Ross, 1972

(7)

28 Howard, Irene, 1978

(2)

29 Howard, William, 1979

(1)

30 Hoy, Helen, 1981

(1)

31 Hughes, Campbell B., 1971

(1)

32 Hughes, Glyn, 1972

(1)

33 Hughes, Kenneth James, 1973

(1)

34 Hughes, P.F., 1968

(1)

35 Humphrey, Catherine E., 1976-78

(29)

36 Humphrey, H. Ruth, 1973

(1)

37 Humphrey, John, 1973

(4)

38 Humphreys, Helen, n.d.

(3)

39 Hunker, Clint, 1981-82

(4)

40 Hunt, Ted, 1978-79

(2)

41 Hunter, Bob, 1974

(1)

42 Hurst, Michael E. Eliot, 1975

(5)

43 Hurtig, Mel, 1973

(3)

44 Hutchinson, Dave, 1977

(3)

45 Hutchinson, Sybil A.5 1948-50

(2)

46 Hutchison, Gertrude M., 1963

(1)

47 Hutchison, Sandy, 1979-81

(17)

48 Hutson, (Mr.), 1972

(1)

49 Hyde, Phoebe, 1969

(1)

50 Hyman, Barry, 1977

(1)

51 Hyperion Press Limited, 1979

(3)

BoxFolder
581 Inch, R.B., 1973-76

(6)

2 Innis, Mary, 1965

(1)

3 Ireland, Willard(?) E., 1942

(1)

4 Irvine, Noble J., 1973

(1)

5 Itani, Frances, 1979

(2)

6 Ivanochko, Bob, 1977

(1)

7 Iverson, Theresa Boyce, 1976

(1)

8 Izawa, Tadasu(?), 1977

(1)

9 Jackman, Mary, 1980

(1)

10 Jackson, B., 1978

(2)

11 Jackson, Terri(?), 1971

(1)

12 Jacobs, Maria, n.d.

(1)

13 Jameson, Seldon, 1972

(1)

14 Jamieson, (Mr.), 1971

(1)

15 Jamieson, M., 1969

(1)

16 Jamieson, Nan, 1973

(1)

17 Jamieson, Norma, 1979

(3)

18 Jankola, Beth, 1980

(1)

19 Janzen , P., 1971

(1)

20 Japanese American Citizen's League, 1949

(1)

21 Jarvis, Julia, 1972

(3)

22 Jeffrey, David L., 1973

(3)

23 Jenkins, Marion, 1973

(2)

24 Jewinsky, Hans, 1976

(1)

25 Jewison, Don B., 1971

(5)

26 Johnson, Al, 1982

(1)

27 Johnson, Leo, 1971

(1)

28 Johnston, Onalee, 1975

(1)

29 Johnston, George, 1970

(1)

30 Johnston, Jean (Jinny) and Stafford, l 932-83

(591)

31 Johnston, Pat, 1980

(1)

32 Johnston, Paulette, n.d.

(1)

33 Johnstone, Keith, 1971

(2)

34 Jonakait, Mill, n.d.

(1)

35 Jones, Elizabeth, 1980

(2)

36 Jones, H.M., 1950

(1)

37 Jones, John, 1971

(1)

38 Jordan, Jane (White), 1976

(1)

39 Journal of Canadian Fiction, 1971

(1)

40 Juhasz, Anna, 1981

(2)

41 Jutras, Luc, 1975-77

(11)

BoxFolder
591 Kafumukache, C., 1963

(1)

2 Kagan, Sam (?), 1935

(1)

3 Kane, Marlene, 1982

(1)

4 Kantes, Maggie, 1976

(1)

5 Kaplan, Bess, 1971-73

(11)

6 Karasick, Irene, 1975-81

(4)

7 Kattan, Naim, 1969-77

(21)

8 Kaufmann, Arlene, 1972

(1)

9 Kaunda, Martin, 1961

(1)

10 Kay, Ernest, 1976-81

(4)

11 Kearns, Lionel, 1970-79

(5)

12 Kee, Y.T., 1975

(5)

13 Kehoe, Joan, 1977

(1)

14 Keitner, Wendy J., 1980

(4)

15 Kelsall, S., 1965

(1)

16 Kennedy, Leo, 1973-82

(16)

17 Kennedy, Murray, 1981(?)

(1)

18 Kennedy, Robert M., 1976

(1)

19 Kennedy, Susan, 1973

(1)

20 Kent, Peter, 1978

(1)

21 Kent, Phillida, 1977-78

(9)

22 Kidd, J.R., 1958

(2)

23 Kiil, Toivo, 1971-75

(49)

24 Killam, Douglas, n.d.

(1)

25 Kimball, Meredith, 1977-78

(3)

26 King, Elizabeth, 1964

(1)

27 King, Faith B., 1974

(1)

28 Kingsbury, 1947

(11)

29 Kirk, Beryl, 1976

(1)

30 Kirkwood, Hilda, 1977-61

(4)

31 Kischuk, B., 1970

(1)

32 Kitaeff, Rick, 1966

(2)

33 Kiyooka, Roy Kenzie, 1968

(1)

34 Klass, Alan A., 1976

(2)

35 Klassen, Al, 1972

(1)

36 Kleiman, Ed, 1971

(2)

37 Klein, Carroll, 1981

(2)

38 Klinck, Carl F., 1973

(3)

39 Klippenstein, Lawrence, 1975

(3)

40 Klymasz, Robert B., 1969

(5)

41 Knight, Rolf, 1981

(2)

42 Kniskern, Julie Ann, 1976

(2)

43 Kogawa, Joy, 1971-77

(3)

44 Kon, Irene, 1975-80

(7)

45 Kon, Louis, 1944-55

(2)

46 Kopp Clinical Laboratories, 1977

(1)

47 Koshure, Linda, 1968

(2)

48 Koubadinski, Pencho, 1980

(2)

49 Kowalenko, Al, 1976

(1)

50 Kozar, Frank, 1974

(1)

51 Krawchuk, Peter, 1973

(2)

52 Kreisel, Henry, 1969-72

(5)

53 Krick(?), Julie, n.d.

(1)

54 Kritsch, Joan, 1971

(2)

55 Kunselas(?), Irene, 1973

(1)

56 Kurc, Marta, 1971

(1)

57 Kurth, Burton, 1972

(2)

BoxFolder
601 La Clare, Leo, 1976

(1)

2 Lachance, Bertrand, 1973-75

(34)

3 Ladner, Peter, 1981

(1)

4 Lamb, Mildred, 1977-82

(25)

5 Lambert, (Mr.), n.d.

(1)

6 Lambertson, (Prof.), n.d.

(1)

7 Lambertson, Michiko, 1973

(1)

8 Lambton, Gwenda and Bill, 1977

(5)

9 L'Ami, Charles E., 1973

(1)

10 L'Ami, Pearl, 1973

(1)

11 Lampert, Arlene, 1973-81

(51)

12 Lampert, Gerald, 1967-77

(31)

13 Landburg, (Mrs.), 1981

(1)

14 Landry, Renee, 1978

(1)

15 Lane, Lauriat (Jr.), 1976

(1)

16 Lane, Patrick, 1967-81

(13)

17 Lang, Christoph H., 1975

(2)

18 Langloys, William, 1975

(1)

19 Lapointe, Francoise, 1977

(1)

20 Larder, David F., 1965

(3)

21 Large, Brenda, 1976

(1)

22 Large, K., 1950

(1)

23 Larock, Margaret Hayes, 1980

(3)

24 Larratt, Denis F., 1970

(2)

25 Latham, Sheila, 1980

(3)

26 Laundy, Cynthia, 1977 (1)
27 Laurence, Margaret, 1982

(1)

28 Laurentian University, 1971

(1)

29 Lawless, D.J., 1976

(1)

30 Lawless, Henry Alan, 1970

(1)

31 Lawrance, James, (Restricted) n.d.

(2)

32 Lawrance, Scott, 1980-81

(5)

33 Lawrence, Bob, 1972

(2)

34 Lawrence, Joan M., 1971-72

(2)

35 Lawson, Jean and Mim, n.d.

(2)

36 Lawson, Patrick, 1972

(1)

37 Lawson, William (Lon) T., 1936(?)-82

(105)

38 Lawton, Dean P.J., n.d.

(1)

39 Layne, W.C., 1970

(2)

40 Lazonick, Bayla, 1977-78

(2)

41 Le Butt, Paul, 1966

(1)

42 Le Dressay, Anne, 1971

(1)

43 Leblanc, Paul-Emile, 1973-74

(11)

44 Lecker, Robert, 1977

(6)

45 Leduc, G., 1977

(6)

46 Ledwell, Frank J., 1969

(1)

47 Ledwidge, Nicholas, 1975

(1)

48 Lennox, Eleanor, 1982

(2)

49 Lent, John, 1982

(4)

50 Leonard, Anne (Sister), 1972

(1)

51 Leslie, Roy F., 1973

(4)

52 Leslie, Susan, 1978-81

(7)

53 Lester, A.M., 1963

(1)

54 Levchev, Lyubomir, 1980

(2)

55 Lever, Bernice, 1974-81

(24)

BoxFolder
656 Levi, Zojica, 1962

(1)

BoxFolder
6057 Levine, Norman, 1958

(1)

58 Levitt, Sonia, 1965

(2)

59 Levy, Simone, 1932

(1)

BoxFolder
611 Levy, Yvette, 1936

(1)

2 Lew, C., 1959

(4)

3 Lewis, (Prof.), 1963

(1)

4 Lewis, David (The Honourable), 1974

(2)

5 Lewis, Hunter, 1947

(3)

6 Lewis, Janet, 1971-72

(3)

7 Leuds, Don, 1975

(1)

8 Liebelein, Eleanore, 1975-76

(10)

9 Lightfoot, William, 1961

(2)

10 Lillard, Charles, 1975

(3)

11 Lindenberger, Alice, 1959

(3)

12 Lipp, Solomon, 1978-79

(3)

13 Lippert, Lora, 1975-76

(4)

14 Lisole, Hans-Joachim (Class of), 1979

(1)

15 Litchie, Candace, 1974-76

(2)

16 Little, C., 1963

(2)

17 Little, Diana, 1961-62

(13)

18 Livesay, Dorothy, 1974

(1)

19 Livingston, Judie, 1972

(1)

20 Locatelli, Rae, 1971

(1)

21 Lochhead, Douglas, 1971-73

(13)

22 Lochhead, Liz, 1979

(3)

23 Locke, Charles H., 1974

(2)

24 Locke, Jeannine, 1980-81

(6)

25 Lockwood, George H., 1974-77

(5)

26 Lo-Cost Moving and Storage, 1971-72

(4)

27 Locus Creative Leisure Society, 1975

(1)

28 Loeb, Louisa, 1976-79

(17)

29 Loeb, Martin B., 1978

(1)

30 Loeb, Naomi, 1973-74

(2)

31 Lombardou, J.(?), 1967-69

(3)

32 Long, Kenneth, 1972

(2)

33 Longley, Michael, 1975

(2)

34 Leopold Waldorf (CA) Ltd., 1963

(1)

35 Lord Elgin Hotel, 1978

(1)

36 Lord, Elizabeth, n.d.

(1)

37 LoVerso, Catrina Edwards, 1973-74

(8)

38 Lovewell, Jan, 1978

(2)

39 Low, A.R., 1971

(1)

40 Low, Gail, 1976-77

(3)

41 Lowry, Malcolm, (3)

n.d.

42 Lowther, Pat, 1970-75

(19)

43 Lucas, David, 1967

(1)

44 Lucas, M., 1969

(2)

45 Lucas, Michael, 1976-82

(4)

46 McAlpine, Mary (Dobbs), 1981

(5)

47 MacAulay, Dorothy, 1980

(1)

48 McBean, Ramona, 1971-72

(15)

49 McCalla, A.G., 1970

(1)

50 McCarthy, Sheila, 1980-81

(6)

51 McClay, Cathy, 1973

(1)

52 McClelland, Jack, 1952-72

(17)

53 McClung, Marcia, 1970

(2)

54 McClung, Nellie, 1974-76

(4)

55 McClure, Donalda (Mrs. James), 1971-74

(3)

56 McConnell, Alice, 1943

(1)

56 McConnell, Ruth, 1968 1968

(1)

57 McConnell, Ruth, 1968

(1)

58 McConnell, William C., 1950-77

(10)

59 McCook, Katherine, 1974

(1)

60 McCormack, Robert, 1960

(2)

61 McCue, Harvey (or Waubageshig), 1971

(4)

62 McCullagh, Joan, 1970-79

(7)

63 Macdonald, Alex B., 1968-81

(61)

64 McDonald, Betsy (Gourre), 1973

(3)

65 Macdonald, Catherine, 1972

(1)

66 Macdonald, Dorothy Anne, 1970-81

(2)

67 Macdonald, Goodridge, 1958

(1)

68 MacDonald, Ian, 1972

(1)

69 MacDonald, Margaret, 1981

(3)

70 McDonald, Mike, 1975

(1)

71 McDonnell, Derry, 1979-80

(3)

72 McDonnell, Jerry, 1978

(1)

73 McDougall, A.L., 1968

(1)

74 McDougall, Anne, 1972

(1)

75 McDougall, Robert L., 1968-74

(15)

BoxFolder
621 McElroy, Walter, 1950

(1)

2 McEwen, C.J., 1977

(1)

3 MacEwen, Gwen, 1971-75

(5)

4 McFadden, David, 1976-77

(2)

5 MacFadden, Jo, 1973

(1)

6 McFarlane, Myra, 1974-78

(18)

7 MacFarlane, Winnifred, 1979

(2)

8 McGill University Library, 1969

(1)

9 McGrawď·“Hill Ryerson Limited, 1950-75

(31)

10 McGregor, Bob, 1949

(1)

11 McGregor, Grant, 1973

(1)

12 MacGregor, R.A., 1949

(4)

13 MacGregor, Roy, 1973

(2)

14 MacGregor, Wilma, 1978

(1)

15 McGugan, Alan, 1971

(2)

16 McGuigan, Brad H., 1981

(1)

17 MacInnis, Grace, 1965(?)

(1)

18 McInnis, Nadine, 1977-81

(30)

19 McIntyre, Iris, 1973

(2)

20 McKay, Constance, n.d.

(1)

21 McKay, Ian, 1979

(3)

22 McKay, Shirley, 1980

(1)

23 McKeag, John W. (Mrs.), 1973

(1)

24 MacKellar, Phoebe Erskine, 1955-67

(2)

25 MacKenzie, Cameron, 1978

(1)

26 McKenzie, Jim, 1977

(1)

27 MacKenzie, Joanne, n.d.

(1)

28 MacKenzie, M., 1971

(1)

29 MacKenzie, Norman 1., 1981

(1)

30 McKinnon, Barry, 1974-75

(8)

31 MacKinnon, Daphne, n.d.

(1)

32 MacKinnon, J.F., 1947-48

(3)

33 Mackintosh, Mhari, 1977

(2)

34 McKitterick, Gertrude, 1960-64

(8)

35 Macklem, Michael, 1971-79

(12)

36 McLab Properties, 1971

(1)

37 McLaren, Floris, 1947(?)-77

(8)

38 McLaren, Joseph, 1981

(2)

39 McLay, Catherine M., 1972-73

(9)

40 McLean, Ken, 1981

(2)

41 Maclean's, 1973

(1)

42 McLellan, Anne, 1959

(1)

43 McLeod, Alan, 1980

(2)

44 McLeod, Garth, 1979

(1)

45 McLeod, Joseph, 1977

(1)

46 McMahon, Mary, 1970

(5)

47 McMaster, Juliet, 1977-78

(4)

48 McMaster, Susan, 1973

(3)

49 MacMillan, Alice, 1977

(1)

50 The Macmillan Company of Canada, 1932-74

(2)

51 McMillan, Hazel, 1972-73

(3)

52 Macmillan, John F., 1970-72

(3)

53 Macmillan, M., 1963

(1)

54 McMullen, Lorraine, 1973-78

(22)

55 McMullin, B.J., 1971

(4)

56 Macnair, A.L., 1960

(1)

57 McNeil, David S. and Florence, 1971-82

(6)

58 McNutt, Robert, 1968

(1)

59 McPhee, Rosalind, 1978

(2)

60 Macpherson, Helen Teskey, 1967

(1)

61 MacPherson, Jay, n.d.

(1)

62 MacRae, Don, 1975

(1)

63 McRobbie, Kenneth, 1975

(1)

64 MacSween, R.J., 1971

(1)

65 McWhinney, William, 1962-63

(6)

66 McWhirter, George, 1972

(3)

BoxFolder
631 Madsen, Ets, 1979

(1)

2 Mahanti, Jogesh C., 1975

(1)

3 Maki, Heather, 1973

(1)

4 Mallinson, Jean, 1976

(5)

5 Mallory, Louise, 1972

(1)

6 Mandel, Eli, 1971-73

(2)

7 Mandelblatt, Donna, 1972

(3)

8 Manders, Don, 1977

(1)

9 Manguni, S.K (Rev.), 1975-77

(6)

10 Mansbridge, Francis, 1978-79

(6)

11 Mansfield, Daria (Papish), 1975

(1)

12 Manson, H.A., 1961

(1)

13 Marchand, Blaine, 1978-81

(9)

14 Maris, Stella (Sister), 1977

(1)

15 Marlatt, Daphne, 1982

(1)

16 Marriott, Anne, 1971-74

(11)

17 Marshall, Andrew, 1978

(1)

18 Marshall, D., 1979

(1)

19 Marshall, Deborah, 1978

(1)

20 Marshall, Hilary S., 1971-73

(6)

21 Marshall, Linda, 1976

(2)

22 Marshall, Joyce, 1978-80

(7)

23 Marshall, Sybil, 1981

(1)

24 Marshall, Tom, 1971-79

(14)

25 Martel, George, 1973

(4)

26 Martens, Antoinette, 1981

(2)

27 Martin, D.R., 1971

(1)

28 Martin, Heather, 1981

(1)

29 Martin, Judith, 1974

(1)

30 Martin, Mary, 1981

(1)

31 Martin, Mary Foster, 1973-77

(7)

32 Martin, Sandy, n.d.

(1)

33 Martin, Stewart, 1979

(1)

34 Martineau, Barbara, 1981

(2)

35 Martinez, M., 1978

(3)

36 The Martlet , 1972

(3)

37 Mary Adelaide (Sister) 1973-74

(2)

38 Mason, Bob, 1977

(1)

39 Mason, Geoffrey, 1974

(5)

40 Matczuk, S., 1979

(1)

41 Mate, Casely M.O., 1961-63

(6)

42 Matheson, Gwen, 1970-81

(29)

43 Mathews, Robin D., 1970-77

(44)

44 Matson, P.J., 1973

(1)

45 Matthews, Burt C., 1973

(4)

46 Matthews, Lynn, 1976

(1)

47 Maude, Mary McD., 1977

(1)

48 May, Ruth, 1982

(1)

49 Maynard, Max, n.d.

(1)

50 Mayne, Seymour, 1967-79

(88)

51 Mayne, W.J., 1970

(2)

52 Mays, John B., 1973-77

(7)

53 Mazvimbakupa, Kido, 1975-77

(7)

54 Meilen, Bill, 1973

(2)

55 Meland, Sheba, 1976

(3)

56 Mellor, Kirsten, 1978

(2)

57 Mellott, R.S., 1974

(1)

58 Merrett, Kathy, 1972

(4)

59 Metcalf, Anne, 1958

(1)

60 Mew, Diane, 1971

(1)

61 Meyer, Bruce, 1980

(2)

62 Meyer, June, 1977

(1)

63 Meyers, Marguerite, 1972

(1)

64 Meyers Studio, 1973

(2)

65 Mezei(?), Kathy, 1978

(1)

BoxFolder
641 Mickelson, Ivy M., 1970

(1)

2 Mickleburg, Bruce, 1971-76

(20)

3 Midi(?), Roy, n.d.

(1)

4 Milbrandt, Roger, 1975

(4)

5 Mildon, Denis, 1976

(2)

6 Miles, Marlene, 1973

(2)

7 Miles, Robert V., 1980

(1)

8 Miles, Ron, 1973

(1)

9 Mill, John B., 1928

(1)

10 Millar, Winn, 1971

(2)

11 Millard, Bernice E., 1976

(1)

12 Miller, Edna, 1975

(2)

13 Millette, Rodrigue, 1968

(2)

14 Milligan, Frank, 1969

(1)

15 Millikan, Marcia, 1958

(1)

16 Millin, Doreen, 1977-78

(3)

17 Millman, Doris A., 1976

(1)

18 Mills, Allen, 1973

(2)

19 Millward, Arthur, 1978

(2)

20 Milner, Phil, 1978

(3)

21 Milner, Ralph, 1965

(1)

22 Milton, Alan, 1962

(3)

23 Mintz, Helen, 1973

(2)

24 Mitchell, Adrian, 1977

(3)

25 Mitchell, Beverly (Sister), 1970-75

(2)

26 Mitchell, Mabel D., 1947

(1)

27 Mkandla, C.F., 1977

(1)

28 Moberly, J. Vera , 1934-35

(2)

29 Mohammed, Faqir, 1970

(1)

30 Mollins, Carl, n. d.

(1)

31 Molotsi, Prisca, Prisc a Jr., Keitumetse, 1961-80

(71)

32 Molotsi, Sam, 1962

(1)

33 Monkman, Robina, 1947

(1)

34 Montero, Gloria, 1976-77

(7)

35 Montgomery, (Mrs.), 1971

(1)

36 Moore, Jocelyn, 1936-78

(11)

37 Moore, Kathleen C., 1979-80

(5)

38 Moreau, Jean, n.d.

(1)

39 Morgan, Richard, 1938

(1)

40 Morley, Patricia , 1979-80

(7)

41 Morrisseau, (Mr.), 1971

(1)

42 Morrissette, George, n.d.

(1)

43 Morton, Mary Lee, 1976

(1)

44 Morton, Tom, 1979-80

(7)

45 Moss, John G., 1971-73

(9)

46 Motzer, Donna, 1974

(1)

47 Moulson(?), Nan, 1953

(2)

48 Mowat, Farley, 1971

(1)

49 Mowatt, Don, 1979-80

(9)

50 Moxon, James, 1972

(1)

51 Muilenburg, Walter J., 1948

(2)

52 Muir, B., 1974

(2)

53 Muir, M., 1946

(1)

54 Mundwiler, Leslie, 1979

(2)

55 Munro, Marion, 1967

(1)

56 Munro, Ross, 1969

(1)

57 Murdoch, Margaret M. and family, 1967-68

(2)

58 Murphy, Sharon M., 1971

(4)

59 Murray, Rona, 1972-74

(4)

60 Murrell-Wright, Gilbert, 1929-73

(4)

61 Musgrave, Susan, 1973-79

(6)

62 Mwilma, U.G., 1963

(2)

63 Myers, R.D., 1970

(1)

64 Myke, Norris A., 1968

(2)

BoxFolder
651 Nadeau, Charlotte, (1) 1972
2 Nause, John, 1973-74

(8)

3 Nelson, Jim, 1969

(1)

4 Nelson, Sharon, 1971

(2)

5 Nemetz, Bel, 1979

(1)

6 Nemetz, N.T. (The Honourable), 1973

(1)

7 Nesbitt, Bruce, 1974-79

(7)

8 Neville, Mary, 1962

(1)

9 New, William H., 1967-79

(13)

10 Newlove, John, 1971-80

(10)

11 Newman, P.C., 1979

(1)

12 Newman, Sally, 1953

(1)

13 New Masses, 1938

(1)

14 Nichols, Sue, 1974-77

(8)

15 Nikolov, Petar, 1981

(2)

16 Nikolova, Dobrina, 1979-82

(23)

17 Niven, Alastair, 1971

(1)

18 Nixon, Doug, 1951

(2)

19 Noble, Allison, 1979

(3)

20 Noel-Bentley, Peter C., 1974

(2)

21 Norris, Ken, 1976

(3)

22 Northern Review, 1950-51

(1)

23 Nowlan, Michael 0., 1978-80

(6)

24 NRG, Dept. of Education, Lusaka, 1963

(1)

25 Nurse, Stuart, 1980

(2)

26 Oakley, Kathryn, 1976

(1)

27 Ober, W.U., 1973

(2)

28 Oberon Press(?), n.d.

(1)

29 Obese-Jecty, K.A., 1963

(1)

30 Ochs, Rene, 1963

(1)

31 O'Dacre, Ed, 1977

(2)

32 O'Doherty, Patrick J., 1973

(1)

33 O'Donnell, Kathleen, 1969-73

(16)

34 O'Kane, Margaret, 1980

(1)

35 Olensky(?), (Miss), 1971

(1)

36 Olney, Austin G., 1950-53

(5)

37 Olthuis, Brian, 1971

(1)

38 Ondaatje, Michael, 1976

(4)

39 Ono, Jenny Polson, 1972

(1)

40 Oppenheimer College, 1963

(1)

41 Optholt, Isabelle, 1965-73

(10)

42 Orrell, J.O., 1971

(1)

43 Osborn, Margot, 1972

(2)

44 Osborne, Julia, 1965

(1)

45 Osmian, Renate, 1981

(1)

46 Ostry, Ethel, (1) 1936
47 Oswald, Lesley , 1976-77

(4)

48 The Ottawa Citizen, 1977

(1)

49 OuTm-et,Albert J., 1977

(1)

50 Ovans, C.D., 1965

(1)

51 Oxley, Bob, 1979

(2)

52 Pacey, Desmond, 1968-75

(13)

53 Pacey, Peter, 1973

(1)

54 Pacsu, Margaret, 1979

(1)

55 Page, Pat K., 1974-79

(8)

56 Palk, Molly and William, 1979

(3)

57 Palmer, Howard, n.d.

(2)

58 Panton, Paul, 1978-82

(40)

59 Paolucci, Anne, 1974-77

(13)

60 Parker, Betty, 1970

(1)

61 Parker-Jervis, N.J., 1969-77(?)

(6)

62 Parkinson, Daniel, 1978

(1)

63 Parmenter, Ross, 1932-81

(9)

64 Partridge, Colin, 1972-73

(2)

65 Paschal, Dorothy, 1979

(3)

BoxFolder
661 Patching(?), Donna(?), 1971

(1)

2 Pater, Alan F., 1980

(6)

3 Patriarche, Valance St.Just (Mrs. Pat), 1939-69

(49)

4 Patterson, F.P., 1955

(1)

5 Patterson, Margaret, 1971

(1)

6 Paull, Margaret, 1965

(1)

7 Paulson, Ronald M., 1972

(2)

8 Paz, Lucille, 1980

(1)

9 Pearce, John, 1976

(2)

10 Pearce, Jon, 1975-77

(4)

11 Pearson, Ian, 1975-76

(12)

12 Peck, Edward, 1977-78

(4)

13 Pedersen, K.G. , 1974

(2)

14 Peel, Tim, 1976

(1)

15 Peguis Publishers Limited, 1973

(3)

16 Pellegrin, (Rev. Dean ), 1977(?)

(1)

17 Pelletier, Jules, 1971-73

(6)

18 Penner, Addie, 1980

(7)

19 Penner, Elva, 1980

(1)

20 Pentland, Barbara, 1951-82

(35)

21 Pentland, H. Clare, 1975

(3)

22 Perly, Caroline M., 1976

(3)

23 Perry, Doris, 1976

(1)

24 Person, Lloyd H., 1975

(2)

25 Petch, Howard, 1975

(1)

26 Peterson, Corinne, 1980

(1)

27 Peterson, Leslie, 1982

(1)

28 Petrone, Penny, 1971-75

(31)

29 Phillips, Donna C., 1977

(2)

30 Pierce(?), Jon, 1983

(2)

31 Pierce, Lorne, 1928-59

(51)

32 Pierce, Pat, 1972-73

(5)

33 Pietropaolo, Damiano, 1982

(1)

34 Pike, C.M., 1963

(1)

35 Pilatyk, Nick, Mary, and Peter, n.d.

(1)

36 Pilon, Henri, 1978

(1)

37 Pires, Benild, 1972

(1)

38 Pirotton, Phyllis, 1979

(7)

39 Pivato, Joseph, 1971

(1)

40 Plantos, Ted, 1967-78

(3)

41 Platter, Emma E., 1970-71

(3)

42 Plimley's, 1967

(1)

43 Ploude, Roger, 1978

(1)

44 Poisson, Helen and Rodney, 1973

(2)

45 Polson, A. Murray B., 1978

(1)

46 Polson, Murray, 1972-77

(33)

47 Polson, Philippa, 1951-78

(23)

48 Pomeroy, H.G., 1970

(3)

49 Popov, Anthony (Tony), 1981

(2)

50 Porteous, Timothy, 1976

(1)

51 Porter, Arabel J., 1953

(1)

52 Posner, Harry, 1977

(1)

53 Poth(?), Helena, 1979

(1)

54 Potts, Doris, 1982

(1)

55 Powell, Craig, 1976

(1)

56 Powell, Marilyn, n.d.

(1)

57 Power, N.E., 1964-65

(6)

58 Powers, Ellen, 1977

(1)

59 Poynter, G.G., 1977

(3)

60 Poyntz, S.G. (The Ven.), 1977-78

(2)

61 Pratt, Ned, 1935

(1)

62 Press Porcepic, 1975-77

(7)

63 Pressers, P., 1977

(1)

64 Preston, Norrie, 1973

(3)

65 Price, Bess, 1982

(3)

66 Price, D.M., 1971

(1)

67 Price(?), Marjorie(?) (Peggy), n.d.

(1)

68 Pritzker, Lee, 1953

(1)

69 The Progressive Arts Club, 1934

(1)

70 Prusak, B., 1972

(1)

71 Pryden, D.M., 1971

(1)

72 Purcell, Gillis (Gil), 1957-82

(32)

73 Purdy, Al, 1971

(5)

74 Puzey, Ruth, 1953-69

(6)

BoxFolder
671 Quayle, W.A., 1972

(1)

2 Queen, Gloria, 1929

(1)

3 Quevillon, Jocelyne, 1965

(1)

4 Quickenden(?), Robert, 1981

(1)

5 Rafferty, Larry, 1972

(1)

6 Rajan, N., 1972

(1)

7 Rampersad, Maureen, 1976

(1)

8 Ramraj, Victor, 1976

(1)

9 Ramsay, (Prof.), 1952(?) or 1972(?)

(2)

10 Randal, Alan, 1974

(1)

11 Randal, Dalton and Rose, 1982

(1)

12 Rankin, Laird, 1976-77

(2)

13 Ransom, Erica, 1930-81

(36)

14 Rapaport, Janis, 1974-77

(11)

15 Ravault, Margaret, 1962

(1)

16 Ravenscroft, Arthur, 1971

(3)

17 Ray, Donald (Rev.), 1970

(1)

18 Read, Robert W., 1973

(1)

19 Reading, C. Antoinette, 1967-69

(9)

20 Reagan, Brian, 1980-81

(2)

21 Reaney, James and Colleen (Thibaudeau), 1969-82

(8)

22 Reed, Percy L., 1980

(2)

23 Reed, Sarah R., 1969

(1)

24 Reid, Ann, 1967-77

(6)

25 Reid, Gayla, 1975-80

(9)

26 Reid, Jamie, n.d.

(1)

27 Reid, W.D., 1964

(1)

28 Reilly, Nolan, 1978

(2)

29 Reimer, Al, 1975

(1)

30 Reimer, Derek, 1980

(2)

31 Reinvalds, Austra, 1973

(1)

32 Renner, John, 1974

(4)

33 Renner, Vivian, 1974

(1)

34 Repka, William, 1977-78

(5)

35 Repo, Satu, 1972-73

(5)

36 Resnick, Philip and Andromat, 1972

(5)

37 Reynolds, Margaret, 1981

(2)

38 Richardson, Karen, 1982

(1)

39 Richardson, Keith, 1977

(1)

40 Richardson, Mary, 1962

(1)

41 Richardson, Stewart, 1951-52

(3)

42 Richens, Anne, 1969

(1)

43 Ricketts, Alan, 1976-78

(13)

44 Ridd, Carl, 1972

(2)

45 Riedel, Walter, 1977

(2)

46 Rinehart, Hollis, 1971

(2)

47 Ringrose, Chris, Jill and Georgia, 1971-73

(3)

48 Ritchot, Ginette, 1982

(1)

BoxFolder
681 Robb, Dodie, 1977

(1)

2 Robbins, John, 1976

(3)

3 Roberts, A.A., 1962

(2)

4 Roberts, Dorothy, 1971

(2)

5 Roberts, Gail (Jewison) and Don, 1981

(4)

6 Roberts, Kevin, 1971-74

(3)

7 Roberts, Sheila, 1980

(1)

8 Robertson, Alastair Howard, 1968

(1)

9 Robertson, Anthony, 1980

(4)

10 Robertson, Heather, 1978

(3)

11 Robertson, Helen, 1975-76

(2)

12 Robertson, Irene, 1979

(3)

13 Robertson, James S., 1961-65

(22)

14 Robertson, N.A., 1974

(2)

15 Robertson, Robert, 1971-76

(4)

16 Robins, Marjorie M., 1974-82

(3)

17 Robinson, Clayton L.N., 1978

(3)

18 Robinson, Guise, 1980-81

(6)

19 Robinson, J.M., 1971-72

(8)

20 Robinson, Nancy, n.d.

(1)

21 Robinson, Noel, 1951-59

(2)

22 Robitaille-Martin, Monique, n.d.

(1)

23 Robson, Margaret, 1975

(1)

24 Roddan, Sam, 1974

(3)

25 Rodgers, Gordon, 1979-80

(4)

26 Rodney, Helen M., 1975-76

(3)

27 Rogers, Dorothy, n.d.

(1)

28 Rogers, Maysie, 1974-78

(5)

29 Romalis, Dorothy, 1981

(3)

30 Rosberg, Rose, 1971

(1)

31 Rose, E.J., 1972

(6)

32 Rose, Shirley, 1970

(5)

33 Rosenblatt, Joe, 1972-73

(6)

34 Rosenbluth, Vera, 1978-79

(3)

35 Rosengarten, Herbert J., 1978-79

(10)

36 Rosenthal, Helene, 1971

(2)

37 Rosettani, Eleanor, 1972

(1)

38 Ross, Art, 1969-74

(2)

39 Ross, Catherine, 1973-77

(11)

40 Ross, Malcolm, 1971-72

(3)

41 Ross, Rose, 1980-81

(6)

42 Roth, William E., 1963

(6)

43 Rowe, Kaye, n.d.

(2)

44 Roworth, E., 1974

(1)

45 Roxburgh, Ross, 1971

(4)

46 Roy, Flora, 1965

(3)

47 The Royal Society of Canada, 1953

(3)

48 Royce, Marion V., 1960

(1)

49 Rudnyckyj, J.D., 1974

(1)

50 Ruhen, Olaf, 1980

(1)

51 Rule, Jane, 1978

(1)

52 Russell, Lawrence, 1972

(1)

53 Russell, Peter, 1973

(2)

54 Rutherford, Anna, 1971

(3)

55 Rutland, Emil, 1976

(1)

56 Ryan, Oscar, 1977-82

(41)

57 Ryan, Toby, 1977-81

(3)

BoxFolder
691 Saab, Ron, 1970

(2)

2 Sackey, Joseph, 1961-63

(8)

3 Safarik, Alan, 1971-82

(110)

4 Sagaris, Lake, 1975-82

(9)

5 St. Finbarre's Cathedral, 1977

(2)

6 St. James Press, 1970

(3)

7 St. John, John, 1951

(3)

8 St. Marks Press, 1978

(1)

9 Saito, Michiko, n.d.

(1)

10 Salmon, Pat, 1966

(1)

11 Samson, Audrey, 1975

(2)

12 Samson, Elizabeth, 1971

(1)

13 Sanburn, R.A., 1971

(1)

14 Sanderad, Roar, 1962

(1)

15 Sandler-Hanson, Kristina, 1975

(2)

16 Sangster, Joan, 1980

(2)

17 Sargeant, Howard, 1982

(3)

18 Saturday Night, 1972

(1)

19 Saunders, Doris, 1972

(1)

20 Saunders, Lyn, 1970

(1)

21 Saunders, Peter R., 1974

(2)

22 Saunders, Tom, 1975

(1)

23 Savoie, Paul, 1974

(1)

24 Sayers, Anne, 1965-69

(7)

25 Scheier, Libby, 1977

(2)

26 Schellenberg, Henry H., 1970

(1)

27 Schermbrucker, W.G., 1976

(4)

28 Schneider, Ernest, 1971

(1)

29 Schutz, Gail, 1979

(4)

30 Schwab, Arnold T., 1982

(4)

31 Scobie, Maureen, 1971

(2)

32 Scobie, Stephen A., 1971-76

(12)

33 Scorer, Mary, 1972-75

(106)

34 Scott, C.O., 1939

(1)

35 Scott, Jack, 1973

(2)

36 Scott, Virginia, 1976

(3)

37 Seager, Allen, 1980

(2)

38 Seaman, M., 1971

(1)

39 Self, J.A., 1945

(2)

40 Semelhago, Bernard, 1976

(1)

41 Seneca College, 1974

(1)

42 Senn, G.C., 1975

(1)

43 Serumaga, Robert, 1973

(1)

44 Service, Dorothy Jane, 1968

(1)

45 Sewell, M.G., 1963

(2)

46 Shain, Merle, 1971

(4)

47 Shakespeare, J., 1963

(1)

48 Shane, J.E., 1974

(1)

49 Shaw, L., 1972

(1)

50 Sheard, Charlene, 1978

(3)

51 Shefrin, Jill, 1977

(2)

52 Shen, Jane E., 1982

(2)

53 Sheppard, Sarah, 1980

(1)

54 Sherry, Ruth, n.d.

(1)

55 Shewchuk, Kathy, 1977

(1)

56 Shipley, Nan E., 1975

(1)

57 Short Story Anthology, 1971

(1)

58 Shreve, Sandy, 1982

(2)

BoxFolder
701 Sibley, Brian, 1971

(1)

2 Sida, D., 1972

(1)

3 Siegler, Karl H., 1979

(6)

4 Silanda(?), Dorcas and Howard, 1980

(1)

5 Sillers, Pat, 1981

(3)

6 Silver, David S., 1972

(1)

7 Simon Fraser University, Sp.Collections, 1980

(2)

8 Simpson, K.P., 1980-81

(4)

9 Simpson, Leo, 1972

(1)

10 Simpson-Cooke, Janet, 1982

(3)

11 Sinclair, James, 1950

(3)

12 Sinclair, Jean, n.d.

(1)

13 Sinclair, Michael D., 1964-70

(8)

14 Sinclair, Phillis, 1982

(1)

15 Singer, D. Kurt, 1973

(1)

16 Sirola, D. Grant, 1977-78

(3)

17 Skelton, Elizabeth, 1972

(3)

18 Skelton, Robin, 1972

(1)

19 Skerrett, Dawn, 1973

(4)

20 Skill, Valerie, 1961-73

(3)

21 Skretkowicz, Victor(Jr.), 1976

(1)

22 Skrypnyk, Mary, 1973

(2)

23 Slater, Judith (Coke), 1981

(1)

24 Slavik, Ron F., 1976

(1)

25 Slobodin, Katie A., 1977

(1)

26 Smal, Steve, 1981

(2)

27 Small, Richard, 1980

(1)

28 Smart, Anne, 1981

(2)

29 Smart, Carolyn, 1974-75

(8)

30 Smart, Pat, 1978-80

(3)

31 Smith, (Mrs.), n.d.

(1)

32 Smith, Arthur J.M., 1948

(1)

33 Smith, Cameron M., 1977

(1)

34 Smith, D., 1979

(2)

35 Smith, D.E., 1968-72

(6)

36 Smith, I. Norman, 1944-67(?)

(2)

37 Smith, Jim, 1975-76

(2)

38 Smith, John, 1977

(2)

39 Smith, (?), Kay, 1971

(1)

40 Smith, Lois, 1981

(1)

41 Smith, Ron, 1973-74

(5)

42 Smith, W.A.S., 1974

(2)

43 Smith, W.I., 1970-71

(5)

44 Smyth, Jacqui, 1982

(1)

45 Snook, Michael, 1979

(1)

46 Sokoloff, Ben, 1974-76

(7)

47 Solecki, Sam, 1979-82

(11)

48 Soles, A.E., 1974

(1)

49 Solomon, B., 1978

(1)

50 Somerset, Dorothy, 1952

(1)

51 Somerville, Jane, 1975

(1)

52 Sommerville(?), Sandi, 1981

(1)

53 Sorfleet, Bob, 1972

(2)

54 Sosnowski, Margaret, 1974

(2)

55 Sosnowsky, Catherine, 1978-82

(9)

56 Souchotte, Sandra (Ketchum), 1977

(2)

57 Souster, Raymond, 1972

(1)

BoxFolder
711 Sparshott, Francis, 1973-78

(3)

2 Spears, Heather, 1976(?)-83

(12)

3 Spettigue, Douglas 0., 1970

(3)

4 Spratt, Albert A., 1971

(5)

5 Stadnyk, Maurice B., 1971

(2)

6 Stambazes(?), Sara, 1971

(1)

7 Stanev, Stefan, 1980

(2)

8 Startup, Charles A., 1980

(1)

9 Steele, Heather, 1958

(1)

10 Steffler, John, 1980

(2)

11 Steiman, Laura B., 1980

(3)

12 Steph, Sid, n.d.

(1)

13 Stephens, Donald G., 1971-73

(10)

14 Stevens, Peter, 1966-73

(9)

15 Stevenson, Lionel, 1959

(1)

16 Stevenson, Warren, 1971

(1)

17 Stewart, Don, 1981

(1)

18 Stewart, Douglas, 1980

(2)

19 Stewart, Joan, 1975

(1)

20 Stewart, R.J., 1970

(3)

21 Stigant, E.W., 1977

(1)

22 Stoddart, Jack, 1975-77

(2)

23 Stoddart, Susan, 1976-77

(2)

24 Stone, James, 1970-71

(12)

25 Stone, Lewis, 1937

(1)

26 Stouck, David, 1972-76

(16)

27 Strackey, Celia, 1946-64

(4)

28 Strang, Elspeth, n.d.

(1)

29 Street, Eloise, n.d.

(1)

30 Street, Shari, 1982

(2)

31 Stricker, Roleen and G., n.d.

(3)

32 Struthers, Betty, 1978

(2)

33 Stubbs, Roy St. George and Margaret, 1972-74

(7)

34 StuParick, Marian A., 1975-76

(6)

35 Such, Peter, 1972-73

(4)

36 Suckow, Ruth (Mrs. Ferner Nuhn), 1946

(1)

37 Suharto, H.E., n.d.

(1)

38 Suknaski, Andy, 1977

(1)

39 Sullivan, John F., 1971

(2)

40 Sullivan, Mary, 1976

(1)

41 Sullivan, Nancy, 1974

(1)

42 Sundal, Barbara, 1979

(2)

43 Sutcliffe, Erma L., 1977-82

(16)

44 Sutherland, Fraser, 1972-76

(12)

45 Sutherland, John, 1943-51

(3)

46 Sutherland, Ronald, 1971-72

(4)

47 Sutherton, Kathleen (Lee), 1950-59

(3)

48 Swallow, Pauline V., 1974

(1)

49 Swann, Anahid, 1971

(2)

50 Sward, Robert, 1973-81

(13)

51 Swartz, Constance Grey, 1964-73

(3)

52 Swayze, Walter, 1974

(3)

53 Sylvestre, Guy, 1970

(6)

54 Symons, T.H.B., 1973

(2)

55 Szumigalski, Anne, 1976

(1)

BoxFolder
721 Takashima, Shichan, 1971-75

(4)

2 Tarasoff, John, 1938

(1)

3 Tasker, Jane A., n.d.

(2)

4 Taskins, Andris, 1980

(1)

5 Tausky, Thomas E., 1972

(1)

6 Tayas(?), Anne, 1955

(1)

7 Taylor, Gladys, 1967

(2)

8 Taylor, Joyce, 1980

(5)

9 Taylor, Thurston, 1975

(1)

10 Tellalov, Konstantine, 1978-79

(9)

11 Temm, Richard, n.d.

(1)

12 Tempest, Peter, 1980

(4)

13 Terry, Bill, 1977

(1)

14 Teunissen, John J., 1973-75

(16)

15 Than(?), Linda, 1979

(1)

16 Thaw, Arnold, 1967

(3)

17 This Magazine, 1973

(1)

18 Tho, M. Le Duc, n.d.

(1)

19 Thomas, A. Lloyd, 1970

(1)

20 Thomas, Audrey, 1978-80

(7)

21 Thomas, Clara, 1972

(1)

22 Thomas, Hallie, 1973

(2)

23 Thompson, Dorothy, 1967

(1)

24 Thompson, Jean, 1970-71

(2)

25 Thompson, John, 1969-72

(6)

26 Thompson, Kent, 1974

(4)

27 Thompson, Lee, 1979-80

(13)

28 Thompson, Valerie, 1979

(2)

29 Thomson, A.E., 1974-75

(2)

30 Thomson, Murray, 1976

(2)

31 Thordarson, Barney, 1971

(3)

32 Thornton, Enid, 1969

(1)

33 Thumboo, Edwin, 1961

(1)

34 Tidler, Charles, 1972

(1)

35 Tierney, Bill, 1971

(2)

36 Tierney, Frank M., 1977-79

(6)

37 Tietzen, Paul A., 1971

(2)

38 Tim, P., 1972

(3)

39 Tindimubona, Alex, 1980-81

(3)

40 Tinmuth, Virginia, 1976

(2)

41 Tippett, Maria, 1975

(4)

42 Tobe, Sarah (Sally) H., 1981

(2)

43 Todd, Barbara J., 1978

(3)

44 Todd, Kim, 1977-81

(31)

45 Tomlinson, John, 1981

(3)

46 Toppings, Earle, 1964-71

(5)

47 Torgensen, Caroline, n.d.

(1)

48 The Toronto Star, 1947-77

(2)

49 Tory, Elmer, 1970

(1)

50 Town, Harold, 1971-73

(4)

51 Toye, William, 1978-81

(5)

52 Trapnell, Richard C., 1977

(1)

53 Tregebov, Rhea, 1974-80

(4)

54 Trepman, Paul, 1980-81

(5)

55 Trotter, Larry, 1980

(1)

56 Trower, Peter, 1974-80

(5)

57 Trudeau, Pierre Elliott (The Honourable), 1970

(1)

58 Trueit, Roger, 1975

(2)

59 Trueman, A.W., 1958-59

(3)

60 Trueman, Peter, 1977

(2)

61 Tudiver, Neil, 1980

(1)

62 Turnbull, Sybil, 1972-74

(4)

63 Turner, Allan R., 1975

(1)

64 Turner, Edwin N., 1969

(1)

65 Turner, G.G., 1969-70

(6)

66 Turner, H.E., 1930

(3)

67 Turner, J.O., 1972

(5)

68 Turner, Jim, 1938

(1)

69 Turner, Joan, 1983

(5)

70 Turner, Myron, 1971-75

(7)

71 Turnstone Press, 1981

(1)

72 Tutiah, Marvis, 1978-79

(7)

73 Twigg, Alan, 1980

(7)

74 Twynam, M.R.L., 1976

(1)

BoxFolder
731 Ugarte, Augusto Pinochet, 1974

(2)

2 UNESCO, Teaching Services Commission, 1961-63

(8)

3 Unger, W., 1976

(2)

4 The Unitarian Church, 1977

(1)

5 University of Alberta, 1972

(1)

6 University of British Columbia, 1978

(2)

7 University of Ibadan, Nigeria, 1955

(1)

8 Upton, Bill, 1974

(2)

9 Urbach, Friedel, 1946

(1)

10 Ursell, Geoffrey, 1976

(1)

11 Valentine, Barry (Rt. Rev.), 1976-79

(2)

12 Valgurtson(?), Billy, 1974

(1)

13 Van den Berg, Robert, 1968-71

(7)

14 Van Every, Laura, 1960

(2)

15 van Herk, Aritha, 1978-79

(6)

16 Van Varseveld, Gail, 1977

(2)

17