Rosemarie van der Hooft
In the Faculty

Vocal studies  

In the Community


Contact

rvander@mts.net

Professional Bio

Mezzo-soprano Rosemarie van der Hooft holds a Masters of Early Music Performance from McGill University and has studied with early music specialist Julianne Baird and 20th century specialist Jane Manning. She is widely respected for her interpretations of Bach and Handel, performing this repertoire in England, the United States, and Canada. Rosemarie has performed in concert and oratorio with leading orchestras and early music organizations across Canada including Tafelmusik, Orchestre Symphnique de Montreal, Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Victoria Symphony Society, Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, Pacific Baroque Orchestra, Alberta Baroque Ensemble, Richard Eaton Singers and the Elora Festival, and in the United States with the New York Collegium, Washington Bach Consort, American Bach Soloists, Apollo’s Fire, Boston Handel & Haydn Society, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, and Seattle Baroque. She is featured with the Aradia Baroque Ensemble on the Naxos label recording of Purcell’s music for The Tempest, as well as a music video excerpt from this CD for broadcast on BRAVO!. As a recitalist she performs with duo partner Rachelle Taylor on harpsichord and also with the four member vocal/instrumental ensemble EMERADO. Rosemarie has been featured on CBC National broadcasts of Two New Hours and is heard frequently in concert on CBC national and regional programs. 

Rosemarie’s interpretation of repertoire from the 20th and 21st  century has received widespread critical acclaim. She has been a frequent performer at the Winnipeg Symphony’s New Music Festival.  She regularly performs, premieres and commissions the work of Canada’s foremost composers including R. Murray Shafer, Randolph Peters and James Rolfe among others. Most recently Rosemarie performed the premiere of David R. Scott’s “The Rising Curve of Day” with the Victoria Symphony.  She has performed the works of international composers such as Gavin Bryars, Bright Sheng, and Sophia Gubaidulina, as well as the Canadian premiere of two works by Peter Sculthorpe for CBC Toronto’s Encounters Series and Soundstreams Canada. Rosemarie’s operatic work reflects her baroque and 20th century specialties including Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas with the American Bach Soloists, Handel’s Ariodante with the Boston Handel & Haydn Society, and Tamerlano at the Aldeburgh Festival in England, and the Manitoba Opera premiere of Randolph Peters’ opera Nosferatu.

Rosemarie is active in Winnipeg as a teacher and adjudicator.  She has taught at Canadian Mennonite University (formerly Canadian Mennonite Bible College) since 1993.  Before her studies at McGill University she also taught at Concord College for two years.  Rosemarie is in demand for workshops and master classes, most recently performing a recital and offering a master class for students at Brandon University and the University of Alberta in Edmonton. She has given lecture recitals in baroque performance practice of vocal music at the University of Manitoba (1994), and Canadian Mennonite University (1994, 1998, 2003).  In the summer of 2004 Rosemarie conducted a workshop in Baroque performance of vocal repertoire for teachers at the Manitoba Conservatory of Music and Arts. Ms. van der Hooft taught History of Baroque Music at the University of Manitoba in 1998. She has adjudicated year end juries at CMU, CMBC and Concord College, the Lawrence Genser Scholarship Competition and the Zita Bernstein Lieder Competition at the University of Manitoba, and the Eckhardt-Gramatté Conservatory Scholarship Competition in Brandon.

“The role of Dido was well and expressively sung by mezzo-soprano Rosemarie van der Hooft. Dido’s famous closing lament was extremely moving and poignant: She died gorgeously.”
~ with the American Bach Soloists, in Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas

“Mezzo Soprano Rosemarie van der Hooft met every nuance head on, with beauty of tone one of many components to savor from this warmly communicative Winnipeg singer.”
~with the Manitoba Chamber in James Rolfe’s Six Songs