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RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

The HLHPRI Research Seminar Series is a core program of the Institute and each year presentations by visiting scholars, Institute research affiliates, the fellowship recipient and invited guests are organized under the banner of the Seminar Series. The Seminar Series has also been a valuable opportunity to collaborate with other units at the University of Manitoba and community organizations. Several seminars have been co-sponsored by other units which has resulted in expanding our audience beyond our affiliates. This has also contributed to achieving the university’s strategic priorities.

As a means of enhancing graduate students’ familiarity with research, it is a requirement that every graduate student attend a minimum of eight research seminar presentations within the first two years of their program. Professionals and practitioners have also benefited from attending our research seminar series. Continuing education credits or professional development credits are also available to professionals, practitioners, and coaches who require them for selected seminars.

We believe this core program is a success, as the HLHPRI Research Seminar Series is attended by a wide variety of institute stakeholders, with a typically audience of 30-65 attendees at each event. This participation enables the institute to disseminate current research findings to more than 300 stakeholders each year.

2018 SCHEDULE

CAN SINGLE ARM TRAINING OFFSET DECLINE IN FUNCTION OF OPPOSING, IMMOBILE LIMBS?


Jon Farthing

Presented by:
Dr. Jon Farthing
Associate Professor, College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan

Friday, September 21, 2:30 p.m., 220 ALC

With an introduction by University of Manitoba, Faculty of Kinesiology graduate student, Cole Scheller.  Cole will speak briefly on his field of research, "Methodologies of Strength Profile Evaluation."

Dr. Jonathan Farthing is an Associate Professor in the College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan. His research focuses on Neuromuscular Physiology, with specific interest in adaptations to various types of acute and chronic strength training. Dr. Farthing is most well known for his work on “cross-education” effects – where strength training of one limb can enhance strength of both the trained and the untrained limb. His most recent work on cross-education has focused on clinical applications after injuries.


PAID AND UNPAID CARE WORK FOR OLDER CHRONICALLY AND TERMINALLY ILL PERSONS.


Photo of Laura Funk

Presented by:
Dr. Laura Funk
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Criminology, Faculty of Arts, Unversity of Manitoba

Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2:30 p.m., 220 ALC

With an introduction by University of Manitoba, Faculty of Kinesiology graduate student, Kevin Boreskie.  Cole will speak briefly on his field of research,  "Frailty and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors."

In her presentation, Dr. Laura Funk will summarize some of her own research into care work for chronically and terminally ill older adults, illustrating the possibilities of qualitative inquiry in this area.

Her research has examined how paid and unpaid carers make sense of their experiences, preserve valued identities, and negotiate complex normative ideals and emotions surrounding care. Applying a sociological perspective, she has also explored (and critiqued) the broader social contexts which shapes carers’ experiences and interpretations.


HEALING HEALTH CARE: FROM SICK CARE TOWARDS SALUTOGENIC HEALING SYSTEMS

CHRIS FRIES

Presented by:
Dr. Christopher Fries
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Criminology, Faculty of Arts, Unversity of Manitoba


Thursday, Nov. 8, 2:30 p.m., 220 ALC

With an introduction by University of Manitoba, Faculty of Kinesiology graduate student Linda Diffey.  Diffey will speak briefly on her field of research, "Teaching Indigenous health within an anti-racist, anti-colonial pedagogical framework: Using an Indigenous perspecive to explore the experiences of media school instructors."

In his presentation, Dr. Chris Fries will speak on his research topic, "Healing Health Care:  From Sick Care Towards Salutogenic Healing Systems".


BARRIERS TO TRANSGENDER CANADIANS' PARTICIPATION IN RECREATION AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE SPORT.

Teetzel

Presented by:
Dr. Sarah Teetzel
Associate Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management, Unversity of Manitoba

Friday, November 30, 2:30 p.m., 220 ALC

In her presentation, Dr. Sarah Teetzel will speak about the following: "How and where trans athletes participate in sport is highly contested and inconsistent due to the competing, and often contradictory, policies in force throughout the country in different sport disciplines at a different levels of competition. This study sought to seek out and amplify the voices of people impacted by trans eligibility policies in sport. The study sought to provide high-performance women athletes and athletes who identify as trans an opportunity to speak openly about trans athlete inclusion in sport, and to comment, criticize, or demonstrate their support for current policies without fearing repercussions."


CARDIOVASCULAR AND RESPIRATORY REGULATION DURING EXERCISE: HOW DOES THE BODY KNOW HOW MUCH BLOOD FLOW AND O2 IS NEEDED?


Villar

Presented by:
Dr. Rodrigo Villar
Associate Professor, Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management, Unversity of Manitoba

January 24, 2019, 2:30 p.m., 220 ALC

Dr. Rodrigo Villar will present on the following topic:  The human body is constantly exposed to physiological challenges (i.e., activities of daily living, exercise, sports) that required rapid metabolic, cardiovascular, and respiratory adaptations to ensure an adequate match between physiological demand and supply. The appropriate responses are vital for the adequate function of the body and determined by a complex interaction between muscular demand, cardiovascular, and ventilatory responses. Therefore, the integrity of cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems is crucial for health and quality of life. Impaired responses to these physiological challenges make the execution of daily activities more difficult and overtime, cause a deleterious impact on health. It is widely recognized that exercise plays an important role in health preventing and counteracting processes that can contribute to chronic diseases. Despite the evident benefits of exercise, there is still a gap in the knowledge of the underlying mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular and respiratory regulation during exercise in healthy and unhealthy populations. The understanding of these regulatory mechanisms is crucial for the determination of healthy responses to exercise and early detection of impairments in physiological responses which can further guide targeted intervention strategies to improve health outcomes (i.e, reduce disability, morbidity, and mortality).


TOPIC: TRANSLATIONAL SHOULDER BIOMECHANICS: Transforming fundamental insights into applied solutions

Clark Dickerson

Presenter:

Clark R. Dickerson, Ph.D., CCPE
Canada Research Chair in Shoulder Mechanics
Professor
Department of Kinesiology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo  

February 11, 2019, 2:30pm, 220 ALC


TOPIC: PERFORMANCE AND THERAPEUTIC IMPACT OF CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION

Scott Forbes

Presenter:

Scott Forbes, PhD

Assistant Professor
Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Education, Brandon University

March 15, 2019, 2:30pm, 220 ALC


TOPIC: FROM FRAIL TO FIT: ACTIVITY APPROACHES TO LESSEN FUNCTIONAL DECLINE

Jenn Jakobi

Presenter:

Jennifer Jakobi, PhD
School of Health and Exercise Sciences,
Faculty of Health and Social Development,
University of British Columbia Okanogan

May 29, 2019, 10:00am, 220 ALC

Dr. Jakobi will discuss the importance of identifying frailty early, and how physiological measures can inform appropriate exercise interventions to mitigate age-related functional decline, and potentially enhance the design of sex-specific interventions. Her talk is entitled: From frail to fit: Activity approaches to lessen functional decline

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