Dr. David Walker

Assistant Professor
253 Wallace
(204) 474-6581
Email

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dr Walker joined the Department of Environment and Geography in 2004, having previously worked as a Post-Doctoral Fellow, and research associate in various departments at the University of Manitoba. Dr. Walker is a quantitative, terrestrial ecologist who has worked in a wide array of different areas of the environment.  Dr. Walker’s research interests are primarily in landscape systems, ecosystem dynamics and human and wildlife interactions with landscapes.  This broad area of interest can be divided into four topical areas: invasive species research, diversity and fragmentation, data integration and modeling, and spatial methods

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Publications

Campbell, M., D. Walker, B. Smid and R. Baydack. 2006. Recreation habitat suitability indices: key concepts and a a framework for application in landscape planning. Environments (33)
Long, Jeffrey M. and D. Walker. 2005. Small scale application and assessment of Index of Biotic Integrity for a large boreal river. Hydrobiologia. 544: 177-187.
Walker, D.J. and N.C. Kenkel. 2001. Landscape complexity in space and time. Community Ecology. 2: 109-119.
Hagen, C, N. Kenekel, D. Walker, R. Baydack, and C. Braun. 2001. Fractal-vased spatial analysis of radiotelemetry data. In J. Millspaugh and J. Marzluff (eds.). Radio tracking and animal populations. Academic Press. New York.
Walker, D.J. and N.C. Kenkel.1998. Fractal analysis of spatio-temoral dynamics in boreal forest landscapes. Abstracta Botanica. 22:13-18.
Walker, D.J. and J. Stewart. 1998. Vascular plant colonization of post-harvest peatlands in Manitoba. In: Malterer, T., K. Jonson, J. Stewart (Eds.) Peatland Restoration and Reclamation. Conference proceedings of the 1998 Internation Peat Symposium. July 14-18, 1998. pp 273.
Kenkel, N.C. and D. Walker, P.R, Watson, R.t. Caners and R.A. Lastra. 1997. Vegetation dynamics in boreal forest ecosystems. Coenoses. 12.
Kenkel, N.C. and D.Wlker. 1996. Fractals in biology. Coenoses. 11:77-100.
Kenkel, N.C. and D. Walker. 1993. Fractals in ecology. Abstracta Botanica. 17:53-70.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Enhancing rural livelihoods in Uganda through community based tourism can be a solution to reducing poverty and its related problems. Makerere University and the University of Manitoba (Faculties of Kinesiology and Recreation Management as well as Faculty of Environment, Earth and Resources) are building on a CIDA partnership and working together with the Government of Uganda, private enterprises, NGOs and community partners to raise human resource capacity, particularly of rural women, to take advantage of tourism opportunities in order to contribute to reducing poverty. The graduate work of John Amuno (Makerere University, exchange advisor David Walker) will be to develop sustainable tourism initiatives that will provide economic benefits from wildlife captial to help protect the few remaining mountain gorilla. Pictured are a female gorilla and baby and the extent of encroachment along the border of Bwindi Impenetrable Forest; one of the last remaining areas of mountain gorilla habitat.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recreational all-terrain vehicle (ATV) use is becoming common across North America. Duck Mountain Provincial Park (DMPP) in Manitoba experiences frequent ATV traffic both in designated and restricted areas that potentially threaten the ecological integrity of the area. A collaboration between the University of Manitoba (Dr. David Walker) and Manitoba Conservation (Parks Branch) has been established to catalog environmental and biological conditions as well as damage type and severity caused by all-terrain vehicles in Duck Mountain Provincial Park. Several honors students at the University and a Master's student have used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and statistical methods to help locate and potentially mitigate environmental damage. Pictured is student Colin Rombough making measurements along a damaged portion of an ATV trail.