Which Degree is Right for You?
 Which Degree is Right for You?

Psychology is a discipline that examines questions concerning behaviour and mental processes. Cognitive processes such as perceiving, learning, re¬membering, thinking, talking, and social interactions as well as the biolog¬ical basis for behaviour and human development are among the issues explored. Psychology on the one hand helps us understand human and animal behav¬iour, but on the other also provides insights that can help and benefit indi¬viduals and society.

B.A. (General) – 3 years

Our three year Bachelor of Arts degree is designed to provide students with a general education in the social sciences. This education is intended to provide students with "employability skills" such as oral and written communication skills, critical thinking, problem solving, basic numeracy, and information literacy.  The General Degree would not normally prepare students for graduate studies but there are some exceptions. Most graduate programs require students complete a four year degree.

See the Faculty of Arts and Department of Psychology sites with admission information and course requirements.

Samantha, Manager - SAP Strategy and Process Improvement, Graduated: 2009, General B.A. – Psychology.  I believe that my Psychology degree was of great benefit towards my Nursing degree and consequently my Nursing career. Dealing with patients from all growth and development stages I first learned about through my psych degree. I believe I would not have done well in nursing school without my psychology degree.

B.A. (Advanced) or B.Sc. (Major) – 4 years

Our four year Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees are designed to provide students with a general education along with a degree of specialization in Psychology through a Major. This education is intended to provide students with "employability skills" such as oral and written communication skills, critical thinking, problem solving, basic numeracy, and information literacy.  The Advanced Degree would not normally prepare students for graduate studies in Psychology but may be used for admission into other faculties such as Law or Medicine.

See the Faculty of Arts, Faculty of Science, and Department of Psychology sites with admission information and course requirements.

Gord, Psychotherapist, Graduated: 2007, Advanced Major B.A. – Psychology.  I do contract work 1 day per week with an agency, one of the very few that serve men who have been sexually abused. I also have a small private practice three days a week. I did not complete my Masters at the UofM but the undergrad degree I received there certainly paved the way for my admittance into a master’s program. Thanks UofM!!!!  In my current employment, psychotherapist, the courses, including electives, have served me and my clients well. Thanks to these courses I am able to understand and assist my clients in more ways than I could have imagined. Many thanks...Megawich.

B.A. (Honours) or B.Sc. (Honours) – 4 years

Our four year Honours degrees are designed to provide students with a high degree of specialization in Psychology. This education will students with "employability skills" such as strong oral and written communication skills, critical thinking, problem solving, statistical knowledge, information literacy, research skills, and broad knowledge of Psychology.  The Honours Degree program is required for students seeking entrance to graduate study in Psychology.

We offer honours degrees in both the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Science. All Psychology courses are open to students in both faculties. It is recommended that students interested in careers in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences or Quantitative Psychology should enroll through the Faculty of Science. Students interested in Applied Behaviour Analysis, Clinical Psychology, Developmental Psychology, School Psychology, or Social and Personality Psychology can register in either program.

Click HERE for a more detailed description of the requirements and steps involved in gaining admission to the Psychology Honours program.

See the Faculty of Arts, Faculty of Science, and Department of Psychology sites with admission information and course requirements.

Sinah, Copywriter – Advertising, Graduated: 2009, B.A. (Honours) – Psychology. The research aspect has been instrumental towards my career that involves finding in-depth information for the product we are working on. The lively discussions that went on until the evening during my last year at university opened up a different method of thinking. This proves to be of immense use when we have to put ourselves in the perspective of the client, the consumers & stakeholders. Advertising does demand creativity, but it also demands an analytical approach. Having a combination of these two and the time spent working in a conducive work environment will make the experience worthwhile.  Thanks to all the professors, lecturers & T.A.s.
Victor, Addictions Counselor – Social Worker, Graduated: 2007, B.A. (Honours) – Psychology. My job includes teaching classes, facilitating group therapy and one-on-one therapy sessions. I also network and liaison with many outside agencies such as Corrections Canada. The clientele I work with largely possess co-occurring disorders and the knowledge I possess around personality disorders, schizophrenia, depression and anxiety disorders has proved invaluable. My honours’ research in the area of dating relationships has also proven to be most valuable in my job as codependency and unhealthy relationships are everywhere with my clients. The most important part about being a counselor is rapport with the client and to this end I have used bits of all the courses I have ever taken to better relate to the client and build trust. Lastly I must say, the experiences I had taking part in the U of W undergrad Psych conference (I did it 3 years in row) and the presenting of my Thesis were extremely valuable in preparing me for teaching classes/workshops. In closing I will say to future students that the most important lesson I learned is that everything you learn is valuable BUT it's how you use it that makes the difference. My electives included courses from Literature, Philosophy, Anthropology, Religion, Chemistry and I have found it all useful. I ran into a past client a few months ago who said to me I was the only counselor he could discuss string theory with. That may seem irrelevant but through that we built a rapport which created trust and allowed me to use my psych knowledge to help him. He is still doing well today.