________________ CM . . . . Volume XVI Number 9. . . .October 30, 2009.

cover

Welcome to the World of Whales.

Diane Swanson.
North Vancouver, BC: Walrus Books/Whitecap Books, 1996.
28 pp., pbk., $6.95.
ISBN 978-1-55110-490-4.

Subject Heading:
Whales-Juvenile literature.

Grades 3-5 / Ages 8-10.

Review by Robert Groberman.

***/4

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Welcome to the World of Sharks.

Diane Swanson.
North Vancouver, BC: Whitecap Books, 2001.
28 pp., pbk., $6.95.
ISBN 978-1-55285-170-2.

Subject Heading:
Sharks-North America-Juvenile literature.

Grades 3-5 / Ages 8-10.

Review by Robert Groberman.

***/4

cover

Welcome to the World of Octopuses.

Diane Swanson.
North Vancouver, BC: Whitecap Books, 2000.
28 pp., pbk., $6.95.
ISBN 978-1-55285-023-4.

Subject Heading:
Octopuses-Juvenile literature.

Grades 3-5 / Ages 8-10.

Review by Robert Groberman.

***/4

   

 



excerpt:

The biggest is the blue whale. It’s longer than a basketball court, as heavy as 100 cars. Besides being the biggest whale, it’s the biggest animal in the world.

Other giants include the fin whale—slimmer than the blue whale, but almost as long. The sperm whale is about the length of 3 cars. Its head, alone, is as long as 1 car.
(From Welcome to the World of Whales.)


These three volumes in the “Welcome to the World of” series of easy-reading animal fact books are colourful and engaging. Each book, Welcome to the World of Whales, Welcome to the World of Octupuses and Welcome to the World of Sharks has a set of chapters in common, including “World of Difference,” “Where in the World,” “New World,” an index. In each volume, “World of Difference” establishes the description and definition of the book’s animal and broadens the definition to include the many different varieties of the animal. The “Where in the World” chapter tells the reader where on earth to find these creatures. In “New World,” the author describes the birth and early life of each book’s focus animal.


     Individual books also contain unique chapters relevant to each particular animal. Welcome to the World of Whales includes chapters about the “World of the Strainer” and the “World of the Hunter,” describing the difference between toothed and baleen whales. Welcome to the World of Sharks has chapters about Motion and Senses, and Welcome to the World of Octupuses has chapters about what octopuses eat, how octopuses change colours, and the predators that attack octopuses.


     The index at the end of each book is thorough and can be used for both searching the book and for teaching the use of an index.


     Each volume includes many full-page, full-colour photographs of excellent quality. Captions for these photos are both descriptive and informative. Under the photo of a shark is the caption “Traveling from deep, dark waters, a sixgill shark can rise swiftly toward the surface.” Each chapter also contains a fact box titled “Monster Exposed!” about how sailors might once have mistaken whale sharks for sea monsters, or “Unarming an Octopus” which describes how an octopus can survive losing an arm to a predator and grow that arm back.


     These three books are from a series of 20 “Welcome to the World of…” books. They present facts in an interesting way that will engage children and even entertain them with memorable facts and fascinating pictures.

Recommended.

Robert Groberman is a grade three teacher at Kirkbride Elementary School in Surrey, BC.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright © the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.
Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.
 

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