________________ CM . . . . Volume XVI Number 17. . . .January 8, 2010.

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Jellyfish. (WOW: World of Wonder).

Judy Wearing.
New York, NY: Weigl (Distributed in Canada by Saunders Book Co.), 2010.
24 pp., pbk. & hc., $9.95 (pbk.), $21.95 (hc.).
ISBN 978-1-60596-101-9 (pbk.), ISBN 978-1-60596-100-2 (hc.).

Kindergarten-grade 3 / Ages 5-8.

Review by Margaret Snow.

****/4

   
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Sea Turtles. (WOW: World of Wonder).

Judy Wearing.
New York, NY: Weigl (Distributed in Canada by Saunders Book Co.), 2010.
24 pp., pbk. & hc., $9.95 (pbk.), $21.95 (hc.).
ISBN 978-1-60596-107-1 (pbk.), ISBN 978-1-60596-106-4 (hc.).

Subject Heading:
Sea turtles-Juvenile literature.

Kindergarten-grade 3 / Ages 5-8.

Review by Margaret Snow.

****/4

   

 



excerpt:

WHAT IS A JELLYFISH?

Have you ever jiggled a bowl of jello? Jellyfish are jiggly like jello. This is because they have jelly inside their bodies.

Jellyfish are a kind of ocean animal, but they are not fish. They have soft bodies and long tentacles.

There may be more than 2,000 kinds of jellyfish. About 200 are known to humans. (From
Jellyfish)


BEACH BABIES

How many eggs do sea turtles lay? They lay more than 100 round, rubbery eggs at once.

On summer nights, female sea turtles climb on to a beach. There, they dig deep holes in the sand. They lay eggs in only one hole. Then, they cover the eggs with sand to hide them from predators. The turtles go back in the water and do not visit the nest again. In two months, the baby turtles begin to hatch.

If the sand is very hot after the eggs are laid, more females will be born. More males are born if the sand is very cold." (From Sea Turtles):



Judy Wearing, a scientist, turned educator, currently is an author of books, magazine articles and curriculum writing. She has a doctorate in biology from Oxford University, in addition to a B.Ed. from the University of Western Ontario. Presently residing in Newburgh, ON, she frequently visits schools to motivate children in reading, writing and nature study. These books are two of the many science books she has written for children of various age groups. So with that kind of a background, we know she has the expertise to share in her two newest "WOW" or "World of Wonder" titles, Jellyfish and Sea Turtles.

     The series is easy to read with each 24-page book having 12 two-page chapters containing a brilliant photograph on one side and enriching vocabulary explanations on the adjacent page. The font chosen is large enough to make it easy to read and not intimidating, but small enough so it doesn't have a "beginner" look to it. Both of these books are written in a simplified format for young researchers to find information quickly, organize thoughts, and classify them into a graphic organizer before writing sentences to explain what was learned in project work. In Jellyfish information has been classified into the following chapters: What is a Jellyfish? (general information about the animal), Around the World (the extent of the habitat), Open Umbrellas (a physical description), Catch of the Day (diet), Moving Right Along (locomotion), Baby Blobs (offspring), Big or Small (range of size in the various species), Watch Out! (some are poisonous to various extents), All in a Look (variations in appearance of species), Move Like a Jellyfish (an great activity for kinesthetic learners), Find out More (three websites for further research - first two were awesome; however the last website is a broken link) and finally culminating in the Glossary/Index (the key words that are located in the Glossary are in bold text throughout the book).


     In Sea Turtles information has been classified into the following chapters: What is a Sea Turtle (general information, Turtle Types (variety in the species), Shell Shock (explanation of the exoskeleton), Sea Snack (range in diet for different species), Long Way Home (returning to their birth nest to lay eggs), Beach Babies (the hatchlings), Which Way is the Ocean (how the babies find their way back to the sea), Flipper Feet (locomotion), Turtles of Tomorrow (endangered species and how we can help), Hide the Nest (a game that can be played with a friend by burying ping pong balls in a sandbox), Find out More (four incredible websites with added information, photos, videos and related online games) and finally the Glossary/Index.


     These books are attractive, colourful and contain a wealth of information. Students like the fast paced move from topic to topic which enhances the flow when used as a read aloud for the young readers. Primary students not only loved the text, but they were on the edge of their seats while following up by investigating the suggested websites. My primary students begged for time on computers to further check out the recommended sites to further expand on their knowledge.


     With that being said, due to the quality of writing, the attention grabbing photography, being filled with facts and the readability of the series, I recommend these books. They would make an excellent addition to school libraries because of their utility in facilitating primary students in creating projects, as well as for nonfiction, high interest reading, not forgetting to mention being able to satisfy the quest of younger children for further knowledge at an appropriate reading/comprehension level.

Highly Recommended.

Margaret Snow is a teacher-librarian, computer and Media Literacy teacher in a small, rural school in Southwestern Ontario.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright © the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.
Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.
 

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