________________ CM . . . . Volume XVI Number 13. . . .November 27, 2009.

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Welcome to the World of Hummingbirds.

Diane Swanson.
North Vancouver, BC: Whitecap Books, 2002.
28 pp., pbk., $6.95.
ISBN 978-1-55285-318-7.

Subject Heading:
Hummingbirds-North America-Juvenile literature.

Grades 2-5 / Ages 7-10.

Review by Margaret Snow.

***½/4

   
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Welcome to the World of Penguins.

Diane Swanson.
North Vancouver, BC: Walrus Books/Whitecap Books, 2003.
28 pp., pbk., $6.95.
ISBN 978-1-55285-450-1.

Subject Heading:
Penguins-Juvenile literature.

Grades 2-5 / Ages 7-10.

Review by Margaret Snow.

***½/4

   
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Welcome to the World of Owls.

Diane Swanson.
North Vancouver, BC: Whitecap Books, 1997.
28 pp., pbk., $6.95.
ISBN 978-1-55110-614-0.

Subject Heading:
Owls-Juvenile literature.

Grades 2-5 / Ages 7-10.

Review by Margaret Snow.

***½/4

   
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Welcome to the World of Bats.

Diane Swanson.
North Vancouver, BC: Whitecap Books, 1998.
28 pp., pbk., $6.95.
ISBN 978-1-55110-784-8.

Subject Heading:
Bats-Juvenile literature.

Grades 2-5 / Ages 7-10.

Review by Margaret Snow.

***½/4

   
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Welcome to the World of Eagles.

Diane Swanson.
North Vancouver, BC: Walrus Books/Whitecap Books, 1998.
28 pp., pbk., $6.95.
ISBN 978-1-55110-706-6.

Subject Heading:
Eagles-North America-Juvenile literature.

Grades 2-5 / Ages 7-10.

Review by Margaret Snow.

***½/4

   

 



excerpt:

Young eagles are eager for fun. They start playing when they're only four or five weeks old. Their nest becomes their playpen.

At first, the eaglets just crawl around, exploring the nest. As they grow bigger and stronger, they start hopping about. And when they're able to flap their wings hard, the eaglets can rise about the nest. Up and down they go - like children jumping on a trampoline.

Eaglets have plenty of toys: feathers, twigs, leaves, bones, fish heads, scraps of fur, and bits of leftover food. Playing alone, an eaglet tosses its toys around with its beak. It heaves them into the air, then grabs them when they land in the nest. It attacks them as if they were prey. Sometimes the eaglet uses its beak to catch and crush the toys. Other times, it uses its talons and toes to pounce on the toys or snatch them.

If there are two eaglets in a family, they will play together. When one flings a toy, they both try to grab it. If they snatch the toy at the same time, the game may change to tug-of-war. All their romping and stomping usually flattens out the nest.

It's lucky that eaglets spend so much time playing. It gives them plenty of exercise. It helps them get ready to fly, and it gives them practice hunting. All that fun helps to make life as a full-grown eagle a little easier.
(From Welcome to the World of Eagles.)



Each of the books in this group of five titles from the "Welcome to the World of..." series focuses on a bird or other flying animal. Each book is divided into seven key chapters which make it easier for beginning researchers to find information quickly, organize their thoughts, and classify them into a graphic organizer before writing their own sentence to explain what they have learned for project work.

     In Welcome to the World of Bats information has been classified into "World of Difference" (general information), "Where in the World" (location), "World on the Wing" (flight), "World of Words" (communication), "World Full of Food" (diet), "Sleepy World" (nocturnal) and "New World" (breeding, birth and babies). Readers will also discover more than one thousand different species of bats exist that range in size from having a wing span of a few centimetres to 165 centimetres.


     In both "Welcome to the World of Eagles and "Welcome to the World of the Owl, information has been classified into "World of Difference" (general information), "Where in the World" (location), "World of the Hunter" (diet), "World of Words" (communication), "World of Mates" (breeding), "New World" (birth and babies) and "World of Fun or Tricky." Added sections include the information that a variety of scientific studies have revealed some fascinating facts about these creatures. For example, because an owl swallows prey whole, scientist learn a great deal about them by studying owl droppings or pellets. Scientists have learned that eagles even use the bones of their prey in the construction of their nests.


     The information in Welcome to the World of Hummingbirds has been classified into "World of Difference" (general information), "Where in the World" (location), "World Full of Food" (diet), "World in Motion" (flight), "World of Words" (communication), "World of Nests" (homes), and "New World" (breeding, birth and babies). Hummingbirds use vacated spider webbing to reinforce their nests. Interestingly, one blue throated hummingbird used the same nest for 10 years. When scientists further examined the structure, they found it contained more than 24, 000 kilometres of spider silk.


     Welcome to the World of Penguinsís information has been classified into "World of Difference" (general information), "Where in the World" (location), "Water Wing" (swimming), "World of Words" (communication), "World of Eggs" (breeding & nesting) and "New World" (babies). To keep cool, penguins actually pant. Additionally, they lose heat through bare patches eyes and feet, but their feet never feel cold because they are composed of special blood vessels.


     The wealth of information and action-packed flow of the books create a readability that would certainly motivate children to finish reading the books to find out all they could about each of these Canadian animals.

Highly Recommended.

Margaret Snow is a teacher-librarian and Literacy teacher in a small, rural school in Southwestern Ontario.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright © the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.
Published by
The Manitoba Library Association
ISSN 1201-9364
Hosted by the University of Manitoba.
 

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